Things you were shockingly old when you learned

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I think I was like 16 or 17 when I learned that cows and bulls were the male and female versions of the same animal and not two distinct animals.

What sort of seemingly basic facts did it take you a surprisingly long time for you to learn?

filthy dylan, Wednesday, 12 November 2008 05:30 (nine years ago) Permalink

How a candle works.

Guayaquil (eephus!), Wednesday, 12 November 2008 05:31 (nine years ago) Permalink

Practically everything.

Abbott of the Trapezoid Monks (Abbott), Wednesday, 12 November 2008 06:20 (nine years ago) Permalink

that SHIFT + 6 = ^. I think I figured it out a month or so ago. I always wondered how people got that character.

ILX MOD (musically), Wednesday, 12 November 2008 06:32 (nine years ago) Permalink

DO you have a Mac?

The best things about macs is that making any character is stupid easy.

¢™
øºÖØ°

Abbott of the Trapezoid Monks (Abbott), Wednesday, 12 November 2008 06:34 (nine years ago) Permalink

&¶¶¶¶¶¶

Abbott of the Trapezoid Monks (Abbott), Wednesday, 12 November 2008 06:34 (nine years ago) Permalink

!

If Timi Yuro would be still alive, most other singers could shut up, Wednesday, 12 November 2008 07:11 (nine years ago) Permalink

That (most) BMWs are named according to engine size (I was a car freak as a child but never knew this until being informed by a German flatmate while I was a PhD student).

i.e. 318 = 3 series 1.8 litre engine etc.

krakow, Wednesday, 12 November 2008 07:54 (nine years ago) Permalink

Didn't know that black and green olives are identical, just different stage of maturity, until a few months ago.

Didn't realise that Adam Ant was a pun, until a year or so ago. Likewise Lipps Inc.

Zelda Zonk, Wednesday, 12 November 2008 07:59 (nine years ago) Permalink

I've got a mac and I still don't know how to do any of, um, ^ those ^

Ismael Klata, Wednesday, 12 November 2008 08:01 (nine years ago) Permalink

I end up going to wikipedia and copy-and-pasting when I want unusual characters

Ismael Klata, Wednesday, 12 November 2008 08:02 (nine years ago) Permalink

The cows-and-bulls thing, plus Adam Ant, are the only things on this thread that I do know

Ismael Klata, Wednesday, 12 November 2008 08:03 (nine years ago) Permalink

how to cook an artichoke properly

nelson algreen (get bent), Wednesday, 12 November 2008 08:09 (nine years ago) Permalink

(a julia child recipe steered me right)

nelson algreen (get bent), Wednesday, 12 November 2008 08:09 (nine years ago) Permalink

How to tie my shoes (velcro, you see..)

Sugar hiccup, Makes a pig soar and swoon (Pillbox), Wednesday, 12 November 2008 08:12 (nine years ago) Permalink

Didn't realise that Adam Ant was a pun, until a year or so ago.

^^^ this. Same with Sandy Shaw.

NotEnough, Wednesday, 12 November 2008 10:34 (nine years ago) Permalink

Fay Fife of the Rezillos.

Mark G, Wednesday, 12 November 2008 10:35 (nine years ago) Permalink

(i.e. it's a pun on "I am from the town of Fife, my good fellow" in broad scots)

Mark G, Wednesday, 12 November 2008 10:36 (nine years ago) Permalink

What's the Adam Ant pun? Adam Ant = adamant? If so... pretty lame pun.

Mordy, Wednesday, 12 November 2008 10:37 (nine years ago) Permalink

That's it.

Mark G, Wednesday, 12 November 2008 10:43 (nine years ago) Permalink

xpost Tell that to Lai Mpun, the lead singer of Bangkok's Phleng Chat.

I CRIED (G00blar), Wednesday, 12 November 2008 10:45 (nine years ago) Permalink

I am 33 and didn't know any of these things. Wait - how the hell DOES a candle work?!

