The Mike Leigh Poll

Message Bookmarked
Bookmark Removed

I voted for Secrets & Lies, but I could have voted for Vera Drake, Topsy-Turvy, or High Hopes.

http://www.wftv.org.uk/userfiles/image/Mike%20Leigh.jpg

Poll Results

OptionVotes
Naked (1993) 18
Secrets & Lies (1996) 11
Topsy-Turvy (1999) 8
Nuts in May (BBC Play for Today, 13/01/1976) 7
Life Is Sweet (1990) 4
Happy-Go-Lucky (2008) 3
Abigail's Party (BBC Play for Today, 01/11/1977) 3
Vera Drake (2004) 2
All or Nothing (2002) 2
Grown-Ups (1980) 2
Meantime (1983) 1
High Hopes (1988) 1
The Short and Curlies (1987) - short 1
Career Girls (1997) 0
Who's Who (1978) 0
Kiss of Death (1977) 0


Anatomy of a Morbius (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 7 August 2009 00:11 (ten years ago) link

Still haven't gotten around to Happy Go-Lucky, but out of the eight I've seen it has to be Naked. Only one I'd go out of my way to see again.

EZ Snappin, Friday, 7 August 2009 00:22 (ten years ago) link

That's the first one I saw, and it's a bit taxing.

Anatomy of a Morbius (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 7 August 2009 00:23 (ten years ago) link

It's definitely taxing, but Thewlis' performance...

Just thinking about it gives me uncomfortable shivers.

EZ Snappin, Friday, 7 August 2009 00:32 (ten years ago) link

I love that movie. It sticks out a bit among Leigh's films I think. Its concerns are... harder to pin down, more esoteric, loftier, something like that.

suggest banh mi (fields of salmon), Friday, 7 August 2009 01:09 (ten years ago) link

Naked may be my favorite movie that I would never ever claim as my favorite movie. Because what is one to make of that information?

Black bread and Victory gin AGAIN? (kenan), Friday, 7 August 2009 01:13 (ten years ago) link

It's brilliant, though.

Thewlis' performance...

Somewhere up there with Brando in Streetcar, it's that good. No, I'm serious!

Black bread and Victory gin AGAIN? (kenan), Friday, 7 August 2009 01:16 (ten years ago) link

leigh is a miserable old bastard, no doubt but i would have to say Naked is amazing. Happy Go Lucky is really worth a watch too, almost 'feelgood' dare i say it. he's gotten some incredible performances from some actors/actresses.....jane horrocks in 'life is sweet'.

Michael B, Friday, 7 August 2009 01:22 (ten years ago) link

Have to say Secrets & Lies, though I'm not quite sure why.

It doesn't seem to be available on DVD, wonder why.

Dr. Johnson (askance johnson), Friday, 7 August 2009 02:01 (ten years ago) link

Naked

M.V., Friday, 7 August 2009 02:01 (ten years ago) link

It doesn't seem to be available on DVD, wonder why.

I just watched it tonight.

Anatomy of a Morbius (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 7 August 2009 02:02 (ten years ago) link

i've seen the run from high hopes through topsy-turvy, i think naked had the biggest impact on me, but all of them are worthwhile except for career girls

velko, Friday, 7 August 2009 02:46 (ten years ago) link

Seen Meantime and then High Hopes on. Lots of good stuff here, but I think I'd need to re-watch some of these to confirm any sort of order (Life is Sweet I've not seen since it came for example--but I recall really liking it then.) Instinct says it's probably between Topsy-Turvy and Naked (which really couldn't be more different, could they?)

Alex in SF, Friday, 7 August 2009 02:51 (ten years ago) link

Secrets & Lies without question.

jed_, Friday, 7 August 2009 02:51 (ten years ago) link

I can't think of a performance in recent memory that could so easily have been as awful as Brenda Blethyn's in Secrets & Lies.

Anatomy of a Morbius (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 7 August 2009 13:40 (ten years ago) link

I think the same could be said of Thewlis' role in Naked.

