British Food: Classic or Dud (S&D too)

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I can't believe we have never discussed this

I'd say ultimately classic, there's a lot of terrible so-caled food out there and plenty in Britain eat badly, but when you get down to the proper stuff so of the best and most interesting food in the world, made from some of the best produce

Ed (dali), Thursday, 21 September 2006 05:58 (fifteen years ago) link

lies.

it's teh_kit! (g-kit), Thursday, 21 September 2006 06:38 (fifteen years ago) link

George Orwell
In Defence of English Cooking
We have heard a good deal of talk in recent years about the desirability of attracting foreign tourists to this country. It is well known that England’s two worst faults, from a foreign visitor’s point of view, are the gloom of our Sundays and the difficulty of buying a drink.

Both of these are due of fanatical minorities who will need a lot of quelling, including extensive legislation. But there is one point on which public opinion could bring about a rapid change for the better: I mean cooking.

It is commonly said, even by the English themselves, that English cooking is the worst in the world. It is supposed to be not merely incompetent, but also imitative, and I even read quite recently, in a book by a French writer, the remark: ‘The best English cooking is, of course, simply French cooking.’

Now that is simply not true, as anyone who has lived long abroad will know, there is a whole host of delicacies which it is quite impossible to obtain outside the English-speaking countries. No doubt the list could be added to, but here are some of the things that I myself have sought for in foreign countries and failed to find.

First of all, kippers, Yorkshire pudding, Devonshire cream, muffins and crumpets. Then a list of puddings that would be interminable if I gave it in full: I will pick out for special mention Christmas pudding, treacle tart and apple dumplings. Then an almost equally long list of cakes: for instance, dark plum cake (such as you used to get at Buzzard’s before the war), short-bread and saffron buns. Also innumerable kinds of biscuit, which exist, of course, elsewhere, but are generally admitted to be better and crisper in England.

Then there are the various ways of cooking potatoes that are peculiar to our own country. Where else do you see potatoes roasted under the joint, which is far and away the best way of cooking them? Or the delicious potato cakes that you get in the north of England? And it is far better to cook new potatoes in the English way — that is, boiled with mint and then served with a little melted butter or margarine — than to fry them as is done in most countries.

Then there are the various sauces peculiar to England. For instance, bread sauce, horse-radish sauce, mint sauce and apple sauce; not to mention redcurrant jelly, which is excellent with mutton as well as with hare, and various kinds of sweet pickle, which we seem to have in greater profusion than most countries.

What else? Outside these islands I have never seen a haggis, except one that came out of a tin, nor Dublin prawns, nor Oxford marmalade, nor several other kinds of jam (marrow jam and bramble jelly, for instance), nor sausages of quite the same kind as ours.

Then there are the English cheeses. There are not many of them but I fancy Stilton is the best cheese of its type in the world, with Wensleydale not far behind. English apples are also outstandingly good, particularly the Cox’s Orange Pippin.

And finally, I would like to put in a word for English bread. All the bread is good, from the enormous Jewish loaves flavoured with caraway seeds to the Russian rye bread which is the colour of black treacle. Still, if there is anything quite as good as the soft part of the crust from an English cottage loaf (how soon shall we be seeing cottage loaves again?) I do not know of it.

No doubt some of the things I have named above could be obtained in continental Europe, just as it is possible in London to obtain vodka or bird’s nest soup. But they are all native to our shores, and over huge areas they are literally unheard of.

South of, say, Brussels, I do not imagine that you would succeed in getting hold of a suet pudding. In French there is not even a word that exactly translates ‘suet’. The French, also, never use mint in cookery and do not use black currants except as a basis of a drink.

It will be seen that we have no cause to be ashamed of our cookery, so far as originality goes or so far as the ingredients go. And yet it must be admitted that there is a serious snag from the foreign visitor’s point of view. This is, that you practically don’t find good English cooking outside a private house. If you want, say, a good, rich slice of Yorkshire pudding you are more likely to get it in the poorest English home than in a restaurant, which is where the visitor necessarily eats most of his meals.

