The German language

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Why is German such a cracking good language? What's your favourite German word?

Daniel Giraffe (Daniel Giraffe), Thursday, 27 July 2006 08:15 (thirteen years ago) link

sehsucht

Baaderonixx immer wieder (baaderonixx), Thursday, 27 July 2006 08:22 (thirteen years ago) link

actually make that, sehnsucht

Baaderonixx immer wieder (baaderonixx), Thursday, 27 July 2006 08:22 (thirteen years ago) link

Wasserpumpe.

Matt DC (Matt DC), Thursday, 27 July 2006 08:23 (thirteen years ago) link

Windschutzscheibenwaschanlage.

Colin Meeder (Mert), Thursday, 27 July 2006 08:31 (thirteen years ago) link

Kugelschriber!

(I have no idea if I've spelled that right. But it means ballpoint pen.)

Silver Machine Manor (kate), Thursday, 27 July 2006 08:33 (thirteen years ago) link

Close. It's "Kugelschreiber". Mine is also a real word. Wanna guess?

Colin Meeder (Mert), Thursday, 27 July 2006 08:36 (thirteen years ago) link

I like Hoechstgeschwindigkeit, meaning top speed.

talking of which, one of the things I like about German is that all nouns start with a capital letter. I think it looks both exotic and dignified.

Daniel Giraffe (Daniel Giraffe), Thursday, 27 July 2006 08:37 (thirteen years ago) link

Colin, I think your word means windscreen wiper

Daniel Giraffe (Daniel Giraffe), Thursday, 27 July 2006 08:38 (thirteen years ago) link

Very close. It's the windscreen washers, actually.

Colin Meeder (Mert), Thursday, 27 July 2006 08:41 (thirteen years ago) link

MANNSCHAFT

Konal Doddz (blueski), Thursday, 27 July 2006 08:59 (thirteen years ago) link

Zwiebel

Teh littlest HoBBo (the pirate king), Thursday, 27 July 2006 09:04 (thirteen years ago) link

Geistlos

NickB (NickB), Thursday, 27 July 2006 09:05 (thirteen years ago) link

What's best about the German language is that when you have learned how each letter is pronounced, you can read any german word and you will have pronounced it properly.

mark grout (mark grout), Thursday, 27 July 2006 09:08 (thirteen years ago) link

isn't that the same with every language ?

AleXTC (AleXTC), Thursday, 27 July 2006 09:10 (thirteen years ago) link

I like how they join a load of words together to make huge nouns so you can usually work it out from a literal translation of each segment. German engineering and technical dictionaries are great for huge words that essentially mean "join all the bits together and you've got one of these."

Onimo (GerryNemo), Thursday, 27 July 2006 09:12 (thirteen years ago) link

isn't that the same with every language ?

Plough rough through

Onimo (GerryNemo), Thursday, 27 July 2006 09:12 (thirteen years ago) link

Kaiserschlacht

DV (dirtyvicar), Thursday, 27 July 2006 09:13 (thirteen years ago) link

hum. ok, I get the idea. it's not just german in that case, yes ?

AleXTC (AleXTC), Thursday, 27 July 2006 09:23 (thirteen years ago) link

entgültig

Soukesian (Soukesian), Thursday, 27 July 2006 09:32 (thirteen years ago) link

Winkelmesser

gentoo (gentoo), Thursday, 27 July 2006 09:52 (thirteen years ago) link

German words I hate: Mobbing, Handy, fighten.

Colin Meeder (Mert), Thursday, 27 July 2006 09:56 (thirteen years ago) link

Sprudel

StanM (StanM), Thursday, 27 July 2006 10:07 (thirteen years ago) link

Schadenfreude

Ben Dot (1977), Thursday, 27 July 2006 10:25 (thirteen years ago) link

What's best about the German language is that when you have learned how each letter is pronounced, you can read any german word and you will have pronounced it properly.

