Pronounciation of Scone and Glasgow

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ok, so lets talk phonetics. how do you pronounce the word SCONE. /skon/ or /sk-oh-n/ (own bastardised phonetic notation here - also i may hgave got the brackets wrong). my other interest is GLASGOW: /glazgo/ or /glahzgo/? (this system is really wack).
so, what conclusions do you draw if you meet someone who uses one of these pronunciations? most people seem to think yo're 'posh' is use the latter version of glasogw, but not the latter of scone, which i find curious. the 'posh' impulse seems to come from long vowels, eg 'bah-th' versus northern 'bath', so why doesnt it apply to 'scone'?

is it possible to generalise about certain sounds that create particular prejudices?

ps this shit really interrests me.

ambrose (ambrose), Tuesday, 29 April 2003 13:32 (seventeen years ago) link

skoan

glahz-go

RJG (RJG), Tuesday, 29 April 2003 13:35 (seventeen years ago) link

Skon, rhymes with "on" (But not LondON). Glaz-go, as rhymes with, erm, "go".

But my pronounciation is really f*cked up due to transatlantic childhood and Scottish grandparents.

Of course accents create prejudices, but you have to know the classes involved to hold those prejudices, which I don't.

kate, Tuesday, 29 April 2003 13:36 (seventeen years ago) link

scone is weird. in some parts skon is posh and skoan is not, in others it is the other way around

glasgow, for me is glazz-go. but that is cuz i say in yorkshire accent, so i could never say glarz, i dont know what scots say cuz i dont know any

are you about at the moment ambrose, going out is in order soon? actually i am thinking you will be at warp nite, or should that be wap neet?

gareth (gareth), Tuesday, 29 April 2003 13:36 (seventeen years ago) link

erm, I meant 'skoon' and you didn't mean the place scone, I guess.

skon.

RJG (RJG), Tuesday, 29 April 2003 13:37 (seventeen years ago) link

Actually, I just realised that I read the thread wrong. I say "Glahz-go" is what I meant - a long A. (Some Americans completely mispronounce the second syllable.)

kate, Tuesday, 29 April 2003 13:39 (seventeen years ago) link

Is the second glasgow in the lloyd grossman style? I've never really heard anyone pronounce it that way.

I say skon, but then I'm from the north. Similarly I pronounce the l in almond.

There are three ways of pronouncing scone, there's skune (as in tune) (sorry, don't know where to put symbols) which is how some people pronounce the place name.

Vicky (Vicky), Tuesday, 29 April 2003 13:42 (seventeen years ago) link

No one eats scones in Glasgow any more, least of all in the Willow Tea Rooms. Best scones are (or were) in Biggar.

Marcello Carlin, Tuesday, 29 April 2003 13:48 (seventeen years ago) link

(Some Americans completely mispronounce the second syllable.)

Yeah, it almost sounds like "Glass-cow"! Ouch.

Nicole (Nicole), Tuesday, 29 April 2003 13:50 (seventeen years ago) link

*off reallyu lame topic* garetrh come to the rhythm factory! actually dont. warp is sat. me and tom are going. other personnel involved = ?

oh, and i meant the breadcake thing, not the place. although was that the orignal pronounciation? presumably...

i say skon and glazgo, both with short vowels, but that is an expection where i live. in fatc what prompted this topic was thinking about when i used to work in a cafe, and they sold scones (obv.) and these old women used to come in and ask for 3 'scoh-nes'. what a dilmemma! i never solved it. sometimes i just lived a lie and said it the same way as them, however alien it sounded, others i said it the other way, but was worried about sounding like i was correwcting them. so how do those in the service industry overcome this sort of problem?


ambrose (ambrose), Tuesday, 29 April 2003 13:54 (seventeen years ago) link

My fiance is a posh northerner.

as I say scown, and if the derbyshire accent really kicks in then it's a scowen.