It is a fact that restaurants which are distinctively English and which also sell good food are very hard to find. Pubs, as a rule, sell no food at all, other than potato crisps and tasteless sandwiches. The expensive restaurants and hotels almost all imitate French cookery and write their menus in French, while if you want a good cheap meal you gravitate naturally towards a Greek, Italian or Chinese restaurant. We are not likely to succeed in attracting tourists while England is thought of as a country of bad food and unintelligible by-laws. At present one cannot do much about it, but sooner or later rationing will come to an end, and then will be the moment for our national cookery to revive. It is not a law of nature that every restaurant in England should be either foreign or bad, and the first step towards an improvement will be a less long-suffering attitude in the British public itself.

Paul Kelly (kelly), Thursday, 21 September 2006 06:59 (fifteen years ago) link

Obviously things have changed sinces Orwell's times as no one seems to cook the traditional dishes at home anymore. Not when I go back anyway.

Paul Kelly (kelly), Thursday, 21 September 2006 07:04 (fifteen years ago) link

I am somewhat of a traditionalist in my home cooking. Orwell does put it very well except of course that, in London at least, a lot of pubs are some of the best paces to sample English cooking (and cooking from elsewhere).

Currently I am preserving and pickling like billy-o. I should have access to a great quantity of apples for making chutneys next week.

Ed (dali), Thursday, 21 September 2006 07:26 (fifteen years ago) link

I want to buy a dinghy so I can scrump the lovely looking apples growing on a tree along the Regents Canal near Victoria Park (they're not accessible by land due to spiky fences).

Rick Stein goes around cooking amazing looking cassoulets and whatnot but then says his favourite dish is battered fish n' chips, the menk!

I often wonder how popular the 'English breakfast' i.e. big greasy fry-up really is with foreign visitors.

Konal Doddz (blueski), Thursday, 21 September 2006 08:53 (fifteen years ago) link

S: Full English Breakfast, Cheeses especially Caboc, Stilton, Dovedale and Cheddar, Lancashire Hotpot, Arbroath Smokies, Beef Stew and Dumplings, Sunday Roast, Artisan Sausages, Yorkshire Pudding, Curd Tarts, Fish and Chips, Haggis, Kippers, Soups and Broths, Puddings especially Trifle, Rhubarb Crumble, Fools, Sponge puddings.

D: Full English Breakfast, Most fast food, poor quality processed food, dodgy versions and poor attempts at above list. Breads and patisserie generally not up to standard on continent, though getting better.

Billy Dods (Billy Dods), Thursday, 21 September 2006 09:30 (fifteen years ago) link

Problem with a lot of British food is the gulf in quality between the generally cheaper mass processed product and those produced by a small, specialist. Pork Pies are a case in point, some of the supermarket attempts aren't fit for dogs never mind humans, whereas a good independent butcher can make some absolutely sublime pies.

Billy Dods (Billy Dods), Thursday, 21 September 2006 09:34 (fifteen years ago) link

full English breakfast will always be AWESOME as long as you use good quality bacon and sausages (which your average cafe doesn't it's true). If only it was easier to get hold that black pudding they do in France with apple bits in it - melt in your mouth!

OTM re pork pies too. The ones starry and others got from the great British beer festival tasted superb and quite different to typical shop ones.

Konal Doddz (blueski), Thursday, 21 September 2006 09:46 (fifteen years ago) link

this thread makes me happy i became vegetarian.

it's teh_kit! (g-kit), Thursday, 21 September 2006 09:47 (fifteen years ago) link

I am a fan of the stornaway black-pudding with oats in.

Also fruit pudding (white pudding with candied fruit in)is a bizarre but tasty scottish breakfast delicacy.

