the thirty years war

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just read c.v. wedgwood's book "the thirty years war" which is about "the thirty years war." its very good! Or at least, well-written; i dont know how its thought of amongst historians.

what a war, though! RIYL game of thrones, brutality, tragedy, pettiness, idiocy, the plague

Poll Results

OptionVotes
Gustavus II Adolphus † 4
Johann Georg I of Saxony 3
Cardinal Richelieu 2
Piet Pieterszoon Hein 2
Duke of Buckingham 1
Earl of Leven 1
Albrecht von Wallenstein 1
Maurice of Nassau 1
Ernst von Mansfeld 1
Maximilian I 1
Christian IV of Denmark 1
Gonzalo Fernández de Córdoba 1
Frederick V 1
Count-Duke of Olivares 0
Diego Felipez de Guzmán 0
Francisco de Melo 0
Antonio de Oquendo 0
Ferdinand II 0
Ferdinand III 0
Franz von Mercy † 0
Johann von Werth 0
Gottfried Heinrich Graf zu Pappenheim 0
Fadrique de Toledo 0
Gómez Suárez de Figueroa 0
Cardinal-Infante Ferdinand 0
Ambrosio Spinola 0
Philip IV of Spain 0
Johann Tserclaes, Count of Tilly † 0
Bohdan Khmelnytsky 0
Christian of Brunswick 0
Lennart Torstenson 0
Carl Gustaf Wrangel 0
Charles X Gustav 0
Marquis de Feuquieres † 0
Louis II de Bourbon 0
Vicomte de Turenne 0
Louis XIII of France 0
Jindrich Matyas Thurn 0
Christian I of Anhalt-Bernburg 0
Bernhard of Saxe-Weimar 0
Frederik Hendrik of Orange 0
Maarten Tromp 0
Ernst Casimir 0
Hendrik Casimir I 0
William of Nassau 0
Gabriel Bethlen 0
Johan Banér 0


max, Wednesday, 17 August 2011 13:42 (seven years ago) Permalink

this is surely the greatest thread ever to have been on ILX.

I read that book a while ago... I can't rememember all those people. The Cardinal Infanta (fightin' clergymen, I wuv em) is tempting, as is Wallenstein, Gustavus Adolphus, and many others. The Earl of Leven wins points for appearing in both this and CVW's books about the English-Scottish-Irish Civil Wars of the 1640s.

The best bit in that book is the description of Johann Georg of Saxony having dinner, so I will have to vote for him.

The New Dirty Vicar, Wednesday, 17 August 2011 13:48 (seven years ago) Permalink

I think the book (and the war generally) would make a great TV series - it goes on and on, has great characters, and lots of blood. Not much in the way of women characters, sadly.

The New Dirty Vicar, Wednesday, 17 August 2011 13:49 (seven years ago) Permalink

I know none of these people BUT there is a common turn of phrase that apparently dates back to the thirty years' war, that I had to look up for work, and turned out to be a mishearing by Polish soldiers of a French term, or something like that. I will find it!

it's not that print journalists don't have a sense of humour, it's just (Laurel), Wednesday, 17 August 2011 13:50 (seven years ago) Permalink

Oh my goodness I should probably read this book. Because I don't even know where to begin, honestly.

Aphex Twin … in my vagina? (Karen D. Tregaskin), Wednesday, 17 August 2011 13:50 (seven years ago) Permalink

xp yeah when i started the book i was joking to my girlfriend that it was going to be my "game of thrones" replacement--and then it turns out to be, well, kind of the same thing, only with no magic or dragons or anything.

the problem with turning it into a tv series though is that its so COMPLICATED and there are so many characters! through the whole book i was wishing that wedgwood had included a "cast list" or something, shell refer to people that i havent thought about for hundreds of pages by their last names and im like wait who was that

max, Wednesday, 17 August 2011 13:52 (seven years ago) Permalink

this list is from wikipedia btw, so it doesnt include people that wedgwood probably would have included, like axel oxenstierna

max, Wednesday, 17 August 2011 13:53 (seven years ago) Permalink

max you're always reading the most interesting things! i never know what i should read--how do you do it??

call all destroyer, Wednesday, 17 August 2011 13:54 (seven years ago) Permalink

ta-nehisi coates is reading this book right now and it was on sale at the borders in providence for 30% off

max, Wednesday, 17 August 2011 13:55 (seven years ago) Permalink

Found it!!