EZ Snappin, Friday, 7 August 2009 13:45 (ten years ago) link

Leigh has lots of a good stuff (and a very consistent basic level of quality)
it's between Naked and the crazy-funny Life is Sweet for me. gonna vote for the latter, Naked will win anyway :)
High Hopes is one of his most depressing. Secrets & Lies has a couple of amazing magical moments.

Ludo, Friday, 7 August 2009 13:50 (ten years ago) link

"I can't think of a performance in recent memory that could so easily have been as awful as Brenda Blethyn's in Secrets & Lies."

Awfully realistic. I've met that woman.

Alex in SF, Friday, 7 August 2009 14:00 (ten years ago) link

One more reason to hate the iMdB! It made my favorite of his TV films, the hysterically funny Home Sweet Home, invisible to Alfred... because it's an "episode" (95 mins.) of an anthology series!

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0084082/

Anyway, Naked of course. Followed by HSH and Topsy-Turvy.

Indiana Morbs and the Curse of the Ivy League Chorister (Dr Morbius), Friday, 7 August 2009 14:07 (ten years ago) link

I got it from Wikipedia!

Naked was made for you, Morbs. What's HSH?

Anatomy of a Morbius (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 7 August 2009 14:12 (ten years ago) link

Voted Meantime, just ahead of Nuts in May. Much underated - in a perfect world it'd be quoted as much as Withnail & I ('have we got ants?', 'and one for Ron - later 'on' etc etc).

And, proof that for all his faults Leigh has an eye for the coming actor - Gary Oldman, Phil Daniels and Tim Roth all in their first big roles...

Oz, Friday, 7 August 2009 14:15 (ten years ago) link

HSH = Home Sweet Home. Tim Spall plays a stupendously dense mailman. obv Wiki took it from iMdb.

Indiana Morbs and the Curse of the Ivy League Chorister (Dr Morbius), Friday, 7 August 2009 14:17 (ten years ago) link

yes, Johnny wd've been SB'd.

Indiana Morbs and the Curse of the Ivy League Chorister (Dr Morbius), Friday, 7 August 2009 14:18 (ten years ago) link

xxp uh pretty sure Phil Daniels had big roles prior to 1983 or 1981 (whichever Meantime actually came out in.)

Alex in SF, Friday, 7 August 2009 14:26 (ten years ago) link

I'm voting for the excruciating Grown-Ups though the first two are iconic bits of British TV. Blethyn is awful (almost but not quite)beyond belief in this (compliment).

Michael Jones, Friday, 7 August 2009 14:27 (ten years ago) link

Oh, and you're missing Bleak Moments too - his first feature from 1971 and with much richer photography than his later BBC productions. Apt title, mind. Filmed round where I live in SE London.

Michael Jones, Friday, 7 August 2009 14:30 (ten years ago) link

yes, Wiki sucks.

Indiana Morbs and the Curse of the Ivy League Chorister (Dr Morbius), Friday, 7 August 2009 14:32 (ten years ago) link

Happy-Go-Lucky was one of the most daring, moving films I've seen in ages, and it has an incredible lead performance by Sally Hawkins, so I gotta got for that. I'm probably exactly the kind of viewer it was targeted for, though, because the whole movie is a big anti-cynicist manifesto, and I'm a big anti-cynic.

Tuomas, Friday, 7 August 2009 14:51 (ten years ago) link

I voted Nuts in May because it's funny as fuck and I never get tired of doing Candice Marie impressions and because it's the single best thing Leigh ever did so BOOM.

AND I KNOW THE NEIGHBORS HATE ME NOW (Noodle Vague), Friday, 7 August 2009 14:55 (ten years ago) link

I do love

Number None, Friday, 7 August 2009 15:01 (ten years ago) link

Oops. I do love Naked and it's probably his "best" film but Topsy-Turvy is just so much fun, so i voted for that.

