This is the crossword puzzle thread

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I have been meaning to make this thread for a few weeks now, since Jordan and I have been derailing the Chicago thread lately with commentary about the Ben Tausig's Ink Well crossword (syndicated in a variety of alt-weeklies) and the Onion AV Club crossword, which Tausig edits. You can find both here.

Additionally, I have been constructing my own crosswords, which I've put up on Flickr. I just spent most of my weekend working on my first puzzle to utilize five theme fills (previous puzzles used only three theme fills or else were themeless).

Feel free to discuss the NYT puzzle, too. I wanted a thread broader than this one, but since that's the premier puzzle in the U.S., it surely belongs here, too. (I have to admit that I don't actually do the NYT one, but that has a lot to do with the fact that you have to pay to do it online.)

Anyway, go forth and tell me about your frequent encounters with "Sea eagle" or "Actress Skye."

jaymc, Monday, 24 December 2007 03:32 (twelve years ago) link

Recently I picked up a copy of the Oregonian in order to do the NYTimes puzzle and I kept it aside for weeks and then finally did it -- it was a Wednesday puzzle and I had a few minutes to spare -- and it was all Latin themed clues, which was nice, and was almost enough to make be believe that divine providence had caused me to hang on to it, almost.

Also while cleaning up I found the enormous bag of old GAMES magazines from the 80s that my friend gave me and which I have yet to explore. Rah!

The difficult part about crossword making is the clues, of course...

Casuistry, Monday, 24 December 2007 03:43 (twelve years ago) link

it was a Wednesday puzzle and I had a few minutes to spare -- and it was all Latin themed clues, which was nice

omg ysi?

anatol_merklich, Monday, 24 December 2007 03:50 (twelve years ago) link

Yes and no. I mean, it takes me several hours to create the fills and usually I'm so relieved to be done that I can rush through the clues in mere minutes. But it's a challenge to make really good clues, ones that will make the difference between an easy and a (more interesting) difficult puzzle. For instance, I like to put a lot of pop-culture references in my puzzles, but a lot of times these are hard to create ambiguous clues for; some end up just being fill-in-the-blanks.

jaymc, Monday, 24 December 2007 03:54 (twelve years ago) link

(xpost)

jaymc, Monday, 24 December 2007 03:54 (twelve years ago) link

Re: YSI: Oh uh I did it and then recycled it. It might still be in my recycle bin though. But it'll have the answers.

Casuistry, Monday, 24 December 2007 04:01 (twelve years ago) link

Har, no worries Casuistry. Are we talking about cryptics or non- here btw?

anatol_merklich, Monday, 24 December 2007 04:04 (twelve years ago) link

Cryptic thread is another one, mostly UK posters, but jaymc and Casuistry show up too.

James Redd and the Blecchs, Monday, 24 December 2007 04:10 (twelve years ago) link

i can do ny times up through wednesday 80-90% of the time with a fair amount of ease, thursday closer to 50-60% (usually with some help), friday almost never, and i dont think ive ever finished a saturday ny times x-word

max, Monday, 24 December 2007 04:15 (twelve years ago) link

Oh. I have. Either I get hopeless stuck on a Saturday (30% of the time?) or it takes about 45 minutes. Or, it did when I was doing them all the time.

Casuistry, Monday, 24 December 2007 06:31 (twelve years ago) link

last week's sunday ny times crossword i did in less than an hour (this is not usually the case for me).

i cannot, under any circumstances, ever finish a cryptic crossword

impudent harlot, Monday, 24 December 2007 06:37 (twelve years ago) link

New crossword from me.

jaymc, Thursday, 27 December 2007 16:25 (twelve years ago) link

Haha "what johns do."

The school clue is super-great, too!

I was momentarily thrown by two spellings not conforming to the way the NYT would render them -- and then in both cases yours seems more Korrect, and theirs seems more of the variEnt.

nabisco, Thursday, 27 December 2007 19:43 (twelve years ago) link

I'm pretty sure I know one of the two you mean. Is this the other? Because I think that's always spelled like that, even though a word that contains that word has a NYT-preferred variant.

jaymc, Thursday, 27 December 2007 19:51 (twelve years ago) link

Nope, two different ones -- 9 across and 48 across.

nabisco, Thursday, 27 December 2007 19:53 (twelve years ago) link

And actually, funny though it may be, I'm kind of annoyed with "what johns do," just because it's a bit of a stretch, even for a Tausig-type puzzle. Really hard to work with five theme fills, though!

jaymc, Thursday, 27 December 2007 19:53 (twelve years ago) link

Nope, two different ones -- 9 across and 48 across.

