avant-garde, experimental, surreal film

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One of my favorite things ever is a good movie that's totally otherworldly and unlike anything I've ever seen before. What are your favorite films like this?

A Nairn (moretap), Saturday, 5 April 2003 03:10 (nineteen years ago) link

"Zorn's Lemma" and "Begotten" (although the latter is haplessly pretentious).

Alex in NYC (vassifer), Saturday, 5 April 2003 03:12 (nineteen years ago) link

some of mine:
Kurosawa's Dreams
Saratossa Manuscript
Brazil
City of Lost Children
The Testament of Orpheus
Dead Man
My Neighbor Totoro
Boy and his Dog

A Nairn (moretap), Saturday, 5 April 2003 03:13 (nineteen years ago) link

How is "Dead Man" (one of my fave films of all time, btw) avant-garde or experimental?

Alex in NYC (vassifer), Saturday, 5 April 2003 03:14 (nineteen years ago) link

Michael Snow, Wavelength
Tony Conrad, The Flicker
Tony Conrad, Straight and Narrow
Stan Brakhage, Window Water Baby Moving (and a bunch more)
Luis Bunuel/Salvador Dali, Un Chien Andalou
Maya Deren, Meshes of the Afternoon
Hollis Frampton, Zorns Lemma
Kenneth Anger, Scorpio Rising
some Paul Sharits and Bruce Connor stuff
could think of more, but all my books are packed.

hstencil, Saturday, 5 April 2003 03:14 (nineteen years ago) link

The Cell (just kidding, just kidding)
I didn't like Begotten at all.
I love the Bros. Quay and basically all underground-or-at-least-not-that-mainstream animation of any kind (except that CG is killing the culture!)

Dan I., Saturday, 5 April 2003 03:15 (nineteen years ago) link

Your books are packed? Are you a fan of Window Water Baby Moving: The Novelization or something?

Chris P (Chris P), Saturday, 5 April 2003 03:15 (nineteen years ago) link

"How is 'Dead Man'"
Yeah, I realixed after I posted I was going into a less experimental category, but that movie still had a very surreal tone to it.

A Nairn (moretap), Saturday, 5 April 2003 03:16 (nineteen years ago) link

No Chris I have a bunch of books about film, ya doofus.

hstencil, Saturday, 5 April 2003 03:16 (nineteen years ago) link

more I like:
Last Year at Annenbad
L'age D'or
Testsuo


I was bored with Begotten

A Nairn (moretap), Saturday, 5 April 2003 03:17 (nineteen years ago) link

I was bored with Begotten

Understandably,....but it was so utterly preposterous that I can't help but love it.

Surreal-wise, I'd cite Peter Weir's early stuff like "The Last Wave" and my beloved "Picnic at Hanging Rock."

Alex in NYC (vassifer), Saturday, 5 April 2003 03:34 (nineteen years ago) link

Harry Smith's Heaven and Earth Magic, one of the wildest, most inscrutable works of art evah.
Chantal Akerman's Je, tu, il, elle and Jeanne Dielman, 23 Quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles, just fucking fabulous.
Michael Snow's Wavelength and La Region Centrale
Stan Brakage's The Act of Seeing with One's Own Eyes
Whoever did the one where it's alternating perspectives from within a hallway flickering back and forth constantly and slowly changing vantage points. Is that Connor? I've seen it twice and I can't even remember.
Also, the guy who took this old found footage of a ride down a San Francisco cable car and did subtle treatments to it but basically left it intact... who the heck was that? And why is my memory so bad these days?

Mr. Diamond (diamond), Saturday, 5 April 2003 03:36 (nineteen years ago) link

Oh, another vote for Ackerman. And there's going to be a Brakhage one-day festival here soon, which I'm looking forward to.

Chris P (Chris P), Saturday, 5 April 2003 03:40 (nineteen years ago) link

Mr. Diamond, I think that's a Sharits film, the hallway one. I can't remember the title tho.