Number None, Friday, 7 August 2009 15:02 (ten years ago) link

You've also missed Hard Labour, another early 70s piece of Play for Today grimness. It was shown on BBC4 recently as past of a Liz Smith night.

bham, Friday, 7 August 2009 15:17 (ten years ago) link

Happy-Go-Lucky was one of the most daring, moving films I've seen in ages, and it has an incredible lead performance by Sally Hawkins, so I gotta got for that. I'm probably exactly the kind of viewer it was targeted for, though, because the whole movie is a big anti-cynicist manifesto, and I'm a big anti-cynic.

I wonder about this...There is a reading of this film that Sally Hawkins's 'happy go luckyness' is just as manic in its own way as David Thewlis in Naked. So in a sense it's a mirror image of Naked - the flip manic side to Naked's depressive side.

I am cynical about its alleged anti-cynicism manifesto - and don't think you should necessarily take what Mike Leigh says at face value. But then I'm a big cynic.

On another Mike Leigh thread, I'm still waiting for more views on this film - not enough people commented on it.

Bob Six, Friday, 7 August 2009 17:54 (ten years ago) link

I posted a few herehere.

Anatomy of a Morbius (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 7 August 2009 17:57 (ten years ago) link

i vote for nuts in may! finally just saw it last month and i loved it. omg, the scene where they make that poor guy sing along to their song...words fail me.

scott seward, Friday, 7 August 2009 17:57 (ten years ago) link

Just thought of two more that are missing: Four Days In July (set in the Falls Road area of Belfast) and The Permissive Society. Neither of which were likely to garner any votes anyway.

Michael Jones, Friday, 7 August 2009 18:06 (ten years ago) link

re-poll

Indiana Morbs and the Curse of the Ivy League Chorister (Dr Morbius), Friday, 7 August 2009 18:10 (ten years ago) link

http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a82/bobbysixer/cheerupmate.jpg

Bob Six, Friday, 7 August 2009 18:15 (ten years ago) link

Automatic thread bump. This poll is closing tomorrow.

System, Tuesday, 18 August 2009 23:01 (ten years ago) link

Super hard to choose. Voted Life Is Sweet for partly sentimental reasons (it was my first Mike Leigh).

Also, RIP Katrin Cartlidge ;_;

discovery witch has "provide you are reciptives" (Jon Lewis), Tuesday, 18 August 2009 23:09 (ten years ago) link

Lots of good choices here, but I can think of few theatrical experiences equal to the first time I saw "Topsy-Turvy." Utterly enthralled.

Josh in Chicago, Tuesday, 18 August 2009 23:28 (ten years ago) link

little-known fact: I own a Career Girls t shirt

Indiana Morbs and the Curse of the Ivy League Chorister (Dr Morbius), Wednesday, 19 August 2009 00:42 (ten years ago) link

Soft spot for Abigail's Party. Would love to see it again... is there a quality difference between the us or uk dvd?

Haven't seen the last two yet for some reason.

Jeff LeVine, Wednesday, 19 August 2009 05:52 (ten years ago) link

"Life is Sweet" is the King of Mike Leigh movies. Next I would go for "Naked" and then for "Career Girls" as a distant third.
The only one that doesn't really fit into his works for me is Topsy-Turvy. It's sort of like his "Gosford Park," for me--the exception that proves the work.

Virginia Plain, Wednesday, 19 August 2009 18:41 (ten years ago) link

Abigail's Party

everyone, just say what you think

Milton Parker, Wednesday, 19 August 2009 19:10 (ten years ago) link

Life is Sweet was the first Mike Leigh movie I saw, and I have more affection for it than his other movies even though some of them are technically "better" for one reason or another.

kill puppies when the kicking stops (Nicole), Wednesday, 19 August 2009 19:43 (ten years ago) link

Don't know much Leigh but for me, 'Topsy Turvy' just beats out 'Naked', as fond as I am of that film.

repeating cycles of smoking and cruelty (Michael White), Wednesday, 19 August 2009 19:53 (ten years ago) link

Err... Nut in May I guess. Don't like this guy's output tbh. Naked is such a stupid, stupid film.

