graphspergers - the graphs and quantitative visualization thread

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This is the thread where we post noteworthy graphs or quantitative diagrams. Ones you've done yourself are especially welcome but, so this doesn't turn into me live-blogging my PhD, any cool graph is welcome.

http://www.nature.com/mp/journal/v11/n1/images/4001750f2.jpg

caek, Tuesday, 6 November 2007 16:59 (fifteen years ago) link

can we include process diagrams y/n

El Tomboto, Tuesday, 6 November 2007 17:01 (fifteen years ago) link

y, definitely. Anything that is on-topic at Ask E.T. is on-topic here. But we can also cover really bad graphs that just look cool when high.

caek, Tuesday, 6 November 2007 17:03 (fifteen years ago) link

http://www.edwardtufte.com/tufte/graphics/poster_OrigMinard.gif

El Tomboto, Tuesday, 6 November 2007 17:04 (fifteen years ago) link

lol u brought up ET and I posted that we are visualization bros

El Tomboto, Tuesday, 6 November 2007 17:05 (fifteen years ago) link

lol tufte

jaymc, Tuesday, 6 November 2007 17:08 (fifteen years ago) link

http://lastgraph.aeracode.org/

jaymc, Tuesday, 6 November 2007 17:08 (fifteen years ago) link

http://img250.imageshack.us/img250/4891/ic5096vy1.gif

Here is my bro IC 5096. The black lines are contours of constant surface brightness of an image taken on a telescope outside Sydney in 1997. The red lines are my model galaxy, which is supposed to match the black lines. It does OK.

The axes are in units of arcsec, which is an angle rather than a distance. 1 arcsec = 1/3600th of a degree (i.e. not far). This galaxy is 40 Mpc = 130 465 450 light years away. At this distance 50 arcsec corresponds to about 10 kpc = 30 000 light years. This is about the distance from us to the centre of the Milky Way.

caek, Tuesday, 6 November 2007 17:09 (fifteen years ago) link

lol it's a vagina

HI DERE, Tuesday, 6 November 2007 17:10 (fifteen years ago) link

http://www.edwardtufte.com/tufte/graphics/poster_cyclogram_big.gif

I have this on my living room wall. As ET would say, it is an image which rewards careful study (and not a 705x363px GIF).

caek, Tuesday, 6 November 2007 17:11 (fifteen years ago) link

It does look a bit vajayjay. Astrophysics is full of them. Here is another, which is called "the finger of god":

http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v410/n6825/images/410169ab.2.jpg

caek, Tuesday, 6 November 2007 17:13 (fifteen years ago) link

Caek can you explain the Autistic Spectrum graph or gimme a link to the article it's from?

Noodle Vague, Tuesday, 6 November 2007 17:15 (fifteen years ago) link

http://i22.tinypic.com/29ks9ys.jpg

StanM, Tuesday, 6 November 2007 17:15 (fifteen years ago) link

That finger of god thing is what a perfectly spherical cluster of galaxies at a very large distance ends up looking like from Earth.

http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v410/n6825/full/410169a0.html

This redshift-space anisotropy should cause two characteristic effects, operating respectively on small and large scales. On small scales, random orbital velocities within galaxy groups cause an apparent radial smearing, known as 'fingers of God'. Of greater interest is the large-scale effect; if cosmological structure forms by gravitational collapse, there should exist coherent infall velocities, and the effect of these is to cause an apparent flattening of structures along the line of sight.

bong hit time.

caek, Tuesday, 6 November 2007 17:16 (fifteen years ago) link

http://i21.tinypic.com/eq2gj7.png

StanM, Tuesday, 6 November 2007 17:16 (fifteen years ago) link

nathan's famous contest winners:
http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1019/1106150394_3084623ad6_o.jpg

my commute home by bicycle:
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2230/1638159993_528b8ae810.jpg

from tracer hand:
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2058/1839391132_d4c011e7e6.jpg

Steve Shasta, Tuesday, 6 November 2007 17:17 (fifteen years ago) link

nathan's famous contest winners:
http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1019/1106150394_3084623ad6_o.jpg

my commute home by bicycle:
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2230/1638159993_528b8ae810.jpg

from tracer hand:
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2058/1839391132_d4c011e7e6.jpg

