Favourite Miyazaki film

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Too much of a foregone conclusion? Let's see.

Poll Results

OptionVotes
Spirited Away 20
My Neighbour Totoro 15
Princess Mononoke 11
Kiki's Delivery Service 6
Porco Rosso 5
Laputa: Castle in the Sky 4
Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind 2
The Castle of Cagliostro 1
Howl's Moving Castle1


chap, Thursday, 31 May 2007 12:10 (sixteen years ago) link

Where's the Never Seen a Miyazaki Film option?

Tom D., Thursday, 31 May 2007 12:10 (sixteen years ago) link

Totoro is the best animated feature made by anyone anywhere.

Tuomas, Thursday, 31 May 2007 12:14 (sixteen years ago) link

Totoro v Spirited Away? Tough choice man.

ledge, Thursday, 31 May 2007 12:21 (sixteen years ago) link

No 'Panda Kopanda', no credibility.

Stevie T, Thursday, 31 May 2007 12:24 (sixteen years ago) link

Not safe. I don't mean not safe for work. I mean not safe, full stop.

Oilyrags, Thursday, 31 May 2007 12:49 (sixteen years ago) link

i saw spirited away away in an empty movie theater

A W E S O M E

the sir weeze, Thursday, 31 May 2007 13:27 (sixteen years ago) link

Yes of course it's a foregone conclusion, I've only seen Spirited Away from this list and it's one of my very favourite films, as I'm sure it is for many people here, now accept it!

Just got offed, Thursday, 31 May 2007 13:37 (sixteen years ago) link

You should see some of the others! Not that I'm saying they're better necessarily (I didn't vote for SA but if I thought it was going to be close I might have) but they're mostly very rewarding.

Groke, Thursday, 31 May 2007 13:41 (sixteen years ago) link

totoro by a whisker, but yeah, there's a lot of full length and studio ghibli side projects missing from this poll!
Besides which, where's Lupin?

forksclovetofu, Thursday, 31 May 2007 13:43 (sixteen years ago) link

above all else, miyazaki films are fun to look at

'my neighbor totoro' is quite the head trip in particular

the sir weeze, Thursday, 31 May 2007 13:43 (sixteen years ago) link

totoro by a whisker, but yeah, there's a lot of full length and studio ghibli side projects missing from this poll!
Besides which, where's Lupin?

All the feature lengths actually directed by Miyazaki are on the list. Castle of Cagliostro is his Lupin film.

Louis - if SA is one of your favourite films you MUST check out his other ones. In fact, why the hell haven't you. There're a couple which are as good if not better.

chap, Thursday, 31 May 2007 13:48 (sixteen years ago) link

totoro is the best

bell_labs, Thursday, 31 May 2007 13:52 (sixteen years ago) link

Besides which, where's Lupin?

what the fuck dude

TOMBOT, Thursday, 31 May 2007 13:53 (sixteen years ago) link

I know totoro or spirited away are going to win but that's because you all hate fun and are girls

TOMBOT, Thursday, 31 May 2007 13:53 (sixteen years ago) link

OK, OK!

Just got offed, Thursday, 31 May 2007 13:54 (sixteen years ago) link

http://www.intercom.publinet.it/manga/lupin.jpg

TOMBOT, Thursday, 31 May 2007 13:54 (sixteen years ago) link

http://www.hkcuk.co.uk/reviews/images/CastleofCagliostro.jpg

TOMBOT, Thursday, 31 May 2007 13:55 (sixteen years ago) link

Mononoke by several thousand miles of ace!

Suedey, Thursday, 31 May 2007 13:58 (sixteen years ago) link

Yeah 'cause the whole ghibli OH NO THE CURSE OF ANGRY GAIA-EQUIVALENT WILL DESTROY US GUILTY, GREEDY HUMANS shit needed a fifteenth do-over

TOMBOT, Thursday, 31 May 2007 13:59 (sixteen years ago) link

Fujiko is the only female character in any of these movies that he couldn't figure out how to totally emasculate by the end of the film, freakin' misogynist

TOMBOT, Thursday, 31 May 2007 14:01 (sixteen years ago) link

OK I'm done

TOMBOT, Thursday, 31 May 2007 14:01 (sixteen years ago) link

I voted for Mononoke too, cue semi-comprehensible Tombot rant.

chap, Thursday, 31 May 2007 14:03 (sixteen years ago) link

(I think miyazaki has made some really beautiful and charming movies that are marvellously put together but that's the absolute best I can say for them, the stories are vaguely nauseating Capra-via-cutesy-animism)

TOMBOT, Thursday, 31 May 2007 14:04 (sixteen years ago) link

Nothing beats the nekobasu. Totoro, definitely.

sidenote: when I was hiking in the rainforest over the weekend, a Japanese family passed - two little girls and the mom, singing the opening Totoro song. A pretty perfect moment.