Just never ask me to pronounce Billy Joel.

chris (chris), Tuesday, 29 April 2003 13:58 (seventeen years ago) link

we have warp tix, i go with lucy and charlotte and maybe jon, i forget now. i will have no scones though. when is rhythm factory?

gareth (gareth), Tuesday, 29 April 2003 14:03 (seventeen years ago) link

it's glahz-gee, mate, but, no??

Tracer Hand (tracerhand), Tuesday, 29 April 2003 14:06 (seventeen years ago) link

Crack Village - 1 May
Helicopter club night with bonkers hip-hoppers and punk bands playing live including, all the way from Shoreditch, Crack Village (pic'd left). Plus DJs Ambrose and Stuart Plimpsoles.

Where: Rhythm Factory, 16-18 Whitechapel Road E1. 020 7375 2771
When: 1 May, 10pm-3am
Cash: £4

ambrose (ambrose), Tuesday, 29 April 2003 14:12 (seventeen years ago) link

bonkers

chris (chris), Tuesday, 29 April 2003 14:13 (seventeen years ago) link

hey those words arent mine. nor is the night. i just work there (i ripped that from 'lets eat drink etc in towerhmalets.com' or something). it would be much better if the real bonkers! posse came down. like sharkey and hixxey etc.

ambrose (ambrose), Tuesday, 29 April 2003 14:33 (seventeen years ago) link

scone rhymes with own

glars go

jel -- (jel), Tuesday, 29 April 2003 15:37 (seventeen years ago) link

scon if it's the wee thing you eat.
Scoon if it's the place outside Perth with the Palace and the Stone.

Glahz-go (slightly accentuated first syllable), though I used to say Glas-go until not long after I moved there.

but then I veer between pronouncing my own name Ail-sa and Ail-za (accent on first syllable) so what would I know.

ailsa (ailsa), Tuesday, 29 April 2003 17:02 (seventeen years ago) link

Glaz-go for me. My scone rhymes with own. I'm a posh-ish northerner, who has lived down south for too long. Is there a social class (clarss?) thing with these two words? Surely it's just regional.

Daniel (dancity), Tuesday, 29 April 2003 17:55 (seventeen years ago) link

scone, as rhyming with 'on'
Glasgow. There is only one way to pronouce this as far as i am aware. I live in Glasgow and everyone says it the same way. Glazz'go. obv.

thuddd (thuddd), Tuesday, 29 April 2003 21:55 (seventeen years ago) link

Everyone I've met from Glasgow pronounces it glaz-gee.

Martin Skidmore (Martin Skidmore), Wednesday, 30 April 2003 10:59 (seventeen years ago) link

six years pass...

i made some scones this weekend.
in the preamble to the recipe it said to pronounce this word "skawn" which rhymes with gone.
pretty much everyone i've said this in front of corrected me to say (rhymes with bone).

stupid amurkins

Q: What is the fastest cake in the world?

A: S'gone! (scone)

salsa sharkshavin (salsa shark), Monday, 5 April 2010 20:49 (ten years ago) link

how can "skawn" rhyme with "gone"?

tomofthenest, Monday, 5 April 2010 20:58 (ten years ago) link

Rhymes for me, I just say scone (cone).

Il suffit de ne pas l'envier (Michael White), Monday, 5 April 2010 21:01 (ten years ago) link

I used to say scone as in gone and would defend that to the death. But inexplicably since moving to the US I have started calling them scooones as in bones. I have some blueberry ones sitting on my counter actually :D

Not the real Village People, Monday, 5 April 2010 21:03 (ten years ago) link

how can "skawn" rhyme with "gone"?

Presumably it was an American recipe. They don't have the /ɒ/ sound that British English uses in 'gone'.

Home Taping Is Killing Muzak (Nasty, Brutish & Short), Monday, 5 April 2010 21:03 (ten years ago) link

I will never call a risotto a ris-OH-to though. NEVER!

Not the real Village People, Monday, 5 April 2010 21:03 (ten years ago) link

scone to rhyme with on. glasgow as either glez gah or glaz go.

that is how you pronounce risotto though?

