HEY JEWS

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Pesach is upon us. Who up in this bitch is keeping Kosher for Passover?

quincie, Monday, 6 April 2009 14:38 (eleven years ago) link

Nope. My excuse is that my wife wouldn't tolerate it, but really it's me, not her.

otm in new york (G00blar), Monday, 6 April 2009 14:40 (eleven years ago) link

Yep. With family for Passover and they're huge kosher-keepers, so we're also kosher-keepers by default.

Mordy, Monday, 6 April 2009 14:42 (eleven years ago) link

I'm all for eating some matzah, but no way I'm koshering my kitchen.

Also: not actually Jewish, so technically not obligated to do shit.

quincie, Monday, 6 April 2009 14:42 (eleven years ago) link

i'm invited to a house for passover where they'll be drinking and smoking lots of trees

Surmounter, Monday, 6 April 2009 14:47 (eleven years ago) link

Haha, ditto. Possibly the same one.

What does koshering actually involve, anyway? I'm vaguely aware of boiling water and possibly some earth or dirt or something? I know you can kosher stainless steel sinks and dishwashers etc but not ceramic or enamel ones. It must be enough of a pain that people cover their counters for Passover rather than deal with it.

strut around with a candle looking for leavened shit

s1ocki, Monday, 6 April 2009 14:56 (eleven years ago) link

Okay so I read this thread title to the tone/pace of the sample starting Front 242's 'Welcome to Paradise.'

Ned Raggett, Monday, 6 April 2009 14:58 (eleven years ago) link

xxp

My parents fill their sinks with boiling water, then drop a burning hot brick into the water in the sink until it overflows on the counter. I think that's how they kasher their sinks. I know one guy who uses a blowtorch.

Mordy, Monday, 6 April 2009 15:06 (eleven years ago) link

whoa

s1ocki, Monday, 6 April 2009 15:06 (eleven years ago) link

Oh yeah. You can't really blow-torch the Corian, can you. I guess I assumed you'd have to get a rabbi in for the ritual re-purification. Is that actually a DIY project? Cool!

We got offered a couple of really cheap apartments in a Lubavitch nabe, until they found out my roomie has a dog. But I specified that we wouldn't be a religious household, or keep kosher, and they were like, whatever, we can take care of that. So...really? The oven, too?

Self-cleaning oven.

Mordy, Monday, 6 April 2009 15:12 (eleven years ago) link

And yeah, this stuff can all be done DIY style. As long as you know the laws, there's nothing you need a Rabbi for.

Mordy, Monday, 6 April 2009 15:13 (eleven years ago) link

Awesome. I do love the endless ingenuity, practical AND theological.

I'm celebrating Passover by saying something about it on the internet.

Zero Transfats Waller (Oilyrags), Monday, 6 April 2009 15:41 (eleven years ago) link

we have some matzah in the house and will probably be going to a seder. I don't bother with the kosherness, I ain't wandering in any stupid desert.

This Board is a Prison on Planet Bullshit (Shakey Mo Collier), Monday, 6 April 2009 15:52 (eleven years ago) link

i really like passover, am i crazy?

cutty, Monday, 6 April 2009 16:04 (eleven years ago) link

no its usually my fave

s1ocki, Monday, 6 April 2009 16:11 (eleven years ago) link

i bought kosher for passover coke yesterday. it's delicious.

right thread, Ned (mizzell), Monday, 6 April 2009 16:14 (eleven years ago) link

ooh nice

s1ocki, Monday, 6 April 2009 16:16 (eleven years ago) link

it's like thanksgiving, in april, without bread

cutty, Monday, 6 April 2009 16:18 (eleven years ago) link

OH SHIT PASSOVER COKE. Need.

I am going to a seder (my first), but because the hostess can't do it on the usual night(s), we're doing it on the 18th. Pseudo-seder. But I'm still psyched. Might try to sort of keep kosher-ish just to see what it's like.