Jaq, Thursday, 31 May 2007 15:32 (sixteen years ago) link

Also, Grave of the Fireflies, though beautifully animated, is horrific in so so many ways.

Jaq, Thursday, 31 May 2007 15:35 (sixteen years ago) link

Come on, PORCO ROSSO!

Close race between SA, Torotro and Kiki's Delivery service for second place though.

DavidM, Thursday, 31 May 2007 15:53 (sixteen years ago) link

good lord porco rosso

TOMBOT, Thursday, 31 May 2007 15:55 (sixteen years ago) link

Not safe. I don't mean not safe for work. I mean not safe, full stop.

I am not clicking on this, but lemme guess. Totoro pr0n?

kenan, Thursday, 31 May 2007 15:55 (sixteen years ago) link

actually it's just bible quotes, I was suprised

TOMBOT, Thursday, 31 May 2007 15:56 (sixteen years ago) link

Porco Rosso is a quirky marvel - although I find the overlong and brutal climactic punch-up rather hard to stomach.

ledge, Thursday, 31 May 2007 15:57 (sixteen years ago) link

Porco Rosso was my tick too.

Groke, Thursday, 31 May 2007 16:19 (sixteen years ago) link

bump

chap, Sunday, 3 June 2007 21:49 (sixteen years ago) link

kiki is the best, then totoro, then nausicaa

J.D., Sunday, 3 June 2007 22:04 (sixteen years ago) link

Well, once upon a time it was totoroporn, at least. Probably all for the best it is gone now.

Oilyrags, Sunday, 3 June 2007 22:08 (sixteen years ago) link

I've seen all of those but Kiki and Porco (both of which are high on my Netflix queue). I think Castle in the Sky might be my favorite, though. Just great high adventure, and a really imaginative world. Am I the only one that likes The Cat Returns the most out of all the ghibli projects?

Jeff Treppel, Sunday, 3 June 2007 22:35 (sixteen years ago) link

Kiki by a mile, of all his childrens' fairy tales it's the one that seems to have the closest handle on the actual experience of childhood. Wonderful little film about adolescence and the irksome relationship between how others treat you and how you relate to your own passions/gifts/art. Also, the most convincing witch-broom-flying ever put on film.

Doctor Casino, Sunday, 3 June 2007 22:38 (sixteen years ago) link

I saw Totoro again last night, wish I hadn't voted for Spirited Away now.

V, Sunday, 3 June 2007 22:42 (sixteen years ago) link

Finally picked Totoro, but dang, that's hard. To be honest, I've liked every bit of Miyazaki I've seen.

Grave of the Fireflies was Miyazaki? I don't think so. Hmmm. That movie wrecked me over. But in a good way.

Hey Jude, Sunday, 3 June 2007 23:24 (sixteen years ago) link

I don't think I ever want to see Grave Of The Fireflies again. Great film though.

Favourite non-Miyazaki Ghibli film = Pom Poko.

V, Sunday, 3 June 2007 23:27 (sixteen years ago) link

Hmmm, looks like it might be a surprisingly strong turn-out for Kiki (which is great, but relatively low-key and overlooked).

chap, Sunday, 3 June 2007 23:37 (sixteen years ago) link

Laputa was always my fave

kingfish, Monday, 4 June 2007 00:05 (sixteen years ago) link

Grave of the Fireflies is Takahata, not Miyazaki. Which is why you don't see any of his usual stuff in it - flying, young woman who grows up strong and fearless, wind through tall grass, environmentalism, etc.

Oilyrags, Monday, 4 June 2007 00:10 (sixteen years ago) link

Totoro is objectively a better movie, no weak points, but Spirited Away is my favorite for including some epic/dark/whatever parts. (The beginning, the train ride...) Mononoke is overrated and Porco is underrated.

Rich Smörgasbord, Monday, 4 June 2007 00:22 (sixteen years ago) link

Yeah, Mononoke was a relatively disappointing note for him to have originally retired on. I was volunteered with some japanese exchange students during the summer of 98, and even they agreed. Spirited Away was much stronger, and i need to see a subbed-copy of Howl's Moving Castle to fully get it.

kingfish, Monday, 4 June 2007 00:34 (sixteen years ago) link

Grave of the Fireflies opened as a double-bill with My Neighbor Totoro. Which, I don't know, I just can't imagine watching them sequentially.