404s & Heartbreak (jim in glasgow), Monday, 5 April 2010 21:04 (ten years ago) link

??

Il suffit de ne pas l'envier (Michael White), Monday, 5 April 2010 21:05 (ten years ago) link

I say /skəʊn/ (like 'bone') rather than /skɒn/ (like 'gone'), but I'm in the minority.

Home Taping Is Killing Muzak (Nasty, Brutish & Short), Monday, 5 April 2010 21:06 (ten years ago) link

riz-otto as in lotto = ok
riz-oh!-to as in Kyoto = dud

Not the real Village People, Monday, 5 April 2010 21:06 (ten years ago) link

btw did you know that you are insane, because no one on Earth pronounces "risotto" so it rhymes with "lotto" unless they are mispronouncing "lotto"

Wood shavings! Laughing out loud! (HI DERE), Monday, 5 April 2010 21:07 (ten years ago) link

Er...I've never met anyone who *doesn't* pronounce 'risotto' to rhyme with 'lotto'.

Home Taping Is Killing Muzak (Nasty, Brutish & Short), Monday, 5 April 2010 21:09 (ten years ago) link

lotto rhymes with risotto. you're the crazy one. in a nice way.

tomofthenest, Monday, 5 April 2010 21:10 (ten years ago) link

Ris-OH!-to is the American way.

Also potentially a solid gold advertising campaign.

OH! to rhyme with "Joe"?

tomofthenest, Monday, 5 April 2010 21:13 (ten years ago) link

it even has a nasty diphthong to make it even more painful -- /ow/

figgy pudding (La Lechera), Monday, 5 April 2010 21:18 (ten years ago) link

rih-SOHT-ow!

Wood shavings! Laughing out loud! (HI DERE), Monday, 5 April 2010 21:20 (ten years ago) link

Also of interest, although probably not much: there's a cafe on Rivington called Bruscheteria that has the pronunciation written parenthetically underneath, pointing out that the "ch" is a hard "k". Because we say it soft, like the ch- in "chef".

As long as we're talking Italian cuisine: broo-SHET-ta or broo-SKET-ta? (I say the latter, but I suspect the former is more common in these parts.)

jam master (jaymc), Monday, 5 April 2010 21:23 (ten years ago) link

OMG xpost!

jam master (jaymc), Monday, 5 April 2010 21:23 (ten years ago) link

I've just realised why my scone pronunciation changed - there is a brand here called 'Sconehenge' (lol) which forces you into the wrong pronunciation. I think I just affected a Bristolian accent to mock the name sconehenge and it stuck.

Not the real Village People, Monday, 5 April 2010 21:24 (ten years ago) link

scone rhymes with own

― jel -- (jel), Tuesday, 29 April 2003 15:37 (6 years ago)

puff puff post (uh oh I'm having a fantasy), Monday, 5 April 2010 21:25 (ten years ago) link

scpne

Wood shavings! Laughing out loud! (HI DERE), Monday, 5 April 2010 21:26 (ten years ago) link

oven hacking

puff puff post (uh oh I'm having a fantasy), Monday, 5 April 2010 21:28 (ten years ago) link

rizzo D'oh!
i was just doing the 8 year old thing of "no-it-isn't, yes-it-is" X like 100 over the skawn vs scone(henge)

with a coworker, who's a punk know-it-all

As long as we're talking Italian cuisine: broo-SHET-ta or broo-SKET-ta? (I say the latter, but I suspect the former is more common in these parts.)

― jam master (jaymc), Monday, 5 April 2010 22:23 (10 minutes ago) Bookmark

I think I say something clumsily between the two, like broo-shket-ta.

the other one I get wrong is chorizo - I'm pretty sure it should be chor-EE-tho, but that's never what I end up saying.

tomofthenest, Monday, 5 April 2010 21:40 (ten years ago) link

I get by with treating the z like it's two zzs, like in pizza and Rizzoli. Which is almost certainly wrong but it feels so right.

yeah, I'm sure I've called it Ko-reet-zo before!

and to answer the thread:

Scone like gone and John, Glaz-go ( short a like "cat", go like "Joe")

tomofthenest, Monday, 5 April 2010 21:44 (ten years ago) link

S'gone, Ris-OTT-oh, chor-EE-tzo.

