Every child in America entering school at the age of five is insane

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"Every child in America entering school at the age of five is insane because he comes to school with certain allegiances toward our founding fathers, toward our elected officials, toward his parents, toward a belief in a supernatural being, toward the sovereignty of this nation as a separate entity. It's up to you as teachers to make all of these sick children well, by creating the international children of the future."

Poll Results

OptionVotes
y 8
n5


and what, Friday, 9 November 2007 22:43 (eleven years ago) Permalink

y but not for the reasons stated!

HI DERE, Friday, 9 November 2007 22:44 (eleven years ago) Permalink

http://budz.files.wordpress.com/2007/08/27_1315a14125_m.jpg

and what, Friday, 9 November 2007 22:45 (eleven years ago) Permalink

show me a 5 yo that understands the concept of national sovereignty

Shakey Mo Collier, Friday, 9 November 2007 22:46 (eleven years ago) Permalink

you're not the boss of me

sexyDancer, Friday, 9 November 2007 22:47 (eleven years ago) Permalink

gabbneb-in-kindergarden.jpg

and what, Friday, 9 November 2007 22:49 (eleven years ago) Permalink

lolz

Shakey Mo Collier, Friday, 9 November 2007 22:50 (eleven years ago) Permalink

my soon-to-be-5-year-old kind of does (now I should get me to the grammar fiends thread to see if those hyphens are proper).

Maria :D, Friday, 9 November 2007 22:54 (eleven years ago) Permalink

These remarks make it easy to see that socialists regard true religion and patriotism to be symptoms of mental illness, qualifying the "mentally abnormal" for ever intensifying psychotherapy until the "anti-social" tendencies are either cured or...... The book 1984 is an accurate prophesy of what's to come. "You will learn to love Big Brother."

libcrypt, Friday, 9 November 2007 23:06 (eleven years ago) Permalink

The Fascists overtaking our country are targeting our nation’s youth, finding ways to make children conform even if it means labeling them as mentally ill and drugging them to do it.

libcrypt, Friday, 9 November 2007 23:06 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Textbooks have been carefully monitored by the sensitivity police and written to erase and undermine a student's capacity for empathy and true history and then we wonder why so many "ostensibly intelligent, morally and decent young people" are committing violent crimes today and yet liberals like Jon Stewart will poke fun at the mentally balanced students at Patrick Henry?

libcrypt, Friday, 9 November 2007 23:07 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Implementing competition into our school systems would HARDLY "break" the system. One school issuing a memo to not correct grammar may be one school acting foolishly on THIS subject but it seems as if I get slapped in the face DAILY with evidence that our system of education is more concerned with making the kids feel good, rather than making them educated.

libcrypt, Friday, 9 November 2007 23:08 (eleven years ago) Permalink

They're on track and will succeed because too many parents are too busy or too lazy or too ignorant to find out exactly what their children are being indoctrinated with--no wonder the leftist social engineers hate the Church, because that's all that presently stands between them and their goal.

libcrypt, Friday, 9 November 2007 23:09 (eleven years ago) Permalink

http://www.newswithviews.com/images/Betty_Freauf_com_hdr.jpg

max, Friday, 9 November 2007 23:13 (eleven years ago) Permalink

if believing in those things makes children insane, what kinds of beliefs render them sane?

max, Friday, 9 November 2007 23:14 (eleven years ago) Permalink

The notion that the "fascists" that control our culture and our government are indoctrinating the children with ANTI-establishment attitudes is a cognitive dissonance of the highest order.

libcrypt, Friday, 9 November 2007 23:19 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Automatic thread bump. This poll is closing tomorrow.

ILX System, Saturday, 10 November 2007 00:01 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Amoral allegiance to country, race or family - yes

Heave Ho, Saturday, 10 November 2007 03:15 (eleven years ago) Permalink

I'm going to spend as much as it takes to get Thomas Kinkade to do a version of that Osama-with-mushroom-cloud pic

J0hn D., Saturday, 10 November 2007 03:21 (eleven years ago) Permalink

You really have to play a strong role in your child's school, especially with teachers trying to force a homosexual, trans-gendered agenda on our students.

