s/d: cookbooks!

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What is your favorite cookbook? Why? Is it full of easy recipes, or ridiculous two-day masterpieces? Are there gorgeous pictures? Do you get hungry just reading the recipes? On the other hand, what's just disappointing?

Maria (Maria), Tuesday, 17 October 2006 15:40 (fourteen years ago) link

i asked some people this a couple weeks ago and everyone told me to get the joy of cooking. i bought it, big as the oed, but yet to use it.

otto midnight (otto midnight), Tuesday, 17 October 2006 15:43 (fourteen years ago) link

When I started doing much more cooking this year, friend Stripey recommended Mark Bittman's How to Cook Everything, a copy of which she passed on to me which I'm deeply appreciating as a basic start all around. Good mix of recipes and approaches, plenty of room for experimentation and ultimately has helped me in getting a hell of a lot of basics down, which I wanted to do first and foremost. Don't know anything about the dude's TV show and if he's utterly insufferable there but the book is solid.

Ned Raggett (Ned), Tuesday, 17 October 2006 15:44 (fourteen years ago) link

http://www.achewood.com/shop/books_cookbook.php

"Did you ever see an item on a menu at a Chinese restaurant called 'Vegetable Delight?' Did you notice that the recipe was bullshit?

And it tasted like bullshit?"

SOME LOW END BRO (TOMBOT), Tuesday, 17 October 2006 15:47 (fourteen years ago) link

Meanwhile, two much more specific cookbooks I've got checked out from the library are:

Persian Cuisine by M. R. Ghanoonparvar

The Little Saigon Cookbook by Ann Le

Great for photos, in-depth explanations, suggestions, etc. etc. As we have huge populations of both Vietnamese and Iranian immigrants in OC getting to specialized markets for the food is simple.

A few years back, I picked up Fred Plotkin's Recipes from Paradise on Ligurian cuisine, and really need to get a copy for myself. Absolutely a joy to read.

Ned Raggett (Ned), Tuesday, 17 October 2006 15:51 (fourteen years ago) link

(I should say, I picked up the Plotkin as a gift for friend Stripey, which is why I need to get one for myself, etc.)

Ned Raggett (Ned), Tuesday, 17 October 2006 15:52 (fourteen years ago) link

The mpst used ones in my collection are: River cottage Meat, The River cottage Year, English Seafood Cookery and European Peasant Cookery. The first two are complete with pictures the second very sparse, the seafood one is a very old school paperback one. All feature simple hearty recipes.

I have La Bonne Cuisine and Il Cuccaio Argento for french and italian cookery respectively.

The best cookbooks get used less and less I find as favourite recipes become imprinted in the brain.

Ed (dali), Tuesday, 17 October 2006 15:52 (fourteen years ago) link

my go-to: How To Cook Everything (Mark Bittman)

gbx (skowly), Tuesday, 17 October 2006 15:53 (fourteen years ago) link

Another vote for How to Cook Everything as a good way to bone up on basics. I'd also recommend his follow up book, Best Recipes in the World, for a basic on branching out and doing more specialized recipes. I'd also recommend Martha Stewart Living Cookbook in the same vein as the above; ie there is 18 trillion recipes in the book at varying difficulty levels--you're bound to find what you are looking for, or at least something similar. Martha's one has a section full of beautiful pix but is mostly text; the Bittman ones are text.

Allyzay lives aprox. 200 feet away from a stadium (allyzay), Tuesday, 17 October 2006 15:57 (fourteen years ago) link

Weird winners: the Williams-Sonoma store line of glossy, coffee table book cookbooks. Recipes in them are actually not bad and very adaptable from what I've seen, and worse case scenario they've got gorgeous pictures and an admirably readable mini-history/travel guide thing in each one; the New Orleans one is spectacular for its pornographic pictures of various alcoholic thirst-quenchers.

Allyzay lives aprox. 200 feet away from a stadium (allyzay), Tuesday, 17 October 2006 15:59 (fourteen years ago) link

The Silver Spoon Cook book is your Italian bible.

