Bob Dylan's least regarded albums

Message Bookmarked
Bookmark Removed

These are the Dylan records I've always passed by and never bothered with, either based on reputation or based on what I've heard. Which is the best of these (relative) mediocrities or atrocities?

Poll Results

OptionVotes
Self Portrait 12
Saved 7
Hard Rain 6
Shot of Love 3
At Budokan 2
Dylan 1
MTV Unplugged 1
Knocked Out Loaded 0
Down In the Groove 0
Dylan and the Dead 0
Under the Red Sky 0


nomar, Wednesday, 1 February 2017 19:55 (one year ago) Permalink

I went to see Dylan on the tour for Under the Red Sky and I listened to it a bunch of times so I'd know the songs. He didn't play a single song from that record.

duped and used by my worst Miss U (President Keyes), Wednesday, 1 February 2017 19:58 (one year ago) Permalink

Self-Portrait is a legit good album, just not what people wanted from Dylan at the time

duped and used by my worst Miss U (President Keyes), Wednesday, 1 February 2017 20:00 (one year ago) Permalink

the xtian ones are also good

duped and used by my worst Miss U (President Keyes), Wednesday, 1 February 2017 20:00 (one year ago) Permalink

hard rain is fire wtf

j., Wednesday, 1 February 2017 20:02 (one year ago) Permalink

hard rain was the one i am most curious about, almost cut it from the poll but its rep seemed to be "not good"...maybe i'm wrong.

nomar, Wednesday, 1 February 2017 20:06 (one year ago) Permalink

feel like another self-portrait bootleg series release has rehabilitated self-portrait's rep

blonde redheads have more fun (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Wednesday, 1 February 2017 20:13 (one year ago) Permalink

I love everything on Another Self Portrait except for Self Portrait. I dunno how he did it, but in a way, I kind of admire the skill involved in making a dull album out of decidedly non-dull elements.

Montgomery Burns' Jazz (Tarfumes The Escape Goat), Wednesday, 1 February 2017 20:18 (one year ago) Permalink

didn't know Infidels was regarded, was gonna vote that based on Jokerman alone

flappy bird, Wednesday, 1 February 2017 20:25 (one year ago) Permalink

I kind of admire the skill involved in making a dull album out of decidedly non-dull elements
ha yeah, this is otm ... hard to say just how intentional it was, but it's interesting

tylerw, Wednesday, 1 February 2017 20:27 (one year ago) Permalink

Infidels is a jam imo

nomar, Wednesday, 1 February 2017 20:29 (one year ago) Permalink

Saved is great

Οὖτις, Wednesday, 1 February 2017 20:35 (one year ago) Permalink

Street Legal, now that's a real turd

Οὖτις, Wednesday, 1 February 2017 20:36 (one year ago) Permalink

they're all great, let's be real
ok, maybe dylan and the dead is pretty bad

tylerw, Wednesday, 1 February 2017 20:36 (one year ago) Permalink

Self Portrait bangs

flappy bird, Wednesday, 1 February 2017 20:40 (one year ago) Permalink

People always say there was a lot better stuff recorded by the Dylan/Dead collaboration than was released.
Haven't heard teh actual lp in years but don't remember much of it taking off. Think I may have bunged like half a track on a tape compilation I was making at the time, & I used to do a couple fo those every couple of weeks so taht I had things to listen to while hitching.
So if I did take something off taht it was from an instrumental break onwards or something. Know I did taht with teh Hard to Handle from Bear's Choice but think I did it on something on there anyway.

Did seem like it would be a collaboration taht should have worked at one time. Not sure if that was the era though.

Stevolende, Wednesday, 1 February 2017 20:41 (one year ago) Permalink

UTRS is the Dr. Seuss album he shoulda recorded in 1966.