Hurting 2, Saturday, 10 November 2007 03:30 (eleven years ago) Permalink

(rough quote of something I heard Laura Ingraham say)

Hurting 2, Saturday, 10 November 2007 03:30 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Where's the original quote from?

Sundar, Saturday, 10 November 2007 03:39 (eleven years ago) Permalink

i remember incredulously asking my dad if the president could be convicted of any crime: "but he's the PRESIDENT!"

i was right

Tracer Hand, Saturday, 10 November 2007 03:42 (eleven years ago) Permalink

All the Americans on this thread learned the pledge of allegiance, and we're all pretty much unindoctrinated.

Well, okay. I did pay my taxes last year. Call me a sell-out.

Pleasant Plains, Saturday, 10 November 2007 03:47 (eleven years ago) Permalink

I mis-parsed this thread title as "it is insane that, in America, every child enters school at the age of five". which seemed like it would be a much more interesting debate.

bernard snowy, Saturday, 10 November 2007 04:13 (eleven years ago) Permalink

I do think high schools/junior highs are kind of a volatile experiment: forcing hundreds of dramatic, hormonal teenagers who have yet to learn the best interpersonal or social skills to interact for 7+ hours a day is asking quite a lot of them. A good, rarefied environment for maximum crazy/self-hate. I think it is a factor in why most everyone says they hated eighth grade: they had to be around other eighth graders constantly!

(Admittedly I don't have a better solution for student organization.)

Abbott, Saturday, 10 November 2007 04:17 (eleven years ago) Permalink

I was just talking with my wife recently about how people might just not be wired for school at that age, that so many schools might be failed schools because the whole idea of school for adolescents is a failed idea.

Hurting 2, Saturday, 10 November 2007 04:20 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Yeah, I don't know what the hell else to do with them either. It's not like we have farms for everyone to work on during puberty.

Hurting 2, Saturday, 10 November 2007 04:21 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Maybe they should get two years off to do Janovian scream therapy, ending with a "standardized test" requiring them to make a Tears For Fears "The Hurting"-style concept album (they could just sing their own lyrics over karaoke versions of other songs, "Sad" Al Yankovich style, if they did not want to or could not write their own songs).

Abbott, Saturday, 10 November 2007 04:23 (eleven years ago) Permalink

They could spend a year of independent study comprised of half the year taking gym classes in one subject (walking, yoga, football, swimming, whatever they want) and the other half learning a programming language.

Abbott, Saturday, 10 November 2007 04:25 (eleven years ago) Permalink

There'd be a school dance every week at 2-3 locations so they could socialize.

Abbott, Saturday, 10 November 2007 04:25 (eleven years ago) Permalink

I also tend to think if we gave kids a little more sense of responsibility for themselves at that age, and less seemingly meaningless crap to do in an over-structured environment, they might act a little less ridiculous.

Hurting 2, Saturday, 10 November 2007 04:28 (eleven years ago) Permalink

A lot of the skipping class & other transgressions I did (ie calling teachers out in class for doing this bullshit) was bcz the teachers were so lazy and pandering. My sophomore year biology class, we spent half the class fucking COLORING. And we were graded on how well we colored!

Abbott, Saturday, 10 November 2007 04:30 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Dr Chester M. Pierce OTM

BIG HOOS aka the steendriver, Saturday, 10 November 2007 04:32 (eleven years ago) Permalink

I found this quote from Chester Pierce on the WWW: Every child in America who enters school at the age of five is mentally ill, because he comes to school with an allegiance toward our elected officials, toward our founding fathers, toward our institutions, toward the preservation of this form of government that we have. Patriotism, nationalism, and sovereignty, all that proves that children are sick because a truly well individual is one who has rejected all of those things, and is truly the international child of the future.