DavidM, Wednesday, 19 August 2009 19:58 (ten years ago) link

Automatic thread bump. This poll's results are now in.

System, Wednesday, 19 August 2009 23:01 (ten years ago) link

yay bitter nihilist antihero!

Indiana Morbs and the Curse of the Ivy League Chorister (Dr Morbius), Wednesday, 19 August 2009 23:18 (ten years ago) link

It makes you years for that kind of invention or for what Bill Douglas brought to the Tolpuddle Martyrs story in Comrades.

brokenshire (jed_), Saturday, 3 November 2018 14:58 (eleven months ago) link

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_I91gVdG2_Q

this is how you do it

the Warnock of Clodhop Mountain (Noodle Vague), Saturday, 3 November 2018 15:48 (eleven months ago) link

I’ve never even heard of that, thanks.

brokenshire (jed_), Saturday, 3 November 2018 17:00 (eleven months ago) link

I’m also thoroughly sick of seeing that Vincent Franklin guy in everything.

brokenshire (jed_), Saturday, 3 November 2018 17:03 (eleven months ago) link

Interesting Quietus article, and always keen to see thoughts on 'Another Year' . Find this a bit much to take however:

Gerri has professional satisfaction and has made a peace with her age; Mary is clinging to a kind of femininity and sexuality that isn’t really a possibility anymore, something that’s maybe already left.

Luna Schlosser, Saturday, 3 November 2018 22:11 (eleven months ago) link

Pedantry perhaps, but I feel like Another Year was definitely a 'hit' for Leigh

Number None, Saturday, 3 November 2018 22:45 (eleven months ago) link

Yes, I really liked it as a film..I was very sympathetic to Mary and found Tom and Gerri a bit cold and self-satisfied.

Luna Schlosser, Saturday, 3 November 2018 23:13 (eleven months ago) link

for some reason I was thinking it was Loach who was making the Peterloo movie, which definitely would have contained lots of dubious expositional dialogue as well

Fwiw, I'd like to see a Loach take on this. His Spanish civil war film includes lots of exposition but is still very good and moving. I do think it owes a lot to Watkins though, in a very respectful way.

brokenshire (jed_), Sunday, 4 November 2018 00:25 (eleven months ago) link

Something about the hand held camera in the debating scenes in Land and Freedom makes it feel very vital.

brokenshire (jed_), Sunday, 4 November 2018 00:26 (eleven months ago) link

Also, Loach has a way of depicting the people in power as evil because they just are evil. Leigh's only way of depicting that is to make them catoonishly ridiculous. Although we love in a world where Jacob RM is taken seriously so you could say it's understandable.

brokenshire (jed_), Sunday, 4 November 2018 00:31 (eleven months ago) link

Live*

brokenshire (jed_), Sunday, 4 November 2018 00:32 (eleven months ago) link

that too though, sometimes

illegal economic migration (Tracer Hand), Monday, 5 November 2018 10:19 (eleven months ago) link

I sometimes think that the debating scenes in land and Freedom are some of the best stuff Loach has ever done. And that that whole sequence, the exciting and tragic liberation of the village, followed by the dull and frustrating debate, is one of the best depictions of politics in film.