I forgot Peggy Ahwesh and Peter Hutton, who are not only great filmmakers but nice people too!

hstencil, Saturday, 5 April 2003 03:40 (nineteen years ago) link

Len Lye - Tusalava

ducklingmonster (ducklingmonster), Saturday, 5 April 2003 03:44 (nineteen years ago) link

muppets take manhattan

jess (dubplatestyle), Saturday, 5 April 2003 03:45 (nineteen years ago) link

jess you cheeky monkey.

hstencil, Saturday, 5 April 2003 03:47 (nineteen years ago) link

hee hee.

i think i burnt out on this stuff in film school. actually, i think i burnt out on all movies in film school.

jess (dubplatestyle), Saturday, 5 April 2003 03:50 (nineteen years ago) link

Except for Leonard Part Six, of course.

hstencil, Saturday, 5 April 2003 03:52 (nineteen years ago) link

you mock, but someday the criterion people will prove me right.

jess (dubplatestyle), Saturday, 5 April 2003 03:53 (nineteen years ago) link

I can't mock something I haven't seen, jess. Okay, maybe I can.

hstencil, Saturday, 5 April 2003 03:54 (nineteen years ago) link

btw, Criterion's releasing a Brakhage DVD.

hstencil, Saturday, 5 April 2003 03:55 (nineteen years ago) link

Except for Leonard Part Six, of course.

Ouch...bad acid flashback of dragging my parents to see that movie in the theater. No wonder I had the shit beaten out of me during my childhood.

I only remember two things from that movie - the stupid ending with Cosby's wife dousing him in his food and the fact that the superweapon had three different colored liquids in it that Cosby switched with dishwashing liquid only to find out that it WAS filled with dishwashing liquid. (Which, of course, I found hilarious at the time. It is true - little kids are just drunken midgets.)

Girolamo Savonarola, Saturday, 5 April 2003 05:14 (nineteen years ago) link

What everyone else has been saying plus The Double Life Of Veronique

Chris Barrus (Chris Barrus), Saturday, 5 April 2003 05:22 (nineteen years ago) link

A.Nairn, didn't we meet last year at Marienbad ?...o, flashback...les ombres...les mirroirs...

http://www.match-cut.de/img&snd/mbad.jpg

L' annee derriere.

Erik, Saturday, 5 April 2003 07:00 (nineteen years ago) link

There's a tendency in this list to include films in the the "avant-garde or experimental" category when in fact, they are simply off beat -- i.e. Brazil or A Boy and His Dog. Also in the list are the simply boring like Last Year at Marienbad.

It's almost, not always, true that if it's a really cutting edge film, no one will know the name of it because no one will have seen it. Non-representational films, for ex., esp. animation created by scratching and coloring, that "liberate" the filmmaker and which are the first days homework in any film school animation class. "Look, continues images don't show up as continuous images. The 24 f.p.m. standard is a compromise between flicker and the appearance of motion created by the persistence of vision." "Oh, wow."

Cinema is a rules-based artform. For the most part, these visual and narrative conventions are liberating, rather than restrictive. Visually and stylistically renegade filmmakers sometimes are useful when they develop a new technique that can be expropriated by more mainstream filmmakers.

But this is nothing new. The art for art's sake movement is relatively new, the product of the industrial revolution giving a lot more people a lot more money and leisure time. Great art has always been popular art. Raffaele and Leonardo were sought after not because they were great artists but because they were popular and each pope/prince had to keep up with the Joneses.

"Every picture tells a story, don't it."

Skottie, Saturday, 5 April 2003 07:15 (nineteen years ago) link

I was going to put in Meshes of The Afternoon, which I guess is an old favourite of mine, also from film school. Also one, it might be Brakhage, but I'm not sure, where the filmmaker laid out the contents of his/her back yard on a strip of film so that the screen flashes with bugs and dust particles for a minute and a half. Anyone know what this is? I can't remember. And the Brakhage film with a horse running around a pole.

Dead Man, while not being experimental or avant-garde, is also one of my favourite films of all time.

Nordicskillz (Nordicskillz), Saturday, 5 April 2003 08:24 (nineteen years ago) link

I saw a copy of De Palma's first film at Kim's last night, it looked pretty experimental, can't remember the name.

Mary (Mary), Saturday, 5 April 2003 11:19 (nineteen years ago) link

gay cowboys eat pudding

mark s (mark s), Saturday, 5 April 2003 11:20 (nineteen years ago) link

Santa Sangre
El Topo

Would "Cabeza de Vaca" qualify?

badgerminor (badgerminor), Saturday, 5 April 2003 13:28 (nineteen years ago) link

Nordic: I'm pretty sure that is a Brakhage film (and that it'll be on the Criterion DVD) but I haven't seen it and don't know its name. (Oh, I could google and pretend to be all smart, but where would the fun in that be?)

Chris P (Chris P), Saturday, 5 April 2003 13:47 (nineteen years ago) link

"Entr'acte," René Clair.

slutsky (slutsky), Saturday, 5 April 2003 14:07 (nineteen years ago) link

gay cowboys eat pudding

Mark cuts to the heart of it all.