It's similar to the quote upthread but different in some key areas. I'm a lot more comfortable with version 2. Did he say both or is one more accurate?

Sundar, Saturday, 10 November 2007 05:10 (eleven years ago) Permalink

My money is on the one not from a conservative e-mail forward

Hurting 2, Saturday, 10 November 2007 05:17 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Yeah, but that one is milder!

Sundar, Saturday, 10 November 2007 05:18 (eleven years ago) Permalink

I have a 5 year old daughter, and I can tell you for a fact that 5 year olds are inherently insane. Just sayin'.

Sara R-C, Saturday, 10 November 2007 05:27 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Think about how well-adjusted to society she'd be if she was home-schooled!

Seriously, we used to take these standardized tests in eighth grade in my little rural town, and the home-schooled kids would show up to take the tests with us. You wanna talk about a herd of Boo Radleys huddled in the corner...

Pleasant Plains, Saturday, 10 November 2007 06:05 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Home schoolers are a mixed bunch for sure.

Julia would not live for a week if I was home-schooling her. I think she'd kill herself out of a need for the company of others. She is the most extroverted kid I've ever met. If she didn't look pretty well exactly like I did at her age, I'd suspect a baby mix-up.

Sara R-C, Saturday, 10 November 2007 06:34 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Automatic thread bump. This poll's results are now in.

ILX System, Sunday, 11 November 2007 00:01 (eleven years ago) Permalink

"Every child in America entering school at the age of five is insane because he comes to school with certain allegiances toward our founding fathers, toward our elected officials, toward his parents, toward a belief in a supernatural being, toward the sovereignty of this nation as a separate entity. It's up to you as teachers to make all of these sick children well, by creating the international children of the future."

I came to school with none of these. I didn't know who the fuck Bill Clinton was & my knowledge of our nation's legal system went about as far as my saying "it's a free country, you can't tell me what to do!" to my mom about twice a day.

Curt1s Stephens, Sunday, 11 November 2007 02:23 (eleven years ago) Permalink

I think by kindergarten I had finally figured out that Bill Clinton was president and George Bush was vice-president. I had also finally figured out that California was a tiny floating island about 300 feet up in the air.

Curt1s Stephens, Sunday, 11 November 2007 02:27 (eleven years ago) Permalink

I thought Rhode Island was a real island.

I knew who Jimmy Carter was, though.

Pleasant Plains, Sunday, 11 November 2007 03:04 (eleven years ago) Permalink

I thought RI was an island until now!

Sundar, Sunday, 11 November 2007 04:34 (eleven years ago) Permalink

(Surely you at least had some allegiances to your parents, Curt1s? The fact that the second version of the quote leaves that part out makes a big difference to me.)

Sundar, Sunday, 11 November 2007 04:35 (eleven years ago) Permalink

There are islands, but it's mostly mainland:

http://www.4to40.com/images/earth/history/rhodeisland/rhodeisland_map.gif

Pleasant Plains, Sunday, 11 November 2007 04:39 (eleven years ago) Permalink

i thought since this person sounds like they might not know any five-year olds, i interviewed my son and here's the results:

"founding fathers"

him: "i already found my father. luke skywalker's father is darth vader. he cut off his hand!!! darth vader's not going to come get me, is he?"
me: "no, remember, the moon is NOT the death star."

"toward our elected officials"

him: "what? who?"

"toward his parents"

him: "dad, can i have a snack?"

"toward a belief in a supernatural being"

"um, God created the ground, and the trees, and most of the bears."

"toward the sovereignty of this nation as a separate entity."

him: "hey dad, let me ask you something first, okay?"
me: "sure."
him: "guess what?"
me: "what?"
him: "chicken butt!"

i mean, my kids are crazy. no doubt about it. but not for any of those reasons. sheesh.

msp, Sunday, 11 November 2007 05:13 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Most of the bears!