Steve Shasta, Tuesday, 6 November 2007 17:18 (fifteen years ago) link

xpost to NV, Found it on GIS. Taken from http://www.nature.com/mp/journal/v11/n1/full/4001750a.html (let me know if you don't have an institutional subscription and want to read the paper).

caek, Tuesday, 6 November 2007 17:18 (fifteen years ago) link

Suicides on the Golden Gate by location. There are three very clear Gaussian peaks on this, and one day I am going to fit them using Bayesian statistics and win the Nobel prize for trivializing mental illness.

http://www.sfgate.com/c/pictures/2005/10/30/mn_suicide30_loc_tt.gif

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/object/article?f=/c/a/2005/10/30/MNG2NFF7KI1.DTL&o=2

caek, Tuesday, 6 November 2007 17:20 (fifteen years ago) link

xp

Okay cheers - I'm guessing from the the magazine title its probably pitched at a level a bit beyond my needs/understanding tho.

Noodle Vague, Tuesday, 6 November 2007 17:21 (fifteen years ago) link

this thread is more amazing than i even imagined

rrrobyn, Tuesday, 6 November 2007 17:23 (fifteen years ago) link

Strong peak in the centre facing toward the city, broad peak around the SF tower, secondary broad peak on the SF side for people too sad to walk out over the water : (, shadow peak facing out to the ocean, peak facing the city by Marin tower.

xpost, yes. Looks very technical. They seem to be looking for statistically significant genes for autism rather than talking about the psychology, which might be a bit more accessible.

caek, Tuesday, 6 November 2007 17:24 (fifteen years ago) link

Powerpoint Gettysburg Address:

http://norvig.com/Gettysburg/img005.gif

http://norvig.com/Gettysburg/

caek, Tuesday, 6 November 2007 17:25 (fifteen years ago) link

Nathan's Famous Graph is dope.

caek, Tuesday, 6 November 2007 17:26 (fifteen years ago) link

http://ej.iop.org/images/1742-5468/2006/02/P02006/Full/1773001.jpg

caek, Tuesday, 6 November 2007 17:32 (fifteen years ago) link

http://www.iop.org/EJ/abstract/-search=37150849.1/1742-5468/2006/02/P02006

Also on the arXiv pre-editing for IOP style if you want to read it and don't have an institutional sub: http://arxiv.org/abs/physics/0511215

caek, Tuesday, 6 November 2007 17:33 (fifteen years ago) link

http://ej.iop.org/images/1742-5468/2006/02/P02006/Full/1773003.jpg

Figure 2. A collection of adjacent k = 3 k cliques centring on the rapper RZA found using the clique percolation method after the weighted edge disparity algorithm is run for X = 50. The community has red edges and sits over the network of all neighbours of the nodes in the community. All of the rappers with several exceptions such as Chuck D, Isaac Hayes, and Chris Rock are directly or indirectly affiliated with the Wu-Tang supergroup and their music labels. The highly clustered rappers in the middle of the diagram are the core members of the original Wu-Tang Clan group (GZA, RZA, Ol' Dirty Bastard, Method Man, Raekwon, Ghostface Killah, Inspectah Deck, Masta Killa, U-God). Plotted with the Kamada-Kawai graphing algorithm.

caek, Tuesday, 6 November 2007 17:35 (fifteen years ago) link

OK, this is starting to get like Boing Boing, so I am going to stop for now.

caek, Tuesday, 6 November 2007 17:35 (fifteen years ago) link

that one is v pretty

rrrobyn, Tuesday, 6 November 2007 17:37 (fifteen years ago) link

OK, two more. Complete map of the universe:

http://www.astro.princeton.edu/~mjuric/universe/all100.gif

http://www.astro.princeton.edu/~mjuric/universe/

and finally, the reason why I need to stop going through my bookmarks looking for graphs and get back to work: the physics job market.

http://scienceblogs.com/principles/5404physics.gif

caek, Tuesday, 6 November 2007 17:40 (fifteen years ago) link

The universe got resized : ( Click link for the full-resolution awesomeness.

caek, Tuesday, 6 November 2007 17:41 (fifteen years ago) link

whoaa

rrrobyn, Tuesday, 6 November 2007 17:42 (fifteen years ago) link

Individual sheets without horizontal axes plotted, suitable for printing and taping together

on the back of my bathroom door opposite the bog in my old house. Good pooping.

caek, Tuesday, 6 November 2007 17:46 (fifteen years ago) link

http://www.isi.edu/ant/address/it.15.all.16-subnet_stats.3px-per-point.annotated.png
census of the internet

