Programming as a career

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I've been doing some programming at work, but because it's a hardware place, the bar is set pretty low in terms of languages. I've floated my resume out there a couple times, but aside from a couple nibbles, nothing, so I've realized that I don't have enough CS knowledge: a decent amount of perl, less decent PHP, some Mysql, some Javascript, and a couple of C classes that I've taken a couple years ago that have fallen into disuse. What, then, should I improve on? Should I take some Java classes? I figure that I'll have to take a data structure class sooner or later; should I aim for a certificate or even a degree?

Leee, Friday, 21 August 2009 03:28 (ten years ago) link

Java and C# are very high in demand. And definitely get a Bachelor's degree in CS if you can. Tons of places won't even give you the time of day if you don't have one.

Mr. Snrub, Friday, 21 August 2009 03:36 (ten years ago) link

Bump. Anyone else, or did Mr. Burns give the long and short of it?

Leee, Friday, 21 August 2009 21:00 (ten years ago) link

I've been in this career so long I'm obsolete, so my best advice is look at the want ads for programmers and see what's needed most. And I hope a BS in CS still means you know C inside and out.

nickn, Friday, 21 August 2009 21:27 (ten years ago) link

Oh, and get the A+ certification. No, it's not very programming-related, but it shows that you know rudimentary knowledge of PC repair, it's a super easy exam, and it's on your resume forever.

Don't bother with most other certifications, though. They're an absolute nightmare to study for and they become obsolete too fast. Instead, I'd start contributing to some free open source project on sourceforge or google code or something, and then bring that code with you to all your interviews. It gives you a good answer to the "yes, but what have you done lately?" question, and voluntarily contributing for a free project makes you look good.

Mr. Snrub, Sunday, 23 August 2009 04:02 (ten years ago) link

three months pass...

Asking coworkers and family, and two things I often hear:

1. Get at least a bachelor's in comp sci/software engineering (I have an ever-useful English degree already) because in terms of career growth, you won't get priority unless you have that degree. This is important to me, given that I'm currently at a position where I have almost no room for growth.
2. Don't get a bachelor's, because everything's getting outsourced in software engineering anyway.

I'm reluctant to give up before I've even gotten started on programming, since I took forever to find a job, first of all, and one that I actually enjoy.

Leee, Friday, 18 December 2009 05:40 (ten years ago) link

People who say #2 don't know what they're talking about.

Just make sure you either specialize or diversify your skills (whichever suits your persona, there are pros and cons to either) so you're not a one trick programmer, and you'll be fine. In this late 2009 economapolypse, I'd go with the diversify-yourself-and-learn-a-whole-bunch-of-shit-for-fun angle. Companies will give preference to people who geek out on programming in their spare time, or *ahem* at least can pretend very well that they do.

Yeah, learn a bunch of shit, more the better.

kingfish, Friday, 18 December 2009 06:40 (ten years ago) link

3. Make up for lack of degree w/ experience (fuck going back 2 school)

shartin jort (am0n), Friday, 18 December 2009 06:44 (ten years ago) link

Other recent observations: open source environment jobs have blossomed.. Microsoft technology jobs have softened (for pretty obvious budget reasons.) It's awesome to know both, but if you had to choose one, choose the former -- since it's free, and if you can prove that you wrestled with bugs in some open source package, and overcame them, that's something you can put on a CV.

(The really stupid thing about tech companies: no one will hire a seasoned C# programmer for a mid-level Java position, or vice versa -- even though the two language skills are highly transferable. This is digressing into rant territory, so I'll stop.)

3b. Or at least spend a number of days going through wiki pages on algorithms involving binary search trees, sort algorithms, and abstract data types like stacks, queues, linked-lists, etc. A BS in CS will teach you that and a lot more, but in practice, it's the former stuff that companies really care about. You do need some math skillz to understand the former. learning O-notation is a bonus.

Then again, some companies just want to hire people who like picking things up quickly.

