once-common words people don’t use anymore

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suet

creosote

chilblains

Li'l Brexit (Tracer Hand), Friday, 16 April 2021 11:07 (three years ago) link

If your home has a chimney, you're gonna talk about creosote all the time.

peace, man, Friday, 16 April 2021 11:17 (three years ago) link

We were talking about chilblains a lot over the past two months (as in did the husband have chilblains or covid toe, we decided the latter). Was it ever really common though?

Scamp Granada (gyac), Friday, 16 April 2021 11:18 (three years ago) link

I still frequently buy lamb suet for making DUMPLINGS!

calzino, Friday, 16 April 2021 11:22 (three years ago) link

'Creosote' appears in a song by The Clientele that I have played a few times this week.

the pinefox, Friday, 16 April 2021 11:23 (three years ago) link

cor!

massaman gai (front tea for two), Friday, 16 April 2021 11:24 (three years ago) link

Suet is also common in bird feeders.

peace, man, Friday, 16 April 2021 11:24 (three years ago) link

I'm sorry, Tracer Hand, that we are working so hard to debunk your OP.

peace, man, Friday, 16 April 2021 11:25 (three years ago) link

I think I say 'Cor'.

the pinefox, Friday, 16 April 2021 13:17 (three years ago) link

desuetude

So who you gonna call? The martini police (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 16 April 2021 13:47 (three years ago) link

hwæt

Camaraderie at Arms Length, Friday, 16 April 2021 13:51 (three years ago) link

I still use 'hwæt'.

pomenitul, Friday, 16 April 2021 13:56 (three years ago) link

Cobblers

Authoritarian Steaks (Tom D.), Friday, 16 April 2021 14:00 (three years ago) link

hwæt, sôðe?

Camaraderie at Arms Length, Friday, 16 April 2021 14:02 (three years ago) link

There's probably somewhere in Derbyshire or somewhere where people still talk like that.

Authoritarian Steaks (Tom D.), Friday, 16 April 2021 14:05 (three years ago) link

Sóþsecgendlíce.

pomenitul, Friday, 16 April 2021 14:05 (three years ago) link

lol, I totally use suet, it's what you put in bird feeders.

Josh in Chicago, Friday, 16 April 2021 14:06 (three years ago) link

'Iceland' I think it's called.

2xp

pomenitul, Friday, 16 April 2021 14:06 (three years ago) link

flummadiddle

pomenitul, Friday, 16 April 2021 14:10 (three years ago) link

think West Frisian is supposed to be the closest extant dialect to Old English

Camaraderie at Arms Length, Friday, 16 April 2021 14:11 (three years ago) link

It is, but Icelandic is cooler. Besides, Frisian is also closest to modern English.

pomenitul, Friday, 16 April 2021 14:15 (three years ago) link

I buy suet once a year to make Christmas Pudding

mahb, Friday, 16 April 2021 15:00 (three years ago) link

if we're talking ilx, i would say RONG never gets used anymore

P-Zunit (Neanderthal), Friday, 16 April 2021 15:01 (three years ago) link

If you had searched for that, you would have found yourself to be incorrect.

peace, man, Friday, 16 April 2021 15:04 (three years ago) link

nobody was capitalizing it tho!

P-Zunit (Neanderthal), Friday, 16 April 2021 15:07 (three years ago) link

The girl group song 'Terry' features the line 'we had a quarrel, I was untrue on the night he died' and every time I hear it I wonder when 'quarrel' and 'untrue' (in that context) fell out of their once-popular use.

You Can't Have the Woogie Without a Little Boogie (Old Lunch), Friday, 16 April 2021 15:20 (three years ago) link

Eh?

Authoritarian Steaks (Tom D.), Friday, 16 April 2021 15:27 (three years ago) link

Tom D: I say 'cobblers' almost literally every day.

And I don't even work at an old-fashioned shoe repair shop.

the pinefox, Friday, 16 April 2021 15:29 (three years ago) link

(xp) Oh I get what you mean about the context for 'untrue', but I think it was old fashioned even then.

Authoritarian Steaks (Tom D.), Friday, 16 April 2021 15:29 (three years ago) link

Using pop culture as a yardstick, 'untrue' as an analogue of 'unfaithful' seems to have been in fairly regular usage in the '60s. I hear it pop up quite a bit in songs, movies, shows, etc. from that era but not really much thereafter.

You Can't Have the Woogie Without a Little Boogie (Old Lunch), Friday, 16 April 2021 15:36 (three years ago) link

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/6/64/BurialUntrue.jpg

pomenitul, Friday, 16 April 2021 15:38 (three years ago) link

Well, it's easy to rhyme, which can never be underestimated in song writing.