Frederik B, Monday, 5 November 2018 10:56 (eleven months ago) link

what does everyone think of Topsy-Turvy? thinking of checking that one out this week...

flappy bird, Monday, 5 November 2018 17:18 (eleven months ago) link

I think it's my favorite of all of his films

Dan S, Monday, 5 November 2018 17:22 (eleven months ago) link

it's top five

I like queer. You like queer, senator? (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Monday, 5 November 2018 18:11 (eleven months ago) link

splendid!

my favorite is Life is Sweet... if only for that final scene between Nikola and her mom

flappy bird, Monday, 5 November 2018 18:54 (eleven months ago) link

Career Girls is still one of his best imo. It's the energy of Katrin Cartlidge, that believable dynamic with the timid Lynda Steadman character. It's just so endearing and appealingly modest, and probably best of all, the pathos isn't overplayed with Ricky, nor the eccentricity of the main characters. Ricky's still a wretched sod and could probably do with a more sympathetic, rounded characterisation than just being some hapless, handicapped foil, but he's someone you can imagine existing in their world, that people of their age might view as entertainment or be casually callous towards, or just misunderstand without it necessarily being an indictment on their character, because he's just kind of there and they're all awkward misfits. Leigh doesn't make him particularly likeable either, instead of patronising and treating Hannah and Annie didactically. The thing with Leigh too is that for all his on the nose caricatures and clumsy melodrama, and Jed massively otm upthread, when he gets it right he leaves the right sort of ambiguity with characterisation, such as with Sally Hawkins in Happy Go Lucky, and Mary, Gerri and Tom in Another Year. It's hard to know exactly where he stands in Another Year, but it's strongly hinted that Gerri and Tom and their son are quite smug and casually haughty, but just as easily Mary can be seen as pathetic, envious and resentful. Maybe Leigh doesn't see it that way, perhaps he's thinking simply that Mary is a misunderstood, downtrodden, mistreated friend whom sees the light at the end, but I doubt that.

vanjie wail (qiqing), Monday, 5 November 2018 20:40 (eleven months ago) link

yeah career girls is one that didn't impress me much upon release but when i watched it again a couple of years ago i was surprised how much i liked it.

visiting, Monday, 5 November 2018 20:49 (eleven months ago) link

I really like the Career Girls score too, which I've just discovered is by Marianne Jean-Baptiste

vanjie wail (qiqing), Monday, 5 November 2018 20:57 (eleven months ago) link

Topsy-Turvy is perfection. I can watch it again and again

Number None, Monday, 5 November 2018 22:03 (eleven months ago) link

I am not that keen on his historical ones, even Topsy-Turvy I don't really get, but Career Girls is probably the film of his that I've rewatched more than any other, it really captures a time and a place so well, and Katrin Cartlidge is just brilliant, never got why it was considered minor.

mfktz (Camaraderie at Arms Length), Monday, 5 November 2018 22:16 (eleven months ago) link

I didn't consider it minor so much as wretched when I saw it 20 years ago. I think I hated it because Katrin Cartlidge seemed a cartoon character. But I'm now super-interested to see it again given what you say and how I think about my 25-year/old self.

Alba, Tuesday, 6 November 2018 04:15 (eleven months ago) link

Wow, Winstanley is by one of the It Happened Here guys. Thanks!

Mince Pramthwart (James Morrison), Tuesday, 6 November 2018 05:29 (eleven months ago) link

From that Quietus article:

Arguably the most memorable of Leigh’s female collaborators, Alison Steadman, would meet Leigh during work on Grown Ups – beginning not only a marriage but a creative partnership that would spawn, amongst others, Abigail’s Party and Life is Sweet.

Am I missing something here, or is that a clunking mistake?

fetter, Tuesday, 6 November 2018 09:51 (eleven months ago) link

Yes, I think it must mean Hard Labour rather than Grown Ups.

Alba, Tuesday, 6 November 2018 10:17 (eleven months ago) link

I didn't consider it minor so much as wretched when I saw it 20 years ago. I think I hated it because Katrin Cartlidge seemed a cartoon character. But I'm now super-interested to see it again given what you say and how I think about my 25-year/old self.

