Ken Loach S/D

Message Bookmarked
Bookmark Removed
Ken Loach retrospective at Toronto's cinematheque this spring. Which are must-see?

(link: http://www.cinemathequeontario.ca/programme.aspx?programmeId=111)

jackl, Wednesday, 7 March 2007 02:46 (twelve years ago) Permalink

must see:

CATHY COME HOME
KES
LAND AND FREEDOM
SWEET SIXTEEN

i dare say some others too.

jed_, Wednesday, 7 March 2007 02:50 (twelve years ago) Permalink

1) KES
2) SWEET SIXTEEN
3) RAINING STONES

remy bean, Wednesday, 7 March 2007 03:05 (twelve years ago) Permalink

raining stones was decent, but oh lord was Ladybird, Ladybird (am i remembering the title correctly?) bad bab bad. not one of my fave directors, makes mike leigh look subtle in comparison(i do love leigh tho)

gershy, Wednesday, 7 March 2007 04:32 (twelve years ago) Permalink

I think Kes is still my favorite. And gershy is wrong, Ladybird Ladybird is fine. also Riff-Raff (early lead role for Robert Carlyle).

Dr Morbius, Wednesday, 7 March 2007 18:58 (twelve years ago) Permalink

one month passes...
The Wind That Shakes the Barley is the best I've seen from him since maybe Ladybird?

Dr Morbius, Saturday, 7 April 2007 19:50 (twelve years ago) Permalink

four months pass...

Too much rolling Irish hills 'n' fog, but, still, a near-great film. I can't fathom how some commentors on websites have actually called this "unobjective"!

Armond White is quite wrong.

Alfred, Lord Sotosyn, Wednesday, 5 September 2007 23:41 (eleven years ago) Permalink

I saw it for the first time the other day, and thought it was very good. But Kes is my favourite film evah.

Madchen, Wednesday, 5 September 2007 23:45 (eleven years ago) Permalink

big box set coming soon, apparently

Tracer Hand, Wednesday, 5 September 2007 23:47 (eleven years ago) Permalink

"I can't fathom how some commentors on websites have actually called this "unobjective"!"

So you think it's objective?!?! I don't know the history, but at least from the early going (I'm only half through) it definitely seems to have a slant to it (it's def good so far btw.)

Alex in SF, Wednesday, 5 September 2007 23:50 (eleven years ago) Permalink

...by which I mean, "totally sold on the IRA cause," which it clearly is not.

Alfred, Lord Sotosyn, Wednesday, 5 September 2007 23:55 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Gotchya. Armond White continues to be an idiot.

Alex in SF, Thursday, 6 September 2007 00:00 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Naughty naughty Clint Eastwood for being a "capitalist"!

Alfred, Lord Sotosyn, Thursday, 6 September 2007 00:03 (eleven years ago) Permalink

armond is bewilderingly wrong, but in confusing ways.

loach's films are all staggeringly loaded melodramas, which isn't a bad thing always, but he's attached to post-war notions of realism -- in acting and in avoidance of close-ups, montage, etc -- that are unnecessarily limiting.

of course he's polemical, that's the point. you couldn't make a 100-minute film about The Troubles and not be; there's too much historical data you just can't get across.

loach is not the great influence people talk about, anyway: alan clarke is. i think 'bloody sunday' was clearly in the line of clarke's n. ireland film 'contact'.

That one guy that hit it and quit it, Thursday, 6 September 2007 08:04 (eleven years ago) Permalink

two weeks pass...

OK, so "It's a Free World". Didn't like it. Clunky, bolted together, as usual. Realism that isn't actually remotely realistic. Reminds me of why I generally avoid Ken Loach films - esp. the more explicitly political ones.

Tom D., Tuesday, 25 September 2007 09:10 (eleven years ago) Permalink

bummed out that i missed this

Tracer Hand, Tuesday, 25 September 2007 09:43 (eleven years ago) Permalink

I thought it was fantastic, despite the contrivances (necessary to make a coherent drama?). I have missed the last few Loach films, so I thought it was quite novel and effective that it was shown from the side of the baddy, who was a really stomach-churning baddy. Admittedly I have no way of knowing whether the realism was realistic or not, but it certainly did not detract from my gripped-ness.