The word "gauntlet" is derived from "gantelope", from the Swedish "gatlopp" (street run, street race); a loanword probably acquired by English soldiers during the Thirty Years' War. The modern spelling of "gauntlet" was influenced by the French-derived word used for a glove worn as protection or armour.

--------

Gantlet comes from the Swedish gatlopp, a running down a lane, from gata, street, lane, and lopp, course, running, wherefore a gantlet is (1) a lane between two lines of men who beat some unfortunate as he tries to run through it, as in ‘run the gantlet,’ and (2) a stretch of railroad track on which on which two sets of tracks overlap to avoid switching in a narrow place. [[note this 2nd meaning]]

Gauntlet comes from French gantelet, diminutive of gant, glove, wherefore a gauntlet is (1) a protective glove and (2) a challenge, as in ‘fling down the gauntlet,’ from the former use of the glove as a symbol of defiance.

it's not that print journalists don't have a sense of humour, it's just (Laurel), Wednesday, 17 August 2011 13:56 (seven years ago) Permalink

I'm gonna vote for the Earl of Leven, on account of 1) being Scottish and 2) having a most excellent mustache. But most of them had excellent facial hair in the 17th Century and also he was a mercenary for some dour protestant dudes, but still. I've decided polls on lesser criteria in the past.

Aphex Twin … in my vagina? (Karen D. Tregaskin), Wednesday, 17 August 2011 13:58 (seven years ago) Permalink

step 1 to finding books: read more blogs

call all destroyer, Wednesday, 17 August 2011 13:59 (seven years ago) Permalink

I find reading PW also works. Even if I only like the sound of one book per issue, that's still every week, and that list gets big fast.

it's not that print journalists don't have a sense of humour, it's just (Laurel), Wednesday, 17 August 2011 14:06 (seven years ago) Permalink

I read Wedgewood's book in May after falling in love with the NYROB edition – a marvelous read.

a 'catch-all', almost humorous, 'Jeez' quality (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Wednesday, 17 August 2011 14:10 (seven years ago) Permalink

*Wedgwood

a 'catch-all', almost humorous, 'Jeez' quality (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Wednesday, 17 August 2011 14:11 (seven years ago) Permalink

Killed more ppl as a percentage of population than any other war in German history.

Also, "defenestration"!

returning the native population to its violent 18th-century high (Michael White), Wednesday, 17 August 2011 14:14 (seven years ago) Permalink

Voted Gustavus Adolphus, btw

returning the native population to its violent 18th-century high (Michael White), Wednesday, 17 August 2011 14:15 (seven years ago) Permalink

At a journalism workshop held last Friday, a staff writer at one of our local papers and a good friend explained how he fought to get "defenestrate" in a crime story. When he noticed the blank looks on our students' faces he told the story of the monks.

a 'catch-all', almost humorous, 'Jeez' quality (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Wednesday, 17 August 2011 14:18 (seven years ago) Permalink

"The victim got de-windowed"

I for one am (Le Bateau Ivre), Wednesday, 17 August 2011 14:19 (seven years ago) Permalink

I prefer exfenestrate, really

returning the native population to its violent 18th-century high (Michael White), Wednesday, 17 August 2011 14:20 (seven years ago) Permalink

"The victim was given a dose of pane"

mark s, Wednesday, 17 August 2011 14:20 (seven years ago) Permalink

I read Wedgewood's book in May after falling in love with the NYROB edition – a marvelous read.