Authoritarian Steaks (Tom D.), Friday, 16 April 2021 15:40 (three years ago) link

Varlet

| (Latham Green), Friday, 16 April 2021 15:42 (three years ago) link

if we're talking ilx, i would say RONG never gets used anymore

I still use this. Does that make me a korny old fuxx0r?

It Is Dangerous to Meme Inside (James Redd and the Blecchs), Friday, 16 April 2021 15:46 (three years ago) link

you aren't hearing "shan't" much in the US these days, and "shall" only got a stay of execution from Gandalf

mark e. smith-moon (f. hazel), Friday, 16 April 2021 15:51 (three years ago) link

xpost it makes you vintage

P-Zunit (Neanderthal), Friday, 16 April 2021 15:53 (three years ago) link

When I was six it was very common for kids my age to say "keen" to mean cool, great, awesome. And then it seemed as if overnight everyone stopped saying it. (Absolutely nobody said "awesome" when I was six but by the time I was 14 everyone said it). Granted kids often have their own words, but some older people said "keen" also, I'm pretty sure of it.

Josefa, Friday, 16 April 2021 15:56 (three years ago) link

"Lumbago" was a pretty common term up to and throughout the 70's, to identify any sort of back pain. Archie Bunker and Fred G. Sanford were all over it! Seems like "sciatica" has taken its place.

henry s, Friday, 16 April 2021 15:59 (three years ago) link

The G. is for “grebt.”

It Is Dangerous to Meme Inside (James Redd and the Blecchs), Friday, 16 April 2021 16:00 (three years ago) link

does anybody say "kneeslapper" anymore

P-Zunit (Neanderthal), Friday, 16 April 2021 16:01 (three years ago) link

xp
a Canadianism I enjoy is "keener"

rob, Friday, 16 April 2021 16:02 (three years ago) link

xp to myself

I think it was lumbago that had George Jefferson walking on Bentley's back.

henry s, Friday, 16 April 2021 16:02 (three years ago) link

"Lumbago" was a pretty common term up to and throughout the 70's, to identify any sort of back pain. Archie Bunker and Fred G. Sanford were all over it! Seems like "sciatica" has taken its place.

cf the Small Faces, "Lazy Sunday"

Authoritarian Steaks (Tom D.), Friday, 16 April 2021 16:06 (three years ago) link

TIL that that line in "Lazy Sunday" is "How's old Bert's lumbago?"

Always thought it was "How's your bird's lumbago?"

Josefa, Friday, 16 April 2021 16:12 (three years ago) link

there are words people used to say in the playground a lot that were conflating being silly/stupid with being mentally handicapped. I don't really want to even say what they were, but it always amazes me that these words were common enough to be learned by children. I'm glad I don't hear them any more.

boxedjoy, Friday, 16 April 2021 16:44 (three years ago) link

xp to myself

I think it was lumbago that had George Jefferson walking on Bentley's back.

Tbh I wasn’t sure of the literal truth of the word being used on the shows you cited but appreciated the sentiment. It was true if only for the body language of those two characters.

It Is Dangerous to Meme Inside (James Redd and the Blecchs), Friday, 16 April 2021 16:47 (three years ago) link

TIL that that line in "Lazy Sunday" is "How's old Bert's lumbago?"

Always thought it was "How's your bird's lumbago?"

"How's yer Bert's lumbago?" surely?

Authoritarian Steaks (Tom D.), Friday, 16 April 2021 16:53 (three years ago) link

Hm it does sound slightly more like "your" than "old." I just went by some random lyric site... now I see there's another site that says it's "your old Bert's"!

Josefa, Friday, 16 April 2021 17:02 (three years ago) link

lumbago was a final jeopardy answer a few years ago and nobody got it. the clue: "Adding “P” to a word for a chronic back condition gets you this synonym for graphite or pencil lead". one of the contestants was a latin teacher.

milliner / millinery

wasdnuos (abanana), Friday, 16 April 2021 17:11 (three years ago) link

Never heard lumbago used in conversation but come across it all the time in medical coding.

A True White Kid that can Jump (Granny Dainger), Friday, 16 April 2021 17:41 (three years ago) link

Divided by a common insult.

Alba, Sunday, 17 July 2022 20:05 (two years ago) link

when I was a kid in the 80's someone reprimanded me for using "twat" told me it meant I was calling them a pregnant fish

calzino, Sunday, 17 July 2022 20:06 (two years ago) link

I think once you reach a certain age it’s harder to be a twerp. Elon Musk can still be a twerp and a twat. Kelvin MacKenzie is just a twat.