Savannah Smiles, Wednesday, 12 November 2008 10:53 (nine years ago) Permalink

Same with Sandy Shaw.
OK I was 32 when I found out this was a pun.

I KNOW WHAT YOU'RE UP TO (Colonel Poo), Wednesday, 12 November 2008 10:54 (nine years ago) Permalink

i don't know how to explain it but i used to think chickens had a really weird way of "mating", something to do with the rooster's legs. (!!?!?) :)

Ludo, Wednesday, 12 November 2008 10:55 (nine years ago) Permalink

I thought penguins were as tall as humans until that march of the penguins movie

I CRIED (G00blar), Wednesday, 12 November 2008 10:56 (nine years ago) Permalink

"that SHIFT + 6 = ^. I think I figured it out a month or so ago. I always wondered how people got that character."

^^^Dude, you beat me by a month. Thanks!

I once spent a half hour trying to eject a cd from a Mac before someone finally told me there's an eject button on the keyboard. I was going through all these crazy menus and preferences...

Nate Carson, Wednesday, 12 November 2008 12:10 (nine years ago) Permalink

I think I was like 16 or 17 when I learned that cows and bulls were the male and female versions of the same animal and not two distinct animals.

What sort of seemingly basic facts did it take you a surprisingly long time for you to learn?

― filthy dylan, Wednesday, November 12, 2008 5:30 AM (6 hours ago) Bookmark Suggest Ban Permalink


I did not know that oxen were cattle until about a week ago.

With a little bit of gold and a Peja (bernard snowy), Wednesday, 12 November 2008 12:23 (nine years ago) Permalink

I thought penguins were as tall as humans until that march of the penguins movie

loooool one of my friends thought this and it was since passed into running joke territory.

I think I've done that Mac eject button thing too :(

Pronounced lapels like 'labels' for years until corrected but happily don't dress well enough to use it often

The Slash My Father Wrote (DJ Mencap), Wednesday, 12 November 2008 12:34 (nine years ago) Permalink

My girlfriend was shocked to learn, at the age of 33, that a 'Flea Circus' is actually a rather charming mechanical toy, and is in no way operated by any parasitic insects.

Huey in Bristol (Huey in Melbourne), Wednesday, 12 November 2008 12:56 (nine years ago) Permalink

Ismael, at the age of 32, is shocked to learn the same thing. This thread is getting embarrassing

Ismael Klata, Wednesday, 12 November 2008 12:57 (nine years ago) Permalink

WAT! http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flea_circus

Øystein, Wednesday, 12 November 2008 12:59 (nine years ago) Permalink

I thought penguins were as tall as humans until that march of the penguins movie

one of my friends thought this and it was since passed into running joke territory

no but seriously, what is this about?

negotiable, Wednesday, 12 November 2008 13:01 (nine years ago) Permalink

i mean i can see that there's rarely anything to size them against in the big white antarctic, but why would anyone then automatically think okay here's a bird i could play tag with

negotiable, Wednesday, 12 November 2008 13:03 (nine years ago) Permalink

u could still play tag w/it tho

SNAKES! (ice crӕm), Wednesday, 12 November 2008 13:04 (nine years ago) Permalink

But you could make the same assumption with ostriches in the big yellow desert (or wherever they live), and in that case you'd be right!

Ismael Klata, Wednesday, 12 November 2008 13:07 (nine years ago) Permalink

I'm still in touch with several grown adults who genuinely believe there's 'something' to supernatural claims about ouija boards, despite its fairly obvious origins in parlour games / illusions which utilised the (admittedly fucking spooky) ideomotor effect.