Ed (dali), Thursday, 21 September 2006 09:50 (fifteen years ago) link

Some additional good things: Full Scottish Breakfast (better than Full English through addition of tattie scone), Suffolk hotpot, ginger beer, malvern pudding, Eton mess, Bakewell puddings, treacle tart, LARDY CAKE, eccles cakes, Victoria sponge, clotted cream (gosh we do cakes and puds well, eh?), cloutie dumpling, my Nanna's mince pies, spotted dick, the scones I had just outside Belfast which were the best I've ever tasted ... there's tons more but I ought to do some work.

I find it highly amusing how popular crumble has become in France.

Mädchen (Madchen), Thursday, 21 September 2006 09:52 (fifteen years ago) link

PICKLED ONIONS, proper strong ones.

Mädchen (Madchen), Thursday, 21 September 2006 09:53 (fifteen years ago) link

now you're talking.

it's teh_kit! (g-kit), Thursday, 21 September 2006 09:53 (fifteen years ago) link

Parkin; oaty spicey bonfire night cake of the gods
Cobbler

Ed (dali), Thursday, 21 September 2006 10:02 (fifteen years ago) link

I think I'm going to see if I can get some treacle tart or apple pie at Konditor and Cook at Lunch.

Ed (dali), Thursday, 21 September 2006 10:04 (fifteen years ago) link

Cloutie Dumpling, now you're talking. Great alternative to Christmas Pudding (which can be fab too).

Billy Dods (Billy Dods), Thursday, 21 September 2006 10:04 (fifteen years ago) link

Everything Mädchen said (esp. Lardy Cake and PROPER Bakewell puddings!) plus most everything in this book...
http://images.amazon.com/images/P/1903018358.01._PE34_OU02_SCMZZZZZZZ_V51204762_.jpg

Ned T.Rifle (nedtrifle), Thursday, 21 September 2006 10:05 (fifteen years ago) link

I won a bakewell pudding from postapudding.co.uk

Ed (dali), Thursday, 21 September 2006 10:06 (fifteen years ago) link

very tasty it was too.

Ed (dali), Thursday, 21 September 2006 10:07 (fifteen years ago) link

proper bread and butter pudding with custard

haven't had a pasty (West Cornwall co. or otherwise) for ages now, missing them (much better than patties imo)

Konal Doddz (blueski), Thursday, 21 September 2006 10:07 (fifteen years ago) link

Classic anyway. Of course there's a load of crap but it's getting easier and easier to find/make the good stuff. Funnily enough Mark Hix is producing a recipe book along these very lines...
http://images.amazon.com/images/P/1844002349.01._PE40_OU02_SCMZZZZZZZ_V62198616_.jpg
I haven't read it yet (it's not out till next month) but it looks scrumptious.

Ned T.Rifle (nedtrifle), Thursday, 21 September 2006 10:09 (fifteen years ago) link

I've decided that next time I go to the UK (which is next week), I am actually going to try some British food. Give me a goddamn pie!

i've dreamt of rubies! (Mandee), Thursday, 21 September 2006 11:32 (fifteen years ago) link

you could try that pie n mash cafe in Greenwich - cheap and good.

Konal Doddz (blueski), Thursday, 21 September 2006 12:11 (fifteen years ago) link

Gave me food poisoning (although I was 11 at the time)

Ed (dali), Thursday, 21 September 2006 12:15 (fifteen years ago) link

I've eaten there many a time with no ill effects. There's one on Exmouth Market that's much closer to where you'll be staying though, Mandee.

Matt DC (Matt DC), Thursday, 21 September 2006 12:17 (fifteen years ago) link

I can find no mention of yorkshire pudding on this thread. This must be remedied.

chap who would dare to contain two ingredients. Tea and bags. (chap), Thursday, 21 September 2006 12:28 (fifteen years ago) link

is it fair to say that british food is on balance softer/mushier than American? it never occurred to me until now that my chief objection to it might be textural, that my favorite meals there were in church cafeterias not because the food was very fresh and light and clean-flavored, but because the bread was crusty - i love pret, etc., sandwiches, but the bread is floppier than i'm accustomed to, almost soggy. i did have one fantastic pie in a pub, and maybe i should have done more restaurant-exploring - i was inhibited by the cost.

gabbneb (gabbneb), Thursday, 21 September 2006 12:43 (fifteen years ago) link

is it fair to say that british food is on balance softer/mushier than American?