Ah! I had originally used the variant for 48-A until I looked it up in Wikipedia and saw that that was a common mistake.

jaymc, Thursday, 27 December 2007 19:54 (twelve years ago) link

my pops schooled me on that holiday sunday NYT puzzle. :(

i got ben tausig's book and i'm about halfway through it, although his cluing seems to have gotten harder as he went along.

Jordan, Thursday, 27 December 2007 19:55 (twelve years ago) link

I think you can get away with one giant stretch per puzzle, so long as it's , you know, funny.

nabisco, Thursday, 27 December 2007 19:56 (twelve years ago) link

Try to be a little sneakier with the clues, maybe? "When Romeo dies" -- the present tense gives that one away far too quickly. Make it past tense, so there's at least a chance that I'll panic for a moment trying to figure out if we know the year -- or, better, "Where Romeo died", and I might think you're going for "GENOA" and realize that won't fit and wonder if I am misremembering the story -- or, maybe even better, for a good Thursdayish clue, find some other character who dies in a similar place, but whose name does not immediately ring of Shakespeare, and I'll be mystified for a while, but it will eventually come to me. Because it's that sort of strip-tease, right?

"What johns do" is nicely phrased for sure, though.

Casuistry, Thursday, 27 December 2007 20:13 (twelve years ago) link

That's a fair point, Chris. My thought process for that clue was basically, "I need something that happens there ... Oh, well, obviously: Romeo dies ... Is that too easy? ... What happens in Othello? ... *reads Wikipedia article about Othello* ... yeah, not really feeling that ... I should probably be working right now ... All right, 'When Romeo dies.'"

jaymc, Thursday, 27 December 2007 20:35 (twelve years ago) link

That's sort of what I meant about the clues being the hard part. But you saw the movie, right? How Will Shortz basically rewrites half the clues for the puzzles he accepts?

Anyway I'm not trying to discourage you, of course. I just want more awesome crosswords to do.

Casuistry, Thursday, 27 December 2007 23:58 (twelve years ago) link

Speaking of Tausig puzzles: the numbering of the clues in the Onion one this week (the sports issue) is completely off!

nabisco, Saturday, 29 December 2007 22:37 (twelve years ago) link

Haha, rly? It was correct online.

Jordan, Saturday, 29 December 2007 23:06 (twelve years ago) link

Yeah, it's bad enough that 1/3 of the down clues are sometimes randomly deleted; this time I was like, "Yeah, that's not gonna work."

jaymc, Saturday, 29 December 2007 23:17 (twelve years ago) link

Another new one. Title is exactly the same as Ben Tausig's Ink Well puzzle last week but with a different interpretation.

jaymc, Monday, 31 December 2007 17:32 (twelve years ago) link

I think this is your hardest one yet, for sure.

Jordan, Monday, 31 December 2007 19:28 (twelve years ago) link

Good!

jaymc, Monday, 31 December 2007 19:35 (twelve years ago) link

Do you have .puz files?

Casuistry, Monday, 31 December 2007 20:15 (twelve years ago) link

Wow, jaymc, that last one is really good.

I used to want to make my own crosswords, and looked for books on how to construct them, but never could find any. Are there such things, or do you just get in there and figure it out?

Rock Hardy, Monday, 31 December 2007 20:45 (twelve years ago) link

Most books about crossword puzzles seem to have an obligatory section on making them, I think. I read Eugene T. Maleska's book, and boy was he proud of the awful crosswordese he used to drill into his puzzles, but I'm pretty sure it had a chapter on making puzzles.

Casuistry, Monday, 31 December 2007 20:53 (twelve years ago) link

No, I don't have .puz files. I need to look into that. Also crossword constructors are always talking about a software program called Across Lite?

And thanks, Rock. I just sort of figured it out through trial and error. All you really need to know is the basic rules for what the grid needs to look like: no words shorter than three letters, diagonal symmetry. But any good software (like Crossword Weaver, which I use) will help you make sure you don't do anything irregular.