It doesn't have a single recipe but Harold McGee's book is a must for anyone serious about cooking.

Other than that anything by Elizabeth David or Nigel Slater.

Treblekicker (treblekicker), Tuesday, 17 October 2006 16:00 (fourteen years ago) link

I don't think I've actually read through a cookbook that was disappointing but I'm going to try to come up with one. There are definitely some random comers I've gotten that I don't use, but just because they didn't really suit me much in the end (like people buying me these basics of meditteranean or italian cooking books--thanks, but uh?? Why are you giving me a 101 course on my specialties?)

Allyzay lives aprox. 200 feet away from a stadium (allyzay), Tuesday, 17 October 2006 16:01 (fourteen years ago) link

in the same vein as Ally's Martha stewart pick the 80s/early 90s Delia Smith's, 'The complete cookery course' is a fantastic manual/reportoire cookery book.

Also the Winnie the Pooh Cookery Book (AA Milne not disney, fools) rules all.

I have several Slater books but I hardly touch them as favourite recipes fix into the brain, I like his style and the fact that he always provides alternative ingredients and ideas to do different things with the same recipe

Ed (dali), Tuesday, 17 October 2006 16:04 (fourteen years ago) link

Of the books on my shelf next to me that don't get used: the Les Halles Cookbook, Cooking under the Influence and the Larousse Gastronomique (occasionally used as a reference)

Ed (dali), Tuesday, 17 October 2006 16:06 (fourteen years ago) link

newish vegan cookbook called Vegan With a Vegeance has some really amazing recipes in it

also search: anything by Yamuna Devi or Kurma Das

Thomas Tallis (Tommy), Tuesday, 17 October 2006 16:15 (fourteen years ago) link

Favorites:
Mark Miller, Coyote Cafe Cookbook
John Egerton, Southern Cooking (more a travelogue that includes recipes)
Crescent Dragonwagon, The Dairy Hollow House Cookbook
A couple of Wei-Chuan cookbooks I found at Costco -- I got the Vietnamese and Thai ones, wish I'd gotten every one I saw.

Fallbacks/reference: Rosso & Lukins, The New Basics
Sheila Lukins, All Around the World Cookbook
and Joy of Cooking

Lately, if I have two or three ingredients in mind and want some ideas, I generally hit epicurious.com and devise something from their search results.

I need to get a good Indian cookbook -- Madhur Jaffrey?

The Bearnaise-Stain Bears (Rock Hardy), Tuesday, 17 October 2006 16:23 (fourteen years ago) link

Whilst we're on the subject of cooking. Anyone got a shit hot fried chicken recipe.

Ed (dali), Tuesday, 17 October 2006 16:24 (fourteen years ago) link

I said this elsewehere, but the new Locatelli cookbook is a marvel - the best Italian cookbook I've ever seen - I have the silver spoon too and it seems to eclipse it, not for breadth but just for sheer quality. It helps that his restaurant is possibly the best I've ever been to (it's a toss-up between that and St John)

My collection of BBQ cookbooks grows apace too, Secrets of Championship BBQ being a particular favourite/

Porkpie (porkpie), Tuesday, 17 October 2006 16:30 (fourteen years ago) link

I need to get a good Indian cookbook -- Madhur Jaffrey?

Jaffrey is excellent but Lord Krishna's Cuisine by Yamuna Devi is better

though Devi cooks Gaudiya Vaisnava = no onions/garlic, if that's a dealbreaker for you then go with Jaffrey

Thomas Tallis (Tommy), Tuesday, 17 October 2006 17:10 (fourteen years ago) link

A Cookbook for Poor Poets (and Others) by Ann Rogers

(favorite tip: "only three ingredients are really essential: good bread, butter, and a bottle of red wine")

Euai Kapaui (tracerhand), Tuesday, 17 October 2006 17:15 (fourteen years ago) link

and if you like baking bread you might already know this one, but if you're just getting interested:

http://www.amazon.com/Laurels-Kitchen-Bread-Book-Whole-Grain/dp/0812969677

Euai Kapaui (tracerhand), Tuesday, 17 October 2006 17:17 (fourteen years ago) link

Persian Cuisine by M. R. Ghanoonparvar (as recommended by Ned)--I can vouch that the recipes in this one are tasty as tasty can be, but I've never cooked from it.

