Passover

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I like seders. I don't like the rest of it. I'm staying with my parents for the whole thing this year and they do it properly, so I won't eat much good for a while. So - what's passover like round your way?

beanz (beanz), Friday, 22 April 2005 11:13 (seventeen years ago) link

Mandatory horseradish. Gotta love that.

driede mousedropping (Dave225), Friday, 22 April 2005 11:23 (seventeen years ago) link

I have real trouble with an entire boiled egg in salt water.

beanz (beanz), Friday, 22 April 2005 11:27 (seventeen years ago) link

Matzah blows. Sorry.

Hurting (Hurting), Friday, 22 April 2005 11:29 (seventeen years ago) link

Charoset is nasty - other than that, I love Seder food.

driede mousedropping (Dave225), Friday, 22 April 2005 11:33 (seventeen years ago) link

im going to go to a seder that isnt my parents' for the first time ever. this itself is cause for celebration. the other cause for celebration is that my host reportedly went to the butcher to get a pound of brisket per person.

it should get pretty rowdy with all the wine, thank god. my mom sent me - because she was worried about me going without - a fake snakeskin yarmulka that is sort of metallic bronze and silver. I could go clubbing with it, it's so hip and shiny.

AaronK (AaronK), Friday, 22 April 2005 11:36 (seventeen years ago) link

The wine definitely helps, especially in the second half.

Matzah is awful but charoset is the dog's bollocks, sorry.

beanz (beanz), Friday, 22 April 2005 11:40 (seventeen years ago) link

there are different types. my mom's side is from iraq, they make it with crushed walnuts and date molasses, very diff from the kosher wine soaked apple thing thats more common in the west.

AaronK (AaronK), Friday, 22 April 2005 11:56 (seventeen years ago) link

OK fair enough the ashkenazy version is the one I'm talking about. That Iraqi version sounds a bit sickly.

I really dislike the expression 'dog's bollocks' and I can't work out why I used it.

beanz (beanz), Friday, 22 April 2005 11:59 (seventeen years ago) link

Because dog's bollocks would not be kosher.

Hurting (Hurting), Friday, 22 April 2005 12:00 (seventeen years ago) link

There's a real art to getting the balance right when it comes to charoset. It's such a genius combination, but it is possible to get it wrong if it's too wet and runny and there's not enough cinnamon (cf my dad's limp efforts). The Iraqi versh sounds good...

Japanese Giraffe (Japanese Giraffe), Friday, 22 April 2005 12:04 (seventeen years ago) link

and yeah, i have to agree with you beanz, the seder is fun, but it kind of wears out it's welcome past the first day. I guess the morning after is good too, you can make fried matzo, which is good about once a year, or pancakes, which are good about once a year. but that's it.

AaronK (AaronK), Friday, 22 April 2005 12:05 (seventeen years ago) link

For the first time in years my parents have decided only to invite people we like to the seder. Usually there's at least 2 relatives we never otherwise see who are toxic in some way.

beanz (beanz), Friday, 22 April 2005 12:09 (seventeen years ago) link

This year will be my first where my girlfriend's FAMILY will be joining us -- a completely secular Israeli family no less.

Hurting (Hurting), Friday, 22 April 2005 12:11 (seventeen years ago) link

Seder is great. not only do i get to see all my aunts, uncles, cousins, whatnot, but as well quite a few of my mom's cousins and their kids. Horseradish contest!

on the downside, i'll be missing the Dizzee Rascal concert as the family is located in Detroit.

lemin (lemin), Friday, 22 April 2005 12:16 (seventeen years ago) link

My poor younger brother is also turning 21 on the second seder night. 4 cups of wine with the folks is not exactly an exciting first legal drinking experience.

Hurting (Hurting), Friday, 22 April 2005 12:18 (seventeen years ago) link

I love charoset and beg Jewish friends to bring me their leftovers!