Yes, it's because we've all got bad teeth.

Billy Dods (Billy Dods), Thursday, 21 September 2006 12:52 (fifteen years ago) link

OAT CAKES. The home-baked kind, not the pressed-sawdust discs from Walker's etc. Pref. w/wedge of Orkney cheddar.

Stephen X (Stephen X), Thursday, 21 September 2006 13:27 (fifteen years ago) link

British bacon is more to the style I do bacon myself at home (everyone is correct, American restaurant bacon is kind of mesmerizing in how inedible it really is), and I love the fish but reckon you all overrate your chips rather much. Properly done bread pudding with the custard is delicious. I think, though, my problem with British cooking is that I don't fancy eating that much piggies and I can't eat all of these cakes and sweets due to dietary restrictions, so it's not really occurred to me to bother much with it. Nothing to do with reasons of thinking poorly about it! I've never had a problem getting good food in the UK, and the beef is fantastic. Stilton is delicious, as is most English cheddars.

This bread mushiness thing is nonsense, I've never had a problem finding nice bread in the UK.

Haha what is a bit of fun in the UK for Americans, going off subject for a second, is getting things that are readily available in the US but are completely different in the UK. Ex: sushi, ketchup, Coca-cola (for the record our sushi restaurants beat yours but your ketchup and coke is 10x more palatable)

Allyzay is a town of people, people who DIED (allyzay), Thursday, 21 September 2006 13:38 (fifteen years ago) link

http://www.bpic.co.uk/bookrevs/yorkshire_pudding.gif

This bread mushiness thing is nonsense, I've never had a problem finding nice bread in the UK.

while its getting better in the UK, bread quality runs like this:

FRENCH BREAD>UK BREAD>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>US BREAD

Haha what is a bit of fun in the UK for Americans, going off subject for a second, is getting things that are readily available in the US but are completely different in the UK. Ex: sushi, ketchup, Coca-cola (for the record our sushi restaurants beat yours but your ketchup and coke is 10x more palatable)

my friend aaron from LA cannot stand british coca-cola (and is a straight-edge musician often touring the UK), though to be honest most convenience stores now sell coke that's bottled all over the place (cheaply imported i guess). there was a time i could tell the difference between coke bottled in the uk and in eire.

i am not a nugget (stevie), Thursday, 21 September 2006 13:49 (fifteen years ago) link

The varieties of wheat available for flour in the UK are different from those in the US - US flours are typically higher in protein (aka "strong" flours from hard winter wheat). Gives breads a different crumb/crust. I've been working through Elizabeth David's English yeast bread book and it's not always possible to find equivalent flours in the US.

The lardy cake turned out amazing, regardless.

Jaq (Jaq), Thursday, 21 September 2006 13:51 (fifteen years ago) link

UK and US coke are different? i thought the point of this kind of global branding was that Coke is Coke ANYWHERE IN TEH WORLD WOW.

it's teh_kit! (g-kit), Thursday, 21 September 2006 13:51 (fifteen years ago) link

The US bread thing is equally nonsense, go to one (1) bakery instead of a supermarket and you're sorted out just fine for all manner of loaves.

And yeah, the things that contain copious amounts of high fructose corn syrup in the US tend not to in other countries, leading to a pretty noticable difference in taste.

Allyzay is a town of people, people who DIED (allyzay), Thursday, 21 September 2006 13:54 (fifteen years ago) link

The US bread thing is equally nonsense, go to one (1) bakery instead of a supermarket and you're sorted out just fine for all manner of loaves.

you're right, of course - i've had some delicious sourdough in the states before. but the difference is you can find ace bread in UK supermarkets, which i haven't seen in the US supermarkets i've been to (but the last i visited tbh would be austin 2004). american bread i've eaten from supermarkets has been insanely nasty, airy, weirdly-textured stuff.

i am not a nugget (stevie), Thursday, 21 September 2006 13:57 (fifteen years ago) link

that partly depends on the UK supermarket, dunnit?