Bread Alone by Daniel Leader is perfect if you want to make a ritual out of making your own bread. There's a great buckwheat banana bread recipe in there too.

The Tassajara Recipe Book by Edward Espe Brown is great for vegetarian things, and also for developing a sense of what makes food good.

patita (patita), Tuesday, 17 October 2006 19:35 (fourteen years ago) link

The Tassajara Recipe Book

Yes, I highly recommend it.

GILLY'S BAGG'EAR VANCE OF COUPARI (Ex Leon), Tuesday, 17 October 2006 19:39 (fourteen years ago) link

Hmm, I'll third that indirectly, I am positive Stripey's mentioned that before as well.

Ned Raggett (Ned), Tuesday, 17 October 2006 19:40 (fourteen years ago) link

its true that the Joy of Cooking is pretty indispensable. Its very matter-of-fact and can tell you how to cook pretty much anything... as for Indian cooking, Madhur Jaffrey's okay, but some of her spice preparations - ugh. I have another recent favorite that I've been sticking with but I got it in India and forget the author's name (bah!)... my other most used cookbook is probably Eula May's Cajun Home Cooking. Oh man that is some good shit.

Shakey Mo Collier (Shakey Mo Collier), Tuesday, 17 October 2006 19:47 (fourteen years ago) link

Seconding the Slater recommendation...this one in particular I've used a lot.
http://images.amazon.com/images/P/1841154709.02._PE34_OU02_SCMZZZZZZZ_.jpg

And this one is great if you've got kids who want to help out.
http://images.amazon.com/images/P/0340826363.01._PE50_OU02_SCMZZZZZZZ_V39900417_.jpg

As for destroying cookbooks - Nico Landenis 'My Gastronomy' is perhaps the only cookbook I've ever bought where I cooked nothing from it. It was just all too difficult!

Ned T.Rifle (nedtrifle), Tuesday, 17 October 2006 20:03 (fourteen years ago) link

I won a Rachel Ray cookbook a couple of months back and still have no idea what to do with it. It's not that the recipes were difficult, they were just...weird. Like spaghetti w/barbecue sauce.

GILLY'S BAGG'EAR VANCE OF COUPARI (Ex Leon), Tuesday, 17 October 2006 20:08 (fourteen years ago) link

One of my most cherished dreams is that she will die from her own cooking.

M. White (Miguelito), Tuesday, 17 October 2006 20:19 (fourteen years ago) link

:-)

Ned Raggett (Ned), Tuesday, 17 October 2006 20:20 (fourteen years ago) link

No love for Fannie Farmer on this thread? It's my go-to book, not that I cook much these days...

mikef (mfleming), Tuesday, 17 October 2006 20:21 (fourteen years ago) link

As mentioned before on ILCooking I swear by the sainted Elizabeth David's French Provincial Cooking. If I'm stuck on a point of technique I'll nearly always refer to Leith's cookery Bible as Prue nearly always knows. The Moro cookbooks are always an entertaining read and the recipes are practically foolproof. Slater thirded, as his sheer exuberance takes a heart of stone to deny. Like Ed I have the Les Halles book but don't have a lot of call to use it.

Matt (Matt), Tuesday, 17 October 2006 20:24 (fourteen years ago) link

I've used les halles a couple of times (and read it cover to cover like a normal book) but it's one of those books where you have to set out, almost on an expedition to make something from it rather than dip into it for something handy.

The Moro books are both good yes - I like them a lot an dthey seem so enthusiastic over the food (restaurant is good too) The Fino book isn't bad either, but it's just not as.... warm if you know what I mean.

We have the first three river cafe books - barely use those.