When I started out doing themeless puzzles, I would just start at the top-right and work my way around the puzzle intuitively. With themed puzzles, I do the theme fills first and then work outward from the middle.

jaymc, Wednesday, 2 January 2008 15:57 (twelve years ago) link

I'm still a little wtf over this Tausig one from the other day (I'm working through his book). The clue is "Good Buddy" and the answer is "CBER". I assume it's CB radio, but still doesn't quite make sense to me?

Jordan, Wednesday, 2 January 2008 16:04 (twelve years ago) link

cockblocker?

Jordan, Wednesday, 2 January 2008 16:04 (twelve years ago) link

I'm guessing that someone who uses CB radio is a CBer, in the same way that Tausig uses the clue "Recipient of 'You've got mail' message" for AOLER.

jaymc, Wednesday, 2 January 2008 16:06 (twelve years ago) link

just "CBer," as in one who does CB? seems ok to me

xpost dang it

n/a, Wednesday, 2 January 2008 16:06 (twelve years ago) link

Yeah guys, I know that CBer is one who does CB, but how do you get that from "good buddy"?

Jordan, Wednesday, 2 January 2008 16:18 (twelve years ago) link

that is CB slang, they say stuff like "ten-four, good buddy."

n/a, Wednesday, 2 January 2008 16:21 (twelve years ago) link

http://www.impawards.com/1977/posters/smokey_and_the_bandit.jpg

n/a, Wednesday, 2 January 2008 16:21 (twelve years ago) link

Across Lite is the program that you use to enjoy .puz files, and you can get it from the NYTimes website, and they distribute their puzzles to online subscribers in that format. Someone you know might have a year's worth of such .puz files, but he has perhaps already worked through them all.

Casuistry, Wednesday, 2 January 2008 16:50 (twelve years ago) link

Also, you're supposed to have no more than [a certain number] of black squares if you hope to get published by the big-leagues, and certain black-square formations are frowned upon (full 90 degree right angles -- basically anything Tetris-y).

Casuistry, Wednesday, 2 January 2008 16:52 (twelve years ago) link

I think it's 17% black squares, or 40 squares in a 15x15 puzzle. Though Tausig had one that was 46 recently.

certain black-square formations are frowned upon (full 90 degree right angles -- basically anything Tetris-y).

I didn't know this.

jaymc, Wednesday, 2 January 2008 16:57 (twelve years ago) link

I'm not sure it's as hard-and-fast a rule as the percentage one, but on those rare occasions when I see such a puzzle, I'm always a little startled by it. I dunno, I should flip through one of my NYTimes books to make sure I'm not fooling myself about it.

Diagramless puzzles, of course, are all about that.

Casuistry, Wednesday, 2 January 2008 17:00 (twelve years ago) link

http://www.cruciverb.com/index.php/articles/htmlpages/120

jaymc, Wednesday, 2 January 2008 17:01 (twelve years ago) link

A++ for "Paris's friend," Jaymc -- actually took me a while, with excellent payoff

nabisco, Wednesday, 2 January 2008 19:09 (twelve years ago) link

Total pro-level theme on that one, too!

nabisco, Wednesday, 2 January 2008 19:09 (twelve years ago) link

Ha, I sort of wrote that one with you in mind, N!

jaymc, Wednesday, 2 January 2008 19:10 (twelve years ago) link

The "Paris's friend" clue, I mean.

jaymc, Wednesday, 2 January 2008 19:10 (twelve years ago) link

I had to look that one up after I got the answer, I don't watch that show.

Jordan, Wednesday, 2 January 2008 19:13 (twelve years ago) link

Hmm. Personally I'd rather scratch my head over "flowers" for "rivers" and be pleasantly surprised when I figure it out, as opposed to the you-know-it-or-you-don't stuff like "1964 Best Actress nominee" or "1987 NL Series MVP" or "Belgian provincial capital."

For me, the ambiguity of e.g. Polish (nationality) vs. polish (wood-finishing product) is what makes puzzling worthwhile and fun - the initial mystification, the gradually working out of crosses, the slow buildup of educated guesses, and the final "ah-ha!" moment of seeing why a river could be called a flow-er.

