once-common words people don’t use anymore

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suet

creosote

chilblains

Li'l Brexit (Tracer Hand), Friday, 16 April 2021 11:07 (one year ago) link

If your home has a chimney, you're gonna talk about creosote all the time.

peace, man, Friday, 16 April 2021 11:17 (one year ago) link

We were talking about chilblains a lot over the past two months (as in did the husband have chilblains or covid toe, we decided the latter). Was it ever really common though?

Scamp Granada (gyac), Friday, 16 April 2021 11:18 (one year ago) link

I still frequently buy lamb suet for making DUMPLINGS!

calzino, Friday, 16 April 2021 11:22 (one year ago) link

'Creosote' appears in a song by The Clientele that I have played a few times this week.

the pinefox, Friday, 16 April 2021 11:23 (one year ago) link

cor!

massaman gai (front tea for two), Friday, 16 April 2021 11:24 (one year ago) link

Suet is also common in bird feeders.

peace, man, Friday, 16 April 2021 11:24 (one year ago) link

I'm sorry, Tracer Hand, that we are working so hard to debunk your OP.

peace, man, Friday, 16 April 2021 11:25 (one year ago) link

I think I say 'Cor'.

the pinefox, Friday, 16 April 2021 13:17 (one year ago) link

desuetude

So who you gonna call? The martini police (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 16 April 2021 13:47 (one year ago) link

hwæt

Camaraderie at Arms Length, Friday, 16 April 2021 13:51 (one year ago) link

I still use 'hwæt'.

pomenitul, Friday, 16 April 2021 13:56 (one year ago) link

Cobblers

Authoritarian Steaks (Tom D.), Friday, 16 April 2021 14:00 (one year ago) link

hwæt, sôðe?

Camaraderie at Arms Length, Friday, 16 April 2021 14:02 (one year ago) link

There's probably somewhere in Derbyshire or somewhere where people still talk like that.

Authoritarian Steaks (Tom D.), Friday, 16 April 2021 14:05 (one year ago) link

Sóþsecgendlíce.

pomenitul, Friday, 16 April 2021 14:05 (one year ago) link

lol, I totally use suet, it's what you put in bird feeders.

Josh in Chicago, Friday, 16 April 2021 14:06 (one year ago) link

'Iceland' I think it's called.

2xp

pomenitul, Friday, 16 April 2021 14:06 (one year ago) link

flummadiddle

pomenitul, Friday, 16 April 2021 14:10 (one year ago) link

think West Frisian is supposed to be the closest extant dialect to Old English

Camaraderie at Arms Length, Friday, 16 April 2021 14:11 (one year ago) link

It is, but Icelandic is cooler. Besides, Frisian is also closest to modern English.

pomenitul, Friday, 16 April 2021 14:15 (one year ago) link

I buy suet once a year to make Christmas Pudding

mahb, Friday, 16 April 2021 15:00 (one year ago) link

if we're talking ilx, i would say RONG never gets used anymore

P-Zunit (Neanderthal), Friday, 16 April 2021 15:01 (one year ago) link

If you had searched for that, you would have found yourself to be incorrect.

peace, man, Friday, 16 April 2021 15:04 (one year ago) link

nobody was capitalizing it tho!

P-Zunit (Neanderthal), Friday, 16 April 2021 15:07 (one year ago) link

The girl group song 'Terry' features the line 'we had a quarrel, I was untrue on the night he died' and every time I hear it I wonder when 'quarrel' and 'untrue' (in that context) fell out of their once-popular use.

You Can't Have the Woogie Without a Little Boogie (Old Lunch), Friday, 16 April 2021 15:20 (one year ago) link

Eh?

Authoritarian Steaks (Tom D.), Friday, 16 April 2021 15:27 (one year ago) link

Tom D: I say 'cobblers' almost literally every day.

And I don't even work at an old-fashioned shoe repair shop.

the pinefox, Friday, 16 April 2021 15:29 (one year ago) link

(xp) Oh I get what you mean about the context for 'untrue', but I think it was old fashioned even then.