Yeah, learn a bunch of shit, more the better.

ehh, having a multidisciplinary cv can be a pain, recruiters don't know what to do with you.

poster x (ledge), Friday, 18 December 2009 10:58 (ten years ago) link

I'll back the assertion that it is possible to be a coder without a degree (my ex is an example - heck he didnt even finish high school) but if you go down that path you gotta know C++, C#, assembly, perl, etc relevant to field language. You have to live and breathe code and *enjoy* doing it. I see people who code like other people play and write songs on guitars. Theyre the ones who do well.

millivanillimillenary (Trayce), Friday, 18 December 2009 11:12 (ten years ago) link

i would think with that trayce you kinda have to get a bit lucky, and find a company that's a bit more relaxed in their recruitment drive.

i recently applied for a java role, having a rather great bouncy interview and selling my enthusiasm for coding etc. They seemed impressed and I thought i'd done well but the other guy won the job basically because he knew more about 'business' terms.

all companies are different, worth researching them individually for your applications.

bracken free ditch (Ste), Friday, 18 December 2009 11:21 (ten years ago) link

Games industry is perhaps a unique beast compared to coding in all other fields, as it is a lot more of a "prove yer shit" industry.

millivanillimillenary (Trayce), Friday, 18 December 2009 11:57 (ten years ago) link

Know this really well.

Then this.

And then this.

Now you're pretty much all set.

Mr. Snrub, Friday, 18 December 2009 12:01 (ten years ago) link

xp Trayce, yeah agree with that

bracken free ditch (Ste), Friday, 18 December 2009 12:14 (ten years ago) link

Is learning C++ a particularly good idea these days? There's got to be a lot more jobs in Java and PHP, at least. Hell, probably even in Ruby and Python. People do argue that you learn so much from programming C++ that it makes other languages much easier to pick up etc, but that doesn't seem to me like a good enough reason to start there.

Guess it depends on the job you want -- I imagine the places where they use C and C++ now are ones where you're most likely to actually need a CS degree.

What do I know -- I just quit my programming job last month and have no idea wtf to do in the future.

Øystein, Friday, 18 December 2009 12:48 (ten years ago) link

I had heard that C++ had lost out a lot to Java and Visual C++ to C#, and meanwhile C is still going strong for embedded systems, which C++ is largely unsuited to. But I have never been paid to write in any of those languages so I dunno.

When I was last job-hunting I put just about every language I had even basic knowledge of, and a specialist IT recruiter told me it was confusing and I needed to narrow it down. So don't do that.

I suppose that sounds obvious (writing 30-line programs in yr spare time or in lol college != doing useful work on a real major project), but when your core skills - and I'm not sure I have any - are kind of limited and obsolete, and your jobs to date have involved a lot of whatever nobody else wants to do that day but thinks you can pick up as you go...

brett favre vs bernard fevre, fite (a passing spacecadet), Friday, 18 December 2009 13:23 (ten years ago) link

I have a good front-to-back knowledge of web development, from html to java, and i do put it all on my cv, but I try to position myself as a java developer. Still most of the stuff i get from agents is for entry level html crap. Basically all agents are know-nothing cunts.

poster x (ledge), Friday, 18 December 2009 13:48 (ten years ago) link

is it worth learning to use stuff like eclipse and that because i guess while most people can do java C++ fewer people will know how to work with the specfic development tools etc?

I sb'ed your mum (ken c), Friday, 18 December 2009 16:37 (ten years ago) link

It might also be helpful to learn about recursion, as told by H.P. Lovecraft:

http://www.bobhobbs.com/files/kr_lovecraft.html

o. nate, Friday, 18 December 2009 17:47 (ten years ago) link

3. Make up for lack of degree w/ experience (fuck going back 2 school)

I kind of sort of have this covered at my current position, but I'm sort of an ad hoc backwater one-person band supporting a group in a hardware company, so there's not a lot of support for me but also not a lot of priority given to me vis-a-vis promotions, accumulating job skills past a rudimentary point, etc. It's good for financial security, but if I need/want a real developer's job, I feel a bit underqualified, thus thinking about doing school part time to get a BA/BS. And that goes to Sock Puppet's 3b; I'm a bit intimidated by the mathier stuff on my own, I do much better in a classroom.

