"We rob banks": A thread for Bonnie and Clyde (1967)

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http://artfiles.art.com/images/-/Bonnie-and-Clyde-Poster-C10129751.jpeg

Since there’s a set of shiny new DVDs due out next week, I figure it’s time for a thread. One of my favorite Texas movies, this did pretty well in the 60s poll (#8 in the revised ranking), so I guess ilx likes it a lot too.

Here’s the original trailer.

Faye Dunaway in a beret. Beatty's toothpick. Pollard parking the car. The farmer shooting out the windows of his repossessed home. Estelle Parsons running w/the spatula. Hackman and his camera. Gene Wilder making out on his porch. The brutal chill you fill during that final shot of the posse emerging from the bushes. Is this film as truly flawless as a movie can be? Discus…and whatever you do, don't sell that cow!

C. Grisso/McCain, Tuesday, 18 March 2008 15:49 (eleven years ago) Permalink

flawless, no. search Robbie Coltrane Cracker speech about its bullshit romanticism.

Dr Morbius, Tuesday, 18 March 2008 15:51 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Summary please.

C. Grisso/McCain, Tuesday, 18 March 2008 15:55 (eleven years ago) Permalink

whatever you do...don't sell that cow!

dan selzer, Tuesday, 18 March 2008 16:07 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Pollard gets a shoutout in the liner notes of an early Byrds album (either Mr. Tambourine Man or Turn! Turn! Turn!)

C. Grisso/McCain, Tuesday, 18 March 2008 16:21 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Estelle Parsons is awful.

Kael's review is a masterpiece – this is what a qualified, uncertain but enthusiastic review should look like.

Alfred, Lord Sotosyn, Tuesday, 18 March 2008 16:26 (eleven years ago) Permalink

I just finished reading Pictures at a Revolution, which made me realize I'd never seen Bonnie and Clyde (maybe edited for tv once), nor The Graduate, so they are now both at the top of my Netflix queue, along with In the Heat of the Night (which I saw for the first time a year ago).

Jaq, Tuesday, 18 March 2008 16:27 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Isn't Estelle Parson always awful? No wonder Archie Bunker hated her.

James Redd and the Blecchs, Tuesday, 18 March 2008 16:29 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Kael's review is a masterpiece – this is what a qualified, uncertain but enthusiastic review should look like.

I love that it was her first review for the New Yorker.

Rock Hardy, Tuesday, 18 March 2008 16:29 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Of course, she's no Ruth Gordon.

James Redd and the Blecchs, Tuesday, 18 March 2008 16:29 (eleven years ago) Permalink

In the Heat of the Night is fucking awful!

Shakey Mo Collier, Tuesday, 18 March 2008 16:32 (eleven years ago) Permalink

anyway this movie is fantastic

Shakey Mo Collier, Tuesday, 18 March 2008 16:33 (eleven years ago) Permalink

It's kind of interesting that prior to this film, the real Bonnie & Clyde were generally considered minor criminal legends at best. Although on the other hand, they had already inspired a couple of well-regarded noirs from the 40s (They Live By Night and Gun Crazy).

C. Grisso/McCain, Tuesday, 18 March 2008 16:42 (eleven years ago) Permalink

pauline kael more like pauline rubbish:

http://books.guardian.co.uk/review/story/0,,2265403,00.html

That one guy that hit it and quit it, Tuesday, 18 March 2008 16:44 (eleven years ago) Permalink

I hated every minute of this smug piece of shit flim.

sexyDancer, Tuesday, 18 March 2008 19:24 (eleven years ago) Permalink

anyway, the "Cracker" speech comes when he grills a teen girl about her bf killer, and he rants about B&C looking into each other's eyes before they get blown away, and how fucked-up a symbol of undying love that is.

Still "important," tho, and Beatty is funny.