Alba, Sunday, 17 July 2022 20:08 (two years ago) link

I was told a prat was a pregnant fish.

Twerp definitely much gentler* than twat, and essentially floats free of any meaning beyond 'a bit of a wally' (see also 'numpty').

*certainly when deployed by my mum.

Shard-borne Beatles with their drowsy hums (Chinaski), Sunday, 17 July 2022 20:08 (two years ago) link

tubular (Also, do you live in a country other than France that uses a comma as a decimal point? Do you know how this difference came to be?)

youn, Sunday, 17 July 2022 20:58 (two years ago) link

Does anyone say full stop anymore or was that just from the age of telegrams?

youn, Sunday, 17 July 2022 21:23 (two years ago) link

I used "full stop" at the end of an article last week!

https://www.stereogum.com/2191562/baroness-yellow-and-green-turns-10/reviews/the-anniversary/

but also fuck you (unperson), Sunday, 17 July 2022 21:27 (two years ago) link

Always assumed”twunt” was an ilx portmaneau, but now words don’t “mean” anything

Warning: Choking Hazard (Hunt3r), Sunday, 17 July 2022 22:45 (two years ago) link

i think twunt might come from b3ta or possibly before that. it's not from ilx though, just general UK internet

full stop is just British for period so yes it's used all the time

even the birds in the trees seemed to whisper "get fucked" (bovarism), Sunday, 17 July 2022 22:52 (two years ago) link

maiden/maid (the latter for anything other than a housecleaner, and even for that becoming less common).

longtime caller, first time listener (man alive), Monday, 18 July 2022 00:34 (two years ago) link

You still hear maiden all the time if you're a cricket fan!

Tom D: I was in the army (Tom D.), Monday, 18 July 2022 07:01 (two years ago) link

don't forget about twit

Piggy Lepton (La Lechera), Monday, 18 July 2022 13:16 (two years ago) link

twit was roughly equivalent to dipshit afaik

Piggy Lepton (La Lechera), Monday, 18 July 2022 13:16 (two years ago) link

There were plenty of slang words for pudenda that I would've used as a teenager. Fanny, minge, radge, snatch, axe wound...anything but twat.

RIP quim

fetter, Monday, 18 July 2022 15:17 (two years ago) link

^^^ revived by the first Avengers movie in 2012!

Doctor Casino, Monday, 18 July 2022 15:19 (two years ago) link

three weeks pass...

https://trends.google.co.uk/trends/explore?date=all&q=facepalm

Noel Emits, Thursday, 11 August 2022 09:32 (one year ago) link

what happened to smdh. bring it back.

Daniel_Rf, Thursday, 11 August 2022 10:26 (one year ago) link

not come across a 429 error before. JUst got one there. So think I might need to start using an alternative to google.

Stevolende, Thursday, 11 August 2022 10:33 (one year ago) link

lmao still hanging on but rofl is in really bad shape these days, sad to see. when was the last time someone even roflmaoed?

I miss pmsl which I thought had real potential but afaict it never spread much beyond UK teens on bebo and myspace

I am very glad the cutesy internet speak of late 00s / early 10s (interwebs etc) seems to be almost extinct though because that shit got unbearable for a while

Left, Thursday, 11 August 2022 12:16 (one year ago) link

I was struck by this article a couple of days in the newspaper about a feud between George Best and Bobby Charlton:
https://www.theguardian.com/football/2022/aug/10/the-feud-between-best-and-charlton-that-shattered-manchester-united

Quoth Bobby, "so many young people on the ‘scene’ have the attitude that nearly everything and ordinary people are ‘sick’. They behave as if the peak of senility is reached at the age of 25 and they must wring every drop out of life by then whether they offend other people or not.” (Bobby) goes on to attack those who insist on being “cool”, “gas” and “with it”."

It's interesting how "sick" has come full circle.

Ashley Pomeroy, Thursday, 11 August 2022 18:38 (one year ago) link

Did people use "vouchsafe"? Shakespeare loves it.

Malevolent Arugula (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Thursday, 11 August 2022 18:40 (one year ago) link

Reminds me of a Proust translation where the literal "He did not respond" became "He vouchsafed no answer" in English.

Halfway there but for you, Thursday, 11 August 2022 19:27 (one year ago) link

six months pass...

“beetling” to mean looming, jutting up etc most commonly used with eyebrows but have also read it in conjunction with hills, cliffs

Tracer Hand, Sunday, 5 March 2023 18:20 (one year ago) link

Jordan Peterson seems to be the only person in the world who still says "up yours"

six months pass...