Chorizo pizza - chorizza.

the big pink suede panda bear hurts (ledge), Monday, 5 April 2010 21:47 (ten years ago) link

trying to get out of the 'glaaaaahzgow' habit.

the big pink suede panda bear hurts (ledge), Monday, 5 April 2010 21:48 (ten years ago) link

chor-EE-tho

is right. i speak spanish after the latin american fashion and so pronounce it chor-EE-so.

404s & Heartbreak (jim in glasgow), Monday, 5 April 2010 21:49 (ten years ago) link

I have been determinedly pronouncing "chorizo" as chor-eeth-o and usually get an Italian-esque pronunciation back, e.g. "koreetzo".

Pronouncing "risotto" like the t isn't doubled is confusing to me, but for all I know that's the Italian way too.

falling while carrying an owl (a passing spacecadet), Monday, 5 April 2010 21:51 (ten years ago) link

Broosketta

Il suffit de ne pas l'envier (Michael White), Monday, 5 April 2010 21:54 (ten years ago) link

I have been determinedly pronouncing "chorizo" as chor-eeth-o and usually get an Italian-esque pronunciation back, e.g. "koreetzo".

'cho-' wouldn't be pronounced 'ko-' in Italian (or Spanish).

Pronouncing "risotto" like the t isn't doubled is confusing to me, but for all I know that's the Italian way too.

It isn't.

Home Taping Is Killing Muzak (Nasty, Brutish & Short), Monday, 5 April 2010 21:59 (ten years ago) link

'cho-' wouldn't be pronounced 'ko-' in Italian

Actually, that's not quite right. What I meant is a 'ko' sound would be spelt 'co' in Italian and a 'cho' sound would be spelt 'cio'. I don't think the spelling 'cho' would exist, because there's no reason for the 'h' to be there.

Home Taping Is Killing Muzak (Nasty, Brutish & Short), Monday, 5 April 2010 22:05 (ten years ago) link

?? Double tts are pronounced in Italian and 'cho' is ko not tcho.

Il suffit de ne pas l'envier (Michael White), Monday, 5 April 2010 22:06 (ten years ago) link

Michael, my "it isn't" referred to the second part of the sentence (i.e. it isn't the Italian way to pronounce 'risotto' like 'Kyoto').

Home Taping Is Killing Muzak (Nasty, Brutish & Short), Monday, 5 April 2010 22:11 (ten years ago) link

i've always pronounced it Rees (rhyming with the english word peas) - ot (rhyming with the english word got) - toe (as in pronounced like the english word toe).

404s & Heartbreak (jim in glasgow), Monday, 5 April 2010 22:13 (ten years ago) link

I say "chuh-REE-zo."

jam master (jaymc), Monday, 5 April 2010 22:13 (ten years ago) link

Would never occur to me to pronounce it with a Spanish accent, but then I'm more likely to encounter Mexican chorizo here than Spanish chorizo.

jam master (jaymc), Monday, 5 April 2010 22:21 (ten years ago) link

There are three ways of pronouncing scone, there's skune (as in tune) (sorry, don't know where to put symbols)

.....

nakhchivan, Monday, 5 April 2010 22:40 (ten years ago) link

ten years pass...

... skoon not skune for the town of Scone, of course. Meanwhile...

https://mk0brilliantmaptxoqs.kinstacdn.com/wp-content/uploads/scone-map.png

I'm Going to Bring a Watermelon to Mark Grout Tonight (Tom D.), Tuesday, 23 February 2021 10:44 (one week ago) link

I find it fascinating how the names of cities and countries are sometimes pronounced differently in the UK & US and wonder why.