Ooooh and I'm in charge of making charoset for the pseudo-seder, so recipes pls!

quincie, Monday, 6 April 2009 16:24 (eleven years ago) link

lol i read that coke thing really wrong.
xposts

tehresa, Monday, 6 April 2009 16:25 (eleven years ago) link

Also: how much hebrew vs. english at your seder?

quincie, Monday, 6 April 2009 16:25 (eleven years ago) link

I never understood why anything other than unleavened bread is necessary though? I mean no bread as a symbol/reminder of events passed makes sense, keeping kosher out of respect for the period I can see, but, like not being allowed to eat corn? What's up with that?

mehlt, Monday, 6 April 2009 16:32 (eleven years ago) link

um are you unfamiliar with the passover story or what

This Board is a Prison on Planet Bullshit (Shakey Mo Collier), Monday, 6 April 2009 16:33 (eleven years ago) link

oh snap

s1ocki, Monday, 6 April 2009 16:35 (eleven years ago) link

During Passover, Jews refrain from eating chometz: anything that contains barley, wheat, rye, oats, and spelt, and is not cooked within 18 minutes after coming in contact with water. No leavening is allowed. This signifies the fact that the Hebrews had no time to let their bread rise as they made a hurried escape from Egypt.
Jews of different backgrounds do not observe all of the same rules. Ashkenazi Jews, who come from Europe (most Jews in America), also avoid corn, rice, peanuts, and legumes as they are also used to make bread and may have other grains mixed in. These items are known as kitniyot.

mizzell, Monday, 6 April 2009 16:35 (eleven years ago) link

I thought it was anything that swells in contact with water? Or something like that. No corn syrup, in any case, which gives us delicious REAL SUGAR COKE.

The Torah instructs a Jew not to eat (or even possess) chometz all seven days of Passover (Exodus 13:3). "Chometz" is defined as any of the five grains (wheat, spelt, barley, oats, and rye) that came into contact with water for more than 18 minutes. This is a serious Torah prohibition, and for that reason we take extra protective measures on Passover to prevent any mistakes.

Which brings us to another category of food called "kitniyot" (sometimes referred to generically as "legumes"). This includes rice, corn, soy beans, string beans, peas, lentils, peanuts, mustard, sesame seeds and poppy seeds. Even though kitniyot cannot technically become chometz, Ashkenazi Jews do not eat them on Passover. Why?

The Smak (Rabbi Moshe of Kouchi, 13th century, France) explains that products of kitniyot appear like chometz products. For example, it can be hard to distinguish between rice flour (kitniyot) and wheat flour (chometz). Therefore, to prevent confusion, all kitniyot was prohibited.

mizzell, Monday, 6 April 2009 16:40 (eleven years ago) link

I'm throwing myself in with the Sephardic camp this year.

quincie, Monday, 6 April 2009 16:42 (eleven years ago) link

Take a Hot Dog
and make it Kosher

the drummer from the hilarious 1990's Britpop act Gay Dad (wanko ergo sum), Monday, 6 April 2009 16:45 (eleven years ago) link

Oh makes more sense, and yes, I know the story, but I'm wondering why go so much further than just bread, I mean, Matzah is just unleavened bread, still has wheat in it and all, it's not like they didn't have enough time to cook pasta when escaping Egypt.

mehlt, Monday, 6 April 2009 16:46 (eleven years ago) link

Keep hearing the spoken intro to "One Step Beyond" when I see this thread title.

•--• --- --- •--• (Pleasant Plains), Monday, 6 April 2009 16:47 (eleven years ago) link

Which is to say, eating corn is a long ways away from letting bread rise.

mehlt, Monday, 6 April 2009 16:48 (eleven years ago) link

Keep hearing the spoken intro to "One Step Beyond" when I see this thread title.

Don't eat that - EAT THIS

This Board is a Prison on Planet Bullshit (Shakey Mo Collier), Monday, 6 April 2009 16:51 (eleven years ago) link

passover is a great holiday.
G R E A T

BUT, the Haggadahs have not arrived in the mail from my grandfather yet and I'm also getting a bit nervous about seating... also, anyone have a good veggie matzoh ball soup recipe? vegetarians certainly won't eat teh brisket.

ian, Monday, 6 April 2009 16:55 (eleven years ago) link

good god how do vegetarians ever survive during Passover without the grains?

quincie, Monday, 6 April 2009 16:58 (eleven years ago) link

apparently quinoa is ok.

mizzell, Monday, 6 April 2009 16:59 (eleven years ago) link

good to qui-know-a

rip dom passantino 3/5/09 never forget (max), Monday, 6 April 2009 17:00 (eleven years ago) link

Seven days of quinoa and matzah sounds . . . constipating.

quincie, Monday, 6 April 2009 17:00 (eleven years ago) link

Can we turn this thread also into a list of all of the awesome things about being jewish in general?

quincie, Monday, 6 April 2009 17:01 (eleven years ago) link

1. Chosen people.
2. Latkes

ian, Monday, 6 April 2009 17:02 (eleven years ago) link

3. Talmud

ian, Monday, 6 April 2009 17:03 (eleven years ago) link

4. hot sabbath sex

This Board is a Prison on Planet Bullshit (Shakey Mo Collier), Monday, 6 April 2009 17:03 (eleven years ago) link

5. Neuroses

This Board is a Prison on Planet Bullshit (Shakey Mo Collier), Monday, 6 April 2009 17:04 (eleven years ago) link

6. control of the media/money

good god how do vegetarians ever survive during Passover without the grains?