Last year I was informed that seder involved ONE plate with all of the stuff on it, whereas all my life I had pictured individual seder plates for each person. Perhaps that was just in my informant's family? SKOOL ME IN SEDER!

quincie, Friday, 22 April 2005 12:18 (seventeen years ago) link

Ha! That stuff is just symbolic -- if everyone had to actually eat a whole serving of everything on the seder plate they'd PUKE.

Hurting (Hurting), Friday, 22 April 2005 12:19 (seventeen years ago) link

So quincie, you've never been to one then?

Hurting (Hurting), Friday, 22 April 2005 12:20 (seventeen years ago) link

No, I've been to a Rosh Hoshanna (sp?) dinner but never a seder. And yeah, I honestly thought that each person ate a whole plate of the stuff.

I would like to go to a seder. I've always felt I was born into the wrong religion (ultra-WASPY episcopalian) and that my true self is a Jew. Kind of like some people are born biologically male but know deep down they are actually a chick.

quincie, Friday, 22 April 2005 12:24 (seventeen years ago) link

Ya'll can mail me your leftover kugel, too kthx

quincie, Friday, 22 April 2005 12:26 (seventeen years ago) link

Eww. Passover kugel is gross. You need to get the real shit made with actual noodles.

Hurting (Hurting), Friday, 22 April 2005 12:27 (seventeen years ago) link

Quincie, one plate with bits of everything on it is the symbolic seder plate and everyone has a plate of their own for eating off. That's just the ceremonial stuff though - after that comes a proper meal. Then after that comes a long boring bit then some more singing at the end.

I miss all the dead relatives. Not many live ones left too.

xposts

beanz (beanz), Friday, 22 April 2005 12:27 (seventeen years ago) link

Wait so what the fuck is in Passover kugel???

quincie, Friday, 22 April 2005 12:30 (seventeen years ago) link

Something from a packet.

beanz (beanz), Friday, 22 April 2005 12:32 (seventeen years ago) link

Quincie, Passover food cannot be "leavened" so it's all made out of ground up matzah or something. It's like cement.

Hurting (Hurting), Friday, 22 April 2005 12:35 (seventeen years ago) link

One thing I'll say about both WASPs and Jews -- Ashkenazic (european) Jews anyway: they both have lousy food.

Hurting (Hurting), Friday, 22 April 2005 12:37 (seventeen years ago) link

Passover can lick my balls and like it. Except for the seders, because I'm in the mood for some juicy brisket.

MindInRewind (Barry Bruner), Friday, 22 April 2005 12:37 (seventeen years ago) link

Matzah also confuses me. The paper's food section said that matzah "is made from matzah meal." Thanks a lot, what the hell is matzah meal?

So I asked my friendly neighborhood Jew and SHE DID NOT KNOW WHERE MATZAH MEAL CAME FROM! I mean, does it come from a matzah plant? What the hell??????

xpost oooooooh, I LOVE me some brisket!

quincie, Friday, 22 April 2005 12:38 (seventeen years ago) link

I thought matzah meal is ground up matza, not the other way around... I'm probably wrong though. Matzah's made like bread only it's not given enough time to rise in the oven. Can't be cooked for more than 18 minutes or something.

beanz (beanz), Friday, 22 April 2005 12:45 (seventeen years ago) link

That's right. Quincie, your paper's food section was wrong.

Matzah is awful. I refuse to eat it. Unless it's fried matzah, because fried matzah is awesome.

MindInRewind (Barry Bruner), Friday, 22 April 2005 12:47 (seventeen years ago) link

Matzah's ok until day 2 when the stomach cramps take hold.

beanz (beanz), Friday, 22 April 2005 12:49 (seventeen years ago) link

So does matzah come from wheat or oats or rice or some other grain? I must get to the bottom of this.

I like to eat matzah (is that what you call the cracker stuff or do you call that something like "matzah cracker?") with butter and a little salt.

quincie, Friday, 22 April 2005 12:53 (seventeen years ago) link

See also: kosher Coke, which sells like hot cakes with the WASPs because it tastes better than the usual corn syrup stuff. Great for mixing highballs.

quincie, Friday, 22 April 2005 12:55 (seventeen years ago) link

Comes from wheat -> plain flour. The only kosher for passover use for flour is matzah. Other grains and pulses and things aren't kosher for passover. Rice isn't for ashkenazy jews and is for sephardis.

beanz (beanz), Friday, 22 April 2005 12:58 (seventeen years ago) link

One year I decided to be Sephardic for Passover. Because when you think about it, their rules make a hell of a lot more sense.