― a 'catch-all', almost humorous, 'Jeez' quality (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Wednesday, August 17, 2011 10:10 AM (8 minutes ago) Bookmark Suggest Ban Permalink

yeah this is the one i read--great cover with a detail from this:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/fe/The_Hanging_by_Jacques_Callot.jpg

max, Wednesday, 17 August 2011 14:21 (seven years ago) Permalink

"The victim was given a dose of pane"

lol

a 'catch-all', almost humorous, 'Jeez' quality (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Wednesday, 17 August 2011 14:24 (seven years ago) Permalink

Killed more ppl as a percentage of population than any other war in German history.

Also, "defenestration"!

― returning the native population to its violent 18th-century high (Michael White), Wednesday, August 17, 2011 10:14 AM (7 minutes ago) Bookmark Suggest Ban Permalink

wikipedia sez "the male population of the German states was reduced by almost half"

max, Wednesday, 17 August 2011 14:26 (seven years ago) Permalink

staying local, voting Buckingham – incarnates early Stuart court mix of power-politics-sex-aesthetics - set up to catch James I's fancy, becoming astonishingly powerful as favourite, failed and farcical endeavours, public hatred, an assassination.

Frederick V in second place. There is a weird romantic charge to him & Elizabeth ( I mean deliberately constructed, yes, but it endures), the Winter King and Queen in exile.

DOn't really know a lot of the continental names. I keep meaning to have a serious reading session about the 30yw, but it's pretty miserable even to casually think about.

you don't exist in the database (woof), Wednesday, 17 August 2011 14:26 (seven years ago) Permalink

"Franz von Mercy" ftw IMO.

Neil S, Wednesday, 17 August 2011 14:28 (seven years ago) Permalink

ive been reading about the war for acouple weeks now and i can recognize maybe 1/2 the names

max, Wednesday, 17 August 2011 14:30 (seven years ago) Permalink

Alsace-Lorraine

returning the native population to its violent 18th-century high (Michael White), Wednesday, 17 August 2011 14:34 (seven years ago) Permalink

alsace-lorraine newman

max, Wednesday, 17 August 2011 14:34 (seven years ago) Permalink

I read this last year and hated it- so dry and confusing. I heard good things about Wedgwood but never got around to it.

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51DcVhOBfVL._SS500_.jpg

I'm voting for Christian of Denmark because the world loves a loser.

brownie, Wednesday, 17 August 2011 15:07 (seven years ago) Permalink

yeah, that's what I keep promising myself I'll read. I am a bit wary - modern historical prose can be a quagmire. Maybe I'll line up the Wedgwood instead.

you don't exist in the database (woof), Wednesday, 17 August 2011 15:11 (seven years ago) Permalink

wedgwood can be confusing--i mean the war is confusing, so--but shes anything but dry. i expected this to take me a couple months of drawn-out "when im in the mood" reading, but it flew by in a couple weeks

max, Wednesday, 17 August 2011 15:14 (seven years ago) Permalink

RIYL game of thrones

lol i wondered if this was why you were reading this!

Monstrous TumTum (Lamp), Wednesday, 17 August 2011 15:14 (seven years ago) Permalink

lol i mean it isnt, really, but it is, kind of

max, Wednesday, 17 August 2011 15:14 (seven years ago) Permalink

ill tell you one thing, there are about 40x as many things going on in the 30 years war as i ASoIaF, and wedgwood manages to get it all done in 1 book

max, Wednesday, 17 August 2011 15:15 (seven years ago) Permalink

yes but how much do we know about frederick the fifth's incestuous relationship w/ his sister???

Monstrous TumTum (Lamp), Wednesday, 17 August 2011 15:21 (seven years ago) Permalink

Been meaning to read this version of the Wedgwood book that's been sitting on my shelf for a while:

http://www.foliosociety.com/bookcat/9042/TYW/thirty-years-war

So maybe I will soon! The whole story really is headspinning and sad.