Casuistry, Sunday, 11 November 2007 07:23 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Glad to see someone's still out there repping for Chicken Butt. Keep up the good work, kids.

Sparkle Motion, Sunday, 11 November 2007 07:31 (eleven years ago) Permalink

youll NEVER be a microwave

max, Wednesday, 14 November 2007 00:30 (eleven years ago) Permalink

an INTERWEBNERD

moonship journey to baja, Wednesday, 14 November 2007 01:23 (eleven years ago) Permalink

I'm sure others are aware that American schools were largely designed to ready people for industrial society, and thus they are largely about organization, structure, learning to follow directions, learning to respect authority and to behave in a docile manner.

hurting, check out walter karp's classic essay "why johnny can't think," from harper's circa 1985. he basically says what you said, only with a great deal more bile and indignation.

furthermore, he spells it all out: the only defensible purpose of public schools in america is to - in thomas jefferson's words - teach every citizen how to decide "what will secure or endanger his freedom." giving every person a well-rounded education is the only reason not to privatize education - if we just want to train industrial workers, then we might as well turn school over to the corporations.

J.D., Wednesday, 14 November 2007 02:35 (eleven years ago) Permalink

compare:

"we want one class of persons to have a liberal education, and we want another class of persons, a very much larger class of necessity in every society, to forego the privilege of a liberal education and fit themselves to perform specific manual tasks." - woodrow wilson, 1909

"(primary education should) be chiefly historical. history, by apprising (students) of the past, will enable them to judge of the future; it will avail them of the experience of other times and other nations; it will qualify them as judges of the actions and designs of men; it will enable them to know ambition under every disguise it may assume; and knowing it, to defeat its views." - thomas jefferson, 1782

judging from the fact that history has largely been replaced in schools by "social studies," which teaches students absolutely nothing worth knowing, looks like wilson won out over jefferson.

J.D., Wednesday, 14 November 2007 02:41 (eleven years ago) Permalink

BTW more than criticizing the way schools are designed, I'm just questioning the efficacy of any school at teaching "independent thinking," because anything you do in school is, by definition, not really independent. In some senses I didn't really learn to think until I had to support myself, although specific things I learned in school came in handy at that point.

Hurting 2, Wednesday, 14 November 2007 03:11 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Also I just wonder about the very fact of being stuck under the same system of what comes to seem like highly arbitrary authority well into one's biological adulthood. I mean the brain and the body are ready to be out hunting or building a shelter but you're stuck doing more advanced versions of the same crap you did in 2nd grade and with very little say in your own life. School is babyfying.

Hurting 2, Wednesday, 14 November 2007 03:14 (eleven years ago) Permalink

only college-level academics use it because MLA/APA citation format isn't much use to a plumber, an exterminator, a hairstylist, a football coach, a newscaster, a doctor, a helicopter pilot, etc etc

Are you arguing that writing papers in advanced-level high school literature and social studies classes is relevant to these people but citing sources when doing so isn't? My point was strictly about those types of classes, whose stated purpose in Ontario was (and I'm guessing still is) to prepare students for a university education. If they're to be offered at all, I think there are a lot (of very do-able things) they could do to come closer to this goal. I am not saying that every teenager needs to learn MLA/APA citation format. (And again, the other things I mentioned concern me a little more.)

I wouldn't really have a problem with making school a little more specialized after Gr 10 or so. Quebec does this to an extent.

(Proper citation format is surely relevant to students in medical sciences?)

Sundar, Wednesday, 14 November 2007 03:28 (eleven years ago) Permalink

(You never found high school unchallenging to the point of mind-numbing?)

