Rolling US Economy Into The Shitbin Thread

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http://bigpicture.typepad.com/comments/2007/10/more-inflation.html

El Tomboto, Thursday, 18 October 2007 23:44 (eleven years ago) Permalink

personally I'm applying for a civil servant position ASAP

El Tomboto, Thursday, 18 October 2007 23:45 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Just FYI, during the 1930s depression, many civil servants were paid with vouchers rather than cash, because local governments were unable to collect property taxes and their receipts fell into the shitbin.

Aimless, Friday, 19 October 2007 00:12 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Economy's doing poorly enough as it stands, why do we deliberately want to roll it into the shitbin?

Abbott, Friday, 19 October 2007 00:14 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Because that way Hillary can rescue us all.

Dandy Don Weiner, Friday, 19 October 2007 00:17 (eleven years ago) Permalink

lol property taxes

El Tomboto, Friday, 19 October 2007 00:18 (eleven years ago) Permalink

shitbin's a great word, BTW.

Dandy Don Weiner, Friday, 19 October 2007 00:20 (eleven years ago) Permalink

you been loving my thread titles lately

El Tomboto, Friday, 19 October 2007 00:26 (eleven years ago) Permalink

i came to this country some time ago with little more than a crippling debt burden in GB Pounds and the shirt on my back. i used to have to send back $1,200 each month to pay off my UK debt, and now I'm sending back over $1,400 to cover the same amount of debt repayment. that's two and a half thousand dollars disappearing from my tiny disposable income every year, for no explicable reason. i *heart* the decline of the US economy.

Roberto Spiralli, Friday, 19 October 2007 00:27 (eleven years ago) Permalink

anyway why start this thread now because the bit where ritholtz points out that domino's pizza can't print new menus fast enough to keep up with inflation was pretty fucking amazing

I wish rasheed wallace was still around to show us the latest and greatest exploding bubble blogs

El Tomboto, Friday, 19 October 2007 00:28 (eleven years ago) Permalink

wow Roberto that was some shitty timing, that sucks

El Tomboto, Friday, 19 October 2007 00:29 (eleven years ago) Permalink

This was in the paper today:

Mortgage defaults

Hit an annual rate of 1.5 million in September. That compares with 900,000 last year from fewer than 800,000 in 2005. At the current rate, more than one million Americans will lose their homes to foreclosure, making this the worst housing recession since the Second World War.

Housing starts

Sank to a 14-year low of 1.19 million in September. Starts are a vital economic engine, creating jobs and growth as people stuff their homes with sofas and TVs. Starts peaked at 2.3 million in early 2006, and the decline will be a drag on the rest of the economy until the slide stops.

Mortgages

A quarter of the roughly 50 million U.S. home mortgages are subprime. That's seven times the number of high-risk mortgages there were in 2001. That means that many more marginal homeowners have mortgages, making it far more likely they'll wind up in default.

House prices

Fell 3.2 per cent in the second quarter. Prices are falling faster and more broadly than they have in decades, according to the closely watched Case-Shiller index.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/LAC.20071018.IBUSECONOMY18/TPStory/Business

everything, Friday, 19 October 2007 00:29 (eleven years ago) Permalink

where the hell is rasheed anyway?

economic blogs I read (they're all fairly liberal):

http://calculatedrisk.blogspot.com/
http://angrybear.blogspot.com/
http://delong.typepad.com/sdj/
http://www.marginalrevolution.com/marginalrevolution/
http://bigpicture.typepad.com/
http://www.janegalt.net/

Dandy Don Weiner, Friday, 19 October 2007 00:37 (eleven years ago) Permalink

In regard to inflation, in the USA during the past three years inflation has been soaring - but almost entirely in the housing sector. The fact that people are encouraged to see their houses as investments rather than as expenses doesn't mean that skyrocketing housing costs weren't inflationary. They were.

