Noah Baumbach's Marriage Story

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https://deadline.com/2019/07/noah-baumbach-directed-marriage-story-set-as-new-york-film-festival-centerpiece-1202656947/

(Driver and Johannson's) “amicable” breakup devolves, one painful rash response and hostile counter-response at a time, into a legal battlefield, led on Nicole’s side by Laura Dern and on Charlie’s side by “nice” Alan Alda and “not-so-nice” Ray Liotta. Merritt Wever, Julie Hagerty and Azhy Robertson also star, the latter playing the son in the middle of the tug of war.

... (Eazy), Wednesday, 31 July 2019 19:07 (six months ago) link

sounds great

Οὖτις, Wednesday, 31 July 2019 19:15 (six months ago) link

Listened to Alda's podcast episode with Adam Driver a few weeks back and they were mentioning this. Didn't have a title yet!

Ned Raggett, Wednesday, 31 July 2019 19:17 (six months ago) link

gonna be a number of psychoanalyze-the-filmmaker pieces

a Mets fan who gave up on everything in the mid '80s (Dr Morbius), Wednesday, 31 July 2019 19:25 (six months ago) link

two months pass...

Very close to Baumbach's best. It avoids the commonplaces of the divorce picture: flashbacks kept to a minimum, Driver's Other Woman is a red herring; Baumbach coaxes ScarJo and Driver into delivering arias steeped in vengeance and foiled love.

Bouquets for the leads and Laura Dern (whose comic timing is exquisite), not enough chatter for Julie Hagerty as ScarJo's mom and an ailing Alan Alda (his Parkinson's is noticeable).

TikTok to the (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Sunday, 13 October 2019 21:30 (four months ago) link

Morbs, who has the hots for Driver, will dig his Sondheim rendition.

TikTok to the (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Sunday, 13 October 2019 21:31 (four months ago) link

Also: rather cool that the film, rare in America concerns process: the awful legal machinations and hefty price tags of modern divorce.

TikTok to the (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Sunday, 13 October 2019 21:32 (four months ago) link

three weeks pass...

The first act is pretty fitful, but after that I warmed up to it. Both leads earn their plaudits. My main reservation is it's (on the plot level) a Rich White People Problems story. (In some ways NB's most 'Woody Allen' movie, not that it's a simulation of one.)

Fair amount of laughs btw, and at MoMA Baumbach told the end of Alan Alda's "Italian vacation" joke, which I guess i'll post eventually. Laura Dern is very amusing playing a total pro of a c*** lawyer (as is Ray Liotta). I found the score annoying-on-the-verge-of-treacly, and was surprised to find it's Randy Newman. Maybe there's just too much of it.

I'm fairly excited that Adam Driver may be the leading male American movie star of the next decade. What an improvement on DiCaprio.

a Mets fan who gave up on everything in the mid '80s (Dr Morbius), Saturday, 9 November 2019 05:28 (three months ago) link

Hm this has me more intrigued than any of the other Baumbach sans Gerwig pictures, wonder if I’ll be able to see it

president of deluded fruitcakes anonymous (silby), Saturday, 9 November 2019 05:37 (three months ago) link

Why wouldn't you?

It's better than any Woody Allen picture I've seen in at least 35 years.

Trying to remember whom Liotta reminded me of, I realized it's every carbuncled, overfed lawyer I've seen advertising on TV.

TikTok to the (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 9 November 2019 11:52 (three months ago) link

Filmmaker Chad Hartigan thought of the Husbands and Wives era, and also commented on the class thing.

https://letterboxd.com/chad_hartigan/film/marriage-story-2019/

a Mets fan who gave up on everything in the mid '80s (Dr Morbius), Saturday, 9 November 2019 14:02 (three months ago) link

When the films are good and the filmmaker coaxes out new nuances like an Ozu or Rohmer, thematic repetitions don't bother me much.

You know what I think of H&W!

TikTok to the (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 9 November 2019 14:14 (three months ago) link

Once the very limited theatrical release in big cities is over on December 6, isn't everyone who doesn't have Netflix outta luck on this?

I hate this streaming-elitist media environment.

a Mets fan who gave up on everything in the mid '80s (Dr Morbius), Saturday, 9 November 2019 14:17 (three months ago) link

It's better than any Woody Allen picture I've seen in at least 35 years.

There but for the grace of Bullets Over Broadway.

temporarily embarrassed thousandaire (Eric H.), Saturday, 9 November 2019 14:37 (three months ago) link

Don't speak!