El Tomboto, Tuesday, 6 November 2007 17:52 (fifteen years ago) link

(anybody who posts the xkcd drawing gets a slap)

El Tomboto, Tuesday, 6 November 2007 17:52 (fifteen years ago) link

also I think 114 and 115 got allocated to asia recently

El Tomboto, Tuesday, 6 November 2007 17:52 (fifteen years ago) link

Anything from xkcd on this thread gets a slap.

caek, Tuesday, 6 November 2007 18:00 (fifteen years ago) link

When I saw this thread title I thought of this thing that was on Metafilter the other day:

http://strangemaps.files.wordpress.com/2007/11/jpcurve.png

Noodle Vague, Tuesday, 6 November 2007 18:05 (fifteen years ago) link

What is a negative unemployment rate? Unfilled jobs/people?

caek, Tuesday, 6 November 2007 18:15 (fifteen years ago) link

I think there's a negative correlation between inflation and the unemployment rate so they've reversed the unemployment axis for some reason: maybe to illustrate the similarity of the shape.

Noodle Vague, Tuesday, 6 November 2007 18:19 (fifteen years ago) link

Ah, so by "(Minus) unemployment rate" they mean "unemployment rate x -1". In which case:

http://img235.imageshack.us/img235/6347/japanzl6.jpg

Hmm.

caek, Tuesday, 6 November 2007 18:26 (fifteen years ago) link

Actually the inflation axis looks a bit odd as well.

Noodle Vague, Tuesday, 6 November 2007 18:28 (fifteen years ago) link

caek u do astrophysics? I work for ApJ.

dan m, Tuesday, 6 November 2007 18:47 (fifteen years ago) link

I could post a lot of graphs and visuals but I would be breaking copyright big time.

dan m, Tuesday, 6 November 2007 18:48 (fifteen years ago) link

will u accept my paper y/n? Actually, it's going to MNRAS because of page charges ; ) Are you in production or editorial or marketing? I used to work in editorial for IoP in Bristol.

Posting figures = fair use (probably), and most of them are on the arXiv anyway, surely.

caek, Tuesday, 6 November 2007 19:02 (fifteen years ago) link

lol IOP... they're taking our jobs! I work for the UofC Press, on peer review and production. My old boss just accepted a position at IOP in the states, I'm hoping to get headhunted by him eventually :D

You're probably right about the figures, but I'd rather not chance it. It'd be kind of a shitty thing to bring down the credibility of the AAS!

dan m, Tuesday, 6 November 2007 19:09 (fifteen years ago) link

I was on peer review and development ("publishing editor") for Journal of Physics A. IoP in the US is in Philadelphia, right? I never got a trip there out of that job, but I did get ones to San Francisco, Pisa and Bangalore, so it wasn't all bad.

caek, Tuesday, 6 November 2007 19:37 (fifteen years ago) link

As far as I know they're mostly in Philly, but the story is a new office is opening in DC, which is where my former boss is going.

Think I can get away with this one, though I am no physicist so I have no idea what it's about beyond pretty colors...

http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1122/653521560_09b57a1062.jpg

dan m, Tuesday, 6 November 2007 19:55 (fifteen years ago) link

i like to call this paradox the "next frontier in theoretical polyscience"

Karl Malone, Wednesday, 9 July 2014 17:28 (eight years ago) link

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Overfitting

caek, Wednesday, 9 July 2014 17:29 (eight years ago) link

hmmm, yes that's an interesting theory

Karl Malone, Wednesday, 9 July 2014 17:39 (eight years ago) link

but it's not the one you subscribe to, professor malone?

chikungunya manatee (Sufjan Grafton), Wednesday, 9 July 2014 17:47 (eight years ago) link

i prefer to let the mysteries of science marinate in the sea of self-collected data for a while - eventually, the answers always rise to the top

Karl Malone, Wednesday, 9 July 2014 17:49 (eight years ago) link

it would be fun to fake your way onto rightwing AM radio as a "science expert"

Karl Malone, Wednesday, 9 July 2014 17:50 (eight years ago) link

I've been making graphs for my company for the past year or so, and with no formal training, I still feel like this newspaper is publishing the rantings of a crazy person.