― quincie, Monday, April 6, 2009 11:58 AM (2 minutes ago) Bookmark Suggest Ban Permalink

This may explain my increased secularism that started around the time I became vegetarian.

mehlt, Monday, 6 April 2009 17:04 (eleven years ago) link

6. Noodle kugel

quincie, Monday, 6 April 2009 17:05 (eleven years ago) link

lol at textbook pricing tho

Swilling Ambergris, Esq. (silby), Friday, 10 January 2020 00:09 (five months ago) link

true, might be able to grab a copy through the library? tho $40 for a used textbook isn't a terrible price.

Mordy, Friday, 10 January 2020 00:12 (five months ago) link

it's on the grimly tolerable end certainly.

Swilling Ambergris, Esq. (silby), Friday, 10 January 2020 00:27 (five months ago) link

one month passes...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TkQATH3O1H8

Mordy, Tuesday, 18 February 2020 19:37 (four months ago) link

p sure Jews and their cultural/media outlets aren't the source of anti-semitism but ok

New York is combatting anti-Semitism with a new ad campaign featured in Orthodox and Hasidic Jewish print and digital outlets, in addition to social media.

The New York City Commission on Human Rights launched a campaign to fight religious harassment and discrimination and to emphasize the city’s support for its Jewish population. The commission said in a release that the campaign was in response to rising anti-Semitic incidents in the city, the surrounding area and the country.

One of the new ads reads, “Jewish New Yorkers belong here. Anti-Semitism does not.”

The advertisements will be featured in Orthodox and Hasidic Jewish print outlets such as Hamodia, Jewish Press and Mishpacha, as well as online at The Jewish Week and in the NYC Human Rights Commission’s social media.

Οὖτις, Thursday, 20 February 2020 20:20 (four months ago) link

¿?

Swilling Ambergris, Esq. (silby), Thursday, 20 February 2020 20:26 (four months ago) link

Kinda like someone wants to be seen doing something more than they want to do something

Swilling Ambergris, Esq. (silby), Thursday, 20 February 2020 20:27 (four months ago) link

run those ads in the Stormfront newsletter, I hear they need the money

Pierre Delecto, Thursday, 20 February 2020 20:27 (four months ago) link

maybe the ads are more to make the jewish community feel safe and supported rather than convince antisemites to stop hating jews?

Mordy, Thursday, 20 February 2020 20:34 (four months ago) link

that was the only rationale I could come up with

idk how comforting a bunch of dumb ads are when people are getting randomly murderedq

Οὖτις, Thursday, 20 February 2020 20:36 (four months ago) link

three weeks pass...

A friend just had to cancel their daughter's bat mitzvah, which is in less than a month. Rescheduled date tbh. So ... will she have to learn an entirely new torah portion? I assume so!

Josh in Chicago, Friday, 13 March 2020 17:32 (three months ago) link

our community's largest synagogue is not holding services this shabbat for the first time ever

Mordy, Friday, 13 March 2020 17:33 (three months ago) link

we're still having small gathering stuff but I expect the kids' shul activities to shut down shortly. They were bummed about the purim megillah getting cancelled, and a shabbat thing we were gonna do next week is also not happening now.

Οὖτις, Friday, 13 March 2020 17:37 (three months ago) link

(lol not rescheduled date tbh, tbd)

We got a generic warning for those at risk to take extra precautions, but also assurances that our synagogue will absolute abide by any recommendations and will be changing things as needed, either moving them to where there is more space or cancelling them outright.

Josh in Chicago, Friday, 13 March 2020 17:43 (three months ago) link

My wife is the executive director of a synagogue. They're suspending all programs and operations as of today, including Shabbat services. We're in Western Mass. I know some places are going to be livestreaming services to an empty sanctuary.