Huey in Bristol (Huey in Melbourne), Wednesday, 12 November 2008 13:08 (nine years ago) Permalink

aw no-one said 'where babies come from'

Cittaslow Mazza (blueski), Wednesday, 12 November 2008 13:14 (nine years ago) Permalink

I've had a lot of experiences in my adult life with mispronouncing words I understood as part of written text, but hadn't heard aurally in the context of conversation etc. For example, I was well into my twenties before I knew the word "vehement" wasn't pronounced veh-hee-ment. I wish others would politely correct you when you do that instead of letting you blindly sound like an idiot.

Sugar hiccup, Makes a pig soar and swoon (Pillbox), Wednesday, 12 November 2008 13:16 (nine years ago) Permalink

I'm a bit like that, but now I'm in the habit of saying works incorrectly, I can't get out of it. Canal is not pronounced can-el, but there's fuck all I can do about it now.

NotEnough, Wednesday, 12 November 2008 13:39 (nine years ago) Permalink

^ This happens to me all the time too - so much so that I actually now find it quite amusing when I realise, midway through a sentence, that a word I've never heard before is looming at the end. I suppose that people who talk a lot, rather than reading, must find the same with spelling. It only annoys me when some moron uses it as an opportunity to score cheap points (sadly fairly often)

Ismael Klata, Wednesday, 12 November 2008 13:40 (nine years ago) Permalink

I was going to start a thread like this, but it was going to be more about 'life lessons' that took you forever to learn, rather than trivia.

Anyway it's taken me this long to fully realize how unreliable first impressions can be when it comes to people.

invisible jet (wanko ergo sum), Wednesday, 12 November 2008 13:42 (nine years ago) Permalink

but why would anyone then automatically think okay here's a bird i could play tag with

haha

Ant Attack.. (Ste), Wednesday, 12 November 2008 13:57 (nine years ago) Permalink

TAL have an episode on this in the "best of" section on their wesite. people who thought unicorns were real, etc., lots of awkward silences at cocktail parties: good stuff.

rent, Wednesday, 12 November 2008 14:00 (nine years ago) Permalink

i like to tag birds. (runs)

Sugar hiccup, Makes a pig soar and swoon (Pillbox), Wednesday, 12 November 2008 14:01 (nine years ago) Permalink

There's a penguin here and he wants to say "you didn't touch me ner ner ner"

Mark G, Wednesday, 12 November 2008 14:12 (nine years ago) Permalink

I thought penguins went "weh weh weh"

╓abies, Wednesday, 12 November 2008 14:14 (nine years ago) Permalink

I'm still in touch with several grown adults who genuinely believe there's 'something' to supernatural claims about ouija boards, despite its fairly obvious origins in parlour games / illusions which utilised the (admittedly fucking spooky) ideomotor effect.

― Huey in Bristol (Huey in Melbourne), Wednesday, November 12, 2008 7:08 AM (1 hour ago) Bookmark Suggest Ban Permalink

you couldnt get me in the same room as a ouija board

a country packed with ponies (sunny successor), Wednesday, 12 November 2008 14:42 (nine years ago) Permalink

I was about 35 when I figured out Open Sesame = Open Says Me.

Rotgutt, Wednesday, 12 November 2008 14:44 (nine years ago) Permalink

i used to think HAZCHEM was a foreign word for danger like Achtung

Cittaslow Mazza (blueski), Wednesday, 12 November 2008 14:45 (nine years ago) Permalink

I just figured out, like 2 days ago, that the lyrics are "highway to the danger zone"

(until then, thought they were "I went to to the danger zone")

homosexual II, Wednesday, 12 November 2008 15:03 (nine years ago) Permalink

When I was a kid I would get puzzled by the use of the past participle of the unfamiliar verb “infrare”

coetzee.cx (wins), Saturday, 20 October 2018 12:29 (two days ago) Permalink

Neneh (Cherry) is pronounced Neh-neh not Nayner.