In fact, I was so impressed I went out and bought "As Long As The Wind That Shakes The Barley Is Mine" from Sainsbury's.

PJ Miller, Wednesday, 26 September 2007 17:08 (eleven years ago) Permalink

"As Long As The Wind That Shakes The Barley Is Mine"

Shit film. End of.

kv_nol, Thursday, 27 September 2007 12:12 (eleven years ago) Permalink

I thought it was fantastic, despite the contrivances (necessary to make a coherent drama?).

Not necessary, just clumsy

Tom D., Thursday, 27 September 2007 12:13 (eleven years ago) Permalink

"As Long As The Wind That Shakes The Barley Is Mine"

Shit film. End of.

-- kv_nol, Thursday, September 27, 2007 12:12 PM

what did you dislike about it? i thought it was brilliant.

CharlieNo4, Thursday, 27 September 2007 12:17 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Basically (please to note: I am Irish) I found it pathetic mea culpa posturing by Loach on behalf of England.

kv_nol, Thursday, 27 September 2007 12:19 (eleven years ago) Permalink

So exactly what you'd expect then

Tom D., Thursday, 27 September 2007 12:24 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Didn't make it any less shit though.

kv_nol, Thursday, 27 September 2007 12:34 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Search: Kes
Destroy: Everything else.

PhilK, Thursday, 27 September 2007 12:35 (eleven years ago) Permalink

lol at Loach "posturing" "on behalf" of England.

Alfred, Lord Sotosyn, Thursday, 27 September 2007 13:18 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Why not, he seems pretty patriotic to me

Tom D., Thursday, 27 September 2007 13:23 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Don't worry Tom, that's just Alfred's way.

kv_nol, Thursday, 27 September 2007 13:43 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Compared to Get On The Bus, It's A Free World is a masterpiece of subtlety.

I mean, you're right about it being clumsy at times, but I thought it was very effective, and I'm still thinking about it, and perhaps most impressively, I didn't fall asleep.

PJ Miller, Friday, 28 September 2007 08:19 (eleven years ago) Permalink

feminism: the soft option

That one guy that hit it and quit it, Friday, 28 September 2007 13:29 (eleven years ago) Permalink

High praise indeed! (xpost)

kv_nol, Friday, 28 September 2007 14:05 (eleven years ago) Permalink

four months pass...

land and freedom is fantastic, like a really good john sayles movie

Tracer Hand, Sunday, 17 February 2008 23:47 (eleven years ago) Permalink

i once made the unfortunate accident of renting 'ladybird ladybird' and watching it with the folks at xmas. quite liked 'the wind that shakes the barley'

Michael B, Monday, 18 February 2008 00:53 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Really enjoyed 'Ae Fond Kiss', for what it's worth.

James Morrison, Tuesday, 19 February 2008 23:25 (eleven years ago) Permalink

three months pass...

jaysus the edge is 'barley' bad. not on a political level -- tho it's a replay of 'land and freedom' (and 'the rank and file' and probably various others): socialist freedom is within grasp but the compromisers fuck it all up: i don't know how feasible this is in the instance of 1920s ireland, but the repetition of the exact same trope is telling -- but it's just embarrassingly primitive as storytelling.

it's a good subject for a nonfiction film because otherwise you have laughable exposition scenes -- as here when a british soldier briefly lets us know how damaged the black and tans were by WW1.

sayles is an interesting comparison: loach seems unable to create characters, as i think sayles can. could loach do something like 'the return of the seacaucus seven'?

banriquit, Friday, 13 June 2008 21:26 (ten years ago) Permalink

one month passes...

anyone seen Hidden Agenda?

Alfred, Lord Sotosyn, Sunday, 27 July 2008 17:06 (ten years ago) Permalink

six months pass...

socialist freedom is within grasp but the compromisers fuck it all up:

this wasn't how i read this at all, movie seemed really circumspect about the uses of violence. the scene where the true believers argue with the IRA honcho to respect the provisional court paralleled nicely up against the scene where the same true believers reject the treaty -- "we are not merely a terrorist gang" becomes "we must remain a terrorist gang until the end". the stock "lesson" seemed to be that political violence requires an unstable fanaticism that doesn't stop.