MindInRewind (Barry Bruner), Friday, 22 April 2005 13:02 (seventeen years ago) link

Does any of it make sense?

beanz (beanz), Friday, 22 April 2005 13:04 (seventeen years ago) link

Thanks for the explanation, beanz. So it is safe to describe matzah as a special form of (wheat) flour?

This is actully the second thread today in which I've seen reference to "pulses." Is this a UK thing, 'cause I have no idea what that is, either!

quincie, Friday, 22 April 2005 13:17 (seventeen years ago) link

my main experience with seders was in college. a bunch of nonobservant ultraliberal jews/half-jews/interested housemates would gather for an afternoon to eat overly lumpy charoset and get sick off manechewitz. someone would have borrowed hagaddahs from the religious center, but there would never be enough to go around and the only song that anyone even vaguely knew the tune for would be 'dayenu' (sp).

lauren (laurenp), Friday, 22 April 2005 13:19 (seventeen years ago) link

overly lumpy charoset

How does one fuck up charoset? It's the easiest thing to make, that's why we used to assign it to my grandfather.

MindInRewind (Barry Bruner), Friday, 22 April 2005 13:23 (seventeen years ago) link

i don't like big walnut pieces in the charoset.

lauren (laurenp), Friday, 22 April 2005 13:28 (seventeen years ago) link

Quincie, pulses are beans, peas and lentils etc. Matzah is the actual cracker:

http://www.paleotimes.org/images/matzo.jpg

beanz (beanz), Friday, 22 April 2005 13:39 (seventeen years ago) link

has anyone here had that creamy horseradish stuff? i know, i know, sounds gross, but MAN is it ever good.

Amateur(ist) (Amateur(ist)), Friday, 22 April 2005 13:58 (seventeen years ago) link

possibly not kosher for passover, but it seemed apposite.

Amateur(ist) (Amateur(ist)), Friday, 22 April 2005 13:59 (seventeen years ago) link

It's a standard roast beef condiment in britain.

Ed (dali), Friday, 22 April 2005 14:01 (seventeen years ago) link

Oh god that picture is making me hungry--time for lunch!

How exactly is this horseradish used in the Passover sense (creamy horseradish spread on matah=idea I must pursue)?

quincie, Friday, 22 April 2005 14:03 (seventeen years ago) link

Whatever it is they put in Pret a Manger roast salmon and horseradish sandwiches is damn fine. It's creamy and horseradishy. Does that sound right? (Ugh, I'm so fucking bourgeois.) Horseradish for the seder is a big lump of raw horseradish. Making my mouth water just thinking about it.

beanz (beanz), Friday, 22 April 2005 14:03 (seventeen years ago) link

http://www.jewishworldreview.com/images/horseradish.jpg

beanz (beanz), Friday, 22 April 2005 14:06 (seventeen years ago) link

Doesn't that look appetising. Mmm mm mmmm.

beanz (beanz), Friday, 22 April 2005 14:06 (seventeen years ago) link

But is actual edible horseradish incorporated into any traditional Passover dishes? Can you (do you?) put it on your brisket?

quincie, Friday, 22 April 2005 14:12 (seventeen years ago) link

My gf (a lovely shebrew) and I went to her coworker's new house for a very secular seder. He is a Maroocan Jew and a very good cook and apart from my neighbor spilling her wine all over me, I had a lovely time.

M. White (Miguelito), Monday, 25 April 2005 14:00 (seventeen years ago) link

Ah, sweet vs unsweet noodle kugel -- the West Coast vs East Coast battle of European Jews for cooking supremacy amongst our people (except there's no coast involved)(see also: sweet vs unsweet gefilte fish).