Authoritarian Steaks (Tom D.), Friday, 16 April 2021 15:29 (one year ago) link

Using pop culture as a yardstick, 'untrue' as an analogue of 'unfaithful' seems to have been in fairly regular usage in the '60s. I hear it pop up quite a bit in songs, movies, shows, etc. from that era but not really much thereafter.

You Can't Have the Woogie Without a Little Boogie (Old Lunch), Friday, 16 April 2021 15:36 (one year ago) link

Well, it's easy to rhyme, which can never be underestimated in song writing.

Authoritarian Steaks (Tom D.), Friday, 16 April 2021 15:40 (one year ago) link

Varlet

| (Latham Green), Friday, 16 April 2021 15:42 (one year ago) link

if we're talking ilx, i would say RONG never gets used anymore

I still use this. Does that make me a korny old fuxx0r?

It Is Dangerous to Meme Inside (James Redd and the Blecchs), Friday, 16 April 2021 15:46 (one year ago) link

you aren't hearing "shan't" much in the US these days, and "shall" only got a stay of execution from Gandalf

mark e. smith-moon (f. hazel), Friday, 16 April 2021 15:51 (one year ago) link

xpost it makes you vintage

P-Zunit (Neanderthal), Friday, 16 April 2021 15:53 (one year ago) link

When I was six it was very common for kids my age to say "keen" to mean cool, great, awesome. And then it seemed as if overnight everyone stopped saying it. (Absolutely nobody said "awesome" when I was six but by the time I was 14 everyone said it). Granted kids often have their own words, but some older people said "keen" also, I'm pretty sure of it.

Josefa, Friday, 16 April 2021 15:56 (one year ago) link

"Lumbago" was a pretty common term up to and throughout the 70's, to identify any sort of back pain. Archie Bunker and Fred G. Sanford were all over it! Seems like "sciatica" has taken its place.

henry s, Friday, 16 April 2021 15:59 (one year ago) link

The G. is for “grebt.”

It Is Dangerous to Meme Inside (James Redd and the Blecchs), Friday, 16 April 2021 16:00 (one year ago) link

does anybody say "kneeslapper" anymore

P-Zunit (Neanderthal), Friday, 16 April 2021 16:01 (one year ago) link

xp
a Canadianism I enjoy is "keener"

rob, Friday, 16 April 2021 16:02 (one year ago) link

xp to myself

I think it was lumbago that had George Jefferson walking on Bentley's back.

henry s, Friday, 16 April 2021 16:02 (one year ago) link

"Lumbago" was a pretty common term up to and throughout the 70's, to identify any sort of back pain. Archie Bunker and Fred G. Sanford were all over it! Seems like "sciatica" has taken its place.

cf the Small Faces, "Lazy Sunday"

Authoritarian Steaks (Tom D.), Friday, 16 April 2021 16:06 (one year ago) link

TIL that that line in "Lazy Sunday" is "How's old Bert's lumbago?"

Always thought it was "How's your bird's lumbago?"

Josefa, Friday, 16 April 2021 16:12 (one year ago) link

there are words people used to say in the playground a lot that were conflating being silly/stupid with being mentally handicapped. I don't really want to even say what they were, but it always amazes me that these words were common enough to be learned by children. I'm glad I don't hear them any more.

boxedjoy, Friday, 16 April 2021 16:44 (one year ago) link

xp to myself

I think it was lumbago that had George Jefferson walking on Bentley's back.

Tbh I wasn’t sure of the literal truth of the word being used on the shows you cited but appreciated the sentiment. It was true if only for the body language of those two characters.

It Is Dangerous to Meme Inside (James Redd and the Blecchs), Friday, 16 April 2021 16:47 (one year ago) link

TIL that that line in "Lazy Sunday" is "How's old Bert's lumbago?"

Always thought it was "How's your bird's lumbago?"

"How's yer Bert's lumbago?" surely?

Authoritarian Steaks (Tom D.), Friday, 16 April 2021 16:53 (one year ago) link

Hm it does sound slightly more like "your" than "old." I just went by some random lyric site... now I see there's another site that says it's "your old Bert's"!