Gennaro Contaldo's Passione book is pretty decent

(yes, I'm twisting round and checking out the cookery bookcase :)

Matt - how are *things*

Porkpie (porkpie), Tuesday, 17 October 2006 20:30 (fourteen years ago) link

BBC Books' GoodFood Magazine series is pretty cool. Wee things, not much bigger than a CD case. I just have the vegetarian one. Shiny picture for every dish, no ingredients I've not heard of, and everything I've made has been fucking tasty.

Eyeball Kicks (Eyeball Kicks), Tuesday, 17 October 2006 20:30 (fourteen years ago) link

Things are progessing tolerably well, ta. It's waiting for estate agents and solicitors to get their respective acts together more than anything else, nearly everything else is in place

Matt (Matt), Tuesday, 17 October 2006 20:34 (fourteen years ago) link

We have loads of cookbooks but the only ones I regularly (or thereabouts) use is NY Times Cookbook or the Joy of Cooking and mostly for various techniques or sub-recipes. As to new recipes, I think we get most of them from friends or from the SF Chronicle or from the Food Network.

M. White (Miguelito), Tuesday, 17 October 2006 20:35 (fourteen years ago) link

The only cookbooks I've actually used:

-The James Beard Cookbook for interesting stuff, or interesting takes on normal stuff. I think it automatically opened to the sour cream pancake/waffle page.

-Some Better Homes & Gardens cookbook for boring stuff that I still didn't know how to make.

Jordan (Jordan), Tuesday, 17 October 2006 20:38 (fourteen years ago) link

ditto what M. White said - new stuff we try is always from friends, Food Network, or (most likely) Grandma.

Shakey Mo Collier (Shakey Mo Collier), Tuesday, 17 October 2006 20:40 (fourteen years ago) link

i just boil everything. except toast sometimes.

otto midnight (otto midnight), Tuesday, 17 October 2006 20:40 (fourteen years ago) link

http://images.amazon.com/images/P/1843401150.02._SS500_SCLZZZZZZZ_V1100882320_.jpg

I absolutely swear by this.

scotstvo (scotstvo), Tuesday, 17 October 2006 20:45 (fourteen years ago) link

That must look odd in court.

M. White (Miguelito), Tuesday, 17 October 2006 20:47 (fourteen years ago) link

Only when I make a hash of it.

Cough.

scotstvo (scotstvo), Tuesday, 17 October 2006 20:49 (fourteen years ago) link

Oyez!

M. White (Miguelito), Tuesday, 17 October 2006 20:54 (fourteen years ago) link

This has been a favourite of mine recently:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Moro-Cookbook-Samuel-Clark/dp/009188084X

chap who would dare to contain two ingredients. Tea and bags. (chap), Tuesday, 17 October 2006 20:58 (fourteen years ago) link

i'll fourth that tassajara

gbx (skowly), Tuesday, 17 October 2006 20:59 (fourteen years ago) link

The Healthy Cuisine of India: Recipes from the Bengal Region by Bharti Kirchner is a really great indian cookbook. no sexy pictures, but the text makes up for it in terms of clarity and quality.

AaronK (AaronK), Tuesday, 17 October 2006 21:26 (fourteen years ago) link

Lord Krishna's Cuisine is an awesome cookbook. Some of the recipes can be quite complex and a bit daunting at times. (I've borrowed it from a friend but don't own it.) A really simple Indian cookbook that will teach a lot of fundamentals is The Spice Box by Manju Shivraj Singh...I've made that pink lentil daal like a million times. Lots of pickle recipes.

Mastering the Art of French Cooking by Julia Child and Simone Beck is great and you'll become a pretty decent cook if you use it once in a while. Truss a chicken, make a white sauce, do a gratin a few times and you're in. You must like the butter though.

pj (Henry), Tuesday, 17 October 2006 22:17 (fourteen years ago) link

Yet another vote for How to Cook Everything. This book isn't just recipes, it really teaches you how to cook, and it's even enjoyable to read. I can probably credit about 60% of whatever meager cooking knowledge I have to this book. Also when you make one of his Indian recipes it actually comes out tasting somewhat like Indian food.