Ned Raggett (Ned), Saturday, 5 April 2003 14:22 (nineteen years ago) link

He watched the same South Park episode as I did last night, the one where the Sundance Festival comes to town. All independent films are summed up that way in it.

Martin Skidmore (Martin Skidmore), Saturday, 5 April 2003 14:35 (nineteen years ago) link

Yus. I larfed like a bonobo when I first saw it years back.

Ned Raggett (Ned), Saturday, 5 April 2003 15:57 (nineteen years ago) link

I'm not sure these are experimental enough for this topic, since most of them do retain a narrative structure, but:

Chantal Akerman - "News From Home"
Jean-Luc Godard - "Weekend"
Abbas Kiarostami - "The Wind Will Carry Us"
Andrei Tarkovsky - "Nostalghia"

o. nate (onate), Saturday, 5 April 2003 16:30 (nineteen years ago) link

I'll go for Meshes of the Afternoon, and raise you Warhol's Chelsea Girls (if that qualifies). I read about a film once called Pasadena Freeway Stills which consisted of a person's hands putting stills shot from the front of a car as it drove on said freeway, with the speed of the placement of the images increasing until thay were at 24 fps. This sounds like something I'd like, although it probably doesn't qualify as a "great" film.

Also, the treated street car film mentioned above may be Bruce Bailey's (I think that's his name) film Castro Street, which consisted of very colorful images sliding across the screen.

nickn (nickn), Saturday, 5 April 2003 22:40 (nineteen years ago) link

good movie: "Independence day" It's all one pace and they use cgi effects w/lots of explosions!! all the actors are really attractive and their motivations are simple & easy to understand!!

bad movie: pretty much any experimental film. For example the quay brothers "institute benjementa". It's just too complicated and it's black and white. Which makes it suck. Switching scenes too slowly completely ruins the flow of the story. A nice predictable and simple story line is always better.

Pashmina (Pashmina), Saturday, 5 April 2003 22:49 (nineteen years ago) link

;)

Pashmina (Pashmina), Saturday, 5 April 2003 22:49 (nineteen years ago) link

Institute Benjementa is my favourite actually. I really like Tarkovski films as well.

Pashmina (Pashmina), Saturday, 5 April 2003 22:51 (nineteen years ago) link

http://www.imageforum.co.jp/quay/src/bq-bnj2.jpg

rowr!!

Pashmina (Pashmina), Saturday, 5 April 2003 23:04 (nineteen years ago) link

Surely Nic Roeg owns this thread from the 'otherworldliness' angle?

N. (nickdastoor), Saturday, 5 April 2003 23:14 (nineteen years ago) link

Don't forget Maya Dern.

Mary (Mary), Sunday, 6 April 2003 21:09 (nineteen years ago) link

here's some of my favorites who are also part of the avant-garde canon:

resnais mon oncle d'amérique
Luis Bunuel The Phantom of Liberty
debord la société du spectacle
Nagisa Oshima In The Realm Of The Senses
michael snow so is this

Sébastien Chikara (Sébastien Chikara), Sunday, 13 April 2003 10:25 (nineteen years ago) link

I slept through Benjaminta. I vaguely remember men banging with forks.

Erik, Sunday, 13 April 2003 10:37 (nineteen years ago) link

one month passes...
Ernie Gehr!

That's the person I was trying to think of in my original post to this thread. The film that features rapidly alternating perspectives from within a hallway. It has been bothering me ever since (particularly as I'd seen the film in question multiple times), and it came to me tonight.

Serene Velocity. Great film. Anyone know this one?

Mr. Diamond (diamond), Friday, 16 May 2003 06:11 (nineteen years ago) link

Second vote for Heaven and Earth Magic! Also:

The Nine Lives of Thomas Katz
...where end of the world in coming to London, windows speak and the subway has it's own gods.

Watch the K Foundation Burn a Million Quid
...where the boys from KLF burn a million pounds of their own money. It really happened.

Don't Touch the White Woman!
...where the famous battle between general Custer and the Indians takes place in modern-day Paris. Marcello Mastroianni plays Custer, and Catherine Deneuve is his mistress.

Tuomas (Tuomas), Friday, 16 May 2003 06:37 (nineteen years ago) link

i agree with whoever said l'age d'or
the bit with the toes is so funny
much better than la chien andalou...

i thought the K foundation thing had been officially discredited now?

arthur woodlouse (arthur woodlouse), Friday, 16 May 2003 09:56 (nineteen years ago) link

True Stories!