Lavator Shemmelpennick, Friday, 13 March 2020 17:45 (three months ago) link

Services are still going on here with distancing measures & no kiddush lunch, who knows for how long. We are organizing to shop for older congregants and leave groceries outside their doors.

Guayaquil (eephus!), Friday, 13 March 2020 17:50 (three months ago) link

A lot of older parents gonna be having seder alone this year. Ours are. I just see no way of traveling to their house and staying with them that doesn't involve a real risk of us bringing them virus.

Guayaquil (eephus!), Friday, 13 March 2020 18:46 (three months ago) link

three weeks pass...

So, um, what's the plan, everybody? A friend of mine joked that we're going to see more articles about Zoom seders than actual Zoom seders. The paltry Passover supplies around here get picked over pretty quickly in the best of times, so I hope no one is hoarding the matzoh.

On a slightly different note, current events will certainly lend an awkward vibe to tales of plague, first born and inviting in strangers. Keep your distance, Elijah.

Josh in Chicago, Monday, 6 April 2020 03:39 (three months ago) link

Don’t have the heart to lead a zoom seder but I’m gonna make the dang brisket.

silby, Monday, 6 April 2020 03:41 (three months ago) link

making my first seder without my parents :/ feels sad man

Mordy, Monday, 6 April 2020 04:26 (three months ago) link

Zoom seder with mother-in-law, brisket

Guayaquil (eephus!), Monday, 6 April 2020 04:41 (three months ago) link

I was out walking the dog this week and noticed for the first time that, a few houses down from, they have a minivan with the license plate KOL TOOV.

Bougy! Bougie! Bougé! (Eliza D.), Monday, 6 April 2020 12:44 (three months ago) link

we will have our regular family seder with my mom on Zoom, most likely. I bought all the necessary supplies over the weekend.

Οὖτις, Monday, 6 April 2020 14:55 (three months ago) link

Free Passover crossword puzzle incoming:

This week's crossword is a meta by @AimeeLucido + avcx forever-friend @metabymatt.

It comes with an original drawing by New Yorker cartoonist Robert Leighton, which figures into the meta.

If your family can't be together on Passover, try solving this together remotely!

— American Values Club (@AVCXWord) April 6, 2020

change display name (Jordan), Monday, 6 April 2020 15:48 (three months ago) link

Huh, so I guess it turns out we *are* doing a Zoom seder with our temple. Let's see how that turns out, but it could be worth it for the novelty alone.

Speaking of how things turn out, my younger daughter's bat mitzvah is (still, at least for now) scheduled for September. A lot of her friends had been teasing her for being on the young end, and the last of the bunch to be a bat mitzvah, but in an ironic twist all of their April and May and June services have been rescheduled for October, November, December. So she may end up being among the first!

Josh in Chicago, Wednesday, 8 April 2020 22:21 (two months ago) link

two months pass...

lovely thought about korach that i just saw from Yeshayahu Leibowitz

"The Judaism of Moses is arduous. It means knowing that we are NOT a holy people. The Judaism of Korah is very comforting. It allows every Jew to be proud and boast that he is a member of the holy people, which is holy by its very nature. This obligates him to nothing. There is no greater opposition than between the conception of Am Segulah (a chosen people) as implying subjection to an obligation and Am Segulah as purely a privilege. He who empties the concept of the Jewish people of its religious content ... and still describes it as Am Segulah turns this concept into an expression of racist chauvinism.

The uniqueness of the Jewish people is not a fact; it is an endeavor. The holiness of Israel is not a reality but a task. "Holy" is an attribute that applies exclusively to God. It is therefore inapplicable to anything in the natural or historical domain. He who does so apply it is guilty of idolatry. He exalts something natural or human to the level of the divine."

Mordy, Tuesday, 23 June 2020 15:17 (two weeks ago) link

remarkable

all cats are beautiful (silby), Tuesday, 23 June 2020 20:26 (two weeks ago) link

Interesting. Maybe related (my theology is half-assed and rusty at best), my younger daughter has been working on her torah portion, which is right when Moses finally reaches the promised land and God more or less reiterates the key tenets of nascent Judaism while threatening those who deviate or fall off. And my daughter was a little annoyed, reading it as more or less extortion: you better do this, or else. And even though this is nothing I really think about, it did make me try to find a way to describe to her what could be going on there, namely that God is giving his followers his blessing but also a choice, but that choice requires work, and in return for doing that work God promises to be forgiving and let you try again, even if that work is not done right, or quickly, or consistently. It's less extortion and more God imparting the wise notion that putting in the effort, even failing, is better than just getting the holy imprimatur and coasting on his support. At least that's how I read it. Yes, you are chosen, but it is kind of a two way street, so don't get complacent.