A-ron Hubbard (Hurting), Tuesday, 17 October 2006 22:19 (fourteen years ago) link

I also really love to find Junior League or church cookbooks when I'm at a thrift store or in another city. A great Louisiana one is called River Road Recipes. It's got like one of those plastic-ringed binders and it looks like it was made on a mimeograph machine.

I guess destroy most cookbooks that come with crock pots or other consumer appliances. Microwave cookbooks can also go away.

pj (Henry), Tuesday, 17 October 2006 22:27 (fourteen years ago) link

the thing to do with books like Lord Krishna's Cuisine is to just make it your project for a week or two - set aside four dinners (more if you can!) to using recipes from it, getting the feel for the processes. Spend a couple of Saturdays learning to make the samosas and make a chutney or two, too. If you make the full recipe you have so many left that you gotta give 'em to neighbors and stuff and the looks on their faces when they're eating a homemade samosa are so priceless that it gives you enough encouragement to keep going.

There is a "Recipes from Lord Krishna's Cuisine" book that's mainly the not-quite-so-intense recipes.

Thomas Tallis (Tommy), Tuesday, 17 October 2006 22:55 (fourteen years ago) link

I always like to rep for that book because it, along with Bernard Clayton's New Book of Breads, totally changed my life!

Thomas Tallis (Tommy), Tuesday, 17 October 2006 22:55 (fourteen years ago) link

what kind of "french"?

― seandalai, Friday, May 24, 2019 5:02 PM (twelve minutes ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

what are the different kinds?

i wanna start going to butcher and asking for some nasty cuts of pork and cooking them in tasty french fashion

― flopson, Friday, 24 May 2019 21:20 (yesterday) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

There are many regional styles (Brittany=seafood+crepes, Normandy=apples and cream, southwest=foie gras+chestnuts, Alsace=plums+choucroute+flammkueche) as well as the classic bourgeois food culture (all those sauces with names). This is a great overview on the regional side with easy recipes (https://www.amazon.co.uk/Larousse-cuisines-régionales-Alix-Baboin-Jaubert/dp/2035604508) but I don't think there's an English version. I don't have the Wolfert book but she's awesome so I'm sure it's awesome too.

seandalai, Saturday, 25 May 2019 12:07 (one year ago) link

(aside: Paula Wolfert's Moroccan Cuisine was as life-changing for me in my twenties as The World of Arthur Russell or Love Saves the Day, it's the reason I have a bookcase dedicated to cookbooks)

seandalai, Saturday, 25 May 2019 12:11 (one year ago) link

A French cookbook in English that's never let us down is Bistro Cooking by Patricia Wells. I'll vouch in particular for her salads, which have become standbys chez nous. Also the chocolate cake, which is like a 20 minute prep tops; you can go for it when you learn late that a friend'll drop by and you'd like to have something after dinner. It's not elaborate, but French people tend to avoid making elaborate desserts at home; that's what a patisserie is for. But simple French desserts are often made at home and they're a joy.

L'assie (Euler), Saturday, 25 May 2019 12:33 (one year ago) link

The 1997 edition of the Joy of Cooking

This is the first cookbook I bought (in June 1998 I believe) and it's what really got me into cooking. The book is beat to hell now with a broken spine and covered in pancake and cornbread batter and gravy and but it's still my definitive source for a number of things.

joygoat, Saturday, 25 May 2019 14:59 (one year ago) link

what you really need is a good tortilleria

i live in london, UK, so that's a hard no, but i have a tortilla press and imported masa flour!

Tiltin' My Lens Photography (stevie), Monday, 27 May 2019 16:04 (one year ago) link

one year passes...

I'm interested in either a cookbook or just a book in general that is as comprehensive an overview of Chinese cuisines as is possible. Has anyone looked at "All Under Heaven" by Carolyn Phillips or "China: The Cookbook" by Kei Lum Chan and Diora Fong Chan? Or are there any others you'd recommend?

vision joanna newsom (Stevie D(eux)), Tuesday, 9 June 2020 16:02 (seven months ago) link

This is totally not what you want but when I saw this had been revived I thought I'd mention that we have been enjoying the recipes from Fuchsia Dunlop's "The Food of Sichuan" which was (re?)published late last year.