Matt (Matt), Friday, 16 May 2003 10:02 (nineteen years ago) link

i thought the K foundation thing had been officially discredited now?

What do you mean by that? I heard Drummond & Cauty have destroyed all the existing copies of the film, but nothing about it being discredited.

Tuomas (Tuomas), Friday, 16 May 2003 10:14 (nineteen years ago) link

anyone know Ed Atkins' work?

http://www.bam.org/film/2016/ed-atkins

we can be heroes just for about 3.6 seconds (Dr Morbius), Tuesday, 8 March 2016 20:03 (six years ago) link

how about Basma Alsharif?

http://www.bam.org/film/2016/basma-alsharif

we can be heroes just for about 3.6 seconds (Dr Morbius), Tuesday, 8 March 2016 20:05 (six years ago) link

one month passes...

i guess i should see some Bruce Baillie in NYC this weekend

http://www.filmlinc.org/festivals/art-of-the-real/

we can be heroes just for about 3.6 seconds (Dr Morbius), Friday, 8 April 2016 02:50 (six years ago) link

soliciting Straub / Huillet recomms for May (only seen Not Reconciled)

http://www.moma.org/calendar/film/1641?locale=en

we can be heroes just for about 3.6 seconds (Dr Morbius), Tuesday, 26 April 2016 20:07 (six years ago) link

I bought Anti-Clock on a whim the other day. It's supposed to be pretty abstract and hard to follow- a sort of Finnegan's Wake of British cinema. Anyone seen it?

TARANTINO! (dog latin), Tuesday, 26 April 2016 23:18 (six years ago) link

Haven't managed to get a copy yet but have seen clips and love what I've seen so far. I am an ardent Arden stan, though (I love both Separation and the Other Side of the Underneath, though the latter is intensely harrowing). There's an element of 60s/70s feminist performance theatre to her work that I think some people struggle with, as well as the abstraction.

Afraid I can't help with Morbs' request, but would like to hear a report back.

emil.y, Tuesday, 26 April 2016 23:33 (six years ago) link

You've got Anti-Clock! I bought it you in the last few months..

lilcraigyboi (Craigo Boingo), Wednesday, 27 April 2016 09:16 (six years ago) link

V jealous of that Straub/Huillet retrospective - only know Chronicle of Anna Magdalena Bach, thanks to this Region 2 DVD set (guess I should get around to watching the other two films there)

http://www.newwavefilms.co.uk/view-film-detail.html/?viewListing=Mjc=

Chicamaw (Ward Fowler), Wednesday, 27 April 2016 09:21 (six years ago) link

xxp I tried watching it (alone) but I wasn't really watching it properly. Not much happens but a lot happens if you know what I mean. It's easy for my attention to wander and then miss out on a lot of detail. I'll give it another go next time I've nothing to do. The DVD has loads of extras and additional short films.

TARANTINO! (dog latin), Wednesday, 27 April 2016 09:22 (six years ago) link

Going to see this on Sunday, a former ILXOR tell me that a Dwoskin retrospective DVD set is in the works

http://luxscotland.org.uk/events/screening-lux-scotland-presents-pain-is-by-stephen-dwoskin/

Chicamaw (Ward Fowler), Wednesday, 27 April 2016 09:25 (six years ago) link

Ward - you've got to watch Sicilia! ASAP, its the best.

xyzzzz__, Wednesday, 27 April 2016 10:08 (six years ago) link

soliciting Straub / Huillet recomms for May (only seen Not Reconciled)

http://www.moma.org/calendar/film/1641?locale=en

― we can be heroes just for about 3.6 seconds (Dr Morbius), Tuesday, 26 April 2016 Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

You've got to see Too Early/Too Late

So much good shit - I'd get to the Holderlin and Pavese adaptations and def Sicilia! (which at nearly 70 mins is not a short)

xyzzzz__, Wednesday, 27 April 2016 10:24 (six years ago) link

Hate how these are relegated to galleries - what's the screen at MoMa like?

In the meantime the BFI is treating to a Spielberg season #bumsOnSeats policy y'all!

xyzzzz__, Wednesday, 27 April 2016 10:27 (six years ago) link

Thanks xyzzzz, will get right on it

Chicamaw (Ward Fowler), Wednesday, 27 April 2016 10:58 (six years ago) link

The MoMA screens are proper theaters; i haven't checked how many are in theater #1, the biggest room and screen

we can be heroes just for about 3.6 seconds (Dr Morbius), Wednesday, 27 April 2016 11:56 (six years ago) link

You've got Anti-Clock! I bought it you in the last few months..