As the bubble market bursts, I predict a recession with an extra added bonus of inflation running close to 10% - before the end of 2008. As it has for the past 30 years, the official CPI will understate the real inflation rate. It was rigged under Reagan so that government entitlement programs indexed to the CPI would not increase at the true pace of inflation.

If Bush continues to shovel shit on the dollar right up to the end of his term in January 2009, the inflation rate could hit 15%-20% by 2010.

Aimless, Friday, 19 October 2007 00:55 (eleven years ago) Permalink

There are some good economics articles put up here as well:
http://www.VoxEU.org

stet, Friday, 19 October 2007 01:02 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Which shit on the dollar are you referring to?

Dandy Don Weiner, Friday, 19 October 2007 01:02 (eleven years ago) Permalink

As the bubble market bursts, I predict a recession with an extra added bonus of inflation running close to 10% - before the end of 2008.

lol

aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa, Friday, 19 October 2007 06:11 (eleven years ago) Permalink

this is why i live in canada!

J0rdan S., Friday, 19 October 2007 06:13 (eleven years ago) Permalink

oh wait.

J0rdan S., Friday, 19 October 2007 06:13 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Guys, this is a good time stay in academia right?

Catsupppppppppppppp dude ่Œ„่•ƒ, Friday, 19 October 2007 11:51 (eleven years ago) Permalink

It's a good time to learn a European language.

Nubbelverbrennung, Friday, 19 October 2007 13:33 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Prime shit examples:

When Bush was elected in 2000, the federal budget was in surplus and the national debt was being paid down. Had this state of affairs continued, as projected, it would have led both to lower interest rates and a strong dollar, together. Instead, Bush submitted a series of enormous tax cuts to the Republican-controlled Congress and lobbied them through. Immediately, the CBO's projected budget surpluses turned to projected deficits for the next decade.

Bush also initiated a war of choice, not necessity, in Iraq. This war has already cost well over $700 billion. Yet, Bush insisted on making his tax cuts permanent. Overall, the national debt has increased under Bush by about $2 trillion in seven years. This represents a difference of about $3 trillion of debt from what was projected at the start of his first term.

Because, due to Bush's tax cuts and other policies, the Federal government was in a far weaker position to stimulate the economy when the recession started after 9/11, almost the entire stimulus was delivered via lower interest rates. Because these rate cuts were artificial, and not based on a stronger dollar, this stimulus not only inflated the current housing bubble, but it also undercut the dollar even more than the ballooning national debt did.

Now the dollar is at an all-time low against the euro and the canadian dollar. However, the incomes of the top 10% of American households have increased at a good clip, while the lower 50% of households have seen a decrease in income after inflation. This is largely thanks to Bush's shitty policies. I expect more of the same mismanagement until he is gone.

Aimless, Saturday, 20 October 2007 18:36 (eleven years ago) Permalink

I agree with everything you've just said. You're predictions still seem a tad extreme on the downside though, if I may so.

aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa, Saturday, 20 October 2007 18:50 (eleven years ago) Permalink

i wonder if income inequality will ever arrive as a political issue in this country. americans tend to not begrudge the rich - so it'll have to be more of a "for everyone's good" type of angle. no?

jhรธshea, Saturday, 20 October 2007 18:54 (eleven years ago) Permalink

I remember the 1970s and early 80s quite well. Back then people couldn't belileve it, either. Bush has done a bangup job of recreating many of the same policy errors under Johnson and Nixon that led to raging stagflation back then, except the underlying economy is now weaker than it was in the 1970s and the oil shocks we are likely to get are not political, as when OPEC was formed, but structural.

Oil will exceed $100/barrel some time this winter. The ever-weakening dollar will lead to smaller profit margins and rising retail prices on all imported goods (which means almost everything we buy in the USA). Transport costs will rise with pil prices. Stock prices will erode along with profits. With so many savings tied up in stocks and home equity, consumer spending will be crunched, and personal debt and bancruptcies will rise like a tide. Businesses will retrench and unemployment will rise. No end in sight.

I hope I am wrong.