― Alba, Tuesday, November 6, 2018 4:15 AM (six hours ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

I remember the criticism of the time being that he'd workshopped the characters until they had ridiculous amounts of ticks and quirks, but I knew people who behaved just like that in real life.

mfktz (Camaraderie at Arms Length), Tuesday, 6 November 2018 10:29 (eleven months ago) link

Wow, Winstanley is by one of the It Happened Here guys

by both of them. i only wish the Youtube was in slightly better quality.

clynical repression (Noodle Vague), Tuesday, 6 November 2018 10:37 (eleven months ago) link

There's a BFI Blu-Ray of it too (haven't seen it myself, but I imagine the picture quality is superior to the YouTube print)

Ward Fowler, Tuesday, 6 November 2018 10:59 (eleven months ago) link

yeah the BluRay's been on my wishlist for ages

clynical repression (Noodle Vague), Tuesday, 6 November 2018 11:00 (eleven months ago) link

Fopp currently have a BFI sale on the go - Blus at six quid a pop - but annoyingly Winstanley isn't part of the promotion

Ward Fowler, Tuesday, 6 November 2018 11:02 (eleven months ago) link

three months pass...

little-known fact: I own a Career Girls t shirt

― Indiana Morbs and the Curse of the Ivy League Chorister (Dr Morbius)

Still got it?

flappy bird, Tuesday, 19 February 2019 06:48 (eight months ago) link

I was enthralled by Brenda Blethyn in Secrets & Lie, but no one else is at her level in this movie. Timothy Spall especially, who has a few very clunky "big," basically greek chorus lines - he even says "Secrets and lies!" at the end.

flappy bird, Tuesday, 19 February 2019 06:56 (eight months ago) link

Another thing: after watching Secrets & Lies, I spent a while looking at clips of Naked on youtube. Lesley Sharp is extraordinary in that film, imo the best performance in a Leigh film besides Jane Horrocks in Life is Sweet. what else is Sharp in that's worth seeing? (I've seen Vera Drake)

flappy bird, Tuesday, 19 February 2019 21:26 (eight months ago) link

Marianne Jean-Baptiste is marvelous opposite Blethyn.

a Stalin Stale Ale for me, please (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Tuesday, 19 February 2019 21:31 (eight months ago) link

She is. extraordinary composure without ever seeming overly stoic or aloof. Blethyn is amazing in S&L - that 7 minute shot of them in the diner is a tour de force - but like I said I think it really goes off the rails in the last act. against Timothy Spall basically spelling out the movie, Blethyn all of a sudden seems histrionic. still, as Josh said itt nearly a decade ago, I've met that woman.

flappy bird, Tuesday, 19 February 2019 21:37 (eight months ago) link

Lesley Sharp is bob's wife in Rita, Sue and Bob too!

Acting Crazy (Instrumental) (jed_), Tuesday, 19 February 2019 21:49 (eight months ago) link

doesnt fit me anymore but it's probly somewhere

a Mets fan who gave up on everything in the mid '80s (Dr Morbius), Tuesday, 19 February 2019 22:48 (eight months ago) link

Rewatched Naked just the other day. Then randomly saw Wonder Woman (2017) and stupidly amused myself thinking of it as a sequel of sorts.

*there's (Noel Emits), Wednesday, 20 February 2019 10:53 (eight months ago) link

Or prequel, I guess.

*there's (Noel Emits), Wednesday, 20 February 2019 10:55 (eight months ago) link

one month passes...

I’ve made four period films. Vera Drake is in a slightly different department because it’s set during a time, and in a world, that I remember. And all of the other films are set around the nineteenth century, which is recent enough to sit in our received memory, if not our actual memory. If I were to make a film that was set in the ninth century, I would find it very difficult. The nature of how people would be talking and behaving would be a concoction. But while making Peterloo, Topsy-Turvy, or Mr. Turner there was a great deal to find out about, even how people talked and what language they used. Whatever film we make, whether it’s contemporary or not, the amount of research that goes on is always colossal. People research everything they can think of to make those characters three-dimensional....

All processes, creative and otherwise, involve laying foundations and doing all the donkeywork, which can be very tedious. Nothing beats the actual filmmaking or shooting and being on set. And the postproduction, which is a glorious thing always.