― lilcraigyboi (Craigo Boingo), Wednesday, April 27, 2016 10:16 AM (4 hours ago)

Doh, you know what, I had *completely* forgotten this and was gonna ask to borrow your copy. FFS, me.

emil.y, Wednesday, 27 April 2016 13:46 (six years ago) link

Werner Nekes - Hynningen

Music by Anthony More of Slapp Happy (along with a lot of other films by Werner Neukes).

(Henry) Green container bin with face (Tom D.), Wednesday, 27 April 2016 13:51 (six years ago) link

Hoberman's piece on Straub-Huillet in the Times today is not going to set off a MoMA stampede -- he quoted Straub saying their movies were made to be walked out of, and finished by asking the curator if he was feeding the audience "spinach."

we can be heroes just for about 3.6 seconds (Dr Morbius), Wednesday, 4 May 2016 19:07 (six years ago) link

TBF, it's hard to think of a 'campaign' that would result in lines around the block for a complete Straub-Huillet retro, if gross deception is not involved. In a way, emphasising the alienated difficulty of these films makes them seem more alluring, more of a challenge to be taken on.

Thanks to xyzzzz, I watched Scilia! - not on a big screen, unfortunately (it's worth saying that it's a very beautiful film in places, cinematography by frequent Rivette collaborator William Lubtchansky, though the framing/editing is totally Straub-Huillet's own - incredible repetition of unmotivated slow pans over empty rural landscapes, other shots that carry on well past their 'end'). In places, it reminded me of Costa's Horse Money, or seemed like it could be one source for Costa's style, a way of presenting historical narrative, giving voice to the unvoiced etc.

Chicamaw (Ward Fowler), Wednesday, 4 May 2016 19:44 (six years ago) link

Hilarious quote from Straub.

Glad you liked Sicilia! Ward - source novel is very much worth reading btw (I think its a great visual intro to those landscapes in mid-cent Italian Lit of Pavese, Vittorini, Moravia, Morante)

And Costa worked with Straubs. Some of Haneke's work is very much S/H (Haneke stole the sequence in Egypt in Too Early/Too Late for the end of Hidden)

xyzzzz__, Wednesday, 4 May 2016 23:10 (six years ago) link

some of huillet/straub's films are quite amazing, so it's impossible to dismiss them, but i also find it kind of impossible not to find them (and some of their more ardent supporters like tag gallagher) a bit silly in their conviction that somehow three-hour films of nonactors declaiming communists texts fromthe 1930s while standing in a calabrian forest are going to aid the Revolution.

wizzz! (amateurist), Thursday, 5 May 2016 00:04 (six years ago) link

even in their worst films, there is something undeniably gripping about the way they record sound, the way they frame people and landscape, their cutting rhythms, etc. it's just that the political conceits behind their "program" seem really misguided to me.

actually, one of the better critiques of their recent (by which i mean last 20 years) work is actually in a trotskyite publication of all places. scroll down to about halfway through: https://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2002/05/baf3-m20.html

i actually kind of like pedro costa's first two features but otherwise i have to say he seems like something of a charlatan to me. if anything he has all of the huillets' self-seriousness and not enough of their filmmaking skill.

wizzz! (amateurist), Thursday, 5 May 2016 00:07 (six years ago) link

here's another attack on straub and costa from the World Socialist Website critic David Walsh, who despite having some serious blinkers on a lot of time, is not at all a bad critic: https://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2015/03/25/fic3-m25.html

wizzz! (amateurist), Thursday, 5 May 2016 00:08 (six years ago) link

re: Costa being a charlatan. You may or may not like what he is doing but I think his work in the inner cities is deeply felt, committed and comes from a genuine place.