EARLY-90S MAN (Enrique), Thursday, 21 September 2006 14:00 (fifteen years ago) link

i guess, but pretty much all the supermarkets near me (wimbledon/colliers wood) have fresh baked bread in various varieties, even the Somerfield attatched to the petrol station in haydon's road.

i am not a nugget (stevie), Thursday, 21 September 2006 14:03 (fifteen years ago) link

i've actually had a pie in that greenwich pie shop, but I was a vegetarian then.. and I'm not, now. So it's time to try some ITTY BITTY KIDNEYS.

i've dreamt of rubies! (Mandee), Thursday, 21 September 2006 14:05 (fifteen years ago) link

well i'm not saying there isn't nice bread - i certainly had some very nice bread (and cheese. and beer!) in churches. but i found like slices of bread to be marginally more pliable than the stuff i usually eat at home. and i found that comparable to a lot of what i ate - meats/fishes are of less 'meaty' cuts and cooked longer, the way vegetables (and potatoes) also are. all of this is the very small-n of my experience, of course, but it's true that meat is in pies more than it is in steak-knife steak, yes? and an apple dessert is a crumble-type thing more often than it is a held-aloft-top-crust pie, right? plus, mushy peas.

my point for myself was maybe i failed to sufficiently appreciate the flavors of what i was eating because i was first experiencing it through a less-familiar textural lens. (and i shouldn't have passed up the epicerie at orrery.)

gabbneb (gabbneb), Thursday, 21 September 2006 14:06 (fifteen years ago) link

The royal oak in Borough does a particularly fine steak and kidney pudding which, as any fool knows, is far better than Pie

Ed (dali), Thursday, 21 September 2006 14:06 (fifteen years ago) link

Speaking of insanely nasty weirdly-textured stuff:
http://www.hnfoods.co.uk/shop/images/products/90043.jpg

Stephen X (Stephen X), Thursday, 21 September 2006 14:20 (fifteen years ago) link

I used to quite like Tartex! I'm not sure that's technically British food though.

Archel (Archel), Thursday, 21 September 2006 14:34 (fifteen years ago) link

True--I just think of it as a mandatory feature of UK vegetarian shops, right next to the nut roast mix. I assume it was actually developed for the Swiss space program.

Stephen X (Stephen X), Thursday, 21 September 2006 15:21 (fifteen years ago) link

Tartex? Looks like toothpaste for Hobbits.

Billy Dods (Billy Dods), Thursday, 21 September 2006 15:24 (fifteen years ago) link

maybe the food follows from the milder climate?

gabbneb (gabbneb), Thursday, 21 September 2006 15:26 (fifteen years ago) link

What's that snack you have in the UK that's like a moist, dense bar of oats or something but then with a thin layer of chocolate or other flavored icing on top? You could find them in just about any convenience store. Man, I miss those.

jaymc (jaymc), Thursday, 21 September 2006 15:43 (fifteen years ago) link

Do you mean flapjacks?

http://www.blackfriarsbakery.co.uk/product_pics%5CFlapjacks.jpg

Not to be confused with the US pancake style flapjacks.

Billy Dods (Billy Dods), Thursday, 21 September 2006 15:58 (fifteen years ago) link

Yes! I was going to say, I think they share a name with something in the US that's completely unrelated.

jaymc (jaymc), Thursday, 21 September 2006 15:59 (fifteen years ago) link

flapjacks, you mean? (one of these days I am going to give in and buy one of the ones with "chocolate-flavoured topping" on, I tend to stop and stare at them every time I'm in a newsagent)

bah xpost

ampersand, hearts, semicolon (cis), Thursday, 21 September 2006 16:00 (fifteen years ago) link

in fairness to britain, white people food in north america is trash also.

bidenfan69420 (jim in vancouver), Thursday, 23 January 2020 21:34 (one year ago) link

and british food includes british indian cuisine which is great

bidenfan69420 (jim in vancouver), Thursday, 23 January 2020 21:35 (one year ago) link

i wish there were more indian fast food/fast casual places in the US.