For example, we used to measure net absorption rates in regular bar form, like this:

http://assets.inarkansas.com/32941/net-absorption-by-quarter.jpg

Net absorption is such a weird stat anyway - Basically how much square footage was gained or lost in a market between two quarters. It can be positive or negative. And if a shopping mall opens or a factory closes, the numbers can vary widely.

So I wanted to show how big of a difference those numbers can be sometimes and came up with this:

http://assets.inarkansas.com/49176/central-arkansas-industrial-real-estate-vacancy-553.jpg

The marks we would've used in bar formats are still there, but I represented the rates by size. The time used above was a good one since everything was positive, but if any were negative, I could've still used the space I've got and just put the zero line in the middle. Like this:

http://assets.inarkansas.com/49054/vacancy-rate-remains-flat-781.jpg

Are those too busy? Do they make any sense? What changes would you make?

I get a little lost in the woods some afternoons I'm putting these together. No one's complained yet, but hell, who knows if anyone's even looking.

pplains, Wednesday, 9 July 2014 17:52 (eight years ago) link

Different sized circles are usually bad for data visualization, because they're easy to mess up and can be difficult to interpret.
http://blog.revolutionanalytics.com/2011/01/for-data-visualization-circles-dont-cut-it.html
And also see the discussion in Nathan Yau's book Visualize This.
But circles might be pretty good to use if you're using them to represent area (or change in area) like you are. Just make sure the circles actually represent area, and you're not accidentally sizing them by radius or diameter.

Dan I., Wednesday, 9 July 2014 18:39 (eight years ago) link

Hm, I think using both circle size and the Y axis to represent net absorption might be bad, because it makes the circle sizes more difficult to compare. If you want to represent net absorption by circle size, consider taking out the Y axis and just setting all the circles on the same horizontal line.

Dan I., Wednesday, 9 July 2014 18:42 (eight years ago) link

pplains, are you trying to demonstrate that the changes are mostly capricious/random or just that they can vary widely year-to-year? from looking at these i'd guess that something happened in 2013 4Q that lead to a huge boom in both commercial + industrial sectors?

Mordy, Wednesday, 9 July 2014 18:45 (eight years ago) link

I also think different sized squares would be a more easily interpretable indicator of area, because people aren't as good at perceiving that the outer parts of a circle contain more area (the famous "biggest pizza = best deal" thing)

Dan I., Wednesday, 9 July 2014 18:46 (eight years ago) link

(Also, Dr. Malone, get one information criterion!)

Dan I., Wednesday, 9 July 2014 18:47 (eight years ago) link

one problem with the circles (as used above) is that it can difficult to tell at a glance what the actual quantities are - is it the point at the middle of the circle? at the top edge? bottom edge? reasonable people could come to different conclusions, i think. it's really impossible to tell without labeling each of the individual circles, which you've done. but if you have to label each of the individual circles in order to communicate the quantities, then there's probably a better way to do it. also, Dan I otm about area vs radius vs diameter

Karl Malone, Wednesday, 9 July 2014 18:49 (eight years ago) link

And especially since some of the values are negative, it's better to just stick with the bar chart in your first image. Really feel like the human brain might have a problem interpreting the size of a thing on a plot as actually being the magnitude of the reduction in that thing.

Dan I., Wednesday, 9 July 2014 18:55 (eight years ago) link

you could implement a new system where you walk around the office giving tootsie rolls for every 1000 sq. ft. of net office space gained that quarter. if your company loses office space, then you take away an item on the person's desk for every 1000 sq. ft. lost. this simultaneously acts as an incentive system

Karl Malone, Wednesday, 9 July 2014 18:58 (eight years ago) link

You could change the unit from square feet to "# of john's houses" to point out to everyone how small your rival john's house is.

chikungunya manatee (Sufjan Grafton), Wednesday, 9 July 2014 19:03 (eight years ago) link

at the least there is a problem with the x positions of the circles. they are not regularly spaced in the x direction. is that real?

those plots are very hard to interpret imo. estimating areas of circles is something we are always terrible at. but in this case it's even harder because what you're trying to get across is conceptually complicated, and the range of point sizes you're using is colossal.

the bar chart in the first example is much clearer. i would stick with that tbh. if you want to explicitly include both the absolute value of SF and the change (i.e. net absorption) (which i don't think you need to, it's implicit, unless i've misunderstood net absorption), i would use two bar graph panels, one above the other, sharing an x axis

x = time
y1 = square feet
y2 = net absorption

caek, Wednesday, 9 July 2014 19:05 (eight years ago) link

These are really helpful, I mean it.