From a scan those pieces don't really give me much to re-think. Looking at the events in mid-70s Portugal from the POV of Cape Verdians is a great way of looking at those events - and carry even more of a charge today, given what is happening in Europe.

xyzzzz__, Thursday, 5 May 2016 07:51 (six years ago) link

re: Straubs. I actually don't see the fuss. From the half-dozen I've seen they seem very watchable and I can only imagine there being other reasons for the difficulty in presenting their work at the BFI. I've seen old arthouse 'classics' in old prints with four fucking people over the years. Seriously, what's the hold up?

xyzzzz__, Thursday, 5 May 2016 07:59 (six years ago) link

I've been hot and cold on Costa, but i generally found Horse Money hypnotic on first viewing. I am gonna steer clear of the more "declamatory"/lengthy S-H films tho. That leaves enough for me to dip my toe.

we can be heroes just for about 3.6 seconds (Dr Morbius), Thursday, 5 May 2016 11:19 (six years ago) link

and linking this Pinkerton piece on S-H because I walked out on History Lessons at the two-thirds mark last week, feeling Straub wouldn't mind. The Bach film was fine, though.

http://frieze.com/article/we-make-our-films-so-audiences-can-walk-out-them

we can be heroes just for about 3.6 seconds (Dr Morbius), Thursday, 19 May 2016 20:02 (six years ago) link

Only the strong survive Straub-Huillet – and I wouldn’t have shirked the test for all the world.

#maMan

xyzzzz__, Thursday, 19 May 2016 20:14 (six years ago) link

Although I was just talking abt my struggles with Brecht's prose on ILB.

xyzzzz__, Thursday, 19 May 2016 20:15 (six years ago) link

soliciting Straub / Huillet recomms for May (only seen Not Reconciled)

Read this as Straub / Huillet romcoms, which would be great.

Although, if anyone can recommend a good place to start with them, that would also be great.

ed.b, Friday, 20 May 2016 19:18 (six years ago) link

ed.b, if you still have access to a DVD machine capable of playing Region 2 DVDs, I would recommend this two disc set from New Wave films, which contains Straub-Huillet's biggest hit - Chronicle of Anna Magdalena Bach - and Sicilia!, which xyzzzz astutely recommended above.

Aren't all their films romances?

http://www.newwavefilms.co.uk/view-film-detail.html/?viewListing=Mjc=

Chicamaw (Ward Fowler), Friday, 20 May 2016 19:36 (six years ago) link

one month passes...

:(

Acid Hose (Capitaine Jay Vee), Tuesday, 28 June 2016 16:51 (six years ago) link

six months pass...

Straub / Huillet retrospective at UC Berkeley, starts on Jan 26, until May 2017

http://www.bampfa.berkeley.edu/program/not-reconciled-cinema-straub-huillet

sbahnhof, Monday, 2 January 2017 05:41 (five years ago) link

three months pass...
three months pass...

Yvonne Rainer recommendations?

https://www.filmlinc.org/series/talking-pictures-the-cinema-of-yvonne-rainer/#films

Supercreditor (Dr Morbius), Wednesday, 19 July 2017 19:53 (five years ago) link

Journey from Berlin is all I've seen - can't remember much about it, except thinking it was good.

Would so see Madame X. Ulrike Ottinger is really good.

Have fun!

xyzzzz__, Wednesday, 19 July 2017 21:15 (five years ago) link

six months pass...

obit roundup for Paul Clipson

https://www.criterion.com/current/posts/5371-the-daily-paul-clipson-1965-2018

ice cream social justice (Dr Morbius), Wednesday, 7 February 2018 18:24 (four years ago) link

eleven months pass...
one month passes...

re: the straub/huillet discussion upthread, full retro happening in london over the next three months: https://www.goethe.de/ins/gb/en/ver.cfm?fuseaction=events.detail&event_id=21471962&

devvvine, Saturday, 2 March 2019 08:23 (three years ago) link

two weeks pass...
three years pass...

word seems to be spreading that straub has passed

devvvine, Sunday, 20 November 2022 11:41 (one week ago) link

:-(

xyzzzz__, Sunday, 20 November 2022 12:59 (one week ago) link

Straub and Godard In the same year, damm. And Rest in Provocation.

Ward Fowler, Sunday, 20 November 2022 14:00 (one week ago) link

RIP. I saw From the Cloud the the Resistance, Antigone and Machorka-Muff just this year. All amazing, and the first is so singular and strange.

glumdalclitch, Sunday, 20 November 2022 15:58 (one week ago) link

Here's a lovely curated playlist of shorts:

http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL5xOztE613KMOvfW_L5zaa6j3cdLUwO4c

glumdalclitch, Sunday, 20 November 2022 16:07 (one week ago) link

I have more vivid memories of reading Richard Roud's Straub book than the films themselves, intriguing though they were.
I should get around to watching Sicilia!, which James Quant of TIFF was always talking up.

Halfway there but for you, Monday, 21 November 2022 03:56 (one week ago) link


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