I personally prefer the sweet kugel, which is the equivalent of growing up in the Bronx, spitting in Biggie's face and tattooing "THUG LIFE" on my chest.

I fucked up already -- at the Rhythm and Sound show yesterday, the bathroom attendant had a jar of candies and I took a Werther's Original on my way out. About ten minutes later, I realized what I'd done. Jeeeeez.

MindInRewind (Barry Bruner), Monday, 25 April 2005 14:36 (seventeen years ago) link

What happens if you eat the wrong food, anyway? Do you just feel bad?

Ned Raggett (Ned), Monday, 25 April 2005 14:39 (seventeen years ago) link

You have to go stand out in a field and wait for this:

http://users.rsise.anu.edu.au/~fergus/wallpaper/lightning/800/lightning_2.800.jpg

MindInRewind (Barry Bruner), Monday, 25 April 2005 14:59 (seventeen years ago) link

Actually, every year I unintentionally eat something I shouldn't. When we were kids, my mom said it was OK to eat Fruit Roll-Ups, because by her logic, "they're just fruit". Stuff like that.

MindInRewind (Barry Bruner), Monday, 25 April 2005 15:04 (seventeen years ago) link

What's wrong with the Werther's? Is this a corn syrup issue?

quincie, Monday, 25 April 2005 15:10 (seventeen years ago) link

Yes, but it's also an issue of not eating things that are otherwise kosher or specifically labelled kosher for Passover (I tend to stick to the former).

My mom bought me a bunch of matzah bagels (the GOOD kind that taste not unlike actual bread). Fittingly, I forgot to bring them home with me. I also meant to take one of her boxes of matzah for making fried matzah one night, but I forgot that too (and I can't find any near where I live). Fortunately, I did bring home some chicken, gefilte fish, and a few sweets.

So essentially, this will be a no carbs week for me (potatoes excepted). Which is perhaps a good thing, because I've been overdoing it on the carbs over the last few months. Except this means I CAN'T GET FULL.

MindInRewind (Barry Bruner), Tuesday, 26 April 2005 16:39 (seventeen years ago) link

This was the easiest Passover ever. I got by on omelettes, lots of fruit (even more than I usually eat), and meat + vegetables for dinner. I made cheese sandwiches on matzah bagels over the last couple of days. This has helped me confirm that I do in fact eat too many carbs. I'm so used to snacking on a muffin or a sandwich, but this week I hardly missed that stuff.

Did anyone on ILX keep Passover besides me?

MindInRewind (Barry Bruner), Sunday, 1 May 2005 22:54 (seventeen years ago) link

Oh yeah, I don't have any bread in the house (I normally shop at the bakery on Monday or Tuesday) so I'm back on the hametz wagon with a cold, savory beer. MMMMMMMMM.

MindInRewind (Barry Bruner), Sunday, 1 May 2005 22:55 (seventeen years ago) link

i ate WAY too many macaroons this week

last night, my parents made pasta with dinner because "there's nothing about it in Leviticus"

gabbneb (gabbneb), Sunday, 1 May 2005 22:58 (seventeen years ago) link

i kept passover with the exception of an accidental bit of whiskey one night (while i was sick - for my throat!) but that hardly counts anyway.

also, i used the sephardic custom (im half israeli, so its ok too, hah) of rice/beans/corn being ok. except basically it just meant that i had like, soda and stuff with corn syrup in it. i never got around to having rice or beans. actually, it worked out really well. i made my matzo lasagne, that went over well, lots of fried matza, and tons of fruit. easiest year yet. still, saturday night i went out to get the now customary pizza.

AaronK (AaronK), Monday, 2 May 2005 01:49 (seventeen years ago) link

Sephardic Jews have got it going on -- rice + corn, seven days instead of eight.

I did Sephardic Passover one year when I felt like going out for nachos one night.

MindInRewind (Barry Bruner), Monday, 2 May 2005 02:20 (seventeen years ago) link

I kept it! My wife tried, but forgot and had some croutons on her salad yesterday...