It's not exactly SO, for example the "e" is "Kaiser" is pronounced differently than in "Freund". It's easier than English though. I don't think there's a language in the world where every letter is pronounced the same way every time, though Finnish comes pretty close (with only major exception, the "ng" sound).

Tuomas (Tuomas), Thursday, 27 July 2006 10:33 (thirteen years ago) link

Geschwindigkeitsbegrenzung

(speed limit)

Joe (Joe), Thursday, 27 July 2006 10:43 (thirteen years ago) link

O WRKLK? JA WRKLK!

weather1ngda1eson (Brian), Thursday, 27 July 2006 10:45 (thirteen years ago) link

I don't think there's a language in the world where every letter is pronounced the same way every time

Spanish is pretty much like that. You change the sound of c and g depending on what vowel they're followed by, but that's about it.

Cathy (Cathy), Thursday, 27 July 2006 10:52 (thirteen years ago) link

my favourite german word and one of the only ones I know is wunderbar.

Cathy (Cathy), Thursday, 27 July 2006 10:54 (thirteen years ago) link

Problembar

DV (dirtyvicar), Thursday, 27 July 2006 11:08 (thirteen years ago) link

xpost i keep saying "wonderbra" by accident (which makes it a classic!)

brustwarze
handschuhe
krankenhaus

lieblingsfach
kunst

ken c (ken c), Thursday, 27 July 2006 11:11 (thirteen years ago) link

"doppelgänger" is pretty cool.
(and shouldn't it be : O WRKLCH ? YA WRKLCH !)

AleXTC (AleXTC), Thursday, 27 July 2006 11:12 (thirteen years ago) link

NEIN WAI!

weather1ngda1eson (Brian), Thursday, 27 July 2006 11:14 (thirteen years ago) link

I don't think there's a language in the world where every letter is pronounced the same way every time

mandarin? (but i guess the characters are more like words than letters)

oh and schadenfreude is indeed a good one, and xpost doppelganger

ken c (ken c), Thursday, 27 July 2006 11:15 (thirteen years ago) link

kaputt!

ken c (ken c), Thursday, 27 July 2006 11:16 (thirteen years ago) link

Mein Hund hat keine Nase!

ken c (ken c), Thursday, 27 July 2006 11:18 (thirteen years ago) link

oh and Ayingerbrau!!

ken c (ken c), Thursday, 27 July 2006 11:20 (thirteen years ago) link

You change the sound of c and g depending on what vowel they're followed by, but that's about it.

What about ll? Or j or h in the beginning of the word? Though Spanish vowels are always pronounced the same, I think.

Tuomas (Tuomas), Thursday, 27 July 2006 11:21 (thirteen years ago) link

xxxxxpost

I think you'll find that werkelijk = Dutch and wirklich = German, so

JA WEG

StanM (StanM), Thursday, 27 July 2006 11:25 (thirteen years ago) link

O WRKLCH ? YA WRKLCH ! NCHT MGLCH ! (with an eagle instead)

AleXTC (AleXTC), Thursday, 27 July 2006 11:25 (thirteen years ago) link

Donnerwetter! Mein Gott Im Himmel! Scheiße!!

(See, video games help you learn!)

Onimo (GerryNemo), Thursday, 27 July 2006 11:28 (thirteen years ago) link

rnsthft!

ken c (ken c), Thursday, 27 July 2006 11:30 (thirteen years ago) link

As far as I know, Japanese pronunciation is incredibly faithful to the spelling system.

I agree with Ken that the word Handschuh is a total classic.

Can we hear it for German syntax, please? e.g. Today have I heard that a man who for Germany football played has has in England to come decided.

Daniel Giraffe (Daniel Giraffe), Thursday, 27 July 2006 11:30 (thirteen years ago) link

What about ll? Or j or h in the beginning of the word? Though Spanish vowels are always pronounced the same, I think

yeah, a double l means a different sound to single l, and same with double r. and j and h are the same sound at the beginning of a word as they are within it - h is never pronounced, anyway.