Jaq, Monday, 4 June 2007 00:35 (sixteen years ago) link

I've only seen the last four on the list, but Porco Rosso. The flashback to the war is one of my favorite scenes ever in anything.

clotpoll, Monday, 4 June 2007 00:42 (sixteen years ago) link

I rented Totoro for my daughter based on the board. It's a lot more linear, kiddie, and therefore not as interesting to me as Spirited Away, although unfortunately I am a Lynch type. But she liked it.

humansuit, Monday, 4 June 2007 00:47 (sixteen years ago) link

Spirited Away is on the tube right now. It's awful good.

forksclovetofu, Monday, 4 June 2007 02:38 (sixteen years ago) link

It's wonderful.

stuffing your suit pockets with cold, stale chicken tende (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 16 December 2023 16:19 (five months ago) link

beware the man-eating parakeets

stuffing your suit pockets with cold, stale chicken tende (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 16 December 2023 16:19 (five months ago) link

I was surprised how much of this seemed to be drawn from Miyazaki's own life - it follows in that great storytelling tradition of children grappling with the horrors of the adult world through fantastical elements that reflect their turmoil.

birdistheword, Saturday, 16 December 2023 17:40 (five months ago) link

Oh, it's out?!?!? I'm gonna go!!!

i do, what’s wrong with that? so? what now? (flamboyant goon tie included), Saturday, 16 December 2023 22:37 (five months ago) link

xp I also got the impression that it was quite autobiographical, on a few levels perhaps. Speaks towards creativity and world building in interesting ways, and it also felt the most "Murakami-esque" of all his films to me.

Unlike something like Spirited Away, which felt non-stop action packed and viscerally overwhelming, this one has a LOT of Ma in it. Also, due to that negative space, the foley work and sound mixing is incredible! I kinda can't wait to watch it again with some really nice headphones just so I can listen to all the rustling, scraping, steps and breathing again.

octobeard, Saturday, 16 December 2023 23:12 (five months ago) link

btw I was referring to Haruki, not Takashi, if that wasn't already clear.

Also the architecture! So many styles, and it added so much to the surrealism

octobeard, Saturday, 16 December 2023 23:15 (five months ago) link

Yes! to all of the above. I watched it again this afternoon and kept noticing all the great sounds - footsteps on wooden floors, fluttering paper, things collapsing.

I haven't thought about it much in terms of 'decoding' the film. I suspect that many of the sequences (the fish gutting) are in there because they make for wonderful animation.

jmm, Sunday, 17 December 2023 00:58 (five months ago) link

So yeah this was great. We did it as a family outing, my kids are huge Miyazaki fans. We were all basically entranced by it. Interesting conversation on the way home with different interpretations and speculations about meanings and symbols, but also just awe at the sensory experience of it.

a man often referred to in the news media as the Duke of Saxony (tipsy mothra), Sunday, 17 December 2023 03:51 (five months ago) link

This line stunned me: "'Mahito'... which means 'sincere one'. No wonder you reek of death."

jmm, Sunday, 17 December 2023 13:55 (five months ago) link

Same, I've been thinking about that line constantly

feed me with your chips (zchyrs), Sunday, 17 December 2023 14:18 (five months ago) link

And the music.

Adding to that, the stretch of silences (musically mostly) near the start is remarkable. It also reminds me about how Hishiashi added more score to some of the earlier films because that’s what American audiences expected; clearly not the case here.

Ned Raggett, Sunday, 17 December 2023 16:07 (five months ago) link

Exactly. In my review I stressed Miyazaki's career-long talent for silences.

Taking the Japanese title at more-or-less face value, it seems to me that the film is its own testament to how to live — with empathy and wonder.

a man often referred to in the news media as the Duke of Saxony (tipsy mothra), Sunday, 17 December 2023 16:37 (five months ago) link

I suspect that many of the sequences (the fish gutting) are in there because they make for wonderful animation.


I'm not big on decoding films but this image actually seems pretty straightforward in its purpose - it makes death visceral, and the mention that the wara-wara need the organs for sustenance connects death to life. And yeah, wonderful animation.

what you say is true but by no means (lukas), Monday, 18 December 2023 02:20 (five months ago) link

Hm, yeah, I think you’re right. Part of the ecosystem of the ocean world, where birds, fish, and human spirits seem to occupy the same cycle of consumption.