Douglas (Douglas), Monday, 2 May 2005 03:32 (seventeen years ago) link

the sephardic ways make so much more sense to me.

s1ocki (slutsky), Monday, 2 May 2005 03:34 (seventeen years ago) link

Corn chips are probably not kosher for passover even Sephardic style, cuz dey's probly leavened.

Hurting (Hurting), Monday, 2 May 2005 04:02 (seventeen years ago) link

I felt bad for my cousin's non-Jewish girlfriend this year who was probably thinking about how "authentic" the gefilte fish was as she forced herself to swallow it. I opted out of the authentic experience myself.

Hurting (Hurting), Monday, 2 May 2005 04:04 (seventeen years ago) link

this past week, i've eaten pita bread, naan, and injera. those all count as unleavened, right?

reno sweeney (Jody Beth Rosen), Monday, 2 May 2005 04:08 (seventeen years ago) link

Rule #1 of Kosher: If you're not sure, don't ask.

Hurting (Hurting), Monday, 2 May 2005 04:10 (seventeen years ago) link

Corn chips are leavened but potato chips (which can be kosher for Passover) aren't? Are corn chips always baked instead of fried?

These are somewhat rhetorical questions, since Hurting's Rule #1 applies.

I had gefilte fish with my lunch four times this week. How can anyone not like the stuff?

MindInRewind (Barry Bruner), Monday, 2 May 2005 04:28 (seventeen years ago) link

Corn chips are made out of corn tortilla, and corn tortilla is leavened (I think).

Hurting (Hurting), Monday, 2 May 2005 04:32 (seventeen years ago) link

And I guess potato chips are just fried potato slices. No Baked Lays, I guess.

Hurting (Hurting), Monday, 2 May 2005 04:35 (seventeen years ago) link

gefilte fish reminds me of a mildewy sponge.

reno sweeney (Jody Beth Rosen), Monday, 2 May 2005 05:04 (seventeen years ago) link

eleven months pass...
oh noes!

my aunt called tonight asking where everyone was as she had prepared her usual enough food for two dozen people meals

my mother: 'um, passover starts TOMORROW night"
aunt: ' oh"

she called her daughter-in-law and is told the same thing

so now who knows what's going on

tokyo nursery school: afternoon session (rosemary), Wednesday, 12 April 2006 00:52 (sixteen years ago) link

This is going OK so far. I haven't done any of my own cooking for the last four days. There's no family left for me to visit so I have to start taking care of myself now. I'm gonna make a hugeass pot of chicken soup tomorrow and that should cover me for a few meals. I didn't end up with a stash of Passover sweets this year so I'll have to make do with fruit for dessert for the next few days.

Rather than bread, I think I'll end Passover with an assload of beer. That worked out really well last year.

NoTimeBeforeTime (Barry Bruner), Sunday, 16 April 2006 05:40 (sixteen years ago) link

I work at a seafood restaurant. Last night a Jewish couple came in an asked me if the crab cakes included bread as an ingredient because they couldn't eat leavened bread because they were staying kosher for passover.

Isn't this pretty inconsequential in light of crab being non-kosher?

Jeff. (Jeff), Sunday, 16 April 2006 18:14 (sixteen years ago) link

I work at a seafood restaurant. Last night a Jewish couple came in an asked me if the crab cakes included bread as an ingredient because they couldn't eat leavened bread because they were staying kosher for passover.

Isn't this pretty inconsequential in light of crab being non-kosher?

WhiskeyBanjoFishbutt (Jeff), Sunday, 16 April 2006 18:14 (sixteen years ago) link

kosher for passover and kosher are two separate things.

the enduring pueblo (Jody Beth Rosen), Sunday, 16 April 2006 18:26 (sixteen years ago) link

Question

What food is not kosher for Passover and why?

Answer

The Torah instructs a Jew not to eat (or even possess) chometz all seven days of Passover (Exodus 13:3). "Chometz" is defined as any of the five grains (wheat, spelt, barley, oats, and rye) that came into contact with water for more than 18 minutes. This is a serious Torah prohibition, and for that reason we take extra protective measures on Passover to prevent any mistakes.