Dan Worsley, Saturday, 20 October 2018 14:04 (two days ago) Permalink

Barfly was my favorite of this particular type of misunderstanding

I would go to the video store and wonder would you call a movie Barfly? Is it about barf?

weird woman in a bar (La Lechera), Saturday, 20 October 2018 14:20 (two days ago) Permalink

it's a syllable boundary mistake more often than not

weird woman in a bar (La Lechera), Saturday, 20 October 2018 14:21 (two days ago) Permalink

I just realised that the cover of Bowie's Tonight is a nod to Gilbert & George, duh x infnity

MaresNest, Saturday, 20 October 2018 14:27 (two days ago) Permalink

I don't know if this is actually true, but it recently occurred to me that the Elton John "Empty Garden" John Lennon tribute song ("Won't you come out to play in your empty garden") is a reference to Lennon's last stage appearance with Elton at Madison Square Garden.

Hideous Lump, Saturday, 20 October 2018 16:04 (two days ago) Permalink

a couple of days ago i encountered the word "misled" and after many years of knowing otherwise my brain still automatically reads this as "miss-eld".

visiting, Saturday, 20 October 2018 16:08 (two days ago) Permalink

me too

the "never make fun of someone for mispronouncing a word because that means they learned it through reading" is a semi-new greeting card / social media thing... I don't know what to make of it... because yes, on the one hand, I grew up near a park with a gazebo, so I knew how to pronounce gazebo at a very early age. at the same time, should we really be congratulating people... on knowing how to read

flappy bird, Saturday, 20 October 2018 16:21 (two days ago) Permalink

The only thing I disagree with is the idea that the correct pronunciation of gazebo “makes no sense”, I feel like as pronunciations of words go it makes an unusual amount of sense. Just three syllables doing exactly what they should imo

coetzee.cx (wins), Saturday, 20 October 2018 16:34 (two days ago) Permalink

it could just as easily be pronounced ga-zeb-o.

visiting, Saturday, 20 October 2018 16:41 (two days ago) Permalink

That’s true

coetzee.cx (wins), Saturday, 20 October 2018 16:48 (two days ago) Permalink

years ago, someone i didn't know well was telling me about a writer i should check out, whose name i heard as "ka-moo". i had no idea who they were talking about. only afterwards did i realise they were talking about albert camus, which was embarrassing as i'd read several of his books but had never thought of his name in its correct french pronunciation.

visiting, Saturday, 20 October 2018 17:07 (two days ago) Permalink

same here with Gerter
I also thought determined was deter-minded!

kinder, Saturday, 20 October 2018 18:31 (two days ago) Permalink

lol yeah once when i worked in a bookstore a customer got annoyed with me when they asked if we had any "gerter" and i didn't get who they were talking about.

visiting, Saturday, 20 October 2018 19:08 (two days ago) Permalink

What's the excuse for people who pronounce "turmeric" like "tumour-ic" or, worse, like it rhymes with "numeric". (I heard both this week.) They clearly weren't reading closely.

The nexus of the crisis (Sund4r), Saturday, 20 October 2018 19:16 (two days ago) Permalink

Builder at a job interview asked if he could explain the difference between a joist and a girder: "Easy. Joist wrote Ulysses, and Girder wrote Faust"

the Warnock of Clodhop Mountain (Noodle Vague), Saturday, 20 October 2018 19:16 (two days ago) Permalink

although that's really more for a "disgusting savages" thread xp

The nexus of the crisis (Sund4r), Saturday, 20 October 2018 19:26 (two days ago) Permalink

Jealous, I’ve never heard the word turmeric twice in one week

coetzee.cx (wins), Saturday, 20 October 2018 19:43 (two days ago) Permalink

I've been cooking with the fresh stuff for the last few years. Turns your fingers orange when you chop it.
Good for anti-inflammatopry purposes too.

& I thought a Gerder was more gerd than normal.
Young Werther would be proud

Stevolende, Saturday, 20 October 2018 20:22 (two days ago) Permalink

I work for Hare Krsnas. Someone was cooking while I was on my dinner break and mentioned something about the spice without pronouncing the "r". I asked if that was the correct pronunciation, since I was actually questioning myself, as my Mum has been pronouncing it (correctly, it turns out) my whole life but she often mispronounces things. A 17yo dude jumped in and said with great confidence that it was pronounced like "numeric". He sounded convincing until I checked a dictionary at home.