Ned Raggett, Wednesday, 17 August 2011 15:22 (seven years ago) Permalink

More even than the other wars of religion, this is a conflict I always bring up w/ppl who are sketchy about separation of church and state.

returning the native population to its violent 18th-century high (Michael White), Wednesday, 17 August 2011 15:25 (seven years ago) Permalink

Pictures may help some people choose their favourite. Here is Gustavus Adolphus:

http://www.waylandgames.co.uk/images/uploads/warlord/wgp-tyw-01.jpg

and here's the Count of Tilly:

http://www.waylandgames.co.uk/images/uploads/warlord/wgp-tyw-03.jpg

you don't exist in the database (woof), Wednesday, 17 August 2011 15:31 (seven years ago) Permalink

I'm voting for Christian of Denmark because the world loves a loser.

his invasion of Germany is great. One of my friends always imagined the Danes riding in on Shetland ponies.

The New Dirty Vicar, Wednesday, 17 August 2011 15:31 (seven years ago) Permalink

this list is from wikipedia btw, so it doesnt include people that wedgwood probably would have included, like axel oxenstierna

but surely he is in the book? I only know about the 30 years war from reading it, and I have heard of this guy.

The New Dirty Vicar, Wednesday, 17 August 2011 15:33 (seven years ago) Permalink

As a kid studying the 30 yrs war, I learned that bayonets are the synthesis of pikes and muskets.

returning the native population to its violent 18th-century high (Michael White), Wednesday, 17 August 2011 15:33 (seven years ago) Permalink

The Peace of Westphalia marks the beginning of the "modern" states system, according to trad IR theory, interestingly. Also, 30 Years' War can be thought of in terms of the playing out of the reformation and counter-reformation, and in the broader context of other 17th century conflicts, e.g. English Civil War, Glorious Revolution.

Neil S, Wednesday, 17 August 2011 15:37 (seven years ago) Permalink

The Peace of Westphalia marks the beginning of the "modern" states system, according to trad IR theory

man, I remember writing an essay for AP European History in which this was the topic sentence. Good times.

a 'catch-all', almost humorous, 'Jeez' quality (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Wednesday, 17 August 2011 15:38 (seven years ago) Permalink

Also crucial in forging a sense of pan-German identity, and facilitating the slow but inexorable rise of Prussia IIRC. In fact, arguably the whole German question, which has overshadowed European history up until 1945/ 1992/ to date can be traced back to the 30 Years' War.

Neil S, Wednesday, 17 August 2011 15:41 (seven years ago) Permalink

iirc the thirty years war was also the last major european war to be fought with mercenaries and your mixed hired goons instead of standing national armies

sonderangerbot, Wednesday, 17 August 2011 15:42 (seven years ago) Permalink

xpost - I don't think they (bayonets) had been invented by the end of the 30 Years War.

One other great thing about the 30 Years War was that it was itself kind of part of the 90 Years War between the United Provinces and Spain.

The New Dirty Vicar, Wednesday, 17 August 2011 15:45 (seven years ago) Permalink

xps to myself

although it is of course possible to characterise European history as essentially French up until 1814(?), then German from then onwards (to the present day?).

Where's a rolling historiography thread when you need one?

Neil S, Wednesday, 17 August 2011 15:46 (seven years ago) Permalink

holy roman empire germanic

conrad, Wednesday, 17 August 2011 15:49 (seven years ago) Permalink

Berlin gets its name from a slavic word for lake.

The New Dirty Vicar, Thursday, 27 October 2011 12:19 (six years ago) Permalink

Fwiw coffee shop world is after 30yw. Only getting underway in the 50s iirc.