I’ve been wondering, is there a suggestion that the rowers who gather for the fish feast may eventually turn into warawara (which are something like the last, most reduced form of unborn spirit)?

jmm, Monday, 18 December 2023 15:10 (five months ago) link

this is definitely his most abstract film and probably the densest, i'm not entirely sure what to make of it. it's decent but at times it was difficult to infer meaning from some of the abstraction and i'm not sure how all the ideas quite fit together

ufo, Sunday, 24 December 2023 06:00 (five months ago) link

For me, it was sort of enough that it'd been 15 years since the world received a properly fun-weird-goofy-scary (at times) Miyazaki film. I was just thrilled to be back into the state of lulled, open-hearted acceptance that his films (excepting The Wind Rises) place me.

stephen miller is not your friend (Eric H.), Sunday, 24 December 2023 12:36 (five months ago) link

Plotting is not his strength, never has been. I don't let it worry me.

poppers fueled buttsex crescendo (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Sunday, 24 December 2023 12:56 (five months ago) link

It was beautiful, and it hit strong emotional beats much more than I was expecting. The sense of grief ran through everything, in ways I often didn't understand. I need to see it a few more times, but it's up there with his best.

Cow_Art, Sunday, 24 December 2023 13:15 (five months ago) link

and god the music

poppers fueled buttsex crescendo (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Sunday, 24 December 2023 13:25 (five months ago) link

He knows how to set sequences to music

poppers fueled buttsex crescendo (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Sunday, 24 December 2023 13:25 (five months ago) link

Plotting is not his strength, never has been.

Not sure I agree with the 'never'. The plotting of Kiki's Delivery Service is so lucid and masterful you hardly even notice. I just see Spirited Away and The Boy and the Heron as operating differently. The Boy and the Heron in particular seems to be playing around with logical and temporal structures (old and young, life and death, dream and literality) in a way where you can sense the strain more.

jmm, Sunday, 24 December 2023 13:33 (five months ago) link

You're right. I'd say this problem looked noticeable starting with Princess Mononoke.

poppers fueled buttsex crescendo (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Sunday, 24 December 2023 13:35 (five months ago) link

I should note that my critics group voted TBATH the best film of 2024, and I'm still proud.

poppers fueled buttsex crescendo (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Sunday, 24 December 2023 13:36 (five months ago) link

Most challenging part for me wasn't the dream world, but how sparse the human world story was. Loved that though.

soup of magpies (geoffreyess), Sunday, 24 December 2023 13:42 (five months ago) link

I keep thinking that this must have some connection to The Tempest. The figures of the wizard and the Heron feel so much like Prospero and Ariel.

jmm, Sunday, 24 December 2023 14:17 (five months ago) link

Enjoyed everything in the tower world, found the real world sections a bit slow. But it's not the first Miyazaki movie I've found slow at times, and accept that it's my issue rather than his. I've only ever truly loved one of Miyazaki's films (Spirited Away) but there's always stretches of brilliance to make them worth watching

Vinnie, Sunday, 24 December 2023 14:52 (five months ago) link

I actually like the slow stretches of his films. Totoro is maybe his slowest in terms of much happening, but one of his best.

a man often referred to in the news media as the Duke of Saxony (tipsy mothra), Sunday, 24 December 2023 18:26 (five months ago) link

Great-uncle = Miyazaki himself
Obnoxious dad = Goro, the disappointing offspring
Mahito = the idealised successor to the great man, who must overcome idle fancies and forge his own path
The tower = Miyazaki's art, which must crumble to dust upon his demise
Evil parakeets = the critics
Heron = Toshio Suzuki (Studio Ghibli producer guy)

That's all I've got

you have already voted in this dolt and cannot vote again (Matt #2), Sunday, 24 December 2023 19:58 (five months ago) link

I figured the rotating mobile of paper shards represented the critics

stephen miller is not your friend (Eric H.), Sunday, 24 December 2023 20:01 (five months ago) link

rotating mobile of paper shards = the public

you have already voted in this dolt and cannot vote again (Matt #2), Sunday, 24 December 2023 20:03 (five months ago) link

Heron = Toshio Suzuki (Studio Ghibli producer guy)

That's all I've got

― you have already voted in this dolt and cannot vote again (Matt #2)

i watched the sub and at one point the heron is described as something like an "bothersome heron" using words that sound a lot like "miyazaki hayao"

Kate (rushomancy), Sunday, 24 December 2023 21:56 (five months ago) link

I think of Princess Mononoke as fairly straight-forwardly plotted - once you know who everyone is and what they want, you just wind them up and watch them go.