Cathy (Cathy), Thursday, 27 July 2006 11:42 (thirteen years ago) link

I gather Finnish is extremely phonetic which I am sure is nice in theory but how do I learn to pronounce all of those VOOOOOWEEEEELS? Words I know in Finnish already =

KIPPIS - cheers!
Hei - hallo!
Moi moi - bye bye!
KRAPULA - HANGOVER!

Hooray!

Bhumibol Adulyadej (Lucretia My Reflection), Thursday, 27 July 2006 12:19 (thirteen years ago) link

"krapula" is a great word ! (especially for a french speaking person)

AleXTC (AleXTC), Thursday, 27 July 2006 12:21 (thirteen years ago) link

Arschkalt

DV (dirtyvicar), Thursday, 27 July 2006 12:31 (thirteen years ago) link

Megahammeraffentittengeil

Colin Meeder (Mert), Thursday, 27 July 2006 12:39 (thirteen years ago) link

CRipes, what do these words mean, DV and Colin?

Daniel Giraffe (Daniel Giraffe), Thursday, 27 July 2006 12:43 (thirteen years ago) link

Dreilochstute

StanM (StanM), Thursday, 27 July 2006 12:48 (thirteen years ago) link

Lebenslüge

Wes Brodicus, Friday, 20 April 2018 19:32 (one year ago) link

Ooh, Ibsen! The Norwegian word is Livsløgn.
"Tar De livsløgnen fra et gennemsnitsmenneske, så tar De lykken fra ham med det samme"

~= If you take the life-lie from the average man, you take his happiness with it.

Øystein, Monday, 23 April 2018 09:17 (one year ago) link

three weeks pass...

geschmäcklerisch
(pejorative) pretentiously faddish, arrogantly contemptuous of tastes other than one’s own

Wes Brodicus, Sunday, 20 May 2018 17:53 (one year ago) link

can anyone explain the difference between "hierhin" and "hierher"?? struggling w/ this at the moment

also the position of "nicht" in a sentence :/

groovemaaan, Saturday, 2 June 2018 20:50 (one year ago) link

"Hierher" points in the speaker's general direction, while "hierhin" points towards a specific place near the speaker. A politician talking about refugees would say they are coming "hierher" (to his country) but not "hierhin" (to his podium).

It's the subtlest of distinctions and most Germans use those terms interchangably.

I don't know about "nicht" because I'm a positive person.

oder doch?, Sunday, 3 June 2018 09:17 (one year ago) link

thanks for your answer!

but doesn't "hin" indicate that someone is moving away from the speaker? i.e. "wohin gehst du?"
which would make "hierhin" kind of contradictory...?

groovemaaan, Sunday, 3 June 2018 15:07 (one year ago) link

"Hierher" is tautological, indicating a larger area / broader meaning. Cf. "vielmehr".
Imagine the speaker pointing "hin" to a specific spot.

Good luck with hinstellen & herstellen!

oder doch?, Sunday, 3 June 2018 15:29 (one year ago) link

two weeks pass...

Hai, der!

And Nobody POLLS Like Me (James Redd and the Blecchs), Monday, 18 June 2018 21:57 (one year ago) link

"Hierher" points in the speaker's general direction, while "hierhin" points towards a specific place near the speaker. A politician talking about refugees would say they are coming "hierher" (to his country) but not "hierhin" (to his podium).

It's the subtlest of distinctions and most Germans use those terms interchangably.


Korean totally has this too I just forget what it is in Hangul

El Tomboto, Monday, 18 June 2018 22:48 (one year ago) link

Like “here, where we are” and “here, where I am”

El Tomboto, Monday, 18 June 2018 22:49 (one year ago) link

Yes, functionally it's a little like the difference between "come here" and "come to me".

Three Word Username, Tuesday, 19 June 2018 06:39 (one year ago) link

Japanese also has this distinction but in the other direction: それ “that” for things closer to the lister and あれ “that” for things far way from both speaker and listener.

Just landed in Munich and was complemented on my german by the immigration officer.