Not really the right thread but I couldn’t find a better one:

“Invincible” is pretty common word but in all my 43 years, despite being a big reader, I’ve never heard or seen the word “vincible” until today.

just1n3, Saturday, 9 September 2023 11:55 (ten months ago) link

nine months pass...

dasn’t

Humanitarian Pause (Tracer Hand), Tuesday, 25 June 2024 12:34 (three weeks ago) link

I love dasn’t, and talked about it on some other thread once. It was one of my grandma’s common admonishments.

The transparently flimsy and misleading (Dan Peterson), Tuesday, 25 June 2024 15:41 (three weeks ago) link

Never heard of it. What does it mean? How was it used?

Nasty, Brutish & Short, Tuesday, 25 June 2024 18:02 (three weeks ago) link

It’s a contraction of “dares not.” Grandma used to say, “you dasn’t do that!”

The transparently flimsy and misleading (Dan Peterson), Tuesday, 25 June 2024 18:34 (three weeks ago) link

oh! i spell it like dursn't

ppl do still say durst (if they're pretending to be gandalf)

mark s, Tuesday, 25 June 2024 18:40 (three weeks ago) link

or dissing Christina Aguilara

A So-Called Pulitzer price winner (President Keyes), Tuesday, 25 June 2024 18:42 (three weeks ago) link

time for an RIP Fetterman thread

A So-Called Pulitzer price winner (President Keyes), Tuesday, 25 June 2024 18:44 (three weeks ago) link

Dasn't is a contraction of dare not [...] "Ah," you say, "but where in the world does that s come from?" Well, for one thing, dare had an old past tense form durst (still occurring in some dialects), and a second person singular present-tense form darst, pronounced (dairst).

Kim Kimberly, Tuesday, 25 June 2024 18:50 (three weeks ago) link

'When you durst do it, then you were a man'.

I would prefer not to. (Chinaski), Tuesday, 25 June 2024 18:54 (three weeks ago) link

lady macbeth pretending to be gandalf (the core of her motivation IMO)

mark s, Tuesday, 25 June 2024 18:56 (three weeks ago) link

I remember that previous thread with the mentions of dasn't! It seems to me I spoke up about remembering seeing it in "Tom Sawyer" or "Huckleberry Finn"

Hongro Hongro Hippies (Myonga Vön Bontee), Tuesday, 25 June 2024 20:34 (three weeks ago) link

I don't hear about people getting "perturbed" anymore. I guess anything less than a seething rage isn't worth mentioning.

punning display, Saturday, 29 June 2024 00:38 (two weeks ago) link

Yeah, I can't remember the last time I was properly miffed...

m0stly clean (Slowsquatch), Saturday, 29 June 2024 01:00 (two weeks ago) link

I'm in a constant state of miffage

Andy the Grasshopper, Saturday, 29 June 2024 01:26 (two weeks ago) link

“There, there.”

Humanitarian Pause (Tracer Hand), Thursday, 4 July 2024 20:48 (two weeks ago) link

When I was a child, everyone knew what a chesterfield was.

It was on a accident (hardcore dilettante), Saturday, 6 July 2024 12:49 (one week ago) link

Contraband

your mom goes to limgrave (dog latin), Saturday, 6 July 2024 13:30 (one week ago) link

mien

koogs, Saturday, 6 July 2024 14:41 (one week ago) link

“Blow”

as in “scram”

Humanitarian Pause (Tracer Hand), Tuesday, 16 July 2024 11:55 (three days ago) link

"Jive" had a good 10-year run, from roughly '75 to '85.

henry s, Tuesday, 16 July 2024 13:14 (three days ago) link

I said perturbed today! I wasn't angry or irked, just concerned in a way that made me feel frustrated. Was I using this word incorrectly?

My contribution to the thread: any variation on "hey, what's the big idea?" or "what is this, a gag?"

Paul Ponzi, Tuesday, 16 July 2024 21:24 (three days ago) link

resolved to start saying "i daresay" instead of "i guess" or "i suppose"

donald wears yer troosers (doo rag), Tuesday, 16 July 2024 21:46 (three days ago) link

it's been a long, long time since I heard anyone called a wally.

This is Dance Anthems, have some respect (Camaraderie at Arms Length), Tuesday, 16 July 2024 21:48 (three days ago) link

also hoping for a chance to tell someone "you can shove it up your jacksie"

donald wears yer troosers (doo rag), Tuesday, 16 July 2024 21:51 (three days ago) link

gonna say that to the next wally i meet

donald wears yer troosers (doo rag), Tuesday, 16 July 2024 21:51 (three days ago) link


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