First of all, that’s where you make the film. Secondly, if you’ve been rehearsing for six months, then shooting for four months and getting up at four o’clock in the morning, it’s like a rest cure! It’s very exciting, and I go backward and forward between the editor and composer, and then we start. People say to me, “You must love the rehearsals best.” I don’t. I hate the rehearsals because it’s donkeywork and you haven’t got anything to show at the end of the day. You’re just preparing and preparing and sometimes it can be quite grueling. On all of my films, and Peterloo is no exception, all the preparation work has happened, but I can only construct each scene in the location. I can’t write it without seeing it. So we do that by improvising and then pinning it down and distilling it and then finally writing it through rehearsal. And the whole business of shooting and working with the cinematographer and all the rest—that’s marvelous. It’s a privilege.

https://www.criterion.com/current/posts/6275-a-sit-down-with-mike-leigh

a Mets fan who gave up on everything in the mid '80s (Dr Morbius), Wednesday, 3 April 2019 16:34 (six months ago) link

Pinkerton diggin' Peterloo (opens in US today)

The characterizations throughout have more than a touch of Hogarth-like caricature to them, but Leigh reserves true grotesquerie for the ruling classes, whom he’s never made a secret of his feelings about—I direct you to his 1992 short A Sense of History, in which the fictional 23rd Earl of Leete (Jim Broadment) gives a guided tour of his splendid estate, gradually leaking details of his murder of his entire family along the way. Here, too, the gentry are found with blood on their hands. Significantly, it’s only when the film arrives at the fateful sixteenth of August that the speechifying stops, that words fail—Joseph’s family are unable to make out Hunt’s speech from the hustings; a magistrate’s reading of the riot act from a window over the square is lost to the wind; and when Yeomanry and cavalry advance suddenly with sabers drawn, actions speak louder. The carnage that follows is genuinely awful, as overwhelming in its way as the Battle of Shrewsbury is in Orson Welles’s Chimes at Midnight (1965)—a comparison not to be wielded lightly. Leigh isn’t shooting for you-are-there-“immersivity,” but rather for a clarified confusion; he doesn’t seek to do dubious honor to the dead by trying to approximate the firsthand experience of their final moments, only to show how these things might very well have happened, in all the panic and clumsiness. (Among other things, Leigh captures the very indignity, the awkwardness, of finding one’s self killed.) After a film so heavy with conference and conversation, the eruption of violence is as shocking as that abrupt cut to the pounding of the looms in the mill—a reign of savagery after so much talk, talk, talk attesting to high-minded civilization. And when the smoke has cleared, it remains only to coin still another word: “Peterloo.”

https://www.artforum.com/film/nick-pinkerton-on-mike-leigh-s-peterloo-2019-79196

a Mets fan who gave up on everything in the mid '80s (Dr Morbius), Friday, 5 April 2019 16:18 (six months ago) link

three months pass...

so anyone seen it?

TikTok to the (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Thursday, 11 July 2019 11:59 (three months ago) link

it's terrible. ludicrous.

Funky Isolations (jed_), Thursday, 11 July 2019 15:52 (three months ago) link

well

TikTok to the (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Thursday, 11 July 2019 16:36 (three months ago) link

Missed it when it played here for a week

flappy bird, Thursday, 11 July 2019 17:02 (three months ago) link

Should've made the effort but "a lesser Topsy-Turvy" was all I heard

flappy bird, Thursday, 11 July 2019 17:02 (three months ago) link

I loved it, y'all should watch it. I cried at the end.

TikTok to the (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 12 July 2019 12:35 (three months ago) link

Now on Amazon Prime (in the UK at least). I think it's fair to say that Jed's is the majority opinion.

Ward Fowler, Friday, 12 July 2019 12:37 (three months ago) link

Yeah, I saw the comments.

TikTok to the (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 12 July 2019 12:40 (three months ago) link


You must be logged in to post. Please either login here, or if you are not registered, you may register here.