Yerac, Thursday, 23 January 2020 21:43 (one year ago) link

yeah, indian food is good here, and people seem permitted to be enthusiastic about it without any stupid hedging filter of health/class/tradition, there might be a good sociological essay in this somewhere.

mfktz (Camaraderie at Arms Length), Thursday, 23 January 2020 21:45 (one year ago) link

i like tons of brit food by default bc a lot of it is part of Australian food culture (obv).

gimme all that fried dough & assorted meats encased in pastry *chef’s kiss*

terminators of endearment (VegemiteGrrl), Thursday, 23 January 2020 22:01 (one year ago) link

https://www.theguardian.com/food/2020/jan/23/taking-the-hake-nottingham-chippy-voted-best-in-uk?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

i refuse to believe this chippy is better than my local one that is run by a master chef who used to the personal chef of Prince Andrew... but still lots of the old boys who go in there are always telling him there aren't chippies as good as his even in Scarborough or Whitby .. and that is a big compliment. Well apparently it is though - i've not been to either places in decades!

calzino, Thursday, 23 January 2020 22:02 (one year ago) link

"The Cod’s Scallops"

wtf - fuck off hipsters!

calzino, Thursday, 23 January 2020 22:03 (one year ago) link

our two local chippies are awful, not sure if there is a decent one in Cambridge at all, nearest good one I know is in Ely

mfktz (Camaraderie at Arms Length), Thursday, 23 January 2020 22:05 (one year ago) link

most chippies are bad ime.

bidenfan69420 (jim in vancouver), Thursday, 23 January 2020 22:09 (one year ago) link

whereas a good chippy is sublime. my favourites I've ever been to are the Anstruther Fish Bar (in Anstruther, Fife, prosaically enough) and Colman's in South Shields are the best i've been to

bidenfan69420 (jim in vancouver), Thursday, 23 January 2020 22:11 (one year ago) link

oof, my posts

bidenfan69420 (jim in vancouver), Thursday, 23 January 2020 22:11 (one year ago) link

There was briefly another good quality one down the road in Savile Town that was set up by someone who had a shop in Hudds with a really good rep as well near the old tech college site. And if you ever went past after Friday mosque there would be queues of people and groups eating outside and it always seemed to be more busy and thriving than all the lousy fast-food fleapit dives offering cheap fried chicken and pizzas. And then someone had the bright idea of buying it up and turning it into another bad fast-food fleapit with hygiene score written on with a sharpie. So yeah good chippies are definitely the exception!

calzino, Thursday, 23 January 2020 22:26 (one year ago) link

i like tons of brit food by default bc a lot of it is part of Australian food culture (obv).

gimme all that fried dough & assorted meats encased in pastry *chef’s kiss*

― terminators of endearment (VegemiteGrrl),

An Australian expat just opened a bar in Tupelo and he has meat pies and rissoles on the menu, looking forward to trying it out.

Miami weisse (WmC), Thursday, 23 January 2020 22:32 (one year ago) link

oooh yum

terminators of endearment (VegemiteGrrl), Thursday, 23 January 2020 22:32 (one year ago) link

He found a basement space and called it Downunder, so props there.

Miami weisse (WmC), Thursday, 23 January 2020 22:34 (one year ago) link

my two great chippies of last year were in milford on sea and sheerness. unsurprisingly being by the sea is an advantage

opden gnash (imago), Thursday, 23 January 2020 22:36 (one year ago) link

although actually saying that there's an incredible one in hackney central now, with superb vegan options too

opden gnash (imago), Thursday, 23 January 2020 22:37 (one year ago) link

yeah being by the sea is only an advantage if they have a clue what they are doing. And loads of by the sea are probably paying sky high rents and pushed to squeeze the business end harder rather than put out quality food.