Josh in Chicago, Tuesday, 23 June 2020 20:39 (two weeks ago) link

god is all about continual improvement per ISO 9000

sound of scampo talk to me (El Tomboto), Tuesday, 23 June 2020 21:44 (two weeks ago) link

It makes a lot of sense that moses judaism would be sisyphean tbf

sound of scampo talk to me (El Tomboto), Tuesday, 23 June 2020 21:45 (two weeks ago) link

My daughter was all, wait a minute, if Moses did all this stuff for God, and brought the Jews to the promised land, then ... why doesn't he get to go into the promised land? (The reason given is clearly total BS.) Or poor Abraham, who is prepared to murder his son until a last minute reprieve, ha ha, all is good, except he and Isaac never see each other again, whoops. The pious can't win for losing.

Josh in Chicago, Tuesday, 23 June 2020 21:52 (two weeks ago) link

here is my stance on God and the Jews:

all cats are beautiful (silby), Tuesday, 23 June 2020 21:58 (two weeks ago) link

you do what God tells you not for prudential reasons but because God tells you to

all cats are beautiful (silby), Tuesday, 23 June 2020 21:58 (two weeks ago) link

I usually try to read the torah with the understanding that the most extreme punishments are likely reserved for the things about wish the drafters intended to send the strongest message/the ideas that were held most sacred. Of course, this is circular to an extent, but I prefer to try to read the Torah by its own internal logic--to the extent that such logic is consistent--rather than according to my own independent moral values.

IIRC, Moses loses his privilege to enter the promised land because he not only disobeys God, but does so in a way that makes him, rather than God, appear to be the one with the power to bring forth water. By punishing Moses so severely, God sends a message that is directly related to the "crime," i.e. even Moses, the great leader, is not exempt from obedience to God.

An episode that always bothered me more was the smiting of Aaron's sons. I mean, obviously the fact that they die for not following the proper ritual practice emphasizes that said ritual practice must be really, really important, but it's hard for me to accept.

longtime caller, first time listener (man alive), Tuesday, 23 June 2020 21:59 (two weeks ago) link

or, more succinctly, xpost

longtime caller, first time listener (man alive), Tuesday, 23 June 2020 22:00 (two weeks ago) link

if it were merely prudent to observe the laws and customs of the Torah it wouldn't be holy

all cats are beautiful (silby), Tuesday, 23 June 2020 22:00 (two weeks ago) link

Which is actually just a terrifying way of teaching the real moral lesson: doing the right thing because it is right, not because it is expedient or, as you say, prudent

sound of scampo talk to me (El Tomboto), Tuesday, 23 June 2020 22:09 (two weeks ago) link

Which is why it's always been more instructive to me to read "the right thing" as beyond the most literal interpretations. Like, what is the right thing here, why is this right thing "the right thing" and how is following these instructions getting me there? Vs. "do this or else," where "the right thing" is inseparable from god's will. *Why* does god instruct such and such is "the right thing?" What is the bigger picture?

Josh in Chicago, Tuesday, 23 June 2020 22:12 (two weeks ago) link

Yeah, I think that, in a roundabout sort of way, this concept helps to lay groundwork for universal moral or ethical principles -- you follow them out of "obedience" to a moral system rather than because of what is prudent or expedient in the moment. But I don't think that is the "why" of the Torah, the why of the Torah is God, period.

longtime caller, first time listener (man alive), Tuesday, 23 June 2020 22:25 (two weeks ago) link

Leibovitz, the subject of Mordy's revive, says that the Torah is not a system of morals or ethics, that a person can and should learn those independently of the Torah.

longtime caller, first time listener (man alive), Tuesday, 23 June 2020 22:26 (two weeks ago) link

Of course, that's probably a bit of an outlier view -- some of the Torah's laws (though not all), clearly have moral and ethical content. There are laws about kindness, stealing, murder. There are laws about hospitality. There are laws about putting up a railing to prevent injuries. There are laws that may have some connection to public health. There are laws that have no discernibly independent reason other than maybe superstition (don't mix wool and linen), there are laws that seem to have come from a place of rejecting the barbaric practices of the other.