i can't believe loach really thinks a socialist revolution was on the eve of happening, cos the movie doesn't seem that optimistic. the movie wanted to remind all us bourgie romantics that a) there were a lot of straight up commies in the early IRA, b) radical movements abuse the shit out of ppl too, c) ireland got rid of the brits kinda but heyo not church and class. but i don't know anything about loach, maybe this is unintentional. it's what i got from it.

i thought it was pretty great btw. ppl arguing politics in real time is cheap exposition but also totally awesome. i don't have a problem with hamfisted.

goole, Monday, 9 February 2009 07:57 (ten years ago) Permalink

im probably reading ken loach's public persona into it, and you definitely saw a much better film than me.

nobody really hates hen fap (special guest stars mark bronson), Monday, 9 February 2009 22:31 (ten years ago) Permalink

im probably reading ken loach's public persona into it

which i think is legit coz i think the films express his viewpoint really (way too) clearly; but otoh this exchange of views says maybe not. hmmm...

nobody really hates hen fap (special guest stars mark bronson), Monday, 9 February 2009 22:32 (ten years ago) Permalink

yeah i liked it quite a lot even tho the bum notes are right out there immediately. the larger movements of history are sort of walked through by the characters forrest-gump style (blank, dispassionate, hand-held, semi-improv filmmaking disguises this), but in a sense i felt those larger movements falling away, and most of the film's attention is on what it takes to apply violence, how people talk about it before and after, what they think it costs, what it's worth.

like, i dunno if historically the nascent free state was as brutal as the british, so i dunno if having the house-search scenes bookend the film is justified. but as a demonstration of how there is a kind of inexorable gravity toward more death by a small (but always non-zero) number, i thought it was v powerful. i'm guessing loach wants me to see the tru IRA thug irridentists as heroes til the end but somehow what ended up on screen didn't say this.

goole, Monday, 9 February 2009 22:45 (ten years ago) Permalink

The worst thing in Loach always = 'relationships', 'love' etc - a disaster area of cringe narrative

the pinefox, Monday, 9 February 2009 22:49 (ten years ago) Permalink

three months pass...

So presumably the Pinefox won't be anticipating Looking for Eric, starring Eric Cantona as himself.

Enormous Epic (Matt DC), Wednesday, 20 May 2009 19:58 (ten years ago) Permalink

eight months pass...

some footballer eh? Opens in US in May.

a "bittersweet comedy about a postman whose downward-spiralling life is given a sudden boost of inspiration"

Not titled Looking for Eric H to See One of My Films

Fusty Moralizer (Dr Morbius), Friday, 12 February 2010 19:45 (nine years ago) Permalink

two months pass...

looks like he's putting his films on youtube

http://www.youtube.com/user/KenLoachFilms
http://www.youtube.com/show/kenloach

abanana, Sunday, 9 May 2010 14:35 (nine years ago) Permalink

kind of tells you how much of a shit he gives about the medium he works in

Greatest contributor: (history mayne), Sunday, 9 May 2010 18:09 (nine years ago) Permalink

one year passes...

so is looking for eric any good

will it be comprehensible to someone who doesnt know who eric cantona is

these pretzels are makeing me horney (Hungry4Ass), Friday, 6 April 2012 16:24 (seven years ago) Permalink

I didn't know who he was and was quite amused.

World Congress of Itch (Dr Morbius), Thursday, 19 April 2012 15:37 (seven years ago) Permalink

one year passes...

anyone seen The Angel's Share?

A deeper shade of lol (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Monday, 6 May 2013 20:47 (six years ago) Permalink

no. considering.

Pope Rusty I (Dr Morbius), Tuesday, 7 May 2013 01:15 (six years ago) Permalink

Yes - it's a good companion piece to The Kid With a Bike.

Ward Fowler, Tuesday, 7 May 2013 07:32 (six years ago) Permalink

Probably the funniest Loach.

Van Horn Street, Tuesday, 7 May 2013 08:53 (six years ago) Permalink

anyone seen /The Angel's Share/?

Is it about the Japanese bar near NYU?

Retreat from the Sunship (James Redd and the Blecchs), Tuesday, 7 May 2013 14:16 (six years ago) Permalink

five months pass...

Clio Barnard's follow up to The Arbor, The Selfish Giant looks very promising and is picking up rave reviews. She has utilised local non-professional actors Loach style. I love that bit from the trailer, angry mum: "You have been excluded from school" "Sick!".