I'm glad Miyazaki can still do wind and water (and goop), but the fire, that was amazing!

Weirdly, the big-twist-that-everyone-spots-immediately (that the hero's same-age companion is their mother) is shared with the Hilda season 3 finale, which we watched recently.

It seems like it sits oddly with a few of the Miyazaki 'tropes' - there is a villain, but he's just turned cute at the end without any specific softening of his character - and it has the 'we are now friends because we've done some shit together' with the Heron, but it weirdly lampshades it by the Heron saying "you could plug this hole and I would have my full power", then Mahito plugs the hole, he tries to escape, then ... nothing really, they are now friends.

Andrew Farrell, Wednesday, 27 December 2023 21:32 (five months ago) link

Just saw this and loved it. The start was slow, yes, but the kids were entranced anyway, but glad they went into the tower when they did as the younger one's patience was beginning to run thin.

The line I've been thinking about on the drive home is "I'm not afraid of fire"

the world is your octopus (Camaraderie at Arms Length), Sunday, 31 December 2023 18:02 (four months ago) link

Watched this yesterday and I don't know if it's because I was very tired but I think I'm gonna have to rewatch it again soon because so little of it made sense to me.

It was a visual feast, so many amazing bits. And not just the visuals but the sound design was so immersive. I'm glad I watched the sub first, but I also dislike having to rip my eyes away from the sensual feast on screen to read the dialogue with these films.

As ever, sometimes it's the small nits of these films that seem magical. There was a little sequence towards the start where the Boy takes his shoes off and walks barefoot on the wooden floorboards of the house, and I swear I could smell the scene of the wood.

With most of Miyazaki's movies I expect a certain amount of "things that don't at first make sense". I gelt the same anoit Howl's the first time i saw it and kow it's a firm fave. Maybe it's something to do with the visual language that jars my understanding, but on first viewing I felt that not enough of it linked up properly for me to truly make me feel involved in the plot.

Like, there were significantly long sections where I was just thinking " okay what is happening and why?" Or simply feeling that it was sequence after sequence of random events that didn't seem to segue properly together. The characters were constantly going in and out of different doors, turning into different characters, and seemingly turning into each other.

I'm sure it will make more sense on subsequent viewings but it did feel like a messy cake with spaghetti hoops on top to me - so many layers and metaphors and doors within doors within doors. It was A LOT. But maybe that's a good thing?

I couldn't figure out if Natsuko was his aunt or his mum reincarnated or just an unrelated person, for example. I don't know why she shouted at him and told him she hated him. I couldn't figure out why Himi was ostensibly his mum. I didn't really get why the Heron started out malicious and then decided to be helpful. I couldn't figure out what the stone and the blocks were meant to be, or why the one old lady turned into a young lady with completely different character traits.

The whole thing bamboozled me as well as my other friend who came with me. Meanwhile our two other companions felt the plot was very simple and straightforward, so who knows. We all watch films differently.

...eh you get the gist of it (dog latin), Wednesday, 3 January 2024 21:11 (four months ago) link

Apologies for all the typos. New phone don'tcha know

...eh you get the gist of it (dog latin), Wednesday, 3 January 2024 21:12 (four months ago) link

I've got to say I think I preferred the real world parts, slow as they were. I spent that part thinking "okay I'm ready for the freaky otherworld now", but as soon as that happened it just seemed to become a layercake of random events - like a story being made up by a six year old as he goes along: "Oh let's have a water mum effigy and now the floor is melting and now the old lady is a young lady and now it's a sea world and we're going fishing and the baddie heron is now a goodie gnome, then let's have some cute marshmallow people and now PELICANS and now CANARIES and now a flame room and now the step mum is ANGRY and now the stepmum is his aunt and his mum is a girl and now there's a big stone and now there's uncle Einstein who's going to talk about Miyazaki's legacy and now they're in the real world again oh wait they're not...." etc.

I love fantasy and otherworld stuff, and I think Miyazaki achieves this in most of his films really well. But this felt extremely disjointed with everything being thrown in mostly because it looks cool.