Which brings us to another category of food called "kitniyot" (sometimes referred to generically as "legumes"). This includes rice, corn, soy beans, string beans, peas, lentils, peanuts, mustard, sesame seeds and poppy seeds. Even though kitniyot cannot technically become chometz, Ashkenazi Jews do not eat them on Passover. Why?

The Smak (Rabbi Moshe of Kouchi, 13th century, France) explains that products of kitniyot appear like chometz products. For example, it can be hard to distinguish between rice flour (kitniyot) and wheat flour (chometz). Therefore, to prevent confusion, all kitniyot was prohibited.

The Beit Yosef (Rabbi Yosef Karo, 16th century, Israel) notes that grains may become mixed together with kitniyot, and one may inadvertently come to eat actual chometz.

* * *

In Jewish law, there is one important distinction between chometz and kitniyot. During Passover, it is forbidden to even have chometz in one's possession (hence the custom of "selling chometz"). Whereas it is permitted to own kitniyot during Passover and even to use it - not for eating - but for things like baby powder which contains cornstarch. Similarly, someone who is sick is allowed to take medicine containing kitniyot.

Interestingly, the Sefardi Jewish community does not have a prohibition against kitniyot. This creates the strange situation, for example, where a Sefardi family could be eating rice on Passover - whereas their Ashkenazi neighbors will not!

* * *

What about derivatives of kitniyot - e.g. corn oil, peanut oil, etc? This is a difference of opinion. Many will use kitniyot- based oils on Passover, while others are strict and only use olive or walnut oil.

Finally, there is one product called "quinoa" (pronounced "ken- wah" or "kin-o-ah") that is permitted on Passover even for Ashkenazim. Although it resembles a grain, it is technically a grass, and was never included in the prohibition against kitniyot. It is prepared like rice and has a very high protein content. (It's excellent in "chollent" stew!) You should be able to find it at most health food stores. Of course, it needs to be from a closed container that is new for Pesach.

Some other things - like chestnuts and alfalfa sprouts were not included in the original prohibition of Kitniot.

To learn more, see Maimonides - Laws of Chometz and Matzah 5:1; Code of Jewish Law - OC 453; Igros Moshe OC 3:63.

the enduring pueblo (Jody Beth Rosen), Sunday, 16 April 2006 18:32 (sixteen years ago) link

kosher for passover and kosher are two separate things.

I didn't realize that. But if you're eating unkosher food that prepared kosher for passover aren't you still doing wrong?

WhiskeyTangoFoxtrot (unclejessjess), Monday, 17 April 2006 02:22 (sixteen years ago) link

You're right, it's a bit nonsensical. Over the weekend, I was at a family dinner (a mix of Jews and non-Jews) and there was a shrimp platter. Normally, I would eat shrimp but on this occasion I didn't because it's Passover. Depending on how you want to look at, this makes perfect sense or absolutely no sense.

Yes, I followed the rules of Passover (no shrimp during Passover, or any other time of the year for that matter) but I wasn't consistent with my usual habits (I like shrimp). If the shrimp had been breaded, it would have been a different story. OTOH, I don't buy kosher meat so you could argue that the chicken I ate tonight is just as unkosher as the shrimp I passed up over the weekend.

NoTimeBeforeTime (Barry Bruner), Monday, 17 April 2006 04:17 (sixteen years ago) link

I didn't realize that. But if you're eating unkosher food that prepared kosher for passover aren't you still doing wrong?

most jews in america don't keep kosher. but passover is a religious holiday and a lot of jewish people want to do something ceremonial to keep those ties to their roots. so they do the "kosher for passover" thing and fast on yom kippur and go on with their lives. i don't think it's particularly hypocritical. it's about having a couple of days out of the year where you recognize those old-world traditions.