The circles do represent area, flat two-dimensional area. This is why I wanted to run with showing the different sizes.

I'm showing how little I know about algebra by not quite understanding the difference between diameter and area. I read the blog about the State of the Union address and didn't quite get what the fuss was about.

(Though if it means anything, I understand why there was a fuss and why I would want to avoid making that mistake even if I'm not sure what the mistake was. How's that for clarity?)

I based the circles off of the area in this way: I somehow did the calculations of what the square root of 448,568 would be. I then put those x,y coordinates into the "exact ratio" field of the circle selection tool, so it would be perfect circle. Then I based the ratios of the other circles on that. Is this voodoo economics?

And fwiw, these graphs never appeared together. Even if they weren't part of the slide, it would still bug me that the circles would be the same size despite one being 448K and the other being -64K.

then there's probably a better way to do it.

oh most indeed.

pplains, Wednesday, 9 July 2014 19:09 (eight years ago) link

at the least there is a problem with the x positions of the circles. they are not regularly spaced in the x direction. is that real?

The x positions, the number of square feet, are accurately pinpointed by the white squares. If it was a bar graph, the bars would rise and fall exactly to those spots on the graph.

The circles are illustrations only.

pplains, Wednesday, 9 July 2014 19:11 (eight years ago) link

I have no idea if I answered that question or not.

pplains, Wednesday, 9 July 2014 19:12 (eight years ago) link

standard advice is don't use the size or area of symbols on the page to represent any important data, because people can't "read" it

your first bar chart has the same data in it and is familiar and easy to read.

caek, Wednesday, 9 July 2014 19:13 (eight years ago) link

why aren't the centres of the circles on the white points?

caek, Wednesday, 9 July 2014 19:14 (eight years ago) link

oh wait. i had totally been misreading your graphs. they are very confusing!

my points still stand. i think you need to get rid of the circles.

caek, Wednesday, 9 July 2014 19:16 (eight years ago) link

And fwiw, these graphs never appeared together. Even if they weren't part of the slide, it would still bug me that the circles would be the same size despite one being 448K and the other being -64K.

this is not a minor thing. it's a huge flaw in the approach.

if area of the circle represents the data, and you have positive and negative data, then negative changes should have circles with negative areas. this is not possible.

caek, Wednesday, 9 July 2014 19:19 (eight years ago) link

things you can't do when you have positive and negative data:

log plots
area plots

caek, Wednesday, 9 July 2014 19:21 (eight years ago) link

you could compare the area to the peak area, which you could show for scale, and never go negative. but you shouldn't.

chikungunya manatee (Sufjan Grafton), Wednesday, 9 July 2014 19:21 (eight years ago) link

I'm starting to think I'm bombing on these.

Another stat that I thought wasn't being illustrated correctly has to do with unemployment figures. Usually, those are in bar graph form from month to month or by region, pretty straight forward.

http://assets.inarkansas.com/47290/arkansas-unemployment-rate-2013-4q-general.jpg

But there's a weird anomaly that happens from month to month where the number of jobs/number of people changes. So you might have a month where there are more people working, but the unemployment rate goes up the number of jobs go up too.

I did my circle thing again and second-guessed later that I should've made the red unemployed figure go around the circumference of the blue ball so that it would match the green total ball.

But now, I feel like I should be working for Fox News or the Enquirer.

http://assets.inarkansas.com/51231/may-2014-employment-in-arkansas.jpg

pplains, Wednesday, 9 July 2014 19:23 (eight years ago) link

bar graphs aren't really performing any role when you can't visually tell the difference between them

iatee, Wednesday, 9 July 2014 19:25 (eight years ago) link

like it is a fox news graph in a sense "look the economy hasn't changed at all!!"

iatee, Wednesday, 9 July 2014 19:26 (eight years ago) link

nine months pass...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sz2mmM-kN1I

, Wednesday, 29 April 2015 11:33 (seven years ago) link

four months pass...

http://gecon.yale.edu/

cool data set with economic output on a 1 degree latitude by 1 degree longitude

http://oi58.tinypic.com/24en8kh.jpg
http://oi58.tinypic.com/inxu87.jpg
http://oi60.tinypic.com/k13skz.jpg

flopson, Tuesday, 1 September 2015 03:24 (seven years ago) link

grid

flopson, Tuesday, 1 September 2015 03:25 (seven years ago) link

three years pass...