I have some Java on me now, I'm taking a C++ class at jr. college this Winter Q.

Leee, Friday, 18 December 2009 21:22 (ten years ago) link

People who say #2 don't know what they're talking about.

Re: outsourcing -- does it matter that I work in Silicon Valley? I tend to assume that if the general trend is towards outsourcing programming, SV would be the place where it happens first.

Leee, Friday, 18 December 2009 21:24 (ten years ago) link

is it worth learning to use stuff like eclipse and that

i guess it'd be a good idea to know how how yer basic ide works but no point going out of your way to learn any particular one. once you know one you know them all, more or less.

poster x (ledge), Friday, 18 December 2009 21:32 (ten years ago) link

OTM. Every company has their own specifics w.r.t. IDEs so it's probably not a good use of your time to worry about the environment outside of what you need to know to get things done.

There's no concrete answer to the get/don't get a C.S. degree question. As you might have guessed already it depends... amount of experience, depth of background, relative visibility, the type of job you're looking for and what industry it's in (something like game development is it's own Universe). I can only offer up anecdotes from my own career - I've had exactly two formal programming classes, but 18 years of job experience from IT garbage collector, to webmaster, device driver wizard, and database king. Like everyone else has been saying, have a broad familiarity with a couple areas of deep knowledge. If I was starting now, I'd make Java one of those deep knowledge areas.

Also, don't underestimate visibility. Write some code, improve on it, and then blog the results. Write comments on someone else's coding blog. I've gotten a couple of contract gig offers just because I posted some sample code to my blog. Go figure.

Lastly, get familiar with database basics. Nothing ridiculous like Oracle but just your basic MySQL/PostGreSQL fundamentals. I didn't set out to be a database guy, but I knew some stuff and now four years later I'm a full-blown DBA and pretty good at it.

Elvis Telecom, Saturday, 19 December 2009 00:25 (ten years ago) link

> I had heard that C++ had lost out a lot to Java

i think this is due to a shift towards webapps (java servlets). i'm a dyed in the wool c programmer now doing java for a living because everything is now sat on a server being served by JBoss.

(never had a lesson in java, hadn't been invented whilst i was in education... lol, z80)

i am aghast at some of the job adverts i see, the list of disparate things they expect you to know. but a lot of this is due to agency idiots. (that said, if i think about all the disparate things i use at work...)

the thing they don't teach you at college but is fundamental when working professionally and/or in groups is version control. get comfortable with cvs or svn or maybe even git. at the very least know what they do.

i'd also recommend having something you can show people, like contributing, or starting, an open source project. or just having some flashy applets somewhere.

this stuff all takes years, 25 years in i'm still picking stuff up.

koogs, Sunday, 20 December 2009 10:27 (ten years ago) link

Hm, I like a syntax-highlighting text editor with parenthesis matching and suchlike, but for the actual business of compiling and running I'm still alt-tabbing to a console window, guess I'd better stop being so afraid of letting the IDE take care of it...

Ha, agency job ads. Seen ads asking for 3 years' experience in technologies which aren't 3 years old.

This is good encouragement to actually listen to the woman who's been trying to get us all to use svn. The only version control I've used was command-line only and didn't do much beyond locking the file and adding a timestamped comment. Seems they're a lot more sophisticated now.

brett favre vs bernard fevre, fite (a passing spacecadet), Monday, 21 December 2009 16:32 (ten years ago) link

file locking is so '90s.

poster x (ledge), Monday, 21 December 2009 16:37 (ten years ago) link

Hm, I like a syntax-highlighting text editor with parenthesis matching and suchlike, but for the actual business of compiling and running I'm still alt-tabbing to a console window, guess I'd better stop being so afraid of letting the IDE take care of it...