The burrito of ennui (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Wednesday, 1 February 2017 20:45 (one year ago) Permalink

Froggy Went a Courtin def more relevant back then

Οὖτις, Wednesday, 1 February 2017 20:45 (one year ago) Permalink

(xpost)

I'm guessing you know about this already, which is what prompted your post. I've got it on my computer but never bothered listening. (Large image, so I won't embed.)

cdn8.openculture.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/DylanHearsAWho.jpeg

clemenza, Wednesday, 1 February 2017 20:50 (one year ago) Permalink

dylan hears a who is surprisingly good -- worth at least one listen, anyway.

tylerw, Wednesday, 1 February 2017 20:51 (one year ago) Permalink

Saved is great

― Οὖτις, Wednesday, February 1, 2017 3:35 PM (eighteen minutes ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

def

marcos, Wednesday, 1 February 2017 20:54 (one year ago) Permalink

self-portrait is great, too, ive always liked it, and it's nice to see that it's been reclaimed as a good dylan album.

marcos, Wednesday, 1 February 2017 20:55 (one year ago) Permalink

Self Portrait was already the subject of a Bootleg series revisitation to recontextualise it. Wondered fi teh Dylan & The Dead thing might get some of the better stuff used for a future volume.
Or released by the Dead themselves since they seem to be pretty comprehensive in their releases. Maybe the better stuff wasn't recorded as well as they'd hoped?

Stevolende, Wednesday, 1 February 2017 20:56 (one year ago) Permalink

i've never heard dylan tbh

knocked out loaded is essential just for "brownsville girl", a top 5 dylan tune for me

marcos, Wednesday, 1 February 2017 20:56 (one year ago) Permalink

down in the groove is trash. i can't tell you a thing about under the red sky even though i've listened to it a few times

marcos, Wednesday, 1 February 2017 20:57 (one year ago) Permalink

if only someone had thought to record the Dead shows

duped and used by my worst Miss U (President Keyes), Wednesday, 1 February 2017 20:57 (one year ago) Permalink

utrs sorta suffers from dull production and uninspired performances, but it really isn't that far off from song-wise from his 21st century output

tylerw, Wednesday, 1 February 2017 20:58 (one year ago) Permalink

UTRS seemed like a regression at the time, after the Oh Mercy comeback narrative

duped and used by my worst Miss U (President Keyes), Wednesday, 1 February 2017 21:00 (one year ago) Permalink

here's the best dylan and the dead show i've heard: https://archive.org/details/gd87-07-19.sbd.fishman.13023.sbeok.shnf
the rehearsals are fun too ...

tylerw, Wednesday, 1 February 2017 21:02 (one year ago) Permalink

My gut says Down in the Groove and Dylan and the Dead are the two worst things here. Though At Budokan is his worst live record not to involve the Grateful Dead.

As far as best, I gotta go Self Portrait.

EZ Snappin, Wednesday, 1 February 2017 21:09 (one year ago) Permalink

I found "Dylan and the Dead" was disappointing as it was nothing like as awful as I was given to understand.

Knocked Out Loaded has "Brownsville Girl", and some other good things too.

I has that Budokan live album, I did not like it, no.

Mark G, Wednesday, 1 February 2017 21:19 (one year ago) Permalink

Street Legal, now that's a real turd

― Οὖτις, Wednesday, February 1, 2017 2:36 PM (forty-one minutes ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

woah woah woah senor #TeamStreetLegal gonna yankee power ya ass!

seriously though it's such a great album, he follows a 10 minute epic "changing of the guard" with a song about fucking a horse

also great album cover the truest expression of bob in photograph form

blonde redheads have more fun (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Wednesday, 1 February 2017 21:19 (one year ago) Permalink

Had. I do not has it now. Xposts.

Am voting "Dylan", someone has to.

Mark G, Wednesday, 1 February 2017 21:20 (one year ago) Permalink

Dylan is great.

EZ Snappin, Wednesday, 1 February 2017 21:21 (one year ago) Permalink

MY GOD THEY KILLED HIM

JoeStork, Wednesday, 1 February 2017 21:26 (one year ago) Permalink

If you ignore the horrifying track witht he children's choir whose title I won't mention for fear of opening a crack in the earth, Knocked Out Loaded is fun: "Under Your Spell," "Maybe Someday," "Driftin' Too Far From Shore," the Petty collab, and of course "Brownsville Girl."