Okay, Boomerang (Ye Mad Puffin), Sunday, 14 June 2020 15:56 (one month ago) link

or maybe the answer is WORD

Li'l Brexit (Tracer Hand), Sunday, 14 June 2020 17:28 (one month ago) link

FWIW, “Flower” for “river” shows up all the time in Cryptics. See also “number” for “feeling more numb”,

Michael F Gill, Sunday, 14 June 2020 21:09 (one month ago) link

i don't mind clues being a bit tricky but no one in real life has ever used 'flower' for 'river'

mookieproof, Sunday, 14 June 2020 21:17 (one month ago) link

In cryptics misdirection is more the point, so I’d say it’s fair game.

Michael F Gill, Sunday, 14 June 2020 21:24 (one month ago) link

Okay but what about something like "Capital of Mexico" yielding PESO?

Ymmv but I think these double entendres and potentially strained interpretations and sidewise puns are exactly what puzzles are supposed to be doing.

If all you want is a strict one question > only possible answer paradigm, go play Trivial Pursuit.

Okay, Boomerang (Ye Mad Puffin), Sunday, 14 June 2020 22:24 (one month ago) link

ymp i don’t want that, it’s cool :)

Li'l Brexit (Tracer Hand), Sunday, 14 June 2020 22:31 (one month ago) link

capital of mexico is fine imo

mookieproof, Sunday, 14 June 2020 22:38 (one month ago) link

Always bloody RIAL, though.

(I cheat all the US sports ones, come at me)

Andrew Farrell, Sunday, 14 June 2020 22:40 (one month ago) link

yeah that’s a nice one :) the william and mary example is a step beyond. it feels a little cheap to me. like it’s slapping you down for even trying to puzzle out the relevance of those particular names. it feels slightly outside the rules. a bit of a dad-joke frankly but like i said before, even though i kind of hate it i admire the chutzpah. it’s rare that i’m surprised by a tactic in the nytimes puzzles.

xpost

Li'l Brexit (Tracer Hand), Sunday, 14 June 2020 22:41 (one month ago) link

xp Actually what's worse is that these days I don't have to, I've started to learn them.

Andrew Farrell, Sunday, 14 June 2020 22:42 (one month ago) link

I don't know if everyone gets the same random puzzles from the archive recommended in the app or the website, but one of the ones this week was from a week in 2015 when they just asked contributors "What would you like to do that's never been done before?", including one featuring an unclued entry with no checkers. The week starts here: https://www.nytimes.com/crosswords/game/daily/2015/10/12

Andrew Farrell, Sunday, 14 June 2020 22:45 (one month ago) link

what’s a checker?

Li'l Brexit (Tracer Hand), Sunday, 14 June 2020 23:02 (one month ago) link

On nyt you can ask it to auto-check your answers. Wrong letters have a red slash through them.

Personally I do not do this. Sometimes, on an archived puzzle, if I haven't solved correctly, I will do "check puzzle" and it will tell me which squares are wrong. It doesn't tell you what the right answer is, just tells you where you're wrong.

Okay, Boomerang (Ye Mad Puffin), Sunday, 14 June 2020 23:30 (one month ago) link

Oh no - this is I think lingo I picked up from the other Times - a checker is a letter in answer that you've got from a crossways answer. I meant that there's no answers intersecting with that clue - it's at the bottom of https://www.nytimes.com/crosswords/game/daily/2015/10/14

(I should check, but I assume that we've discussed upthread that the NYT style where every letter is in two clues is weird and claustrophobic from a UK perspective?)

Andrew Farrell, Monday, 15 June 2020 07:54 (four weeks ago) link

Every letter is in two clues? Just the ones that intersect surely?

Li'l Brexit (Tracer Hand), Monday, 15 June 2020 07:57 (four weeks ago) link

Sure, but they all intersect! I should probably have said square instead of letter. You can see the UK style here - nearly half the squares are in only one clue.

https://www.theguardian.com/crosswords/quick/15633

This might be a general US crossword thing, the NYT is pretty much my only exposure.

Andrew Farrell, Monday, 15 June 2020 08:04 (four weeks ago) link

Ahh yes you're right. I'd never realised that until just now!

Li'l Brexit (Tracer Hand), Monday, 15 June 2020 08:07 (four weeks ago) link

See, to me, UK-style crosswords seem weird. Requiring all the letters to work in two different words is harder from a construction perspective, and is a different intellectual challenge for the solver. It's like the difference in Scrabble between playing for word length vs. playing for tile density (that is, multiple overlapping words at a time).

When I see a US crossword that doesn't cross completely, I assume it is for beginners and/or children.