Sundar, Wednesday, 14 November 2007 03:33 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Are you arguing that writing papers in advanced-level high school literature and social studies classes is relevant to these people but citing sources when doing so isn't?

yes

moonship journey to baja, Wednesday, 14 November 2007 04:46 (eleven years ago) Permalink

J.D. are you actually roger adultery?

moonship journey to baja, Wednesday, 14 November 2007 04:48 (eleven years ago) Permalink

judging from the fact that history has largely been replaced in schools by "social studies," which teaches students absolutely nothing worth knowing, looks like wilson won out over jefferson.

-- J.D., Wednesday, November 14, 2007 2:41 AM

at least they're teaching kids rhetoric, ey?

moonship journey to baja, Wednesday, 14 November 2007 04:48 (eleven years ago) Permalink

you're right, moonship. clearly thomas jefferson had nothing to tell us about education, and anyone who thinks his opinion might be more worth listening to than some academic who comes out with reactionary anti-democratic bilge like "on-the-job training, if incorporated into present educational structures, could produce educational success" is just being silly. and clearly our public schools are in fine shape, and anyone who thinks otherwise is a right-wing nutjob.

J.D., Wednesday, 14 November 2007 08:15 (eleven years ago) Permalink

im going to go ahead and say that yeah, the opinion of a 20th-century academic for whom schooling and school systems are a major interest is probably "more worth listening to" on this topic than an 18th-century politician who lived a century before compulsory schooling was free and widespread.

max, Wednesday, 14 November 2007 08:28 (eleven years ago) Permalink

i mean dont get me wrong, thomas jefferson's not a dummy but hes been dead for 150 years and a lot has changed

max, Wednesday, 14 November 2007 08:29 (eleven years ago) Permalink

yeah, the notion of every citizen deserving a well-rounded education* has clearly had its day.

*srsly this is ALL I'M SAYING and somehow it's controversial?

J.D., Wednesday, 14 November 2007 08:33 (eleven years ago) Permalink

also lol @ the idea that a dude who owned slaves would somehow disagree with "we want another class of persons, a very much larger class of necessity in every society, to forego the privilege of a liberal education and fit themselves to perform specific manual tasks."

max, Wednesday, 14 November 2007 08:34 (eleven years ago) Permalink

i dont know that anyone thinks that we shouldn't give kids a "well-rounded" education. i think the question is "what does well-rounded mean?" aka, "do we really need to teach 10th graders MLA citation formats or is that irrelevant garbage to the 95% of them who will never use it?"

max, Wednesday, 14 November 2007 08:35 (eleven years ago) Permalink

way to ad hominem the argument, dude, but you still haven't explained why "a lot has changed" to the degree that the idea of emphasizing civic education over fking job training is uselessly outdated. x-post

J.D., Wednesday, 14 November 2007 08:45 (eleven years ago) Permalink

i dont know that anyone thinks that we shouldn't give kids "educational success." i think the question is "what does educational success mean?"

J.D., Wednesday, 14 November 2007 08:48 (eleven years ago) Permalink

way to ad hominem the argument, dude

some academic who comes out with reactionary anti-democratic bilge

Curt1s Stephens, Wednesday, 14 November 2007 09:34 (eleven years ago) Permalink

There are islands, but [Rhode Island is] mostly mainland:

The mainland is originally the "Providence Plantation" part of the state's name, isn't it?

anatol_merklich, Wednesday, 14 November 2007 10:21 (eleven years ago) Permalink

J.D. are you actually roger adultery?

x-post

J.D., Wednesday, 14 November 2007 10:31 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Sundar's final year lit class sounds both similar and different to mine.

I think we studied 5 texts in year 12 (final year) literature (Agamemnon, Wuthering Heights, a Henry James, a collection of Australian short stories and King Lear), which I thought was a reasonable amount. Enough for everyone to get through, but more than enough scope to actually do a lot of interesting work if you wanted to: year 12 was the year i discovered Leavis and IR Richards and Bloom on King Lear which rocked my world. It's dubious to extrapolate from personal experience in this manner, but if you were a smart kid in my class and you couldn't find ways to stretch yourself you weren't trying hard enough.