the enduring pueblo (Jody Beth Rosen), Monday, 17 April 2006 05:16 (sixteen years ago) link

really, we're not like catholics. we don't believe we're gonna get sent to hell if we don't kosher up for the holidays. ;-)

the enduring pueblo (Jody Beth Rosen), Monday, 17 April 2006 05:19 (sixteen years ago) link

you talk about jews and americans

RJG (RJG), Monday, 17 April 2006 09:39 (sixteen years ago) link

and food

RJG (RJG), Monday, 17 April 2006 09:41 (sixteen years ago) link

RJG otm haha

AaronK (AaronK), Monday, 17 April 2006 10:48 (sixteen years ago) link

omg jbr talking about jewish-americans on a thread about passover TOTALLY UNCALLED FOR

the enduring pueblo (Jody Beth Rosen), Monday, 17 April 2006 20:14 (sixteen years ago) link

rgj, what do you talk about, besides your disapproval of other people?

the enduring pueblo (Jody Beth Rosen), Monday, 17 April 2006 20:15 (sixteen years ago) link

I think that that is a bit of a silly question

RJG (RJG), Monday, 17 April 2006 20:22 (sixteen years ago) link

you're so "edgy"

the enduring pueblo (Jody Beth Rosen), Monday, 17 April 2006 20:23 (sixteen years ago) link

no need for personal attacks

RJG (RJG), Monday, 17 April 2006 20:25 (sixteen years ago) link

haha

the enduring pueblo (Jody Beth Rosen), Monday, 17 April 2006 20:26 (sixteen years ago) link

COMMAS, PEOPLE.

Ned Raggett (Ned), Monday, 17 April 2006 20:36 (sixteen years ago) link

one year passes...

http://www.judaism.com/gif-bk/80389a.gif

gabbneb, Monday, 31 March 2008 02:03 (fourteen years ago) link

it really is worth it to get the genuine huggable matzah ball. the knock-off ones give you a rash

burt_stanton, Monday, 31 March 2008 02:05 (fourteen years ago) link

I always eat way too many macaroons. Favorite are Manichevitz chocolate chip.

I love the Hillel sandwich why because it tastes intersting.

I try to do the unleavened kosher for Passover but usually some Gentile will trick me into eating cake on the last day, arguing with me over when the holiday ends.

what's passover like round your way?

Sometimes (including this year) I visit my parents. We invite the widow over, eat lamb and boiled egg and parsley and matzo ball soup. Then we play bridge, while the dog jumps on the table and eats a golf-ball shaped hole in the honey cake.

I like the idea of the stupid son.

felicity, Monday, 31 March 2008 02:19 (fourteen years ago) link

it only occurred to me now that the reason the GHMB looked just a bit small for hugging (lol, matzoh ball is hueg) was because it might not be meant for adults. i have to see my sister's plague kit.

i was holding onto the possibility that my mom had invented 'hillel sandwich', but i'm glad it's found elsewhere as well.

my parents are abandoning me for grandma, tho i may join them if i can and the crowd isn't too large already. i might end up leading a seder - lol?

gabbneb, Monday, 31 March 2008 02:57 (fourteen years ago) link

two weeks pass...

oh yeah, the hillel sandwich is in the hagaddah isn't it

happy pesach!

gabbneb, Sunday, 20 April 2008 03:34 (fourteen years ago) link

wtf with bay area "matzah shortage"?! By Saturday night, every single grocery store in town was completely out of matzah and matzo meal.

Shakey Mo Collier, Monday, 21 April 2008 21:17 (fourteen years ago) link

Matzah blows. Sorry.

-- Hurting (Hurting), Friday, April 22, 2005 11:29 AM (3 years ago) Bookmark Link

CONTROVERSIAL OPINION.

We didn't do Passover this year, as my Grandparents, who usually host, are on the other side of the country. Usually it's the seder with the reading and the singing and the wine and the plagues and the haroset and the bitter herbs and the matzoh ball soup and family arguments.

ian, Tuesday, 22 April 2008 23:28 (fourteen years ago) link

Plagues are A++++ would visit them on Egypt again.

felicity, Wednesday, 23 April 2008 06:24 (fourteen years ago) link


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