Yeah, I programmed in notepad etc for years, before moving to a proper IDE, mostly because I figured I should learn to program without any tools to help me out. In hindsight that wasn't a particularly good idea, it just made thinks more convoluted and slow. Rewriting code was a major pain etc.
Learning an IDE (Eclipse, for instance) is hardly any work at all, since you can start off treating it as little more than a fancified text-editor, and learn the cool tricks as you go along. I mean, hell, I'd used one for over a year before I even heard of "extract method"! Sheesh.

Actually, that reminds me that getting comfortable with Maven or Ant is fairly quickly done, and something well worth doing once you're comfortable with Subversion (SVN) or CVS.
Also, testing frameworks. JUnit if you're using Java. It's both quick to learn, and well worth it; just don't let the annoying Test-Driven Design (TDD) fanatics put you off.

Øystein, Monday, 21 December 2009 18:15 (ten years ago) link

there are things netbeans cannot do that easily vim will do in a heartbeat but i can't live without the code completion stuff as i don't really know the libraries (and they change). plus java projects have such a deep directory trees and our stuff is so scattered that you end up spending most of your time in vim typing directory paths to swapping between files (could use ctags i guess)

eclipse i never got to grips with - there's no 'compile' button as it's continually compiling and i like having a compile button.

svn can be used on the command line but we use tortoise.

koogs, Monday, 21 December 2009 19:11 (ten years ago) link

four years pass...

Programmers are the magicians of the modern age

calstars, Sunday, 8 June 2014 21:36 (six years ago) link

Not the ones I've known. And I've known more than a few.

Aimless, Monday, 9 June 2014 04:56 (six years ago) link

buncha putzes

j., Monday, 9 June 2014 05:09 (six years ago) link

Programming is the worst

Nhex, Monday, 9 June 2014 06:46 (six years ago) link

DevOps is the worst.

koogs, Monday, 9 June 2014 10:32 (six years ago) link

Software Engineer USA™

, Monday, 9 June 2014 16:04 (six years ago) link

we like to pretend we're architects and engineers and builders but we're really more like apprentice mechanics or those dudes that assemble pre-made furniture half the time

a strange man (mh), Monday, 9 June 2014 16:07 (six years ago) link

programming is great if functions and syntax are well documented. it is the worst thing imaginable otherwise.

sufi john paxson (Sufjan Grafton), Monday, 9 June 2014 16:09 (six years ago) link

I do enjoy the critical thinking parts of my mind that were unlocked by learning CS theory and programming over a period of time, but it really chafes me to see software developers think that they're able to solve non-software societal problems with that toolkit

a strange man (mh), Monday, 9 June 2014 16:09 (six years ago) link

professional googlers

lag∞n, Monday, 9 June 2014 16:10 (six years ago) link

Oh, I forgot that one. Software Architect. Classic.

I much rather SysAdmin, coder, developer, webmonkey/webmaster, script kiddie

Mind you, my end goal is probably to be a 'Software Architect', so I should lol carefully

, Monday, 9 June 2014 16:10 (six years ago) link

yeah, really smart or tricky code makes you seem like a wizard but what it really makes you is an asshole if it's ever meant to be maintained

pretty sure my coding style has gotten progressively dumber on purpose

a strange man (mh), Monday, 9 June 2014 16:10 (six years ago) link

^^ thank you

sufi john paxson (Sufjan Grafton), Monday, 9 June 2014 16:11 (six years ago) link

I think software/systems architect is a fine title, even if my actual designs-buildings-and-structures friend recoils in disgust. I hate when people introduce themselves as "architects" without the qualifier.