Dr Morbius, Tuesday, 18 March 2008 19:27 (eleven years ago) Permalink

important like Hitler

sexyDancer, Tuesday, 18 March 2008 19:28 (eleven years ago) Permalink

from The Guardian review that one guy posted, which hardly seems written in English:

Bonnie and Clyde wasn't an immediate or obvious hit (ditto The Graduate) and met with a poor initial reception. Kael jumped on the support bandwagon later than most, with a review that smacked of self-serving; both films now seem less of a departure than prescient of a yuppie generation and new conservatism.

Alfred, Lord Sotosyn, Tuesday, 18 March 2008 19:29 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Shakey, you should read James Baldwin's review of ITHOTN in his film book.

I can't stand The Graduate, and I'm sympathetic to BAC's glamour-magazine take on the killers, but it's not a harbinger of the "new conservatism."

Alfred, Lord Sotosyn, Tuesday, 18 March 2008 19:32 (eleven years ago) Permalink

ITHOTN's plot is kinda miserable, but it's really about the interaction of Steiger and Poitier and is a qualified success on that score.

Dr Morbius, Tuesday, 18 March 2008 19:34 (eleven years ago) Permalink

...and B&C was maybe the first Hollywood film that made getting shot look kinda messy.

Dr Morbius, Tuesday, 18 March 2008 19:35 (eleven years ago) Permalink

...like sex? Faye Dunaway looks well fucked before the blood splatters in the final scene.

Alfred, Lord Sotosyn, Tuesday, 18 March 2008 19:36 (eleven years ago) Permalink

I love Dunaway, btw, but this is not one of her best performances.

Alfred, Lord Sotosyn, Tuesday, 18 March 2008 19:37 (eleven years ago) Permalink

That'd be Mrs. Pendrake in same director's Little Big Man.

James Redd and the Blecchs, Tuesday, 18 March 2008 19:38 (eleven years ago) Permalink

I wd have to RESCREEN to say more

Dr Morbius, Tuesday, 18 March 2008 19:39 (eleven years ago) Permalink

my new word is "re-see"

Alfred, Lord Sotosyn, Tuesday, 18 March 2008 19:40 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Am I the only one who basically liked Beatty in only one movie ever, Shampoo?

James Redd and the Blecchs, Tuesday, 18 March 2008 19:41 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Well, I guess I liked him in Lilith too, but that could just be the rarely-screened cachet acting up.

James Redd and the Blecchs, Tuesday, 18 March 2008 19:42 (eleven years ago) Permalink

maybe that and Bullworth for the Out vote

sexyDancer, Tuesday, 18 March 2008 19:42 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Also Bullworth- it was some kind of dramatic irony when he learned to use that phrase that is the name of an instrumental on Cosmic Slop.

(xpost)

James Redd and the Blecchs, Tuesday, 18 March 2008 19:43 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Am I the only one who basically liked Beatty in only one movie ever, Shampoo?

He's very fine in McCabe & Mrs Miller and has good bits in Reds.

Alfred, Lord Sotosyn, Tuesday, 18 March 2008 19:44 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Little Big Man! I need to see that again, I remember really liking it when I saw it as a teenager.

Beatty had a bunch of great 70s roles, come on guys

Shakey Mo Collier, Tuesday, 18 March 2008 19:44 (eleven years ago) Permalink

All right, I'll grant you McCabe.

James Redd and the Blecchs, Tuesday, 18 March 2008 20:14 (eleven years ago) Permalink

anyway, the "Cracker" speech comes when he grills a teen girl about her bf killer, and he rants about B&C looking into each other's eyes before they get blown away, and how fucked-up a symbol of undying love that is.

Ah, I see. I thought it was going to be about how the film whitewashed history or something along those lines.

On a different note, there's a funny story from either Newman or Benton about Jean-Luc Godard's involvement in the film that Colin MacCabe buried in the endnotes to his Godard bio. Apparently Godard--who was about to shoot Alphaville--was so pleased with the script that he wanted to shoot it three weeks after wrapping that production. Furthermore, he felt the script was universal enough that he wanted to change the setting to modern day Tokyo.