The burrito of ennui (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Wednesday, 1 February 2017 21:31 (one year ago) Permalink

yeah street legal seems like it shouldn't be good but it's actually kinda awesome

otm about the cover photo, too

(The Other) J.D. (J.D.), Wednesday, 1 February 2017 21:48 (one year ago) Permalink

I'm not a fan -- it has more sexist drivel than usual ("Is Your Love in Vain") and two songs that count as history-as-farce ("Changing of the Guard," "Where Are You Tonight?"). I've liked "Senor" the last couple times he's played it.

The burrito of ennui (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Wednesday, 1 February 2017 21:49 (one year ago) Permalink

Where the FUCK is Empire Burlesque???

Mr. Snrub, Wednesday, 1 February 2017 22:00 (one year ago) Permalink

It'd well regarded.

The burrito of ennui (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Wednesday, 1 February 2017 22:00 (one year ago) Permalink

Not by me!!

Mr. Snrub, Wednesday, 1 February 2017 22:03 (one year ago) Permalink

I stand by this re: Street Legal, my opinion hasn't changed

Bob Dylan's "Street Legal" - Classic or Dud?

Οὖτις, Thursday, 2 February 2017 00:33 (one year ago) Permalink

Self Portrait is mostly great, imo, but I'm a casual music listener

a but (brimstead), Thursday, 2 February 2017 01:02 (one year ago) Permalink

I stand by this re: Street Legal, my opinion hasn't changed

Bob Dylan's "Street Legal" - Classic or Dud?

― Οὖτις, Wednesday, February 1, 2017 7:33 PM

can you understand my paaain?

The burrito of ennui (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Thursday, 2 February 2017 01:33 (one year ago) Permalink

No

Οὖτις, Thursday, 2 February 2017 01:45 (one year ago) Permalink

your love is in vain

The burrito of ennui (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Thursday, 2 February 2017 01:53 (one year ago) Permalink

Self Portrait
on first listen I was surprised at how not terrible this was - has some good songs, but it's not one I return to often. Overlong. Also, the bootleg series compilation is great, so not much need for this one after all.

Dylan
as received wisdom has it, this is indeed a lesser 'Self Portrait'. 'Mr. Bojangles' is... fun. And I like 'Lily of the West'

Hard Rain
I don't like Dylan's shouting on this and other 70s live records

At Budokan
Well this one has a p good band, some enjoyable interpretations. From what I've read, the band became kicking on the North American leg of the tour, and Budokan are some of the least good concerts with this setup. Too bad.

Saved
Has good songs but ultimately boring and a lesser 'Slow Train Coming'

Shot of Love
Now here's a good album! Great energy, great phrasing, wit, fun. 'Heart of Stone' and ofc 'Every Grain of Sand' are standouts.

Knocked Out Loaded
Crap record which for some reason has 'Brownsville Girl' which is all time

Down In the Groove
So bad

Dylan and the Dead
Embarrassing

Under the Red Sky
Haven't listened too much to this one but I do like the sticker on my copy

http://i.imgur.com/c1cUc3X.png

MTV Unplugged
First time I heard this I thought it was awful, last time I checked it sounded a lot better. He plays Dignity. Probably one of the best in this lot.

Dishonorable mentions: Empire Burlesque, Real Live

In other news: Bootlegs 1-3 have been reissued on vinyl, get 'em while you can!

niels, Thursday, 2 February 2017 08:26 (one year ago) Permalink

After reading Dave Marsh on Budokan (RS Record Guide, blue/1983 edition) I thought, jeez, it can't be THAT bad. But it is.

The versions of Dylan's songs on Budokan sabotage meaning, reduce it to rubble, and walk blithely away, snapping their fingers like so many little hipster hitmen. It was as though Dylan were daring his audience to continue to pay attention -- or even to respect him. This is his worst record by such a wide margin it's hard to fathom it.

Montgomery Burns' Jazz (Tarfumes The Escape Goat), Thursday, 2 February 2017 14:18 (one year ago) Permalink

The version of Shelter From The Storm on Hard Rain is excellent.