Now, the part of the business where people use "architect" as a verb... not so good.

a strange man (mh), Monday, 9 June 2014 16:12 (six years ago) link

I do enjoy the critical thinking parts of my mind that were unlocked by learning CS theory and programming over a period of time, but it really chafes me to see software developers think that they're able to solve non-software societal problems with that toolkit

― a strange man (mh), Monday, June 9, 2014 5:09 PM (1 minute ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink


From the dudes I've met, I get the impression many of them think they do have superpowers and can basically write a piece of software/webapp to solve just about any social/civic/political issue

, Monday, 9 June 2014 16:12 (six years ago) link

they probably also think they can throw together that application in a matter of a few days

programmers are horrible estimators

a strange man (mh), Monday, 9 June 2014 16:13 (six years ago) link

working with computers makes people feel very powerful because computers are powerful

lag∞n, Monday, 9 June 2014 16:13 (six years ago) link

bring back punch cards

sufi john paxson (Sufjan Grafton), Monday, 9 June 2014 16:14 (six years ago) link

ya, it's just funny because in canada you're not really allowed to use "software engineer", because, well, you're not an engineer. but in the states, it's quite common

, Monday, 9 June 2014 16:15 (six years ago) link

Why does every fucking thing have to be a function, how about you () => juggle(myBalls)

juggle(this.nuts)

cherry blossom, Wednesday, 15 July 2020 19:26 (three weeks ago) link

everything being a function is good not bad tbh

all cats are beautiful (silby), Wednesday, 15 July 2020 21:17 (three weeks ago) link

fuck state, keep it in a box

all cats are beautiful (silby), Wednesday, 15 July 2020 21:17 (three weeks ago) link

counterpoint: nah

shout-out to his family (DJP), Wednesday, 15 July 2020 23:20 (three weeks ago) link

Mutable state is a turd on the polished marble floor of my exquisite grand hall hung with crystal chandeliers

all cats are beautiful (silby), Wednesday, 15 July 2020 23:27 (three weeks ago) link

Classic or dud: late night email from colleague cc-ing management saying he can’t figure out something you gave him a few weeks ago and it is crashing and you need to put in more error checking etc. ( because his time and productivity etc)

Isolde mein Herz zum Junker (James Redd and the Blecchs), Thursday, 16 July 2020 18:40 (three weeks ago) link

Well this has been sorted for now.

Left Eye Frizzell (James Redd and the Blecchs), Sunday, 19 July 2020 13:17 (two weeks ago) link


# get password via terminal without echoing
password = STDIN.noecho(&:gets).chomp

reasonable, right? sentence in english explaining the cryptic command that follows. i don't get the "document WHY not WHAT" review comments i always get.

coming new to this code, debugging it later say, such things let you understand which part does what without having to decode the code. = useful, especially if you're in a mixed ability team.

also, review comments from people you haven't asked for reviews, classic or dud?

koogs, Tuesday, 21 July 2020 13:09 (two weeks ago) link

Leaning towards dud.

Left Eye Frizzell (James Redd and the Blecchs), Tuesday, 21 July 2020 13:15 (two weeks ago) link

Codesplainers gonna codesplain.

Left Eye Frizzell (James Redd and the Blecchs), Tuesday, 21 July 2020 13:17 (two weeks ago) link

If people would just put in fucking comments saying what they were trying to do and what their expectations were, basically defining the contract they're trying to fulfill, it would be about 8 billion times easier to identify logic mistakes than it currently is.

shout-out to his family (DJP), Tuesday, 21 July 2020 13:31 (two weeks ago) link

https://www.hillelwayne.com/post/what-comments/

𝔠𝔞𝔢𝔨 (caek), Tuesday, 21 July 2020 13:40 (two weeks ago) link

i have an issue with that

> //f.ex $F1a3

f.ex? for example? what's wrong with 'ie' or 'eg'?

koogs, Tuesday, 21 July 2020 13:56 (two weeks ago) link

(my whole script only exists because someone checked in an aws kms encrypted key without explaining how it was generated, and 3 years later we needed another - lack of documentation again)

koogs, Tuesday, 21 July 2020 13:58 (two weeks ago) link

I can see where the anti comment review on that is coming from. The comment duplicates stuff that’s in the docs, right? It’s not a “trick” that depends on undocumented behaviour (like the fact that piping to xargs is a way to trim leading and trailing white space?! Did you all know this?!). It’s just something that’s not obvious from reading the code. That’s not where I draw the line and your point about mixed ability teams is a good one, but it’s not a terrible place to draw it.