calzino, Thursday, 23 January 2020 22:40 (one year ago) link

Most of the chippies I went to in Newquay were shite tbh.

calzino, Thursday, 23 January 2020 22:42 (one year ago) link

milford on sea one was good because the place is pretty posh (albeit quiet and out of the way), sheerness one was good because it was in a fucking backstreet in a derelict industrial wasteland in one of england's least fashionable towns

both knew what they were doing but maybe the place either has to be eerily picture-perfect or long-destroyed for the magic to take hold

opden gnash (imago), Thursday, 23 January 2020 22:44 (one year ago) link

maybe lack of tourism either way is key

opden gnash (imago), Thursday, 23 January 2020 22:45 (one year ago) link

although actually saying that there's an incredible one in hackney central now, with superb vegan options too


the laughing halibut in strutton ground is really good

steer karma (gyac), Thursday, 23 January 2020 22:45 (one year ago) link

Where’s the sheerness one?

steer karma (gyac), Thursday, 23 January 2020 22:46 (one year ago) link

tbh I haven't had a bad one in Hastings. but while I usually go to one that's near the fishing harbour, no idea if the fish actually come from there or if they just get them from a wholesaler somewhere else

Colonel Poo, Thursday, 23 January 2020 22:46 (one year ago) link

been to that one (I think - bit posh, feels like a gastropub inside) and yes, it was very good

mfktz (Camaraderie at Arms Length), Thursday, 23 January 2020 22:48 (one year ago) link

It's been 16 months since I left the UK and I'm over most of my cravings now but occasionally I'll see a picture of a bag of British chippy chips on Instagram or Twitter and I want it so bad I could die. Greasy, soggy, undercooked and soaked in vinegar but amazing.

nate woolls, Thursday, 23 January 2020 22:50 (one year ago) link

Sheerness one is on Google Maps as Blue Town Fish Bar but it's actually Bluetown Fish & Chips, on the so-called High Street of Blue Town, which is basically a semi-abandoned dockland area at the tip of the island, not too far from the station. The guy who runs it is...Turkish, I think? Been doing fish and chips in the area for decades apparently. Anyway everything is freshly cooked to order and the chips are amazing. I thoroughly recommend a visit. Check out the ecstatic Google reviews if you're not sure!

opden gnash (imago), Thursday, 23 January 2020 22:56 (one year ago) link

Laughing Halibut - that takes me back - think I last went there in my schooldays.

Hackney one is Sutton & Son - v good

opden gnash (imago), Thursday, 23 January 2020 22:58 (one year ago) link

Ty, I will check out that one! Wasn’t impressed by Sutton & Sons when I lived in Hackney.

steer karma (gyac), Thursday, 23 January 2020 23:22 (one year ago) link

presumably new ownership - it seems very 'recent' idk

sheerness worth a visit regardless - a few v interesting places on the high st

opden gnash (imago), Thursday, 23 January 2020 23:31 (one year ago) link

im starvin now ye fuckeds me insides are touchin

Catherine, Boner of JP Sweeney & Co (darraghmac), Thursday, 23 January 2020 23:33 (one year ago) link

I am still very sad I never got to try Guinness Marmite.

Yerac, Friday, 24 January 2020 01:09 (one year ago) link

I think our best meals on our summer vacation last year were in Newcastle. Considering that any family dining for us has to meet the preferences of A) the sensible pescatarian B) the sausage appetizer with a steak entree hardman C) the eight-year-old young lady who likes some fried things, some green things, and not much else

El Tomboto, Friday, 24 January 2020 04:48 (one year ago) link

WRT Australian Food being well grounded in British food, Australia takes the meat pie to new heights. I will rep for the steak pie from the Caltex servo in Penong, SA, (next to the windmill museum) as being one of the best in existence.