Tim, Tuesday, 9 June 2020 16:23 (seven months ago) link

I'm not familiar with it, but maybe All Under Heaven: Recipes from the 35 Cuisines of China by Carolyn Phillips?
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B012KJYR48/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_hsch_vapi_tkin_p1_i0

Irritable Baal (WmC), Tuesday, 9 June 2020 16:33 (seven months ago) link

Not suggesting buying it from amazon, of course.

Irritable Baal (WmC), Tuesday, 9 June 2020 16:34 (seven months ago) link

are you anti-blog bc

https://thewoksoflife.com/

Its big ball chunky time (Jimmy The Mod Awaits The Return Of His Beloved), Tuesday, 9 June 2020 16:43 (seven months ago) link

Complete Asian Cookbook by Charmaine Solomon has been my bible for 20+ years

terminators of endearment (VegemiteGrrl), Tuesday, 9 June 2020 16:46 (seven months ago) link

You’ll prob have to get it used, i think it is out of print here

The Complete Asian Cookbook https://www.amazon.com/dp/1743791968/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_Rp83EbS8V1AWC

terminators of endearment (VegemiteGrrl), Tuesday, 9 June 2020 17:17 (seven months ago) link

oh wow Woks of Life looks GREAT!!!

vision joanna newsom (Stevie D(eux)), Tuesday, 9 June 2020 17:42 (seven months ago) link

we are a fuchsia dunlop household. her books are wonderful

flopson, Tuesday, 9 June 2020 17:59 (seven months ago) link

woks of life is, in fact, great

like, I’m eating an elephant head (katherine), Tuesday, 9 June 2020 18:00 (seven months ago) link

yeah I don't know how many books she has but she has two very good books on Sichuan and Hunan cuisine

Rik Waller-Bridge (jim in vancouver), Tuesday, 9 June 2020 18:00 (seven months ago) link

xp

Rik Waller-Bridge (jim in vancouver), Tuesday, 9 June 2020 18:00 (seven months ago) link

fuchsia rules, I've seen tons of really wonderful books from her and others on individual cuisines, but not a whole lot that are like "ok here are all the diff regions and the types of food they prepare and how they've influenced or been influenced by these other regions etc etc etc"

vision joanna newsom (Stevie D(eux)), Tuesday, 9 June 2020 18:06 (seven months ago) link

ya she’s basically exclusively szech

flopson, Tuesday, 9 June 2020 18:35 (seven months ago) link

Another vote for Fuschia Dunlop.

As well as the Hunan and two Sichuan books she has a couple of others.

‘Every grain of rice’ which is a more general every day Chinese cookery book.

‘The land of fish and rice’ which is cuisine from the Jiangnan (Lower Yangtze) Région

All highly recommended and highly accessible but Every grain of rice is the one I use the most as it is really focussed on everyday cookery.

American Fear of Pranksterism (Ed), Tuesday, 9 June 2020 21:00 (seven months ago) link

I've cooked about half the Sichuan book and idk max 3 recipes from "The land of fish and rice". Not sure I have an explanation.

She's great in any case, her memoir is a good read too.

coptic feels (seandalai), Tuesday, 9 June 2020 23:18 (seven months ago) link

I’m probably about the same ratio. I think I just love the spicy bombast of Sichuan food.

American Fear of Pranksterism (Ed), Wednesday, 10 June 2020 03:12 (seven months ago) link

four months pass...

where is the love for OLIA HERCULES? I've been working my way through Kaukasis and Summer Kitchens, and I have a pot of bubbling green tomatoes at the ferment, but ultimately I'lll just say she has a love of food that everyone should engage with.

timber euros (seandalai), Saturday, 24 October 2020 01:35 (two months ago) link

i've had kaukasis on my cookbooks list probably since it came out but never bought it. what does she do with green tomatoes? i am supposedly getting a batch in my farm share tomorrow and have never worked with them.