Josefa, Friday, 16 April 2021 17:02 (one year ago) link

lumbago was a final jeopardy answer a few years ago and nobody got it. the clue: "Adding “P” to a word for a chronic back condition gets you this synonym for graphite or pencil lead". one of the contestants was a latin teacher.

milliner / millinery

wasdnuos (abanana), Friday, 16 April 2021 17:11 (one year ago) link

Never heard lumbago used in conversation but come across it all the time in medical coding.

A True White Kid that can Jump (Granny Dainger), Friday, 16 April 2021 17:41 (one year ago) link

As a Yank, I think I first heard the term shift in Rubberbandits song Horse Outside.

peace, man, Wednesday, 29 June 2022 12:42 (three days ago) link

I thought the Irish used to use the word scone in a similar way to snog, may have been a more localised thing, Do remember it being used when I was in Galway in 90 and I think in Dublin a couple of years later.
Looks like the word shift which is also interrelated may have been more innocent or whatever than I thought. I was thinking of it as had sex with, may have been more got off with. But I'm not sure how these terms translate to a different understanding like bases or similar.

I grew up with the word "winch" in Scotland, which I always found rather unpleasant. I assume it's from "wench", I'm not sure if that makes it worse.

Eavis Has Left the Building (Tom D.), Wednesday, 29 June 2022 13:15 (three days ago) link

“pashing” and especially “pash rash” will flush out the gen X Aussies

assert (matttkkkk), Wednesday, 29 June 2022 13:20 (three days ago) link

and 'heavy petting' happens at lover's lane

Also in UK swimming pools

fetter, Wednesday, 29 June 2022 14:18 (three days ago) link

In Minnesota in the early 90s my midwestern college peers said “scamming” meant “making out” (I think, but I’m still not clear) and it confused me as an east coaster.

Antifa Sandwich Artist (Boring, Maryland), Wednesday, 29 June 2022 14:41 (three days ago) link

—-said “scamming” in place of “making out”—

Antifa Sandwich Artist (Boring, Maryland), Wednesday, 29 June 2022 14:42 (three days ago) link

then there are all those old songs that use "making love" to describe what i'd think of as "making out", it used to really confuse me how songs as explicit as that could get popular

my favorite example of semantic shift is the way "cock" used to refer to the female pudenda in african-american vernacular - this is the sense in which it's used in "rotten cocksucker's ball". i'm definitely here for lucille bogan singing about her cock!

Kate (rushomancy), Wednesday, 29 June 2022 15:53 (three days ago) link

'stoned' for drunk, that's old school

Andy the Grasshopper, Wednesday, 29 June 2022 17:10 (three days ago) link

It's better than drinking alone

Nutellanor Roosevelt (Ye Mad Puffin), Wednesday, 29 June 2022 20:21 (three days ago) link

Getting your end away

immodesty blaise (jimbeaux), Wednesday, 29 June 2022 20:22 (three days ago) link

there's also the term "make whoopee" which always makes me laugh, because who the hell came up with that? did some guy who was getting laid in the 50's yell out "whoopee!!" one time?

frogbs, Wednesday, 29 June 2022 20:24 (three days ago) link

1920s, more like. "Makin' whoopee" is old.

but also fuck you (unperson), Wednesday, 29 June 2022 20:34 (three days ago) link

I like "tight" for oldschool drunk terms...

m0stly clean (Slowsquatch), Wednesday, 29 June 2022 21:40 (three days ago) link

Cockeyed

immodesty blaise (jimbeaux), Wednesday, 29 June 2022 21:41 (three days ago) link

I hate the term 'necking' and associate it with Alan Partridge describing Bond

kinder, Wednesday, 29 June 2022 22:03 (three days ago) link

Jack London always talked about being 'jingled' for drunk, which is pretty good

Andy the Grasshopper, Wednesday, 29 June 2022 22:08 (three days ago) link

‘tight’ is my favorite of those terms, too, tho i never use it.

broccoli rabe thomas (the table is the table), Wednesday, 29 June 2022 22:52 (three days ago) link