𝔠𝔞𝔢𝔨 (caek), Tuesday, 21 July 2020 14:04 (two weeks ago) link

Whoa, xargs trick is neat!

Left Eye Frizzell (James Redd and the Blecchs), Tuesday, 21 July 2020 14:10 (two weeks ago) link

I am old. I still use xargs -i and never switched to -I

Left Eye Frizzell (James Redd and the Blecchs), Tuesday, 21 July 2020 14:13 (two weeks ago) link

Also can never remember that xargs idiom using the shell trick.

Left Eye Frizzell (James Redd and the Blecchs), Tuesday, 21 July 2020 14:18 (two weeks ago) link

Ah, xargs -0 will keep the whitespace

Left Eye Frizzell (James Redd and the Blecchs), Tuesday, 21 July 2020 14:22 (two weeks ago) link

Feel like comments should be judged on their practical effects rather than from some philosophical position. If it takes 2 minutes to figure out a chunk of code without comments and 10 seconds to figure out the code with comments, I don't care how "obvious" or "self documenting" the code itself is, the comments are good.

Dan I., Tuesday, 21 July 2020 14:25 (two weeks ago) link

otm

Left Eye Frizzell (James Redd and the Blecchs), Tuesday, 21 July 2020 14:28 (two weeks ago) link

I say this as person who long ago took a course - in Pascal! - nicknamed "Commenting For Credit" in which people were expected to do things like

  i := I + 1; //increment I 

So in general I prefer self-documenting but yeah

Left Eye Frizzell (James Redd and the Blecchs), Tuesday, 21 July 2020 14:32 (two weeks ago) link

(input wants to uppercase every i)

 i := i + 1; //increment i again

Left Eye Frizzell (James Redd and the Blecchs), Tuesday, 21 July 2020 14:33 (two weeks ago) link

Next topic: git commit messages.

//increment topic

Left Eye Frizzell (James Redd and the Blecchs), Tuesday, 21 July 2020 14:36 (two weeks ago) link

ruby doesn't let you i++. spent a chunk of sunday looking at cryptic error message and not seeing the problem.

koogs, Tuesday, 21 July 2020 14:44 (two weeks ago) link

Feel like comments should be judged on their practical effects rather than from some philosophical position. If it takes 2 minutes to figure out a chunk of code without comments and 10 seconds to figure out the code with comments, I don't care how "obvious" or "self documenting" the code itself is, the comments are good.

Can we attach this to everyone's monitor?

shout-out to his family (DJP), Tuesday, 21 July 2020 14:58 (two weeks ago) link

I think I only write comments that are at least 100 words long

all cats are beautiful (silby), Tuesday, 21 July 2020 15:08 (two weeks ago) link

I'm the only one reading my code/commenting so too many of my comments are targeted at my osteoporosis of a memory, e.g.,

// The + 16 offset is event type, commenting so I don't forget it yet again
// The + 16 offset is still event type, it appears I forgot it again

like, I’m eating an elephant head (katherine), Tuesday, 21 July 2020 15:32 (two weeks ago) link

(4000 lines apart, to be fair, and not my code but decompiler output)

like, I’m eating an elephant head (katherine), Tuesday, 21 July 2020 15:33 (two weeks ago) link


public static final int EVENT_TYPE_OFFSET = 16;

koogs, Tuesday, 21 July 2020 15:35 (two weeks ago) link

trust me that's not feasible in this thing, it's certainly possible but this is 240K lines of code and I can't just ctrl-f

like, I’m eating an elephant head (katherine), Tuesday, 21 July 2020 15:53 (two weeks ago) link

Btw, my posts from a few weeks ago was about colleagues who are part of the development process and are participating in alpha testing but seem to want to behave as if they are end users and are shocked - shocked! - when something breaks. Perhaps this is a touchy subject.