call all destroyer, Saturday, 24 October 2020 01:58 (two months ago) link

J. Kenji Lopez-Alt put out a kids book with recipes if anyone wants to cook with their progeny

Donald Trump Also Sucks, Of Course (milo z), Saturday, 24 October 2020 02:13 (two months ago) link

nice of kenji to remind anyone who missed it the first 5000 times that he is a dad

call all destroyer, Saturday, 24 October 2020 02:20 (two months ago) link

lol do u need a minute cad

terminators of endearment (VegemiteGrrl), Saturday, 24 October 2020 02:30 (two months ago) link

haha he had a kid and then instantly altered all of his bios to read like this: J. Kenji López-Alt is a stay-at-home dad who moonlights as the Chief Culinary Consultant of Serious Eats.....

call all destroyer, Saturday, 24 October 2020 02:45 (two months ago) link

I lost track of him after the Food Lab book came out and he cut back on writing to open a restaurant, didn't even realize he had his own cooking channel until last month. His videos rack up a crazy number of views for a guy wearing a GoPro and chatting.

Donald Trump Also Sucks, Of Course (milo z), Saturday, 24 October 2020 02:48 (two months ago) link

his videos are good! he's still one of the best out there at teaching people how to actually cook but could otherwise stand to relax a bit.

call all destroyer, Saturday, 24 October 2020 02:50 (two months ago) link

His videos are good fun, I trust his recipes and I enjoy peeping at his kitchen and fridge

Change Display Name: (stevie), Saturday, 24 October 2020 08:38 (two months ago) link

kenji's zucchini basil soup (on youtube) is KILLER

flopson, Saturday, 24 October 2020 22:00 (two months ago) link

His pressure cooker chile con carne is a winter staple.

Donald Trump Also Sucks, Of Course (milo z), Saturday, 24 October 2020 22:05 (two months ago) link

Nice. ive always wanted a pressure cooker

flopson, Saturday, 24 October 2020 23:46 (two months ago) link

pressure cookers are great

call all destroyer, Saturday, 24 October 2020 23:54 (two months ago) link

Instapot mania seems to have died down but I still use mine once or twice a week. The stovetop pressure cooker I had wasn't worth the effort for the extra pressure.

Donald Trump Also Sucks, Of Course (milo z), Saturday, 24 October 2020 23:58 (two months ago) link

don't have place for a pressure cooker, and am not sure I need to cook my food that much faster, but I liked reading about that J. Kenji Lopez-Alt Chili Con Carne recipe

Dan S, Sunday, 25 October 2020 00:01 (two months ago) link

it calls for a dutch oven, which I do have

Dan S, Sunday, 25 October 2020 00:04 (two months ago) link

yeah had to grudgingly admit the instant pot is way better than a stovetop pc

call all destroyer, Sunday, 25 October 2020 00:04 (two months ago) link

https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2015/01/quick-and-easy-pressure-cooker-chicken-lentil-bacon-stew-recipe.html

another incredibly good cold weather recipe but I swap out the bone-in/skin-on thighs for boneless and a little bit of gelatin powder. Pressure cooked chicken skin is gross and more trouble than it's worth to fish out.

Donald Trump Also Sucks, Of Course (milo z), Sunday, 25 October 2020 00:16 (two months ago) link

made that one a few times, it's quite good

call all destroyer, Sunday, 25 October 2020 00:21 (two months ago) link

I have tried more recipes from Ottolenghi's "Jerusalem" than most other cookbooks over the last few years I think. After many years I'm still impressed by Patricia Wells' "Bistro Cooking" especially, but also "The Best Recipe" book, the Silver Palate books, and Madhur Jaffrey's books

Dan S, Sunday, 25 October 2020 00:55 (two months ago) link

i've had kaukasis on my cookbooks list probably since it came out but never bought it. what does she do with green tomatoes? i am supposedly getting a batch in my farm share tomorrow and have never worked with them.