Aimless, Saturday, 20 October 2007 19:07 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Anyone want to join my modern-day James Gang? We shall ride across the lower Midwest, robbing and pillaging.

milo z, Saturday, 20 October 2007 19:09 (eleven years ago) Permalink

sounds fun

jhรธshea, Saturday, 20 October 2007 19:13 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Sorry, I don't want to relocate. But this scheme sounds ripe for franchising.

Aimless, Saturday, 20 October 2007 19:14 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Oil will exceed $100/barrel some time this winter. The ever-weakening dollar will lead to smaller profit margins and rising retail prices on all imported goods (which means almost everything we buy in the USA). Transport costs will rise with pil prices. Stock prices will erode along with profits. With so many savings tied up in stocks and home equity, consumer spending will be crunched, and personal debt and bancruptcies will rise like a tide. Businesses will retrench and unemployment will rise. No end in sight.

I hope I am wrong.

-- Aimless, Saturday, 20 October 2007 19:07 (14 minutes ago) Link

The coming of $100/barrel oil is not Bush's fault. It's yours and mine and everyone else's for using too damned much energy. I agree Bush could and should have done a lot more with policy to encourage energy efficiency, but there's little he could have done to stop oil's eventual rise to that price level.

Hurting 2, Saturday, 20 October 2007 19:26 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Part of the pricing of oil represents the weakness of the dollar. This hurts the USA more than it does other countries. US citizens are paid in dollars and the US government collects revenue in dollars, so they are stuck. EU countries can use euros to buy increasingly cheap dollars, so they don't see the same rise in prices as we do. The weakness of the dollar is mainly Bush's fault.

Aimless, Saturday, 20 October 2007 19:31 (eleven years ago) Permalink

The US also uses way more oil than other countries.

Hurting 2, Saturday, 20 October 2007 19:33 (eleven years ago) Permalink

he could have done to stop oil's eventual rise to that price level.
Not starting a war in Iraq would definitely have helped here.

stet, Saturday, 20 October 2007 19:57 (eleven years ago) Permalink

arrgh, if that won't work then
http://calculatedrisk.blogspot.com/2007/10/imf-mortgage-reset-chart.html

El Tomboto, Monday, 22 October 2007 17:47 (eleven years ago) Permalink

tombot u r freakin me out

gff, Monday, 22 October 2007 17:50 (eleven years ago) Permalink

i hope my small apartment + modest savings plan + job in "information services" is enough to weather the shitstorm, if it comes. i got myself out of credit card debt a few months ago, at least

gff, Monday, 22 October 2007 17:53 (eleven years ago) Permalink

well if you can hold down a job and don't have to worry about an ARM reset you should be okay, it's the homeowner with kids and a subprime loan and two cars who ought to be shitting themselves

El Tomboto, Monday, 22 October 2007 17:58 (eleven years ago) Permalink

apart from some student loans and binging on credit cards over a few years, i'm kind of debt phobic.

which has actually made me lose out over the past several years, i realize, since i pay for EVERYTHING with a debit/check card... i could have just paid that balance on a credit card with some rewards scheme and has some air miles or something

gff, Monday, 22 October 2007 18:00 (eleven years ago) Permalink

rolling gff personal finances into the shitbin thread, ha

gff, Monday, 22 October 2007 18:01 (eleven years ago) Permalink

This will give you a boner Tombot

http://nymag.com/guides/money/2007/39952/

Dandy Don Weiner, Wednesday, 31 October 2007 11:30 (eleven years ago) Permalink

the economy increased by 3.9% this quarter! bull market forever, baby. economy's better than ever. golden age.

yet me and so many people I know are getting laid off next month. granted we're all in the writing/design field, but urhhhhh. gggg.

burt_stanton, Wednesday, 31 October 2007 14:58 (eleven years ago) Permalink

http://nymag.com/guides/money/2007/catastrophist071105_560.jpg
http://nymag.com/guides/money/2007/catastrophist071105_2_560.jpg

^^^ lol

most of that guy's scenario is not really news to regular bigpicture/CR readers I don't think. But #5, the "we don't pay attention" thing, yeah, well, evidently the awareness campaign is underway, but hell if the big players are paying attention.