Left Eye Frizzell (James Redd and the Blecchs), Tuesday, 21 July 2020 16:21 (two weeks ago) link

Because no one wants to be that guy that breaks things.

Left Eye Frizzell (James Redd and the Blecchs), Tuesday, 21 July 2020 16:28 (two weeks ago) link

But only the other hand there is the short-term/local/pre-mature optimization of being fast on the send button with "It broke! Nothing should ever break!"

Left Eye Frizzell (James Redd and the Blecchs), Tuesday, 21 July 2020 16:30 (two weeks ago) link

"Strike mine eyes from my face!"

Left Eye Frizzell (James Redd and the Blecchs), Tuesday, 21 July 2020 16:31 (two weeks ago) link

"I have reported thy breaking to mine Lord of Unbreakability. My day's work is done, now I shall take leave and rest for the nonce."

Left Eye Frizzell (James Redd and the Blecchs), Tuesday, 21 July 2020 16:34 (two weeks ago) link

But only the other hand there is the short-term/local/pre-mature optimization of being fast on the send button with "It broke! Nothing should ever break!"

this is me :(

𝔠𝔞𝔢𝔨 (caek), Tuesday, 21 July 2020 16:36 (two weeks ago) link

Knew it!

Left Eye Frizzell (James Redd and the Blecchs), Tuesday, 21 July 2020 16:39 (two weeks ago) link

caek’s link is otm

I am in favor of breaking down functions to component parts when they’re overly long or complex. This is a necessity in code of any length, especially when it makes scope of variables clear and you’re doing a specific manipulation of data that is secondary to the purpose of what you’re writing. You don’t need inline parsing of object A into object B if what you’re actually doing is some sort of calculation.

The primary use of functions is to encapsulate code that could be reused somewhere else. If you can add a few comments and make it clear what you’re doing in the primary function, and you’re not reusing anything, just add comments.

Same for code paths that are going to end up calling all functions — why are all of them separate functions if you call every one of them 90% of the time? You’re just replacing comments with function names, and outside of the context of reading *all* of that code, I have no idea what replaceAllInstances does. Instances of.. the one argument to the function? It’s method signature as comment

solo scampito (mh), Tuesday, 21 July 2020 18:27 (two weeks ago) link

Well said.

Left Eye Frizzell (James Redd and the Blecchs), Tuesday, 21 July 2020 18:37 (two weeks ago) link

Kevlin Henney to thread

Left Eye Frizzell (James Redd and the Blecchs), Tuesday, 21 July 2020 18:48 (two weeks ago) link

World’s Finest Commit Message:

Merge remote-tracking branch 'origin/master'

Time Will Show Leo Weiser (James Redd and the Blecchs), Tuesday, 28 July 2020 14:50 (one week ago) link

smh

all cats are beautiful (silby), Tuesday, 28 July 2020 15:31 (one week ago) link

SMH CARD

Time Will Show Leo Weiser (James Redd and the Blecchs), Tuesday, 28 July 2020 15:41 (one week ago) link

speaking of commit messages

https://www.twitter.com/gitlost

like, I’m eating an elephant head (katherine), Tuesday, 28 July 2020 19:06 (one week ago) link

lol

shout-out to his family (DJP), Tuesday, 28 July 2020 19:08 (one week ago) link

always happy to see that account again

all cats are beautiful (silby), Tuesday, 28 July 2020 20:08 (one week ago) link

this component test, two of the 'expected' fields are actually a comma separated list of additional tests and a parallel comma-separated list of the expected values for these tests.

koogs, Friday, 31 July 2020 12:34 (six days ago) link


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