DAMMIT

TracerHandVEVO (Tracer Hand), Thursday, 27 October 2011 12:26 (six years ago) Permalink

totally want the relatable everyman character in the HBO series to be a fledgling reporter

TracerHandVEVO (Tracer Hand), Thursday, 27 October 2011 12:32 (six years ago) Permalink

or barista, obv

TracerHandVEVO (Tracer Hand), Thursday, 27 October 2011 12:50 (six years ago) Permalink

he should be a courier obv

mark s, Thursday, 27 October 2011 13:14 (six years ago) Permalink

and a potman

mark s, Thursday, 27 October 2011 13:14 (six years ago) Permalink

He can invent the exposé - just a thuringian broadsheet-writer-for-hire who's meant to be covering the birth of a two-headed lamb, but uncovers a Bavarian secret treaty with France.

you don't exist in the database (woof), Thursday, 27 October 2011 13:31 (six years ago) Permalink

when i get back to the smiley project, i should add in a bit about the writer smiley is doing a monograph on, who seems to be a german diplomatic envoy, from around this time, who writes up his travels (i'm on a train at the moment so can't look it up) (or even move, the student beside me is lolling in his sleep)

mark s, Thursday, 27 October 2011 13:38 (six years ago) Permalink

lolling or lol-ing?

goole, Thursday, 27 October 2011 13:40 (six years ago) Permalink

the copy i'm reading is a 1961 penguin (v.early pelican imprint): it has a callot collage on the cover, in blue and pink, and the pages are nice and old and furry-feeling

it is very funny

mark s, Wednesday, 2 November 2011 10:56 (six years ago) Permalink

The Death of Wallenstein, by Fredrich Schiller -

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/6787

TracerHandVEVO (Tracer Hand), Friday, 11 November 2011 12:18 (six years ago) Permalink

The Piccolomini

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/6786

TracerHandVEVO (Tracer Hand), Friday, 11 November 2011 12:21 (six years ago) Permalink

I think I voted already: Frederick V - he thought he could win, with magic.

Fizzles the Chimp (GamalielRatsey), Friday, 11 November 2011 12:24 (six years ago) Permalink

SPOILERS

just reached the bit where one of the many christians* gets thrown from a horse 80 feet down from the battlements and another dies aged 28, his "vitals gnawed by a giant worm"

END SPOILERS

*name not denomination

mark s, Monday, 14 November 2011 10:14 (six years ago) Permalink

one month passes...

"If one considers the expense on this occasion and wants to reduce it so that it can be afforded for a long time, it should be replied that great emergencies have no rule; that it is not a question of an expense that will last for many years; but that if, in order to remedy the present evil, one fails to make an extraordinary expenditure now, it will be necessary to make one in the future -- though it would not then produce any result, nor prevent our ruin."

-- Cardinal Richelieu to Louis XIII, Sept 6 1634

TracerHandVEVO (Tracer Hand), Wednesday, 4 January 2012 10:12 (six years ago) Permalink

six months pass...

voted john george

John George... has been known to sit at table gorging homely foods and swilling native beer for seven hours on end, his sole approach at conversation to box his dwarf's ears, or pour the dregs of a tankard over a servant's head as a signal for more.

skrill xx (cozen), Wednesday, 18 July 2012 22:09 (six years ago) Permalink

four weeks pass...

Automatic thread bump. This poll is closing tomorrow.

System, Thursday, 16 August 2012 00:01 (six years ago) Permalink

oh no I haven't read this all the way through yet!

Legendary General Cypher Raige (Gukbe), Thursday, 16 August 2012 00:03 (six years ago) Permalink

Automatic thread bump. This poll's results are now in.

System, Friday, 17 August 2012 00:01 (six years ago) Permalink

Disappointed this poll didn't run for 29 more years.

Shepton Mullet (White Chocolate Cheesecake), Friday, 17 August 2012 10:14 (six years ago) Permalink

so is wedgwood definitely a better bet than wilson?

ogmor, Friday, 17 August 2012 12:40 (six years ago) Permalink

i think so

if wilson is at your library give it a try but it's dry. he just isn't an engaging writer imo

hail dayton (brownie), Friday, 17 August 2012 13:43 (six years ago) Permalink

Piet Pieterszoon Hein was robbed u cocks.