Shot of Love is probably the best of these records overall, but there are good songs on all of them. Seek out Born In Time from Under The Red Sky, that is super duper good.

kornrulez6969, Thursday, 2 February 2017 14:46 (one year ago) Permalink

I like Hard Rain fine, it's just not near as good as Before the Flood.

a man often referred to in the news media as the Duke of Saxony (tipsy mothra), Thursday, 2 February 2017 14:47 (one year ago) Permalink

lol I heard fuckin "To Make You Feel My Love" at Starbucks today

The burrito of ennui (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Sunday, 5 February 2017 00:07 (one year ago) Permalink

Nah, "Gotta Serve Somebody" sucks. It isn't even the subject matter. The whole song, from the singing to the playing, sounds totally comatose.

some sad trombone Twilight Zone shit (cryptosicko), Sunday, 5 February 2017 00:17 (one year ago) Permalink

Strongly disagree, I find it menacing as fuck.

attention vampire (MatthewK), Sunday, 5 February 2017 00:24 (one year ago) Permalink

That someone singing this way should be allowed near women and children?

The burrito of ennui (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Sunday, 5 February 2017 00:33 (one year ago) Permalink

I've always loved "gotta serve somebody" but the version that's always in my head is from the SNL appearance that year which I will still contend is fucking smokin'

https://vimeo.com/187895396

though she denies it to the press, (Joan Crawford Loves Chachi), Sunday, 5 February 2017 00:42 (one year ago) Permalink

like seriously when he gets to "you may be living in another country / under another name" I practically leap from my seat it's so goddamn good

though she denies it to the press, (Joan Crawford Loves Chachi), Sunday, 5 February 2017 00:43 (one year ago) Permalink

Ha was gonna bring up that SNL clip

Οὖτις, Sunday, 5 February 2017 00:45 (one year ago) Permalink

Bass player is so great

Οὖτις, Sunday, 5 February 2017 00:47 (one year ago) Permalink

Self Portait was the first Dylan album i ever heard and i've loved it for 45 years.

bodacious ignoramus, Sunday, 5 February 2017 01:22 (one year ago) Permalink

I will always love Hurricane because I picture that scene in Dazed & Confused

blonde redheads have more fun (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Sunday, 5 February 2017 03:02 (one year ago) Permalink

^^^ yes

velko, Sunday, 5 February 2017 03:03 (one year ago) Permalink

You know, listening to Budokan for the first time and this is kinda awesome! It makes more sense now than it probably did at the time, almost reminds me of him trying to do Van Morrison style versions of his songs. Simple Twist of Fate is pretty great

blonde redheads have more fun (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Sunday, 5 February 2017 03:30 (one year ago) Permalink

I love At Budokan.

heaven parker (anagram), Sunday, 5 February 2017 09:25 (one year ago) Permalink

I will always love Hurricane because I picture that scene in Dazed & Confused

― blonde redheads have more fun (upper mississippi sh@kedown),

I'd love to know if "Hurricane" got airplay incommensurate with its middling chart position or it's become more famous in the last 20 years.

The burrito of ennui (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Sunday, 5 February 2017 12:40 (one year ago) Permalink

Thanks. Well done as usual, but is there a typo here, did you mean to say "songs" where you you first said "albums"?

He’s a man who wrote wonderful songs and quite a few terrible albums and stuck them on albums which rejected wonderful and terrible songs like a heart might the wrong blood type.

In Walked Bodhisattva (James Redd and the Blecchs), Sunday, 5 February 2017 14:04 (one year ago) Permalink

I guess they were engaging in the usual Rolling Stone Monday morning quarterbacking when they ran that Dave Marsh review in the Rolling Stone record guide. The original Janet Maslin review is a more sympathetic and interesting read, and attempts to contextualize it with his other period live albums. Also Dave Marsh is a nerd and authenticity mongering square as far as I could ever tell.

blonde redheads have more fun (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Sunday, 5 February 2017 20:21 (one year ago) Permalink

However much they may offend purists, these latest live versions of his old songs have the effect of liberating Bob Dylan from the originals. And the originals — however lasting, however beautiful — constitute a terrible burden. The effect of Dylan's revisionist efforts, beginning at the time of the 1974 "comeback" tour with the Band commemorated on Before the Flood and now reaching a giddy crescendo, has been to make one realize how extraordinarily lucky Bob Dylan was as a young man.