A lot of pronunciations/word usages we in the UK consider American are in fact the way we used to say the words here - like saying "dew" as "doo" rather than the same as "due" or not putting a 'y' sound in Tuesday.

But did British people used to pronounce the last half of "Moscow" like the bovine animal and switch to "co" later? It's not like the Russian name Moskva influenced it one way or another!

Grandpont Genie, Tuesday, 23 February 2021 11:12 (one week ago) link

A lot of pronunciations/word usages we in the UK consider American are in fact the way we used to say the words here - like saying "dew" as "doo" rather than the same as "due" or not putting a 'y' sound in Tuesday.

They still do in Norfolk and the West Country don't they?

I'm Going to Bring a Watermelon to Mark Grout Tonight (Tom D.), Tuesday, 23 February 2021 11:26 (one week ago) link

They still do in Norfolk and the West Country don't they?

I never noticed it when I lived in Bristol, though I was there as a student not a working person so didn't hear as many locals as, say, Dog Latin. Maybe they do in Somerset, Devon, Cornwall?

Grandpont Genie, Tuesday, 23 February 2021 11:30 (one week ago) link

In Norfolk there seems to be a lot of 'oo' going on, Funeral is Fooneral

Maresn3st, Tuesday, 23 February 2021 11:34 (one week ago) link

Yes, they're even more enthusiastic about than Americans.

I'm Going to Bring a Watermelon to Mark Grout Tonight (Tom D.), Tuesday, 23 February 2021 11:35 (one week ago) link

what's with the anomalous Essex / NE London scone/cone rhyming belt ?

where did the UK "los angeleez" pronunciation come from, i've never heard it from an american? and I know USers pronounce New Orleans a few different ways but most seem to emphasise the second syllable rather than the third like brits almost always do

in london there are the traditional pronunications of marylebone and holborn which seem to be used less these days, but probably varies by age, class, area of origin

Towards a Britain-Free Planet (Left), Tuesday, 23 February 2021 11:47 (one week ago) link

which came first "noo" or "nyoo"?

Towards a Britain-Free Planet (Left), Tuesday, 23 February 2021 11:47 (one week ago) link

"noo"

Grandpont Genie, Tuesday, 23 February 2021 11:48 (one week ago) link

"nyoo" another london affectation like broad As and dropped Rs? or something else

Towards a Britain-Free Planet (Left), Tuesday, 23 February 2021 11:49 (one week ago) link

That reminds me, I was watching Stephen Sackur interviewing Douglas Stuart about his novel, "Shuggie Bain", a few days ago and Sackur kept pronouncing Shuggie as Shoogie - since when was -ugg pronounced as -oog in English? Now, the author, who you would imagine would know how to pronounce the name of his own novel, was obviously mentioning the title pretty often, and yet Sackur ploughed on regardless. I just thought, posh arrogant BBC wanker who thinks he knows best, which probably says more about me than Stephen Sackur, but it was bugging - sorry, booging - me so much that I found myself saying "Shuggie... Shuggie... SHUGGIE!" out loud, through gritted teeth, each time he said it.

I'm Going to Bring a Watermelon to Mark Grout Tonight (Tom D.), Tuesday, 23 February 2021 12:25 (one week ago) link

... hold on, is he called Douglas Stuart? Isn't that the guy in the BMX Bandits?

I'm Going to Bring a Watermelon to Mark Grout Tonight (Tom D.), Tuesday, 23 February 2021 12:26 (one week ago) link

... yes he is.

I'm Going to Bring a Watermelon to Mark Grout Tonight (Tom D.), Tuesday, 23 February 2021 12:26 (one week ago) link

shoogie and doogie

himpathy with the devil (jim in vancouver), Tuesday, 23 February 2021 17:46 (one week ago) link

Your man from the BMX Bandits is Duglas T Stewart.

[I can never leave it alone, Scone the place is Skoon. Glasgow is Glazzgo]

hamicle, Tuesday, 23 February 2021 17:55 (one week ago) link


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