Matt DC, Friday, 17 August 2012 13:45 (six years ago) Permalink

three months pass...

we have this book in our library! *borrows book*

Great thread, this one...

Neil S, Tuesday, 27 November 2012 13:41 (five years ago) Permalink

one year passes...

this is pretty breezy reading, considering

caucasity and the sundance kid (goole), Wednesday, 5 November 2014 22:48 (three years ago) Permalink

it was a pretty breezy war

LIKE If you are against racism (omar little), Wednesday, 5 November 2014 22:48 (three years ago) Permalink

it was a helluva war

Karl Malone, Wednesday, 5 November 2014 22:49 (three years ago) Permalink

some called it the "war of a lifetime"

for some, their lifetime WAS the war of a lifetime, because they were born after 1618 and died before 1648

legend has it that the phrase "put up your dukes" was coined during the thirty years war, after one nobleman, after hearing tell of the maiming of an enemy duke, said "gather anew thy dukes of replacement, for we shall battle again as soon as it stops raining"

Karl Malone, Wednesday, 5 November 2014 22:54 (three years ago) Permalink

re: economics and bottom-up social business upthread, she does start after protestantism has been firmly entrenched across parts of europe. my thumbnail understanding was that war broke out right away after the reformation but duh there was a generation or two in between. it's during the period of protestant emergence when socio/demo/economic type questions are really interesting imo.

interestingly she does touch -- breezily! -- on intersecting questions of demographics, money and technology when explaining why most of the armies of this period were mecernaries

caucasity and the sundance kid (goole), Wednesday, 5 November 2014 22:54 (three years ago) Permalink

retroactively it was briefly named "world war -I", and historians referred to it as such for a time in the late 1940s to mid 1950s, until the popular re-release of the wedgwood book returned the name "thirty years war" to popularity

LIKE If you are against racism (omar little), Wednesday, 5 November 2014 22:56 (three years ago) Permalink

elector frederick, whatta dope!

goole, Tuesday, 11 November 2014 19:29 (three years ago) Permalink

two years pass...

rereading right now: seems all too grimly apt suddenly :(

i actually think she does touch on the element tracer was missing, abt the cultural dimension, in the first chapter -- if only to say that its salience was small relatively small (i'll go back and have a closer look)

mark s, Saturday, 19 November 2016 00:01 (one year ago) Permalink

Can't believe Wallenstein got only one vote.

sarahell, Saturday, 19 November 2016 02:21 (one year ago) Permalink

fans of both the 30 years war and The Sot Weed Factor (and indeed Don Quixote) may want to dip into this. Written in 1669 about a naif who wanders about the horrors of the 30YW.

http://rbsche.people.wm.edu/teaching/grimmelshausen/

The officer bade them dig on stoutly. And presently they came to a cask, which they burst open, and therein found a fellow that had neither nose nor ears, and yet still lived. He, when he was somewhat revived, and had recognized some of the troop, told them how on the day before, as some of his regiment were a-foraging, the peasants had caught six of them. And of these they first of all, about an hour before, had shot five dead at once, making them stand one behind another; and because the bullet, having already passed through five bodies, did not reach him, who stood sixth and last, they had cut off his nose and ears, yet before that had forced him to render to five of them the filthiest service in the world* . But when he saw himself thus degraded by these rogues without shame or knowledge of God, he had heaped upon them the vilest reproaches, though they were willing now to let him go. Yet in the hope one of them would from annoyance send a ball through his head, he called them all by their right names: yet in vain. Only this, that when he had thus chafed them they had clapped him in the cask here present and buried him alive, saying, since he so desired death they would not cheat him of his amusement. ...

illegal economic migration (Tracer Hand), Saturday, 19 November 2016 16:23 (one year ago) Permalink

george smiley reads grimmelshausen!! (i think his academic studies were in medieval german)

mark s, Saturday, 19 November 2016 16:52 (one year ago) Permalink

one year passes...