American Fear of Pranksterism (Ed), Friday, 24 January 2020 05:06 (one year ago) link

My grandma was 100% australian, never been to England & still somehow cooked like a Brit expat every day of her life. Steamed puddings, trifles, kedgereee, every boiled vegetable known to man...

terminators of endearment (VegemiteGrrl), Friday, 24 January 2020 05:23 (one year ago) link

I am still very sad I never got to try Guinness Marmite.
― Yerac, Friday, 24 January 2020 01:09 (twenty hours ago)

It didn't taste different in any way!

I often wonder what the US/whatever tourists in London really think when they have their shite fish and chips in a pub in a bland pub in zone 1. Poor sods. It really is true 90% of fish and chip shops are very ordinary.

kraudive, Friday, 24 January 2020 21:59 (one year ago) link

Yeah I think they did a champagne Marmite one time and that tasted just like regular Marmite, 😥

GK Chessington's World of Adventure (Noodle Vague), Friday, 24 January 2020 22:04 (one year ago) link

Literally the worst thing about Hull is chippies don't do potato scallops

GK Chessington's World of Adventure (Noodle Vague), Friday, 24 January 2020 22:06 (one year ago) link

Muswell Hill (of course) has a gourmet fish n' chippy, bit out of the way for the average tourist though

it's after the end of the world (Matt #2), Friday, 24 January 2020 22:13 (one year ago) link

Marmite is still made in Burton-on-Trent, I think, having outlived the brewing industry it is a by-product of there.
Yes, Guinness flavour Marmite was nothing special, but Marmite flavour Guinness is still widely available in corner shops.

fetter, Friday, 24 January 2020 22:47 (one year ago) link

There's still a humongous brewery in Burton, one of the multinationals iirc, and yeah they make Marmite there too. We used to go shopping there once a fortnight or so when I was a kid, the whole town stank of yeast

GK Chessington's World of Adventure (Noodle Vague), Friday, 24 January 2020 22:53 (one year ago) link

Having just visited there at the weekend I can confirm that Edinburgh still smells of yeast too.

Frozen Mug (Tom D.), Friday, 24 January 2020 22:58 (one year ago) link

hmmmm... supposedly trying to make homemade marmite is "dangerous and hard to control".

Yerac, Friday, 24 January 2020 23:05 (one year ago) link

Just found a "recipe" that takes 10 days

GK Chessington's World of Adventure (Noodle Vague), Friday, 24 January 2020 23:10 (one year ago) link

I really miss the cheap fishcakes I used to get from the fish and chips shops in Liverpool as a kid.

kraudive, Saturday, 25 January 2020 00:25 (one year ago) link

actually bought my first ever squeezy marmite yesterday, will report back on the consistency.

― mfktz (Camaraderie at Arms Length), Thursday, January 23, 2020 9:08 PM (two days ago) bookmarkflaglink

My report is that it's just regular marmite. The pot is good though, it dispenses the very thin stream which you need.

mfktz (Camaraderie at Arms Length), Saturday, 25 January 2020 22:40 (one year ago) link

one year passes...

Cheesy chips at Cheltenham Town (@CTFCofficial)

💷 £3 pic.twitter.com/B3ACM7OCbP

— Footy Scran (@FootyScran) December 26, 2021

, Saturday, 15 January 2022 01:59 (four days ago) link

This may be an appropriate thread for me to rediscover the enthusiasm expressed by ILX whenever DUMPLINGS! get mentioned.

more difficult than I look (Aimless), Saturday, 15 January 2022 02:14 (four days ago) link

Muswell Hill (of course) has a gourmet fish n' chippy, bit out of the way for the average tourist though

assuming it's the same one, somewhat impressed it's still going. there was a fancy fish & chips place there when I lived there 2003-6. I only went there a couple of times because the queues were ludicrous but it was pretty good (and didn't cost a fortune either, 17 years ago anyway)

bovarism, Saturday, 15 January 2022 02:22 (four days ago) link

I had some very bland chips at Whaddon Road in 2003 with no not very melty cheese slices. My most notable memory of the day was the house right next to the football ground with a boarded up window where presumably a league two standard defensive hoof had smashed through it at some point.

calzino, Saturday, 15 January 2022 03:30 (four days ago) link


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