Okay, Boomerang (Ye Mad Puffin), Monday, 15 June 2020 13:55 (four weeks ago) link

totally

Li'l Brexit (Tracer Hand), Monday, 15 June 2020 13:58 (four weeks ago) link

xposts I'm reminded of a classic bit of dialogue from the Hallmark channel's Crossword Mysteries

Xword Ed.: "Nightingale did the Sunday puzzle?"

Detective: "Well, not all, he just filled in the Across clues, in cursive"

Xword Ed.: "Just the Across clues!?"

Me: "SO ALL THE DOWNS TOO THEN BY DEFINITION!"

This show, man. Truly high-end #CrosswordMysteries

— Rex Parker 🐈🐾☕️🐾🐈 (@rexparker) September 9, 2019

Vaguely Threatening CAPTCHAs, Monday, 15 June 2020 14:09 (four weeks ago) link

This week’s series of Thursday/Friday/Saturday has been difficult for me—I haven’t finished any of them and I’m at a standstill in each. I flip between them to look at clues with fresh eyes but it doesn’t seem to be helping. Tough week!

unashamed and trash (Unctious), Saturday, 20 June 2020 17:49 (three weeks ago) link

I found Saturday really easy, and posted my personal best time. Friday, though, was definitely hard, and I didn't finish before the streak deadline.

Learned Leeegue (Leee), Saturday, 20 June 2020 17:57 (three weeks ago) link

I thought Thursday's gimmick was cute, and nicely telegraphed at 31D.

I agree that Friday was tough. I didn't get a foothold until the southwest quadrant (I think 34D was my first confident answer).

Today? It seemed to be of appropriate overall difficulty, but the structure lends itself to "you know it or you don't" type answers, rather than things you can work out with perseverance. Like, the long answer in the middle.

If you have even modest familiarity with Miles Davis album titles, you can confidently fill in a huge section of puzzle without even needing the downs for confirmation. If you don't, then you will have a tough time getting traction.

somehow i failed to even look at the miles clue until i was well into the puzzle : /

mookieproof, Saturday, 20 June 2020 18:48 (three weeks ago) link

Funny, this week also kicked my butt. On Thursday I broke my streak because I had 'Ines' for Inez' and couldn't spot the error and had to use the correcting tool in the app.

Friday was just hard. It also wasn't fun. I got naticked twice.

I've liked today's so far (I don't do it in one setting). I didn't know the Miles Davis album, but with just a few crosses I was able to intuit it.

rb (soda), Saturday, 20 June 2020 20:26 (three weeks ago) link

saturday nyt was my best time yet too

Fuck the NRA (ulysses), Sunday, 21 June 2020 00:42 (three weeks ago) link

I had 8:45, vs. a 10:47 Saturday average- not best but pretty good.

lol you guys are maniacs

Li'l Brexit (Tracer Hand), Sunday, 21 June 2020 08:43 (three weeks ago) link

i timed myself once and i hated it. i felt hustled and bullied along. i like just kind of dawdling over it.

Li'l Brexit (Tracer Hand), Sunday, 21 June 2020 08:43 (three weeks ago) link

I am nowhere near that fast, best time is 13.12 for saturday

Fuck the NRA (ulysses), Sunday, 21 June 2020 09:02 (three weeks ago) link

I wish I didn't care but I kind of do. It's an inner conflict.

See, to me, UK-style crosswords seem weird.

Sure sure sure - I meant from a UK perspective, I'd expect the same the other way.

Requiring all the letters to work in two different words is harder from a construction perspective

Absolutely, yes - it's very impressive.

is a different intellectual challenge for the solver.

I agree here literally, but I'm not getting the sense why it wouldn't just be an easier challenge? What's the thing that makes it harder (to solve) that you only get when every letter is twice covered?

My Thursday time was my best ever (while still terrible, Thursdays just kick me ass for some reason) - isn't it rare to see an answer like the central one?

LOScamposinos (Andrew Farrell), Sunday, 21 June 2020 20:28 (three weeks ago) link

Not as rare as you might think. Thursdays in particular are kind of famous for these tricksy ones that bend the rules.

Li'l Brexit (Tracer Hand), Sunday, 21 June 2020 20:55 (three weeks ago) link

I nearly got Naticked on a WEDNESDAY puzzle of all days.