― call all destroyer, Saturday, 24 October 2020 01:58 (two days ago) bookmarkflaglink

Recipe in Kaukasis is a mostly-straight fermentation recipe - cover in brine with various flavourings, leave bubble away for a week or two until they taste fizzy. There's another great/simple fried green tomatoes recipe in Summer Kitchens - the secret is to cover them in a huge amount of cheese after frying.

timber euros (seandalai), Monday, 26 October 2020 00:39 (two months ago) link

yeah had to grudgingly admit the instant pot is way better than a stovetop pc

― call all destroyer, Sunday, 25 October 2020 1:04 AM (yesterday) bookmarkflaglink


really? tell me more... my stovetop one has broken and i’m looking at replacing. was thinking that browning things would be the biggest issue with instant pot?

just sayin, Monday, 26 October 2020 00:48 (two months ago) link

it has a sauté function, can't say i'm a big fan of it because it tends to get too hot and hard to control but it's ok for browning meat or onions before pressure cooking

superdeep borehole (harbl), Monday, 26 October 2020 01:10 (two months ago) link

Re: Instant Pot, it's better than a standard pressure cooker, imo, but not better than a slow cooker. Or at least not a 1:1 replacement. If you want to use it as a slow cooker, you have to kind of adjust the time/temperature to compensate. Fwiw, my Dutch oven is pretty much my most go-to big pot.

I heard something good about a cookbook called "Feast," apparently a broad survey of Islamic cuisine around the world, but I saw one review that said the book was OK but ultimately not for "most American kitchens." I figured, OK, it's going to be some rube bristling at hummus or sumac or something, but no, it was a recipe for ... roast camel hump. And I thought, yeah, that is pretty exotic. Can I even buy a camel hump? A quick look suggested no, at least not easily. But I soon enough came across the cookbook author's blog expressing big enthusiasm for camel hump, and, curious, read up to see where she got it. And she concedes that the easiest way to get a camel hump is ... from someone cooking an entire camel. Not a big one, mind, just a small one, but an entire camel all the same, which I'm pretty confident isn't any easier a get. And I thought, you know, this cookbook is probably not for me.

Josh in Chicago, Monday, 26 October 2020 01:21 (two months ago) link

i've never used it as a slow cooker and also haven't used my slow cooker (iirc) since i got it. there's probably nothing i would slow cook instead of pressure cooking for 1 hr - 90 min.

i've never encountered a recipe for camel hump! i think i have a book with sheep's brains, but no hump. even if i could get that i'm not sure i would cook it because what if i don't like it? there is a grocery store here that i think is owned by yemenis and has a butcher shop attached to it, could probably get a place like that to order a camel hump. probably deliciously fatty.

superdeep borehole (harbl), Monday, 26 October 2020 01:34 (two months ago) link

really? tell me more... my stovetop one has broken and i’m looking at replacing. was thinking that browning things would be the biggest issue with instant pot?

― just sayin, Sunday, October 25, 2020 8:48 PM (one hour ago) bookmarkflaglink

for me the stovetop pressure cooker involved just enough monitoring that it outweighed the convenience factor. having to wait around for it to come up to pressure so i could reduce the heat (my stovetop is aggressive) and then making sure that it stayed at a happy pressure meant i was just staying in the kitchen as much as i would for any other operation, where ideally if i wanted to do a pot of beans it would be a set and forget operation. so the instant pot takes care of all of that.

the saute function isn't amazing but does the job for onions and stuff. if i needed to brown something really carefully i guess i would do it in a saute pan, deglaze and transfer to the instant pot, but that hasn't come up.

call all destroyer, Monday, 26 October 2020 01:58 (two months ago) link

A lot of instant pot recipes we've found and like aren't just toss everything into the pot and let it go types. They typically involve growing meat or veggies first on sautés before locking everything else in there. Honestly, we love to use the IP most for hardboiled eggs!

Anyway, for the record: https://www.anissas.com/camel-hump-finally/

Josh in Chicago, Monday, 26 October 2020 03:07 (two months ago) link

I bought Jerusalem right before moving and never quite “bonded” with it for lack of a better term, I really should go through it again for ideas

joygoat, Monday, 26 October 2020 03:51 (two months ago) link


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