Reminds me: is there a replacement for "uptight"? I can't think of what would be adequate, in a contemporary way. Last time I heard "anal" was in, "Don't get anal about the wordcount," which was advised by Chuck Eddy at the Voice, so a while back.
Oh yeah, "uptight" and xpost Jack London and xpost 1905 use of "gay" reminds me of "Baked beans! Out of sight!" said by someone at a boarding house table, in a turn-of-the-century Jack book.
(R.Crumb got "Keep on Truckin'" from his collection of very vintage 78s.)
Speaking of music writers, haven't noticed one using "albeit" in a while, and don't miss it---but does it have a shade of meaning missed by "although"?

dow, Wednesday, 29 June 2022 23:17 (three days ago) link

xp - yeah, I don't use it myself but I always enjoy hearing it in old films or such...

m0stly clean (Slowsquatch), Wednesday, 29 June 2022 23:34 (three days ago) link

xp - yeah, I don't use it myself but I always enjoy hearing it in old films or such...


it was either Hemingway or John O’Hara who introduced me to it!

broccoli rabe thomas (the table is the table), Thursday, 30 June 2022 00:18 (two days ago) link

Don't people still say uptight to mean uptight? Certainly more than I hear "anal" anymore.

Guayaquil (eephus!), Thursday, 30 June 2022 00:23 (two days ago) link

Hope so!

dow, Thursday, 30 June 2022 01:24 (two days ago) link

At the time of the Stevie Wonder song, did "uptight" mean something like "got everything sewn up correctly"? Because he seems to be unusually excited about being anxious and repressed.

Halfway there but for you, Thursday, 30 June 2022 01:27 (two days ago) link

"Tighten Up" probably also related.

Doctor Casino, Thursday, 30 June 2022 01:32 (two days ago) link

yeah, he seemed to mean like, "tighten up/shipshape'---never heard anybody else use "uptight" in that way, rhyming with "out of sight," even!

dow, Thursday, 30 June 2022 01:47 (two days ago) link

'stoned' for drunk, that's old school

― Andy the Grasshopper, Wednesday, June 29, 2022 1:10 PM (eight hours ago) bookmarkflaglink

Also, stoned in the 1960s for tripping on acid.

peace, man, Thursday, 30 June 2022 01:51 (two days ago) link

"Uptight" went from a negative word, meaning "tense," in the 1930s, to a positive one, meaning "out of sight," in the early '60s, before whiplashing back to its negative connotation in the late '60s.

There were multimedia performances with the Velvet Underground promoted under the name "Andy Warhol's Up-Tight" in early '66, perhaps playing on the double connotation of the word.

Josefa, Thursday, 30 June 2022 03:04 (two days ago) link

then there are all those old songs that use "making love" to describe what i'd think of as "making out",

I don't know if "making love" ever meant "making out". In old movies it always means "hitting on" or "courting" or otherwise developing a romantic relationship. As in this exchange from Horse Feathers (1932):


Frank : Dad wants me to give you up. You know, you're interfering with my studies.
Connie : Ha-ha-ha. He must think I'm terrible.
Frank : But I think you're wonderful. You're beautiful.
Connie : Are you making love to me?

Hans Holbein (Chinchilla Volapük), Thursday, 30 June 2022 05:22 (two days ago) link

In Minnesota in the early 90s my midwestern college peers said “scamming” meant “making out” (I think, but I’m still not clear) and it confused me as an east coaster.

My memory of the early 90s was that to "scam on" someone was synonymous with "hitting on" them; I never heard "scam" without the on used to mean "make out." But who knows what they were up to in the Midwest.

Guayaquil (eephus!), Thursday, 30 June 2022 05:28 (two days ago) link

Have vague memories of saying 'laced' for drunk/high... and weirdly, maybe 'draced'? Maybe that was a local thing.

kinder, Thursday, 30 June 2022 12:34 (two days ago) link

Blootered
Steamin'/ Steamboats
Away wi' it
Stocious
Paraletic (sp?)
Miroclous (sp?) etc

You probably not be surprised to hear there are dozens of words in Scotland for being drunk. However I'm not sure how many of them are still in use, the last time I was up "mortal" seemed to be in vogue. And "goosed".