Tim F, Wednesday, 14 November 2007 10:45 (eleven years ago) Permalink

I thought this thread was going to be about kids being insane to wait until age five to ENTER school, as by then it was already too late to get on the ultracompetitive treadmill that starts in nursery school.

James Redd and the Blecchs, Wednesday, 14 November 2007 12:10 (eleven years ago) Permalink

But maybe that's what it is about. Anyway Sundar and J.D. otm mostly. Sundar, I couldn't hear intervals until around the time of this thread. Well, maybe a little before that.

James Redd and the Blecchs, Wednesday, 14 November 2007 12:37 (eleven years ago) Permalink

lot of interesting stuff going on in this thread. i should point out that you badly misinterpreted what becker's saying. he's not arguing for vocational training in schools, he's arguing that the ways in which people learn *at work* should be included in schooling, so that you might learn shakespeare the same way you learn to play football.

moonship journey to baja, Wednesday, 14 November 2007 15:35 (eleven years ago) Permalink

way to ad hominem the argument, dude, but you still haven't explained why "a lot has changed" to the degree that the idea of emphasizing civic education over fking job training is uselessly outdated. x-post

thats, uh, not what becker is saying

max, Wednesday, 14 November 2007 16:15 (eleven years ago) Permalink

i also dont really have any fucking clue what "civic education" means

max, Wednesday, 14 November 2007 16:16 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Is anyone actually arguing that US/Cdn high schools are doing enough to challenge and engage academic-track students? I can't tell. That was my basic gripe. I'm not an expert on or an educator in the high school system so I don't really have a well-devised programme laid out for how to reform the curriculum. (moonship, you're a high school teacher IIRC?) I just have a feeling that more could be done in some key areas and have memories of being bored and unengaged. I'm kind of throwing things out there wrt more specific suggestions.

I'll drop the citation format thing since people have focused on that one point rather than the others concerning e.g. basic grammar, writing coherently, the possibility that 16-17-year-old Gifted students could stand to read 5 books in a year rather than 3 and might not read every word read aloud in class, the idea that people could stand to be better informed about world issues and some of the most basic ideas that have shaped them, the idea that maybe people should come out of public school music courses able to sing a major third and perfect fifth (I can do this BTW but it wasn't until grad school in music that someone sat me down and made me learn it really solidly.)

I think it would be worthwhile for academic-track students graduating from Canadian high schools to be able to easily e.g. explain what the Geneva Convention is, summarize the basic differences between the Cdn and US systems of government, name some of the major accomplishments of Rene Levesque, or discuss one of the major anti-colonial movements of the 20th century in cursory depth. I don't think high school is useless in this regard but I think there's more it could do. Not J.D. but this would be part of my concept of civic education.

I'll read the Becker when I get a moment.

Sundar, Wednesday, 14 November 2007 17:13 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Anyway, I better stay away from this thread before I screw up my current education!

Sundar, Wednesday, 14 November 2007 17:17 (eleven years ago) Permalink

I never let school threads interfere with my education.

James Redd and the Blecchs, Wednesday, 14 November 2007 17:32 (eleven years ago) Permalink

I never let school threads interfere with my education.

Laurel, Wednesday, 14 November 2007 17:47 (eleven years ago) Permalink

basic grammar, writing coherently, the possibility that 16-17-year-old Gifted students could stand to read 5 books in a year rather than 3 and might not read every word read aloud in class, the idea that people could stand to be better informed about world issues and some of the most basic ideas that have shaped them

i think more people *can* write coherently than ever before!

but why 5 rather than 3? why not read every word aloud?

moonship journey to baja, Wednesday, 14 November 2007 17:48 (eleven years ago) Permalink

should we discuss here the probably detrimental aspects of all parents having to work? since we're bringing up preschooling

El Tomboto, Wednesday, 14 November 2007 18:02 (eleven years ago) Permalink

we try not to because 1) educators don't like people telling them how to teach, so we don't want to tell people how to parent and 2) that line of argument very quickly ends up (like many, many historical arguments in education) disproportionately blaming poor parents, black parents, latino parents, immigrant parents.

moonship journey to baja, Wednesday, 14 November 2007 18:13 (eleven years ago) Permalink

B-b-but Sundar, when did you learn to sing a tritone?