C. Grisso/McCain, Wednesday, 19 March 2008 00:42 (eleven years ago) Permalink

oh those wacky french guys.

don't hate this movie, and yuh it's "important", but it's not particularly good. certainly not as good as 'they live by night'.

banriquit, Wednesday, 19 March 2008 00:58 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Am I the only one who basically liked Beatty in only one movie ever, Shampoo?

Mcabe and Parallax View! "I'm a girl... Don't touch me unless you love me."

poortheatre, Wednesday, 19 March 2008 01:10 (eleven years ago) Permalink

er, mccabe. my high-school girlfriend's estranged, alcoholic father started crying when talking about McCabe one night. He was a television commercial director, hated his job, and said that all he ever wanted to be able to do was spend his life making movies like it.

poortheatre, Wednesday, 19 March 2008 01:13 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Gene Hackman is amazing in his one scene (with Beatty) near the end of Lilith, his first screen role of consequence.

While the Estelle Parsons hate would match up nicely with her winning an Oscar for B&C, sorry, I remember her being fab.

Dr Morbius, Wednesday, 19 March 2008 13:16 (eleven years ago) Permalink

hey jaq what's 'pictures at a revolution' like? dying to read that.

pisces, Wednesday, 19 March 2008 14:38 (eleven years ago) Permalink

i always found this one pretty boring, except for the gene wilder scene and the ending.

J.D., Wednesday, 19 March 2008 23:48 (eleven years ago) Permalink

when I was at the neighborhood bar this afternoon the History Channel was showing a Bonnie and Clyde documentary focusing on their guns.

sleeve, Thursday, 20 March 2008 02:02 (eleven years ago) Permalink

didn't they toy with the idea of suggesting that Clyde had sex with CW Moss (as the real one apparently did)?

Dr Morbius, Thursday, 20 March 2008 13:20 (eleven years ago) Permalink

hey jaq what's 'pictures at a revolution' like? dying to read that.

A fun, readable blend of gossip (omg, Rex Harrison! and his wife!! Mike Nichols and Elaine May duking it out live on stage!), the dying travails of the old studio system, the intricacies of distribution, and all the weird stuff that goes on w/r/t getting a movie made (like options on scripts and how the $$ gets scraped together, etc etc). Major subplots of the blatant bigotry and racism of the times (also prudishness) and the death of the Production Code.

Jaq, Thursday, 20 March 2008 13:59 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Mr. Rex and his long-suffering wife

Dr Morbius, Thursday, 20 March 2008 14:07 (eleven years ago) Permalink

She was the striking ginger-haired lady in Genevieve, no?

James Redd and the Blecchs, Thursday, 20 March 2008 14:25 (eleven years ago) Permalink

didn't they toy with the idea of suggesting that Clyde had sex with CW Moss (as the real one apparently did)?

Yeah sort of. I read somewhere that an early draft of the script had a three-way sex scene w/Bonnie, Clyde, and CW wherein both B & C were both very interested in CW. Benton and Newman scrapped that subplot in favor of making Cylde impotent, suggesting that he'd be sodomized in jail.

C. Grisso/McCain, Thursday, 20 March 2008 14:35 (eleven years ago) Permalink

She was the striking ginger-haired lady in Genevieve, no?

I don't think so; this was his 4th wife, Rachel Roberts. She was in Picnic at Hanging Rock but I don't know what else she did.

Jaq, Thursday, 20 March 2008 14:44 (eleven years ago) Permalink

omg, she's great in a buncha stuff: This Sporting Life, O Lucky Man, etc.

Dr Morbius, Thursday, 20 March 2008 14:47 (eleven years ago) Permalink

but I don't know what else she did.

Drank like a fish.

Also great in "Saturday Night and Sunday Morning" and "This Sporting Life"

Tom D., Thursday, 20 March 2008 14:47 (eleven years ago) Permalink

(xpost!)

Tom D., Thursday, 20 March 2008 14:47 (eleven years ago) Permalink

does Arthur Penn have his own thread? Now there's a man with made his share of dross. Seeing Targets with my parents is one of my earliest childhood memories.

Alfred, Lord Sotosyn, Thursday, 20 March 2008 14:48 (eleven years ago) Permalink

But Targets was Bogdanovich!