American Fear of Pranksterism (Ed), Tuesday, 19 June 2018 12:02 (one year ago) link

Spanish has the same thing you mention Ed, with 'este, ese, aquel' being 'this, that, that over there' (plus other corresponding forms eg esta, esos, aquellas etc).

brain (krakow), Tuesday, 19 June 2018 12:42 (one year ago) link

The Plain People of Ireland: Isn’t the German very like the Irish? Very guttural and so on?
Myself: Yes.
The Plain People of Ireland: People say that the German language and the Irish language is very guttural tongues.
Myself: Yes.
The Plain People of Ireland: The sounds is all guttural do you understand.
Myself: Yes.
The Plain People of Ireland: Very guttural languages the pair of them the Gaelic and the German.

oder doch?, Tuesday, 26 June 2018 21:34 (one year ago) link

Frühlingstagundnachtgleiche

Uncle Redd in the Zingtime (James Redd and the Blecchs), Wednesday, 4 July 2018 16:16 (one year ago) link

I have been enjoying hearing newspeople talk about the SPD, because it sounds to me like "sbd", which Beavis & Butthead fans at least will appreciate

droit au butt (Euler), Wednesday, 4 July 2018 16:43 (one year ago) link

four weeks pass...

So the word “leutselig” seems to be normally translated as “affable” but the usually reliable dict.cc has an added usage

leutselig sein gegen jdn.
to condescend to sb.

Can’t seem to find this anywhere else. Can a native or fluent speaker comment?

3-Way Tie (For James Last) (James Redd and the Blecchs), Wednesday, 1 August 2018 14:50 (one year ago) link

Ah, Langenscheidt says “condescending (in a friendly way)”

3-Way Tie (For James Last) (James Redd and the Blecchs), Wednesday, 1 August 2018 14:54 (one year ago) link

I don't know that usage, and really hate Langenscheidt. I'll ask around.

Three Word Username, Wednesday, 1 August 2018 15:24 (one year ago) link

I always thought "leutselig" means "affable"; if you add condescension, you're "gönnerhaft." According to Duden leutselig means "wohlwollend, von einer verbindlichen, Anteil nehmenden Freundlichkeit im Umgang mit Untergebenen und einfacheren Menschen" (affable towards people of lower rank or social status).

The Wikipedia entry for Leutseligkeit sheds some light: the definition of "Leute" has shifted much in the same way "common people" has, so leutselig today means "friendly towards your fellow man" when it used to be closer to "fraternizing with the plebes."

oder doch?, Thursday, 2 August 2018 07:10 (one year ago) link

three weeks pass...

Thanks for the help with “leutselig.“ Today’s question has to do with the proper way(s) to say “What’s-his-name” and “Peter so-and-so.”

The Vermilion Sand Reckoner (James Redd and the Blecchs), Sunday, 26 August 2018 18:30 (one year ago) link

I see Dingsbums or just Dings in the dictionary but I have never really used or come across these before.

The Vermilion Sand Reckoner (James Redd and the Blecchs), Sunday, 26 August 2018 18:34 (one year ago) link

What’s-his-name = wie-hieß-er-noch
So-and-so = soundso
Dings/Dingsbums is reserved for inanimate objects, for people it's Dingens/Dingenskirchen.

oder doch?, Monday, 27 August 2018 00:12 (one year ago) link

That’s perfect, thanks!

The Vermilion Sand Reckoner (James Redd and the Blecchs), Monday, 27 August 2018 00:27 (one year ago) link

two months pass...

nach wie vor

groovemaaan, Friday, 23 November 2018 19:47 (one year ago) link

It means “we for natch”

F# A# (∞), Friday, 23 November 2018 19:49 (one year ago) link

naw wir gegen es mayne

j., Friday, 23 November 2018 19:52 (one year ago) link

seriously this fkn language

groovemaaan, Friday, 23 November 2018 20:14 (one year ago) link

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/12/05/world/europe/merkel-storm-translation-germany.html

Speaking at a technology conference on Tuesday, Ms. Merkel, known as a staid, no-drama politician, told a self-deprecating anecdote about being widely mocked online five years ago after she described the internet as some mysterious expanse of “uncharted territory.”