News
Video
Music
Politics
TV
Movies
Sports
Glixel
RS Country
More

Bob Dylan: At Budokan

By Janet Maslin
July 12, 1979
However much they may offend purists, these latest live versions of his old songs have the effect of liberating Bob Dylan from the originals. And the originals — however lasting, however beautiful — constitute a terrible burden. The effect of Dylan's revisionist efforts, beginning at the time of the 1974 "comeback" tour with the Band commemorated on Before the Flood and now reaching a giddy crescendo, has been to make one realize how extraordinarily lucky Bob Dylan was as a young man.
More News
See Taylor Swift Debut Latest Singles Live at Pre-Super Bowl Gig
Watch Alessia Cara's Electrifying 'SNL' Debut
Black Sabbath Deliver Pure Heavy-Metal Mastery at Hometown Farewell Show
Marc Spitz, Veteran Music Journalist and Author, Dead at 47
Watch Big Sean's Mesmerizing 'Halfway Off the Balcony' Video
All Stories
It doesn't denigrate his brilliance to say that he happened to be in the right place, of the right age, at the right time. Nor does it bode badly for his future to suppose that circumstances may never again conspire to make his voice so perfectly representative, so widely heard. His talent has changed, evolving into something more supple, less stubborn, more musical, finally leading toward an odd and private synthesis of the visionary and the mundane. Considered fairly, removed from the shadow of his past achievements, Dylan's new songs are often as lovely as the old ones. Bob Dylan at Budokan comes as a shock, a sacrilege and an unexpectedly playful bonanza. The illumination it offers is long overdue.

Bob Dylan at Budokan is also a marked departure from the live LPs that have preceded it (and the very volume of this material — three albums, five records in all, in as many years — betrays a regrettable nervousness about breaking new ground). Before the Flood was caught up in keeping the legend intact, in proving that the old lion was alive and ready to roar. Virtually every arrangement there strained to sound fierce, to beef up the old songs without really changing anything. The mood was emphatic at all costs, and sometimes — with Dylan and the Band chanting "How does it feel?" over and over in "Like a Rolling Stone" — genuinely triumphant. Later, after Before the Flood's corrective surgery removed that great big chip from his shoulder, Dylan's approach to his old songs began to sound more random, almost petulantly so. Hard Rain, the soundtrack LP from his TV special, seemed to come at a time when the Rolling Thunder Revue, so joyful and electrifying in its first performances, had just plain run out of steam.
But this time the old songs have been recast sweetly, without that self-defeating aggression, in what sounds suspiciously like a spirit of fun. The sanctimonious, Las Vegas-style bastardization of "Blowin' in the Wind" and the wise-guy tenor of the liner notes (he thanks "that sweet girl in the geisha house — I wonder does she remember me?") echo Dylan's old evasiveness, even though what used to pass for mystery in him has the look of cowardice now. But most of this two-album set is forthright, astonishingly so. Can it really be that Bob Dylan had to go all the way to Budokan, to Japan, to find an audience with a short memory, a crowd that didn't think he had anything to prove? In any case, the jig is up: he's given up trying to outdo himself and begun something new.
A lot of the older songs sound changed just for the sake of tinkering. Many of the more recent ones, like "Oh, Sister" and "One More Cup of Coffee (Valley Below)" and "Shelter from the Storm," are vastly improved, as if, when they were first recorded, they hadn't been fully thought through. "Is Your Love in Vain?", by no means the prettiest song on Dylan's much-underrated Street-Legal, is prettier still.
The method here is hit-or-miss, and the results are correspondingly spotty. "Going, Going, Gone" didn't need to be speeded up, and "I Want You" didn't need slowing down. This version of "Like a Rolling Stone" is too readily comparable to the Before the Flood track, to which it can't hold a candle. The low point of the set is "The Times They Are A-Changin'," which Dylan introduces by saying: "Thank you, you're so very kind, you really are. We'll play you this song — I wrote this, also, about fifteen years ago. It still means a lot to me. I know it means a lot to you, too."
A lot, yes. But not so much that it need be crippling. The fire and brimstone are behind Dylan, if only because his adolescence, and that of his principal audience, are things of the past. This hardly means the fight has gone out of him: Bob Dylan at Budokan is a very contentious effort — and, for the most part, a victorious one. On the evidence of the renewed energy of his new material since Blood on the Tracks, Dylan sees a world in which nothing is simple anymore, however hard (as in songs like "Hurricane" or "Joey") he tries to populate it with heroes and villains of the old school. He also has at his disposal, as demonstrated by the best songs he's written since then, the strength and artistry to grapple with his visions. And if the premature embalming properties of his fame have been an obstacle to his progress, he's done battle with those, too. Bob Dylan at Budokan clears the way.