Was that your yearbook quote, Laurel?

James Redd and the Blecchs, Wednesday, 14 November 2007 18:14 (eleven years ago) Permalink

I can't believe you guys' weak ass reading requirements in high school
I took the "gifted" english in HS and we had to go through 6-7 books in SUMMER, then another seven or eight over the course of the school year

El Tomboto, Wednesday, 14 November 2007 18:17 (eleven years ago) Permalink

made me hate hemingway and faulkner, I can tell you that

El Tomboto, Wednesday, 14 November 2007 18:17 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Perfect training for an interweb hardman.

James Redd and the Blecchs, Wednesday, 14 November 2007 18:19 (eleven years ago) Permalink

i actually would love to teach or take an english class were we focused, in serious depth, on a single book for an entire semester or even an entire year

max, Wednesday, 14 November 2007 18:26 (eleven years ago) Permalink

ok, the book is

ETHAN FROME

have fun

Catsupppppppppppppp dude 茄蕃, Wednesday, 14 November 2007 18:28 (eleven years ago) Permalink

lol

Curt1s Stephens, Wednesday, 14 November 2007 18:55 (eleven years ago) Permalink

thats, uh, not what becker is saying

i was responding to your "a lot has changed" remark, not becker.

i also dont really have any fucking clue what "civic education" means

here's a hint: ask any kid why they're going to school, and chances are they'll respond "to get a better job." if this were actually the purpose of school, any private company could do it better; as i've said, the only defensible purpose of public schools is to give future citizens a strong, rounded education - in science, in the arts, in history, whatever - in order to allow them to participate in public life. once you start thinking "why should we be teaching calculus to future construction workers?" you've totally lost sight of what public schools are for.

J.D., Wednesday, 14 November 2007 21:13 (eleven years ago) Permalink

calculus helps people become better citizens and participate in public life?

Hurting 2, Wednesday, 14 November 2007 21:41 (eleven years ago) Permalink

I know we've done this like three hundred times already, but the idea of public jr high and high schools teaching kids anything positive/productive about group dynamics and civilization and constructive socialization is hilarious to me.

Laurel, Wednesday, 14 November 2007 21:46 (eleven years ago) Permalink

every person between the ages of 14 and 20 should be given part-time jobs and allowed to spend the rest of their time smoking and having sex. then when you turn twenty you go to a five-year combination high school/college program and graduate with a degree.

max, Wednesday, 14 November 2007 21:52 (eleven years ago) Permalink

OTM, and xpost also OTM

Hurting 2, Wednesday, 14 November 2007 22:14 (eleven years ago) Permalink

http://www.fys.uio.no/~hkippe/gifer/crazy_mouse.gif

chaki, Wednesday, 14 November 2007 22:30 (eleven years ago) Permalink

and chances are they'll respond "to get a better job." if this were actually the purpose of school, any private company could do it better

is this actually true, though? don't a lot of jobs presuppose that you come prepared with things you learned in high school? i mean, "to get a better job" you could teach kids how to talk, how to present themselves, how to dress, some job skills, etc etc

there's a lot of stuff that goes into getting a job, but school works one part (basic cognitive skills) and i wonder whether a private company could do a better job of it.

moonship journey to baja, Wednesday, 14 November 2007 22:33 (eleven years ago) Permalink

I was SO BORED with the insane easiness and busywork in fourth grade that I would spend hours trying to pull out my remaining teeth for a reason to get out of class for 15 minutes.

Abbott, Thursday, 15 November 2007 19:51 (eleven years ago) Permalink


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