AxoLOLtl (Leee), Friday, 26 June 2020 05:02 (two weeks ago) link

Natick is still a funny term to me since I’ve lived in Boston for a long time and have always known about Natick. Used to pass the train stops for it all the time.

The pandemic has given me a lot of time for puzzles. Out of seemingly nowhere, I got hooked on variety crosswords and cryptics back in January and I don’t know if I can go back to a normal crossword again. There seems to be more online versions of these types around too.

Michael F Gill, Friday, 26 June 2020 05:17 (two weeks ago) link

Which cryptics are you doing?

Barry "Fatha" Hines (James Redd and the Blecchs), Friday, 26 June 2020 15:01 (two weeks ago) link

I do mainly North American ones. I read fifteensquared and appreciate the UK ones for their difficulty/creativity, but I actively dislike their heavy reluctance to modernize their vocabulary/references/slang. I haven't done the ones in Australian papers as they all seem to be behind paywalls.

My favorite free daily one is Lovatts from Australia though. I do the weekly puzzles by Cox/Rathvon, Kosman/Piciotto, and the archival ones by The New Yorker. Monthly I do the ones by Aries puzzles, NYT, and WSJ. A bunch of other places occasionally run a cryptic like the Incubator, AVCX, and Outside The Box.

There are lots more links to personal sites if you go to The Puzzler group on FB. Also the Fill Me In podcast does a live stream where they solve cryptics.

Michael F Gill, Saturday, 27 June 2020 22:52 (two weeks ago) link

Thought Cox/Rathvon did a Monthly Cryptic these days for the WSJ and the weekly was a regular Sunday-sized puzzle.

Two Spocks Clash (James Redd and the Blecchs), Saturday, 27 June 2020 23:07 (two weeks ago) link

The Sunday crossword was recently revived on Patreon, but they’ve been doing a weekly non-variety cryptic for The National Post in Canada since 1998 I think. There’s a blog that has a post about each one since 2010, including the blank grid.

Michael F Gill, Sunday, 28 June 2020 00:39 (two weeks ago) link

are there any good profiles of Cox & Rathvon out there? They've been doing this for decades.

all cats are beautiful (silby), Sunday, 28 June 2020 00:41 (two weeks ago) link

My friend - and neighbor! (no, not the one you are thinking of) met them once, think they live out in Hershey, PA, and told me Emily was really shy, that's all I know.

Two Spocks Clash (James Redd and the Blecchs), Sunday, 28 June 2020 00:55 (two weeks ago) link

I've only seen little blurbs here and there, like these: https://wordplay.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/11/08/acrostic/ or https://www.the-scientist.com/contributors/contributors--64959

Hard to believe they've been doing it since the late '70s. (See http://chall.us/hex/hex_puzzles.html for the complete list)

Michael F Gill, Sunday, 28 June 2020 00:59 (two weeks ago) link

I've been meaning to ask if you've tried the cryptics in the Enigma and now I just got a message from a B finalist crossword guy about my
expired NPL membership.

Two Spocks Clash (James Redd and the Blecchs), Monday, 29 June 2020 01:55 (two weeks ago) link

And I'm back in. Am I the only one?

Two Spocks Clash (James Redd and the Blecchs), Monday, 29 June 2020 19:26 (two weeks ago) link

I tried that book of NPL cryptics and had little success. Maybe I'll try again another day. I sort of associate NPL with people who do puzzle hunts and are constantly in search of puzzles that they find difficult. I know that's not 100% the case, but for me its more fun to watch them solve those impossible puzzles then it is to actually do them.

Michael F Gill, Monday, 29 June 2020 22:54 (two weeks ago) link

NPL cryptics do very wildly in quality. Many of them are insanely difficult.

Two Spocks Clash (James Redd and the Blecchs), Monday, 29 June 2020 22:58 (two weeks ago) link

Yes, I've seen Kevin Wald's cryptics! EEK.

Michael F Gill, Monday, 29 June 2020 23:03 (two weeks ago) link

Coax troubled cry (3)

all cats are beautiful (silby), Tuesday, 30 June 2020 00:50 (two weeks ago) link

Seems simple, but still can’t get that one, sorry.

Came to post that I just heard a WBGO DJ talking about the crosswordese word ONER.

Lipstick O.G. (James Redd and the Blecchs), Sunday, 12 July 2020 14:37 (two days ago) link


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