I worked on some of the most deprived estates in Bradford for 4 years and as someone who grew up on a council estate I was still shocked at the extreme poverty I saw; as in rooms that smell of raw ammonia, houses without furniture, carpets or bedding that children lived in, houses without any heating because tenants had ripped out their own heating system as scrap.

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2013/oct/24/the-selfish-giant-review

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7tEgcpTbvJ8

Damo Suzuki's Parrot, Friday, 25 October 2013 22:36 (five years ago) Permalink

one year passes...

Anyone who has seen Jimmy's Hall yet? It's not a good film, but it's pretty funny for a last film for a political filmmaker. A story about an old fighter returning one last time to fight the battle, does exactly the same thing he did before, and loses all over again. I'd read Jimmy Gralton as a standin for Loach himself, not because it's necessarily true, but because it makes it all bleakly funny. Older, but non the wiser. If only the filmmaking didn't trap it all up constantly, never ever selling what is going on as having any kind of significance whatsoever.

Frederik B, Saturday, 16 May 2015 18:34 (four years ago) Permalink

It's an interesting period in Irish history (mid 1930s) that's never really been covered in film before. I found it slightly average though, something lacking or too pandering to mainstream tastes which has hampered some of his later work. Jim Norton is excellent in this though.

tayto fan (Michael B), Saturday, 16 May 2015 19:15 (four years ago) Permalink

ten months pass...

Just watching The Price Of Coal tonight, it is so good and on youtube in it's entirety.

calzino, Tuesday, 22 March 2016 21:46 (three years ago) Permalink

Thought revive would be Barry Hines related.

Woke Up Scully (James Redd and the Blecchs), Tuesday, 22 March 2016 22:45 (three years ago) Permalink

It absolutely is, it was someone mentioning this on two different RIP threads, one of them on a different board that made me want to watch it.

calzino, Tuesday, 22 March 2016 22:56 (three years ago) Permalink

Lol the "SCARGILL RULES OK" graffiti; "Some Vandals, some pillock morelike"

calzino, Tuesday, 22 March 2016 23:41 (three years ago) Permalink

seven months pass...

No issue with the politics or the message of "I, Daniel Blake" but the movie, as a piece of art, has all the subtlety of a sledgehammer. Its realism is contrived, "Clunky, bolted together" as Tom D said above.

This is more to do with Paul Laverty's script rather than Ken Loach imo

Neptune Bingo (Michael B), Saturday, 12 November 2016 08:36 (two years ago) Permalink

one month passes...

I can't shake how much Dave Johns looks and sounds like Phil Collins.

The burrito of ennui (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Tuesday, 13 December 2016 13:18 (two years ago) Permalink

How can he sound like Phil Collins, he's from Wallsend?

The Doug Walters of Crime (Tom D.), Tuesday, 13 December 2016 13:22 (two years ago) Permalink

Collins has faked northeastern accents before to make himself sound "local."

The burrito of ennui (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Tuesday, 13 December 2016 13:24 (two years ago) Permalink

He has?

The Doug Walters of Crime (Tom D.), Tuesday, 13 December 2016 13:26 (two years ago) Permalink

Collins has faked northeastern accents before to make himself sound "local."

For a second a thought I had opened a thread on ILB and you were talking about subboard nemesis Billy Collins.

I Walk the Ondioline (James Redd and the Blecchs), Tuesday, 13 December 2016 13:52 (two years ago) Permalink

I'm perhaps not as au fait with the corpus of collins' forays as a thespian as i could be but I've never heard him do anything but a london accent

harold melvin and the bluetones (jim in vancouver), Tuesday, 13 December 2016 22:39 (two years ago) Permalink

Maybe he means Romford.

The Doug Walters of Crime (Tom D.), Tuesday, 13 December 2016 22:46 (two years ago) Permalink

i liked the angel's share

rewatched kes a year or two back and found it harder work than i expected -- perhaps because i'd over-invested in my memory of it (my mum took me to see it when it came out, when i was 9 or 10)

mark s, Tuesday, 13 December 2016 23:22 (two years ago) Permalink

No issue with the politics or the message of "I, Daniel Blake" but the movie, as a piece of art, has all the subtlety of a sledgehammer. Its realism is contrived, "Clunky, bolted together" as Tom D said above.