C. Grisso/McCain, Thursday, 20 March 2008 14:51 (eleven years ago) Permalink

No – Target singular, starring Hackman and Matt Dillon.

Alfred, Lord Sotosyn, Thursday, 20 March 2008 14:53 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Night Moves was probably Penn's last mildly interesting movie.

Dr Morbius, Thursday, 20 March 2008 14:55 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Movie holds up pretty well, though in a lot of ways it's sort of hard to see what all the fuss was about ...

Eric H., Wednesday, 26 March 2008 04:45 (ten years ago) Permalink

i.e. to my taste, it doesn't really actually do all that much glamorizing; they're actually portrayed as really low-stakes criminals

Eric H., Wednesday, 26 March 2008 04:47 (ten years ago) Permalink

Aside from the true-love last glance, I was essentially basing the glamorizing on this:

http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~ozarkgal/bonnie-clyde.JPG

not their brains or ambition.

Ever see Penn's Mickey One, which he made with Beatty 2 years prior? I remember it as more self-consciously nouvelle vaguey than B&C. It's being revived in a new print next month at MoMA, so I guess a DVD might follow.

oh, some folx think The Missouri Breaks is interesting, but I still haven't seen it.

Dr Morbius, Wednesday, 26 March 2008 13:43 (ten years ago) Permalink

Oh yeah, I was thinking about Rex Harrison's second (I think) wife, Kay Kendall. In addition to those Angry Young Man movies, I vaguely remember Rachel Roberts being on American TV as one of those slightly annoying British housekeeper/nanny types. IMDB informs me that I am thinking of The Tony Randall Show.

James Redd and the Blecchs, Wednesday, 26 March 2008 21:05 (ten years ago) Permalink

I recall her being kinda great on that

Dr Morbius, Wednesday, 26 March 2008 21:13 (ten years ago) Permalink

four weeks pass...

A fun, readable blend of gossip (omg, Rex Harrison! and his wife!! Mike Nichols and Elaine May duking it out live on stage!), the dying travails of the old studio system, the intricacies of distribution, and all the weird stuff that goes on w/r/t getting a movie made (like options on scripts and how the $$ gets scraped together, etc etc). Major subplots of the blatant bigotry and racism of the times (also prudishness) and the death of the Production Code.

Jaq OTM. Less hungup on nostalgia than Peter Biskind's book on the seventies generation. The bits dealing with Spencer Tracy's failing health and the awful crossroads in which Sidney Poitier found himself are worth a read.

Alfred, Lord Sotosyn, Thursday, 24 April 2008 17:12 (ten years ago) Permalink

one year passes...

rip.

i think this movie is kind of uneven, but the opening sequence is fucking incredible, and 85% of it is the editing.

by another name (amateurist), Monday, 19 April 2010 14:16 (eight years ago) Permalink

She did The Hustler too. RIP

Roomful of Moogs (C. Grisso/McCain), Monday, 19 April 2010 20:25 (eight years ago) Permalink

damn, rip indeed.

call all destroyer, Monday, 19 April 2010 20:27 (eight years ago) Permalink

five months pass...

Arthur Penn RIP.

State Attorney Foxhart Cubycheck (Billy Dods), Wednesday, 29 September 2010 16:37 (eight years ago) Permalink

probably deserves his own thread. besides b&c and little big man, i forgot that he made penn and teller get killed, which is pretty great.

a tenth level which features a single castle (tipsy mothra), Wednesday, 29 September 2010 17:10 (eight years ago) Permalink

one year passes...

Hackman is sure good in this. And, yes, the editing is the star here.

lumber up, limbaugh down (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 15 October 2011 02:40 (seven years ago) Permalink

The soundtrack contributes so much to the mood of this film it's ridic.

one dis leads to another (ian), Saturday, 15 October 2011 04:05 (seven years ago) Permalink

what's with the weird colour in that bit where they meet her ma?

piscesx, Saturday, 15 October 2011 06:44 (seven years ago) Permalink

seven years pass...

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