blonde redheads have more fun (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Sunday, 5 February 2017 20:23 (one year ago) Permalink

I'd love to know if "Hurricane" got airplay incommensurate with its middling chart position or it's become more famous in the last 20 years.

― The burrito of ennui (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Sunday, February 5, 2017 12:40 PM (eight hours ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

I remember it getting a fair bit of airplay, possibly Capital Radio..

Mark G, Sunday, 5 February 2017 21:08 (one year ago) Permalink

i started being a lot more sympathetic to dave marsh when i realized his favorite year for rock music was _1962_.

increasingly bonkers (rushomancy), Sunday, 5 February 2017 21:15 (one year ago) Permalink

Also Dave Marsh is a nerd and authenticity mongering square as far as I could ever tell.

That explains why he loves PiL's Metal Box and Sun Ra.

It's, like, squaresville, daddy-o.

Montgomery Burns' Jazz (Tarfumes The Escape Goat), Sunday, 5 February 2017 22:01 (one year ago) Permalink

I WOULD LIKE TO RESCIND MY COMMENTS AND ISSUE A FORMAL APOLOGY TO MR. DAVID MARSH

Regarding a possible Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction for Kiss, Marsh said: "Kiss is not a great band, Kiss was never a great band, Kiss never will be a great band, and I have done my share to keep them off the ballot."

blonde redheads have more fun (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Monday, 6 February 2017 03:39 (one year ago) Permalink

Automatic thread bump. This poll is closing tomorrow.

System, Wednesday, 15 February 2017 00:01 (one year ago) Permalink

Automatic thread bump. This poll's results are now in.

System, Thursday, 16 February 2017 00:01 (one year ago) Permalink

Guessed.

Mark G, Thursday, 16 February 2017 17:24 (one year ago) Permalink

What a bunch of bullshit. I will NEVER understand the critical hate for Self Portrait.

Mr. Snrub, Thursday, 16 February 2017 17:36 (one year ago) Permalink

Oh wait, the poll was which is the BEST. Now I got it. I retract my statement.

Mr. Snrub, Thursday, 16 February 2017 17:37 (one year ago) Permalink

eleven months pass...

I have been listening to my 27-year-old vinyl copy of UNDER THE RED SKY.

Does anyone else like this LP?

the pinefox, Sunday, 28 January 2018 18:31 (five months ago) Permalink

'Cat's in the Well' might possibly be the best track - based on a kind of retro rockabilly groove.

'Handy Dandy' a 'Rolling Stone' remake that they play pretty well.

'Unbelievable' - I like the blues riffing and the whole rhythm.

'TV Talking Song' - a highlight with its daft long narrative about Speaker's Corner.

the pinefox, Sunday, 28 January 2018 18:33 (five months ago) Permalink

ps / this thread does not show up on New Answers for me so if you answer I am afraid I will not see it. :/

the pinefox, Sunday, 28 January 2018 18:34 (five months ago) Permalink

I love that the only single released from Self Portrait was Wigwam.

✖✖✖ (Moka), Sunday, 28 January 2018 18:42 (five months ago) Permalink

Didn’t Dylan himself said he made Self Portrait with the intention of press and fans to lose interest in him and leave him the fuck alone?