Eavis Has Left the Building (Tom D.), Thursday, 30 June 2022 12:57 (two days ago) link

“shitpiled” was my favorite local term in the early 90s.

joygoat, Thursday, 30 June 2022 18:29 (two days ago) link

“pashing” and especially “pash rash” will flush out the gen X Aussies

LOL sorry Matt I'm late to the party, was just coming here to say this one. Honestly it feels like theres loads of Aussie slang from the 70s that americans peobably thing we still say but we just dont, like struth and crikey and pash.

And "rack off".
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WAgIFeq72oM

Stoop Crone (Trayce), Thursday, 30 June 2022 22:13 (two days ago) link

the word we (kids/Herefordshire/80s) used to use all the time was "skill" (adj) (or sometimes even "skilliant") - the only time I've heard it anywhere else is in Son of Rambow

Sudden Birdnet Thus (Camaraderie at Arms Length), Thursday, 30 June 2022 22:29 (two days ago) link

I don't think "skilliant" was a thing but "skill" definitely was in Worcester in the 80s

even the birds in the trees seemed to whisper "get fucked" (bovarism), Thursday, 30 June 2022 22:41 (two days ago) link

I think "ace" hung on a bit longer

even the birds in the trees seemed to whisper "get fucked" (bovarism), Thursday, 30 June 2022 22:41 (two days ago) link

until "wicked" took over

even the birds in the trees seemed to whisper "get fucked" (bovarism), Thursday, 30 June 2022 22:42 (two days ago) link

surely not another middle-aged Worcester person on here! (unless you are colonel poo with a new name)

Sudden Birdnet Thus (Camaraderie at Arms Length), Thursday, 30 June 2022 22:43 (two days ago) link

I think 'skill' made a brief appearance round our way but it seemed a bit affected.

kinder, Friday, 1 July 2022 16:16 (yesterday) link

Skill very popular where I grew up in west London in the early 80s. Favourite morphing of the phrase was 'skillage in the village'.

Shard-borne Beatles with their drowsy hums (Chinaski), Friday, 1 July 2022 17:01 (yesterday) link

i remember "i am skill!" in shropshire in the early 70s

mark s, Friday, 1 July 2022 17:05 (yesterday) link

People don't seem to 'chip off' any more (i.e. leaving), that was a big north London thing in the 80s, probably the rest of London too

how many bowling greens does one town need (Matt #2), Friday, 1 July 2022 17:22 (yesterday) link

Do UK people still use 'et' for 'ate'?

Andy the Grasshopper, Friday, 1 July 2022 17:34 (yesterday) link

Depends where you are in the UK I would imagine.

Eavis Has Left the Building (Tom D.), Friday, 1 July 2022 17:36 (yesterday) link

Do UK people still use 'et' for 'ate'?


I used this in a recent poem and people really loved it, and i am very much a yank

broccoli rabe thomas (the table is the table), Friday, 1 July 2022 20:04 (yesterday) link

I didn't even realize that was a UK thing; I thought it was a Boston/Maine thing, because I think I first encountered it in Jaws (the book) and then later in Stephen King.

but also fuck you (unperson), Friday, 1 July 2022 20:10 (yesterday) link

I think "ace" hung on a bit longer

― even the birds in the trees seemed to whisper "get fucked" (bovarism)

until "wicked" took over

― even the birds in the trees seemed to whisper "get fucked" (bovarism)

both peak sophie aldred

Kate (rushomancy), Friday, 1 July 2022 20:10 (yesterday) link

I didn't even realize that was a UK thing; I thought it was a Boston/Maine thing, because I think I first encountered it in Jaws (the book) and then later in Stephen King.

New England.

Eavis Has Left the Building (Tom D.), Friday, 1 July 2022 20:20 (yesterday) link

wait there's a New England??

Andy the Grasshopper, Friday, 1 July 2022 20:26 (yesterday) link


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