The nexus of the crisis (Sund4r), Saturday, 20 October 2018 23:13 (two days ago) Permalink

I've definitely been saying it to rhyme with 'numeric'

I knew an otherwise intelligent guy who said 'epi-tome' but he always (mis)used the word in the most hilariously cranky sentences (at a hipster cupcake stand: "this is the epi-tome of why everyone should be killed," etc) that I never bothered to correct him

I used to pronounce Jan Garbarek's last name wrong (fwiw it's yar-BAR-ekk, not YAR-ba-rek)

Paul Ponzi, Sunday, 21 October 2018 00:46 (yesterday) Permalink

what % below intelligent is he as a result one wonders

Dmac TT (darraghmac), Sunday, 21 October 2018 00:53 (yesterday) Permalink

a film professor in university pronounced Jim Jarmusch's name "yarmusch" and he was usually right about everything else but i have never heard anyone else say it this way, ever

illegal economic migration (Tracer Hand), Sunday, 21 October 2018 08:55 (yesterday) Permalink

Yim Yarmusch

My Gig: The Thin Beast (sic), Sunday, 21 October 2018 08:59 (yesterday) Permalink

Is it pronounced Jar-mush, or Jar-moosh? Cause I heard someone pronounce it the latter way and it seemed wrong to me.

grawlix (unperson), Sunday, 21 October 2018 15:52 (yesterday) Permalink

punchuin
givjabunchafivesin

Stevolende, Sunday, 21 October 2018 16:23 (yesterday) Permalink

JIm Jar-moosh's 2 violent brothers..

his band the Del Byzanteens were quite great in places. A Girl's Imagination for one.

Stevolende, Sunday, 21 October 2018 19:04 (yesterday) Permalink

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uC7yrT1MJrw

Hadn't realised that he's actually played with John Lurie before they made films together

Stevolende, Sunday, 21 October 2018 20:13 (yesterday) Permalink

a film professor in university pronounced Jim Jarmusch's name "yarmusch" and he was usually right about everything else but i have never heard anyone else say it this way, ever

― illegal economic migration (Tracer Hand), Sunday, October 21, 2018 4:55 AM (eighteen hours ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

this is awesome, instead of sounding dumb he sounds pretentious

flappy bird, Monday, 22 October 2018 03:09 (sixteen hours ago) Permalink

I thought most surname pronunciations Americanised after a few generations anyway so a Scandinavian Y pronunciation for J spelling would cease to be. & assuming that that being the source of the name meant it still kept the same qualities is overthinking and indeed pretentious.
Yeah, like.

Stevolende, Monday, 22 October 2018 07:41 (eleven hours ago) Permalink

That’s my understanding - so you wouldn’t say “vakovski sisters”, say (if indeed that’s how you say it in polish, I don’t fucking know do I)

coetzee.cx (wins), Monday, 22 October 2018 09:40 (nine hours ago) Permalink

I think I once said 'tumeric' and my mum corrected me. Since then I've noticed that at least half of people seem to say it that way, including my wife, and I wonder what it is about the word that makes us want to drop the first r. I don't think I've ever heard anyone pronounce it to rhyme with numeric!

Alba, Monday, 22 October 2018 13:08 (six hours ago) Permalink

Idgi at all. No one says "tunip" or "tukey".

The nexus of the crisis (Sund4r), Monday, 22 October 2018 13:35 (six hours ago) Permalink

I haven't heard many of these words pronounced aloud.

Except for the director, Mr. Jair-a-moosh.

pplains, Monday, 22 October 2018 13:47 (five hours ago) Permalink

Speaking of words that are frequently mispronounced, or maybe not, why does everyone seem to pronounce (sea) anemone "an enemy" (i.e. -n-n-m- not -n-m-n-)?