She chuckled at the memory of the digital blowback.

“It generated quite a shitstorm,” she said, using the English term — because Germans, it turns out, do not have one of their own.

j., Thursday, 6 December 2018 11:46 (one year ago) link

Donaudampfschifffahrtsgesellschaftskapitän

Learned in school, never forgotten.

Bimlo Horsewagon became Wheelbarrow Horseflesh (aldo), Thursday, 6 December 2018 11:57 (one year ago) link

Um sie den Arm geschlungen zag,
sprach er mit sanftem Zungenschlag,
was war das für ein Schlangenzug,
der mich in deine Zangen schlug.

maximum waste and minimum joy (oder doch?), Friday, 7 December 2018 01:16 (one year ago) link

Es war einmal ein Leibesriese,
der machte eine Liebesreise.
Des Abends sprach er: „Reib es, Liese!“
Und Liese kam und rieb es leise.

maximum waste and minimum joy (oder doch?), Friday, 7 December 2018 01:32 (one year ago) link

two weeks pass...

Frohe Weihnachten!

Spirit of the Voice of the Beehive (James Redd and the Blecchs), Tuesday, 25 December 2018 15:17 (eleven months ago) link

wot's german for wobs

j., Tuesday, 25 December 2018 17:18 (eleven months ago) link

It's pronounced 'vaubz'.

pomenitul, Tuesday, 25 December 2018 17:21 (eleven months ago) link

ach, ein lehnwort!

j., Tuesday, 25 December 2018 17:23 (eleven months ago) link

Wie so oft.

pomenitul, Tuesday, 25 December 2018 17:24 (eleven months ago) link

Fast immer, glaube ich

Spirit of the Voice of the Beehive (James Redd and the Blecchs), Tuesday, 25 December 2018 18:01 (eleven months ago) link

two months pass...

Redewendung des Tages: Pi mal Daumen.

Theorbo Goes Wild (James Redd and the Blecchs), Thursday, 14 March 2019 12:58 (eight months ago) link

Oder besser gesagt:
Gott sei Dank, es ist Pi-Tag!

Theorbo Goes Wild (James Redd and the Blecchs), Thursday, 14 March 2019 13:00 (eight months ago) link

Pi-Tag ist 22/7.

Three Word Username, Thursday, 14 March 2019 22:06 (eight months ago) link

warum?

das ist pi-annaeherungstag

John Jacob Jingleheimer Schmidt, Thursday, 14 March 2019 22:25 (eight months ago) link

3.14 ist kein Datum in der deutsche Schreibweise.

Three Word Username, Friday, 15 March 2019 02:17 (eight months ago) link

Vielleicht doch in Texas?

seandalai, Friday, 15 March 2019 11:58 (eight months ago) link

wikipedia:

https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pi-Tag

Zum anderen wird ein Pi-Annäherungstag (Pi Approximation Day) am 22. Juli gefeiert, mit dem die näherungsweise Darstellung von π durch Archimedes als 22/7 ≈ 3,14 geehrt werden soll.

pi ist 3,14

John Jacob Jingleheimer Schmidt, Friday, 15 March 2019 21:16 (eight months ago) link

eight months pass...

Kleinvieh macht auch Mist.

Irae Louvin (James Redd and the Blecchs), Saturday, 30 November 2019 23:08 (one week ago) link

Small /something/ power also poop?

viborg, Saturday, 30 November 2019 23:53 (one week ago) link

small animals also poop I think

britain's secret sauce (seandalai), Saturday, 30 November 2019 23:54 (one week ago) link

Sorry little m not big M - 'makes'.

viborg, Saturday, 30 November 2019 23:54 (one week ago) link

My favorite word was always 'Eisdiele', not sure why. Typical grade school bs I guess.

viborg, Saturday, 30 November 2019 23:55 (one week ago) link


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