He also leaves out the approaching demographic catastrophe as millions of inexperienced thirtysomethings and even some late-twenties kids are forced to move into arguably tougher jobs that the boomers have been holding for two decades. Beyond the social security and healthcare costs associated with mass retirement, I don't really know if this generation has the work ethic and definitely not the rolodex to just start filling in and not fuck up royally. too busy updating their linkedin pages.

El Tomboto, Wednesday, 31 October 2007 15:11 (eleven years ago) Permalink

can someone explain what "being upside down on your mortgage" means, in plain English?

Tracer Hand, Wednesday, 31 October 2007 16:14 (eleven years ago) Permalink

essentially, owing more than your home is worth.

Dandy Don Weiner, Wednesday, 31 October 2007 17:10 (eleven years ago) Permalink

also Tombot I'm not going to blame this generation as much as I blame their parents.

Dandy Don Weiner, Wednesday, 31 October 2007 17:11 (eleven years ago) Permalink

isn't that the way people buy homes? by paying for the privilege of a loan?

Tracer Hand, Wednesday, 31 October 2007 17:12 (eleven years ago) Permalink

When you enter into a contract with a bank for a mortgage, both you and the bank assume that the property value will not plummet. The bank doesn't want you to default any more than you want to default. But if for whatever reason you need to sell your home, and you can't get what you owe on it, then you will owe the difference to the bank. And the bank knows that when that happens, you probably will not have enough assets to cover the difference.

Predatory-type loans (which seems like a nebulous description to me) typically compound the problem because they have higher transaction rates (points, etc.)

Dandy Don Weiner, Wednesday, 31 October 2007 17:17 (eleven years ago) Permalink

oh certainly! well played baby boom letting healthcare slide for the 20 years you've owned the electorate

El Tomboto, Wednesday, 31 October 2007 17:18 (eleven years ago) Permalink

yeah Tracer it's also called "negative equity"

El Tomboto, Wednesday, 31 October 2007 17:19 (eleven years ago) Permalink

I remember when Limewire had its office in NYC and they had this really great rooftop hangout, catered lunch, yearly team vacations to Costa Rica.

Yerac, Friday, 11 January 2019 17:35 (one month ago) Permalink

I remember when the generic Irish middleware company my friends worked for had 'end of JavaOne' party and hired Spinal Tap.

Andrew Farrell, Friday, 11 January 2019 17:47 (one month ago) Permalink

Yeah that kind of thing still goes on. I am going to Scottsdale Arizona next week for example lucky me. But that WeWork trip is kind of out there for a company that loses money and leases more real estate in Manhattan than any other entity.

๐” ๐”ž๐”ข๐”จ (caek), Friday, 11 January 2019 17:48 (one month ago) Permalink

We went to Vegas last year and there were so many complaints from engineers about how much it cost and how awful Vegas is that this year theyโ€™re sending half of us to Scottsdale and half to Seattle.

๐” ๐”ž๐”ข๐”จ (caek), Friday, 11 January 2019 17:49 (one month ago) Permalink

In 2018 is it still super-expensive to get the Red Hot Chili Peppers?

Guayaquil (eephus!), Friday, 11 January 2019 17:50 (one month ago) Permalink

caek I can't believe you're not coming to Seattle, rude

I have measured out my life in coffee shop loyalty cards (silby), Friday, 11 January 2019 17:54 (one month ago) Permalink

in the neighborhood of $1,000,000 xp

rip van wanko, Friday, 11 January 2019 17:55 (one month ago) Permalink

haha, i didn't get any say, but truly i am all about the 0% humidity and golf courses and rotting from the inside so scottsdale is perfect

๐” ๐”ž๐”ข๐”จ (caek), Friday, 11 January 2019 18:28 (one month ago) Permalink

https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/articles/2019-01-08/wework-gets-a-visit-from-financial-reality

this is not a company that should be flying a global workforce to one of the most expensive conference cities on earth