After I saw it written down as a kid I made an effort to say the Ns and Ms in the right order next time and my gran asked me to repeat myself, after which she hmmed and moved on as if declining to point out my mistake, and since then I've tried not to say it out loud. Not that it comes up very often, but it'd be nice to know if I'm missing something.

(NB "everyone" here is mainly my family, so maybe it's another from my Dad's family's repertoire of in-jokes stemming from 1950s radio comedies or something - but I have heard other people say it like that too, and I'm not sure I've heard anyone except myself say it -n-m-n- out loud)

a passing spacecadet, Monday, 22 October 2018 13:51 (five hours ago) Permalink

you are right, they are wrong

i’ll hufflepuff i’ll blow you away (bizarro gazzara), Monday, 22 October 2018 14:00 (five hours ago) Permalink

Correct pronunciation of 'anemone' iirc:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1fW3_Zvd8ME

a butt, at which the shaft of ridicule is daily glanced (Old Lunch), Monday, 22 October 2018 14:09 (five hours ago) Permalink

Lol, Josh Fenderman is a national treasure

Mario Meatwagon (Moodles), Monday, 22 October 2018 14:11 (five hours ago) Permalink

I struggle with anemone myself. I put it the same childhood boat as sumbarine instead of submarine.

Alba, Monday, 22 October 2018 14:19 (five hours ago) Permalink

I wonder what it is about the word that makes us want to drop the first r

I wonder if it's something to do with the strongly pronounced 'r' sound right after the 'm'. Maybe that has the effect of de-emphasizing the first 'r' so that some dialects eventually dropped it.

jmm, Monday, 22 October 2018 14:20 (five hours ago) Permalink

I didnt imagine id get a chance to share this feel, but the new and effective shingles vaccine is named “Shingrix,” which is horrible and unpronounceable (tho not as horrible as a couple of cases of shingles i’ve seen, so...”pass me that Shingrix.”

Hunt3r, Monday, 22 October 2018 14:33 (five hours ago) Permalink

i mean i think i used to say turmeric and i think it's just because the -urm- in there makes it hard to tell in some typefaces that the R is even there.

vote no on ilxit (Will M.), Monday, 22 October 2018 15:37 (four hours ago) Permalink

dammit. i used to say TUMeric is what i meant

vote no on ilxit (Will M.), Monday, 22 October 2018 15:38 (four hours ago) Permalink

IT'S NOT A TUMERIC!!!

a butt, at which the shaft of ridicule is daily glanced (Old Lunch), Monday, 22 October 2018 15:44 (three hours ago) Permalink

if we can say amorous and terminator and hermeneutic and philip sherburne it can't be THAT tough??

illegal economic migration (Tracer Hand), Monday, 22 October 2018 15:48 (three hours ago) Permalink

yeah, but hemeneutic doesn't "look" like a word, and terminator has been heard by everyone with a TV, and wait what amorous?

vote no on ilxit (Will M.), Monday, 22 October 2018 15:54 (three hours ago) Permalink

The Todd Rundgren song that always reminds me of the Beatles' "You Won't See Me" is called "I Saw The Light." Must've heard it 100 times, never knew what it was called.

Montgomery Burns' Jazz (Tarfumes The Escape Goat), Monday, 22 October 2018 16:03 (three hours ago) Permalink

That song the Finsbury Park busker plays every day is not, in fact, a cocktail jazz song from the 1980s, but the instrumental of an apparently popular modern song called "despacito"

Chuck_Tatum, Monday, 22 October 2018 16:18 (three hours ago) Permalink

Hesitant to bring up 'suprise' at this point..

Andrew Farrell, Monday, 22 October 2018 17:07 (two hours ago) Permalink

Or Febuary

Alba, Monday, 22 October 2018 17:41 (one hour ago) Permalink


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