rereading

mark s, Sunday, 28 January 2018 12:10 (six months ago) Permalink

p certain he comes up in wolfgang kayser’s v good the grotesque in art and literature, which is v strong on the “german” 17th century groteske.

see ask adam tooze’s powerpoint for the thirty year’s war, a lecture in his current series on germany and war

Fizzles, Sunday, 28 January 2018 16:57 (six months ago) Permalink

battle of the white mountain not how i imagined it from wedgwood

Fizzles, Sunday, 28 January 2018 16:59 (six months ago) Permalink

Maximilian I, Elector of Bavaria

He banned dancing and anyone under the age of 55 from using a horse and carriage, paid his servants a pittance, "his meanness a byword in Europe". lol, I couldn't vote for this one in good conscience.

calzino, Tuesday, 30 January 2018 09:26 (six months ago) Permalink

that PowerPoint is fabulous but ironically I'm too wrapped up in China this year to have time for Wedgwood or Wilson

hard to be a spod (Noodle Vague), Tuesday, 30 January 2018 09:59 (six months ago) Permalink

I like Tooze's books on the Nazi economy and the tumultuous "Deluge" of the interwar period. His twitter is always good value as well.

calzino, Tuesday, 30 January 2018 10:05 (six months ago) Permalink

i didn't vote bcz polls are bad and you should feel bad: however i have a fondness for johann tserclaes count of tilly as he shares a name w/my niece

mark s, Tuesday, 30 January 2018 11:21 (six months ago) Permalink

In 1619 the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth was truly massive! https://t.co/5Nc4669zIm pic.twitter.com/QShLEhFH2P

— Adam Tooze (@adam_tooze) January 30, 2018

calzino, Wednesday, 31 January 2018 00:42 (six months ago) Permalink

also i realised i have a residual fondness for gustavus adolphus bcz purely he was mentioned in passing in an erich kästner book i enjoyed as a kid

(i think he appears in a dream, the book is in storage so i can't check)

mark s, Wednesday, 31 January 2018 11:29 (six months ago) Permalink

just reached the part where gustavus adolphus dies and was overcome with unexpected sadness, this despite the the fact that

a) he probably wasn't that great of a guy, given that he was a king invading several other countries uninvited, razing crops and towns to the ground etc
b) given that he is not around today aged 424 i kind of suspected he had to have died at some point
c) i have read the book before
d) CVWedgwood foreshadows his death some pages before

mark s, Friday, 2 February 2018 12:24 (six months ago) Permalink

also lol he is at the head of the poll with max's † by his name

mark s, Friday, 2 February 2018 12:25 (six months ago) Permalink

he had to destroy Germany to save it, you see

Wedgwood has written an account of the life and times of Cardinal Richlieu, which i have bought, yet it sits forlorn and unread on the shelf above my desk

illegal economic migration (Tracer Hand), Friday, 2 February 2018 12:35 (six months ago) Permalink

Started reading this last year but didn't get very far and I've resolved not to read any history this year, it's too depressing.

Video reach stereo bog (Tom D.), Friday, 2 February 2018 12:38 (six months ago) Permalink

I found myself chuckling out loud at some audio-book Wedgewood the other day. It probably wasn't actually very funny, but it tickled me at the time. It was some quote from a diplomat reporting that Johann Georg had become very heated with the consumption of much wine, or words to that effect.

calzino, Friday, 2 February 2018 13:12 (six months ago) Permalink

attention 30yw fans! i recently discovered that cv wedgwood wrote a biography of CARDINAL RICHELIEU, and it covers much of the same territory but from the french/bourbon angle, which was sort of a sideline in the og text

and i am happy to report that her Authority and Tone is present and correct throughout

illegal economic migration (Tracer Hand), Monday, 12 February 2018 08:49 (six months ago) Permalink


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