๐” ๐”ž๐”ข๐”จ (caek), Friday, 11 January 2019 18:44 (one month ago) Permalink

This is a firm whose valuation only really makes sense if it grows at double-digit rates for years to come, while managing to maintain its rental prices even if the era of cheap financing comes to a halt.

lol

I have measured out my life in coffee shop loyalty cards (silby), Friday, 11 January 2019 18:48 (one month ago) Permalink

i had a desk at the wework in DTLA for november. i needed it for a specific project, but gave some thought to keeping it. in the end, the sheer amount of sponsored content events that they were clearly getting a cut of was too much. the final straw was someone who'd paid wework to have the opportunity to sell her custom kimonos in the coffee area. a company that needs to shill custom kimonos getting softbank money and signing 99 year leases seems like a top of the market signal as much as the apple letter about china.

๐” ๐”ž๐”ข๐”จ (caek), Friday, 11 January 2019 18:50 (one month ago) Permalink

I like looking up the wikis of the founders of these types of companies. Always weird tidbits.

Yerac, Friday, 11 January 2019 18:53 (one month ago) Permalink

FT says Ivanka Trump's name is being floated to head World Bank. https://t.co/wbNL7AcAym

— Alan Rappeport (@arappeport) January 11, 2019

reggie (qualmsley), Friday, 11 January 2019 23:44 (one month ago) Permalink

>i had a desk at the wework in DTLA for november.

a friend stayed at a welive for a while. let's just say that several of the people that she thought were renters there, supporting themselves by offering friendly dogsitting / grocery services, she learned later were all on payroll. my friend is on the trusting side, but I think her confusion was encouraged; the intent is to help you feel more 'at home' in this place than at your average hotel. it's an odd trade off; I can see how you could argue this minimizes some power imbalances / dignifies certain kinds of work. it is also obviously pulling off the trick of making certain relationships even more invisible: there's no 'help', only fellow contractors just like you. but those welive rooms don't rent for cheap.

and the phrase 'complimentary disco' should strike terror into anyone's heart

Milton Parker, Saturday, 12 January 2019 01:04 (one month ago) Permalink

Only thing worse: 'mandatory disco'

Ned Raggett, Saturday, 12 January 2019 01:50 (one month ago) Permalink

โ€œmandatory discoโ€ is a dystopia i can lol tho

Hunt3r, Saturday, 12 January 2019 15:25 (one month ago) Permalink

just a little paper trade here, but see how on the SPY we seem a little overbought and keep butting up against 259 but can't break it, this would seem to be a fairly obvious opportunity for a short swing trade. But given that, but also how this market seems to like to clear out all stoplosses on "obvious" trades, I think the best call in the very near term is long SPY here to at 258 with 261 target in the next 2 days let's see

rip van wanko, Monday, 14 January 2019 18:29 (one month ago) Permalink

objective met, now look for a little spike today or tomorrow to go short imo

GarugBand (rip van wanko), Wednesday, 16 January 2019 17:45 (one month ago) Permalink

Oh nice. I have been trading in and out of a handful of equities (SQ, ROKU, BABA, some pot stocks etc.) since the beginning of the year but it's insane how well the market has been doing so far. I've missed out on some gains but I just don't want to be stuck holding anything.

Yerac, Wednesday, 16 January 2019 19:35 (one month ago) Permalink

i trade penny/pink sheet stocks actively and it's crazy how volatile pot stocks (on those exchanges) have been. and how much money people have made, and lost. the first quarter of 2014 was the most prosperous of my life because of the MJ (which has become shorthand for marijuana) craze, which really hit the penny stock market. i know one guy who grew a 5 figure account to 7 figures in the first 5 months of that year by just holding pot stocks.