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/D6PtWdLXsAAgIht.jpg

mookieproof, Saturday, 11 May 2019 03:46 (three years ago) link

- "Maybe we should get another usual suspect in the lineup besides the Indian woman."

- "But from where? Estonia? Venezuela? There aren't many other countries to choose from!"

pplains, Saturday, 11 May 2019 03:55 (three years ago) link

Look at the difference between 5’4” and 5’5” on the y-axis, compares to between 5’0” and 5’1”

these are not all of the possible side effects (Karl Malone), Saturday, 11 May 2019 04:02 (three years ago) link

Other than that, great chart design!!

these are not all of the possible side effects (Karl Malone), Saturday, 11 May 2019 04:03 (three years ago) link

The Latvian woman is huge and the woman from India is tiny to visually convey the fact that Latvia has a female population at least ten times larger than the female population of India.

A is for (Aimless), Saturday, 11 May 2019 05:00 (three years ago) link

The sum of the height of all the Indian women will be more though. Is there a graph of that?

StanM, Saturday, 11 May 2019 05:25 (three years ago) link

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/D7K2CkyXkAAEJKT.jpg

mookieproof, Thursday, 23 May 2019 20:05 (three years ago) link

that was so upsetting. Also needs the the n/2+7 line drawn on as well

don't mock my smock or i'll clean your clock (silby), Thursday, 23 May 2019 20:12 (three years ago) link

eight months pass...

is there a name for a visualization that would accomplish the following?

i want to compare two populations that each have two subsets--say one of them is 15M people total, then 4M of those people meet a specific condition, and 1.9M of those 4 meet a further specific condition. and the other population has the same conditions but completely different proportions.

so basically like a treemap but instead of the whole area adding up to the total it would have proportional smaller rectangles embedded within a big rectangle? is this even a thing?

call all destroyer, Tuesday, 28 January 2020 03:41 (three years ago) link

would a simple stacked bar graph do the trick? here are two that meet your requirements:
https://i.imgur.com/me2obge.png
https://i.imgur.com/sW9m0c5.png

the first shows two populations of different sizes, the second shows two population of equal sizes.

But guess what? Nobody gives a toot!😂 (Karl Malone), Tuesday, 28 January 2020 04:08 (three years ago) link

or wait, i see what you're saying. subsets within subsets. if that's the case, you could just color code the results. 11M non-diarrhea, 6 million with diarrhea. non-diarrhea is a deep calm blue, diarrhea is an agitated warm color. 4.1 million of the 6 million have severe diarrhea, so make that deep red. the other 1.9 million have moderate diarrhea, so make that orange.

https://i.imgur.com/eZND3qv.png

But guess what? Nobody gives a toot!😂 (Karl Malone), Tuesday, 28 January 2020 04:15 (three years ago) link

or, to go to your op, a tree map, and just format the results to highlight the groupings you want

But guess what? Nobody gives a toot!😂 (Karl Malone), Tuesday, 28 January 2020 04:17 (three years ago) link

Karl I am gonna need seventeen more made up diarrhea graphs on my desk by COB tomorrow.

Swilling Ambergris, Esq. (silby), Tuesday, 28 January 2020 04:36 (three years ago) link

i'm glad i processed those extra participants' waivers during my lunch break yesterday, sunday, instead of eating

But guess what? Nobody gives a toot!😂 (Karl Malone), Tuesday, 28 January 2020 04:45 (three years ago) link

"Beginner's Diarhhea"!

zuck zuck lucify (Sufjan Grafton), Tuesday, 28 January 2020 06:22 (three years ago) link

two years pass...

What a wonderfully misleading diagram in the Times today 📈 pic.twitter.com/isQtZS6Mot

— Will Bailey-Watson (@mrwbw) June 27, 2022

koogs, Tuesday, 28 June 2022 13:29 (seven months ago) link

six months pass...

loooooooool

An analysis looks at how defense spending among the nations with the highest expenditures has changed since 1992 and what may have driven the changes https://t.co/3ln08vOKAo pic.twitter.com/yqK6MqwQUm

— St. Louis Fed (@stlouisfed) January 22, 2023

Karl Malone, Monday, 23 January 2023 22:33 (one week ago) link


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