It wasn't at all clunky, wtf?

Art = stuff. Don't worry about it.

xyzzzz__, Tuesday, 13 December 2016 23:39 (two years ago) Permalink

Good movie, and it wasn't a sledgehammer.

The burrito of ennui (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Tuesday, 13 December 2016 23:59 (two years ago) Permalink

Alfred, you still haven't answered the question

An Alan Bennett Joint (Michael B), Wednesday, 14 December 2016 00:19 (two years ago) Permalink

About Phil Collins and Johns? I was thinking of Collins when he talks in 'Miami Vice' and his videos and tries to be the American idea of a Funny Local. It was a dumb point and I retract it.

The burrito of ennui (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Wednesday, 14 December 2016 00:28 (two years ago) Permalink

The Angel's Share was basically Pride, but with whiskey instead of gays and the old ladies who love them.

Ballistic: ILX vs. Sever (Eric H.), Wednesday, 14 December 2016 01:04 (two years ago) Permalink

this film was wonderful

Dave Plaintive rapper with classical training (imago), Wednesday, 14 December 2016 01:33 (two years ago) Permalink

four months pass...

i watched land and freedom last night as part of barcelona trip prep and loved it again

yes loach doesn't do "character" the way we expect film characters to be but in land and freedom it's actually very appropriate. the political was indistinguishable from the personal for a lot of the utopian collectivists who took up arms for the POUM. there is a moment in a barcelona pension when the lover of our liverpudlian hero says "i took a 7 day leave.. for a few days i don't want politics, no fighting, no trenches, i just want to feel human" and well i could not help peanut-gallerying "i regret to inform you are in a ken loach film my dear". the next morning she wakes up, discovers our liverpudlian hero has abandoned the POUM and is joining the regular communist-led brigades. she instantly disowns him, disavows her love, is off. they were so close to being "human", to being "characters"! but she gives it up in an instant when she discovers it might involve any sort of compromise. to me this feels extremely apposite to what people in that war were wrestling with.

the most interesting "character" to me by far is the granddaughter sorting through the clippings. up until the very last moment we think we know her story, and we think she's alone at the funeral, the only one who knows or cares about any of this. but she's found the old guy's buddies from the brigade! she's invited them! and she believes in the struggle! it's absurdly over the top and i loved it

illegal economic migration (Tracer Hand), Friday, 28 April 2017 10:53 (two years ago) Permalink

One of his very best. I vividly remember long and loud applause at the Gft when it finished and that was not a special screening or a premier or anything. Need to revisit it.

Heavy Doors (jed_), Friday, 28 April 2017 11:28 (two years ago) Permalink

five months pass...

Up the Junction is amazing

plax (ico), Thursday, 26 October 2017 20:03 (one year ago) Permalink

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2wvGbwwWBXI

plax (ico), Thursday, 26 October 2017 20:03 (one year ago) Permalink

hi plax! xo

(send me your email, i've lost it again)

Haven't seen any TV stuff that early, just Cathy Come Home, which is the next year. Carol White is also in that, and Poor Cow.

ice cream social justice (Dr Morbius), Thursday, 26 October 2017 20:07 (one year ago) Permalink

The Price of Coal is still on youtube. It has really cracking, angry class-war dialogue, but also mixes it with genuinely funny shit. And I think generally, Loach is very bad at doing humour. But some of the cast playing miners + middle management were Northern comedy circuit/WMC type comedians and made the best of the funny stuff. Also I only just noticed Bobby Knutt died last month (RIP), he is really good in this.

calzino, Thursday, 26 October 2017 21:05 (one year ago) Permalink

that song is awesome.

plax, i sent you an email through ILX, did you get it?

Susan Stranglehands (jed_), Sunday, 29 October 2017 21:50 (one year ago) Permalink

one year passes...

saw Ladybird Ladybird (35mm) for the first time in ~25 years yesterday; what a punishing scorcher. Glad to see Crissy Rock has had a career, albeit little that's made it to the US apparently.

a Mets fan who gave up on everything in the mid '80s (Dr Morbius), Monday, 13 May 2019 17:59 (one week ago) Permalink


You must be logged in to post. Please either login here, or if you are not registered, you may register here.