GarugBand (rip van wanko), Wednesday, 16 January 2019 19:51 (one month ago) Permalink

(holding as opposed to selling -- if I had just held all mine to the top, instead of selling early, I could be retired)

GarugBand (rip van wanko), Wednesday, 16 January 2019 19:53 (one month ago) Permalink

People have no idea how easy it will be for legalization to create a massive oversupply of weed.

A is for (Aimless), Wednesday, 16 January 2019 19:55 (one month ago) Permalink

The people who genuinely make a fortune on weed will be those who make their fortune off the other people who want to make a fortune on weed.

A is for (Aimless), Wednesday, 16 January 2019 19:57 (one month ago) Permalink

Some local medical cannabis upstart literally just sold a few weeks ago for six hundred million dollars.

Josh in Chicago, Wednesday, 16 January 2019 20:01 (one month ago) Permalink

The people who genuinely make a fortune on weed will be those who make their fortune off the other people who want to make a fortune on weed.

just like the gold rush or the dotcom boom

ฮŸแฝ–ฯ„ฮนฯ‚, Wednesday, 16 January 2019 20:03 (one month ago) Permalink

Oh I remember that pot penny stock craze, athough I thought it was earlier than 2014. I speculated a bunch but they were all busts.

Yerac, Wednesday, 16 January 2019 20:04 (one month ago) Permalink

I've talked with a couple of people who have invested in the industry, and their faith/money is based less in the ultimate success of the product/industry and more about gambling the things they invest in get bought out by Budweiser or Pfizer or whatever.

Josh in Chicago, Wednesday, 16 January 2019 20:44 (one month ago) Permalink

I just like market manipulation due to low float. It's a game.

Yerac, Wednesday, 16 January 2019 20:47 (one month ago) Permalink

@Yerac if you have the trading bug you should check out nanocap/pink sheet trading, it can be fun. Early last week I bought a million shares of VYST at .0007, and sold for a good profit in the teens and finally .0021... But if I'd held you'll see it went to almost .02 this week and my initial $700 investment would have been worth $18k lol.

GarugBand (rip van wanko), Wednesday, 16 January 2019 21:39 (one month ago) Permalink

I don't really trade OTC/pink sheets anymore. Although I have in the past a little, but I usually keep my portfolios in about 20 equities (mostly tech and biotech, retail, some randoms) for dividends or swing trading and then do most daytrading in commodity lev etfs/etns.

Yerac, Wednesday, 16 January 2019 21:52 (one month ago) Permalink

Yeah I'm addicted to the otc trash tbh. Big board/blue Chip stuff is infinitely more liquid (not to mention marginable) but I've found I cannot consistently outwit the HFT's/ hedge fund managers/Goldman trades/aliens that run it

GarugBand (rip van wanko), Wednesday, 16 January 2019 21:57 (one month ago) Permalink

Goldman traders i mean

GarugBand (rip van wanko), Wednesday, 16 January 2019 21:58 (one month ago) Permalink

I only had to have a couple of things go illiquid and have paid to get it removed from my account before I decided it was too much hassle. Plus I don't like things I can't premarket or afterhours trade.

Yerac, Wednesday, 16 January 2019 22:00 (one month ago) Permalink

anyone know anything about Marcus by GS or similar online savings high APY accounts?

YouTube_-_funy_cats.flv (Jimmy The Mod Awaits The Return Of His Beloved), Monday, 21 January 2019 01:16 (four weeks ago) Permalink

I just did a cursory look because I didn't know they were offering regular savings accounts/cds now. The rates look good. If you just want to deposit and leave it, it seems like a good choice. The last time I reviewed these I opened a Schwab checking and savings which I never funded. But it was primarily for the no fee worldwide atm usage.

Yerac, Monday, 21 January 2019 01:28 (four weeks ago) Permalink

I do that with Ally. They currently pay 0.25% less than Goldman and theyโ€™ve been one of if not the top earner all the time Iโ€™ve banked with them. Also theyโ€™re not Goldman Sachs you know?