If there is symbolism and allegory in there, cool, but i felt there was A LOT of it all crammed into one space and it was hard for me to work out what was significant and what was just there for the heck of it

...eh you get the gist of it (dog latin), Wednesday, 3 January 2024 22:16 (four months ago) link

Unlike something like Spirited Away, which felt non-stop action packed and viscerally overwhelming, this one has a LOT of Ma in it. Also, due to that negative space, the foley work and sound mixing is incredible! I kinda can't wait to watch it again with some really nice headphones just so I can listen to all the rustling, scraping, steps and breathing again.

― octobeard, Saturday, December 16, 2023 11:12 PM (two weeks ago) bookmarkflaglink

Interesting you feel that way about Spirited Away. I felt like that film was incredibly well paced in terms of action/reflective scenes (the Sixth Station sequence, Granny's house, quieter, less consequential parts where Chihiro is just doing housework etc...
Whereas TBATH felt incredibly stuffed, almost claustrophobic once they left the real world - it was dizzying.

To use an analogy we both might enjoy: I feel like this is Miyazaki's NTS Sessions to Spirited Away's LP5: Totemic, labyrinthine, sense-bombarding to the point of overload

...eh you get the gist of it (dog latin), Wednesday, 3 January 2024 22:57 (four months ago) link

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qH2q9ZJMaAU

Deflatormouse, Thursday, 4 January 2024 01:00 (four months ago) link

Miyazaki's manga Shuna's Journey is beautiful. Every panel a work of art. I highly recommend everyone check if their libraries have it. It got reprinted last year in an English translation.

jmm, Friday, 5 January 2024 00:15 (four months ago) link

one month passes...

Finally saw this last night with my brother JoeStork. We both felt sort of shell-shocked at the end of it and then, as we talked about it, came down on the side of really liking it. Also we both absolutely loved the giant murderous parakeets with their hilariously dumb faces and their huge butcher knives.

I was impressed by how long and grim the first part of the movie - the real-world part - is. There's such a long stretch with very little dialogue and this feeling of unresolved jangling grief hanging over all of it, and the almost silent sequence with his first day at school and everything that follows it is so horrifying in its intensity while telling you almost nothing about what is actually happening in Mahito's mind. Other than, of course, that he is desperate. And it's telling that he goes straight to self-injury rather than tell his father what happened to him. This is a child who has learned to keep his thoughts to himself and not to ask for things. (And frankly I wouldn't try to talk to that dad either. What a dipshit. Why do both of these perfectly nice-seeming women feel the need to marry this dude?)

Anyway, it's so rare for anything to be paced slowly these days, let alone something aimed at children, and Miyazaki does this without even offering the rewards of, say, the slow and quiet parts of Totoro, so that there were moments where I thought, "This is beautiful in a grim way but I don't know if I can put myself through watching it again." And yet I ended up feeling like it was essential to establish the stakes of the movie, how much Mahito needs to be able to save someone.

I liked how understated the reveal is that Mahito does indeed save his mother, just as the heron promised he could - that the year where she disappeared into the tower and the time that he is spending there are happening simultaneously, and that when she leaves through a separate door at the end, she is returning to her life in the real world.

Lily Dale, Thursday, 22 February 2024 05:07 (three months ago) link

ponyo

jpeg (Fadii), Thursday, 22 February 2024 13:35 (three months ago) link

one month passes...

Shoulda called it Disturbance At Heron House

your mom goes to limgrave (dog latin), Monday, 25 March 2024 22:00 (two months ago) link

ha!

karl...arlk...rlka...lkar..., Tuesday, 26 March 2024 00:06 (two months ago) link

It's coming on Netflix, right? I want to watch it again. It has stayed with me. I think it's pretty great.

Oh, boo hiss, that's only outside the U.S. It'll be on Max here with the rest of the Ghibli films. Well, I'm sure we'll renew our Max subscription at some point.

one month passes...

It's in Chinese cinemas now, watched it twice this week. The otherworld section sure is dense and the ending is predictably full of things collapsing (a problem... or, maybe fairer just to say, trope since Nausicaa, or was it Cagliostro?). But on second watch I caught a lot more things that helped a lot of things make sense; and the ending was still full of things collapsing but also, this second time around, made me cry.

Lily, that "understated reveal" is incredible! -- I did not pick up on that.

TheNuNuNu, Sunday, 12 May 2024 15:13 (two weeks ago) link

two weeks pass...

Damn... I hope he and George Miller keep it up! They seem to have boundless enthusiasm and creative energy for people their age, and seem to be getting better to boot.

octobeard, Tuesday, 28 May 2024 19:16 (two days ago) link


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