✖✖✖ (Moka), Sunday, 28 January 2018 18:43 (five months ago) Permalink

yeah but I dunno he says a lot of things

bhad and bhabie (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Sunday, 28 January 2018 18:49 (five months ago) Permalink

I paid $1 for a cassette copy of Under the Red Sky back in '95 or so and listened to it once.

iCloudius (cryptosicko), Sunday, 28 January 2018 19:50 (five months ago) Permalink

Born In Time on Under the Red Sky is classic

kornrulez6969, Sunday, 28 January 2018 20:06 (five months ago) Permalink

^^

niels, Monday, 29 January 2018 07:31 (five months ago) Permalink

With special appearances by David Crosby, George Harrison, Bruce Hornsby, Elton John, Al Cooper, Slash, Jimmy and Stevie Ray Vaughan, Don Was and more.

https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0806/6897/products/13697_FRONT_1_1024x1024.jpeg

niels, Monday, 29 January 2018 07:54 (five months ago) Permalink

This is a curious LP. One thing about that guest list (combined with the sound) is, it suggests something like: 'LA Rock Establishment, 1990'.

The LP was released a year after Dylan had released the atmospheric and organic OH MERCY - so it's like he deliberately went from that New Orleans sound to this LA one.

Then there's the nursery rhyme quality of the writing. But then again, some of the songs are different - 'born in time' as said, and 'TV talking song'.

the pinefox, Monday, 29 January 2018 16:33 (five months ago) Permalink

i like this record — though there is something a bot off about the production / performances. listening to later neverending tour versions of these songs suggests it's kinda the precursor to his 21st century stuff, at least in songwriting approach.

favorite story from don was (which probably should be taken w/ a grain of salt) is that Handy Dandy was chopped down from a 33-minute take.

tylerw, Monday, 29 January 2018 16:38 (five months ago) Permalink

Handy Dandy, Cat's in the Well, and wiggle Wiggle are among his best songs

morning wood truancy (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Monday, 29 January 2018 18:11 (five months ago) Permalink

hmm

marcos, Monday, 29 January 2018 18:26 (five months ago) Permalink

haha, yeah, I don't think I'd go that far ... but they're good!

tylerw, Monday, 29 January 2018 18:28 (five months ago) Permalink

And that band -- fabulous.

morning wood truancy (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Monday, 29 January 2018 18:34 (five months ago) Permalink

two months pass...

the reverse Stetson he wears in the live-in-the-studio Cold Irons Bound from Masked and Anonymous is probably my favorite Dylan hat, but this cap from the Tight Connection to My Heart vid is p good too:

https://i.imgur.com/0W5Omp8.png

A song I always enjoyed from an album I never liked, Dylan's delivery is actually pretty good, that casual rambling style he does so well. Revisited today because this vid was recommended to me on Youtube:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0grZUoUhn_k

Not sure how I feel about it, it's quite a performance, most of all I'm impressed they took the source material so seriously

niels, Monday, 16 April 2018 10:02 (three months ago) Permalink

it is not on this list since it is not poorly regarded, but i have been enjoying "planet waves" very much lately

marcos, Monday, 16 April 2018 15:53 (three months ago) Permalink

i still think of it as "minor dylan" tho i guess

marcos, Monday, 16 April 2018 15:55 (three months ago) Permalink

Planet Waves is my favorite Dylan album!

As for those rankings above, they came out pretty good, I guess. "Knocked Out Loaded" has a few moments (heck, so does "Red Sky"). I think I've never actually listened to "Down in the Groove" all the way thru. (Also, "Hard Rain" is a kickass live album; seems sort of unfair to rank it alongside studio albums...)

absorbed carol channing's powers & psyche (morrisp), Monday, 16 April 2018 19:36 (three months ago) Permalink

Yes. Real Live should be on there instead of Hard Rain.

kornrulez6969, Monday, 16 April 2018 19:40 (three months ago) Permalink

Yes. I do like the License To Kill on Real Live though.

Hard Rain is great.

DACA Flocka Flame (Hadrian VIII), Monday, 16 April 2018 19:57 (three months ago) Permalink

My favorite version of License To Kill is Tom Petty's at the Bob tribute concert in the 90s.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6CEfNY02n5E

kornrulez6969, Monday, 16 April 2018 21:49 (three months ago) Permalink


You must be logged in to post. Please either login here, or if you are not registered, you may register here.