๐” ๐”ž๐”ข๐”จ (caek), Monday, 21 January 2019 01:49 (four weeks ago) Permalink

Oh, does Ally have a high rate? I have one account with them from when it got moved over from Tradeking. I was actually thinking of moving it to Interactive, so all my accounts would be there, but I kind of hate their platform.

Yerac, Monday, 21 January 2019 02:09 (four weeks ago) Permalink

Places I have had an account: E*Trade, TD Ameritrade, Morgan Stanley, Scottrade, Tradeking, Ally whatever it's called now, Interactive Brokers, Washington Mutual, Chase.

Yerac, Monday, 21 January 2019 02:14 (four weeks ago) Permalink

Ally has a checking and high interest savings account. They have a broker thing but I donโ€™t know much about it. And I donโ€™t believe the checking account is remarkable. But the savings account is the one all the reddit personal finance and early retirement needs recommend.

๐” ๐”ž๐”ข๐”จ (caek), Monday, 21 January 2019 02:42 (four weeks ago) Permalink

turns out ally's savings rate is 2.2% not 2.0%, which must have happened in the last couple of days. ally isn't a fuzzy credit union, but it's not goldman sachs.

๐” ๐”ž๐”ข๐”จ (caek), Monday, 21 January 2019 03:50 (four weeks ago) Permalink

I have a Marcus account now--I liked it because it was really easy to connect with my main bank account (maybe Ally is like that too).

I have most of my money now in either interest-bearing savings accounts or CD ladders (which don't get a huge amount more interest than the savings accounts, 2.5-3%). I have maybe 10-20% in index funds and a bit in bond funds too. A friend told me she has most of her money in T-bills. Sentiment seems pretty bad right now.

longtime caller, first time listener (man alive), Monday, 21 January 2019 04:26 (four weeks ago) Permalink

Thank u all. Mostly just interested in a cash hole w my partner and online/non brick and mortar seem to have dope rates. I figure Iโ€™m participating in the annoying parts of capitalism so Goldman vs Ally and that .15 percent might be worth it. Theyโ€™re all crooked deep down

YouTube_-_funy_cats.flv (Jimmy The Mod Awaits The Return Of His Beloved), Monday, 21 January 2019 04:27 (four weeks ago) Permalink

and the phrase 'complimentary disco' should strike terror into anyone's heart

โ€• Milton Parker

they turned Supertrain into a hotel?

The Elvis of Nationalism and Amoral Patriotism (rushomancy), Monday, 21 January 2019 04:41 (four weeks ago) Permalink

People have no idea how easy it will be for legalization to create a massive oversupply of weed.

โ€• A is for (Aimless)

no, no. i'd say we're pretty aware of exactly how easy it is here in portland.

The Elvis of Nationalism and Amoral Patriotism (rushomancy), Monday, 21 January 2019 04:42 (four weeks ago) Permalink

fwiw my CD ladder is through a Fidelity account -- they made it pretty easy to set up. I have an old rollover IRA there and also set up a brokerage account there.

longtime caller, first time listener (man alive), Monday, 21 January 2019 05:16 (four weeks ago) Permalink

We both have our own retirement/long term accounts so the idea was for a mattress/emergency fund that would be more liquid than a CD xp

YouTube_-_funy_cats.flv (Jimmy The Mod Awaits The Return Of His Beloved), Monday, 21 January 2019 22:31 (four weeks ago) Permalink

My CU pays high (4%ish) interest on the first $500 in each of my primary checking and savings accounts which for the amount of cash I have there results in a fairly generous effective APY.

I have measured out my life in coffee shop loyalty cards (silby), Monday, 21 January 2019 22:46 (four weeks ago) Permalink

(In lieu of debit card rewards I suppose)

I have measured out my life in coffee shop loyalty cards (silby), Monday, 21 January 2019 22:46 (four weeks ago) Permalink

is that the actual Storm Shadow or just a Storm Shadow cosplayer

The Elvis of Nationalism and Amoral Patriotism (rushomancy), Tuesday, 22 January 2019 00:41 (three weeks ago) Permalink


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