I think it's more likely that at the time(s) it was written, the idea of having entirely separate categories of morals, ethics, civil laws, criminal laws, ritual laws, etc. that might be found in entirely separate texts was not so widespread, and weaving all of these together in one book made a kind of cultural sense.

longtime caller, first time listener (man alive), Tuesday, 23 June 2020 22:30 (two weeks ago) link

None of that really answers the question "So what am I supposed to do with all this as a Jew living in 2020?"

longtime caller, first time listener (man alive), Tuesday, 23 June 2020 22:32 (two weeks ago) link

Which I think is what Josh is getting at

longtime caller, first time listener (man alive), Tuesday, 23 June 2020 22:32 (two weeks ago) link

Yeah, that's the bigger picture I was talking about. The "why" of the Torah is always "because God," but I've always found interpretation outside of strict dogma more rewarding, personally.

Josh in Chicago, Tuesday, 23 June 2020 22:32 (two weeks ago) link

I think the confusion partly comes from a sort of pre-modern, pre-literate unity of physical, material, cultural and spiritual life. That's why it feels like such a mish-mash of different things at times -- there was no compartmentalization of "this book tells you how to be good to your fellow man" "this book tells you how to prepare a sacrifice" "this book tells you how to dress" "this book tells you how to celebrate a holiday" etc. And I think that's also why the laws can sometimes be confusing to modern people. But that's all still a historic sort of reading that, again, doesn't speak to what to do with all of it in 2020.

longtime caller, first time listener (man alive), Tuesday, 23 June 2020 22:38 (two weeks ago) link

None of that really answers the question "So what am I supposed to do with all this as a Jew living in 2020?"

― longtime caller, first time listener (man alive), Tuesday, June 23, 2020 3:32 PM (one hour ago)

one of the catchphrases of the reconstructionist movement is "tradition has a voice but not a veto" and one of the things that means for me is that as Moderns there's no getting around the fact that our values come from more than one place

all cats are beautiful (silby), Tuesday, 23 June 2020 23:56 (two weeks ago) link

We've got the Deuteronomy we have and not the one we might want but as Jews who continue to study Torah and much else besides to this very day we have other resources than shrugging or rejection to take us out of the fundamentalist mindset Christian hegemony steers us into when we read it. Like, my understanding of the rabbinic treatment of the death penalty in the Torah was to patiently render it void through argument. One doesn't know if the Torah's death penalties were ever applied in any polity anywhere. One might suspect the rabbis of having started with their desired conclusion (make it impossible to render a death penalty) and finding the arguments to get them there. One might suspect similar things of (e.g.) the Conservative movement's rulings on homosexual behavior. It's not so much that we pick and choose our scriptures but that to us, they don't actually work like that, they work in a different way I can't adequately explain to myself.

all cats are beautiful (silby), Wednesday, 24 June 2020 00:18 (one week ago) link

But like rabbinic cunning also isn't the only way to make sense of Torah. We know people wrote, redacted, and compiled the Tanakh, Jews like us, and wrote down their own practices and values and stories and lo, the received text. We make sense of it that way, sometimes. Some words in the Torah scarcely make sense to scholars, readings are disputed. And then in the liturgy we chant "v'ahavta et adonai elohecha", we try to love god with all our hearts, because after all god told us to, commands it, and maybe we make sense of some Torah that way. Most Torah, most of us don't know, we can't make sense of it because the time to study is short. The sweetest thing of all for Tevye was the idea of being rich enough to study, and he didn't even have Sefaria.

Maybe one might say, adopting an academic register, making sense of Torah is productive of Judaism.

all cats are beautiful (silby), Wednesday, 24 June 2020 00:35 (one week ago) link

https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2020/06/29/in-search-of-king-davids-lost-empire

In search of David. Was he real and what did he do. Archeologists and more quoted

curmudgeon, Thursday, 25 June 2020 14:24 (one week ago) link

We've been planning a bat mitzvah for September, which is going to happen in some way shape or form with the same or more or fewer restrictions than are in place right now. Currently the guidance is max 50 people, masked, socially distanced, though I doubt we'll come close to 50. We had a virtual meeting with the rabbi today about all the moving parts. Anyway, apparently rather than souvenir yarmulkes people are starting to print up souvenir face masks!

Josh in Chicago, Monday, 29 June 2020 18:41 (one week ago) link


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