TikTok to the (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 9 November 2019 14:45 (three months ago) link

but for the screeching of Jennifer Tilly xp

a Mets fan who gave up on everything in the mid '80s (Dr Morbius), Saturday, 9 November 2019 14:46 (three months ago) link

Oh, Merritt Wever is in this? Extra sold!

temporarily embarrassed thousandaire (Eric H.), Tuesday, 12 November 2019 20:15 (three months ago) link

Well, for about 6-7 minutes? Don't know her TV stuff, but very funny, as is the actress who plays the Evaluator.

N.B. joked that he reverse-engineered the whole movie so Adam could sing "Being Alive." Apparently they discuss Company often.

btw people marry and/or shack up to save money kthxbye

a Mets fan who gave up on everything in the mid '80s (Dr Morbius), Tuesday, 12 November 2019 21:54 (three months ago) link

Only slightly mourning the Company movie that didn’t come to pass.

temporarily embarrassed thousandaire (Eric H.), Tuesday, 12 November 2019 22:36 (three months ago) link

btw people marry and/or shack up to save money kthxbye

― a Mets fan who gave up on everything in the mid '80s (Dr Morbius),

Which explains why Ira Sachs' Love is Strange is one of the wisest of recent films.

TikTok to the (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Tuesday, 12 November 2019 22:40 (three months ago) link

https://youtu.be/FX32wicAYaI

temporarily embarrassed thousandaire (Eric H.), Tuesday, 12 November 2019 23:16 (three months ago) link

Saw this today. I liked it a lot (his best since Squid for sure), but it was a much less "balanced" telling than the marketing suggested. It felt to me very much like Driver's movie and, outside of the opening 15 minutes or so, it's largely told from his character's POV - and when it does switch over to ScarJo's side it's for broader stuff like Dern's Mary rant. (Not a complaint, exactly, just an observation.) Supporting performances all great.

The "Being Alive" scene is indeed quite something. I'm now extra excited for the Carax/Sparks Driver/Cotillard musical.

Simon H., Saturday, 23 November 2019 07:00 (three months ago) link

I don't get Baumbach at all, but this was indeed really good. I don't think it's balanced, in that it's definitely Driver's story - ScarJo knows what she wants from the start, already has most of it, knows how to get the rest, Driver has a thing to go through - but it's balanced in that it's not just complaining about the ex.

Frederik B, Saturday, 23 November 2019 09:57 (three months ago) link

Yeah, I just think the "his and hers" trailers/posters might lead people to expect otherwise. But that's not on the movie itself, really.

Simon H., Saturday, 23 November 2019 10:16 (three months ago) link

otm. I was a bit surprised as well, definitely.

Frederik B, Saturday, 23 November 2019 10:29 (three months ago) link

I don't have a non shitty link handy but the NYT op ed unfavourably comparing this to Kramer vs Kramer depressed me, and not in the intended fashion

Simon H., Saturday, 23 November 2019 10:41 (three months ago) link

Now, Kramer vs Kramer, that's a film that good use a bit more balance.

Frederik B, Saturday, 23 November 2019 10:57 (three months ago) link

Yeah the vilification of Streep in that is v harsh

Οὖτις, Saturday, 23 November 2019 14:18 (three months ago) link

saw a preview for this when I went to see the irishman, also a fair bit on it in the recent driver NYer profile, definitely plan to see it

k3vin k., Saturday, 23 November 2019 18:22 (three months ago) link

Thought this was good, although--I experience this a lot nowadays--I was just watching it without really feeling anything until the very end (Driver reading Johansson's letter was the one time I found it genuinely moving). Didn't know what to make of their cathartic, Virginia Wolf-like meltdown argument. (Unmarried me to my married friend: "Is this the kind of stuff you people suppress?"). Performances were good, the lawyers especially--and Alda especially especially. I hope he gets lots of year-end recognition. If I empathized with anything, it was Driver's exasperation with being caught in a web of illogic--I've been experiencing a lot of that lately in a different context, trying to sort out moving-related stuff with various companies. (Like the company where I can't access my e-mail account to check a bill, so they send me an access code to the very e-mail account I can't access. It's maddening.) I don't think it's as good as Kramer, but it's good enough that I want to rewatch that for the first time in years to be sure. The kid reminded me of Danny from The Shining. Didn't find him all that compelling, certainly as compared to the kid in Kramer.

clemenza, Friday, 29 November 2019 15:29 (two months ago) link

I said Virginia Wolf--I think I meant Vivica Fox.

clemenza, Friday, 29 November 2019 19:38 (two months ago) link

Also: rather cool that the film, rare in America concerns /process/: the awful legal machinations and hefty price tags of modern divorce.


How expensive? Here it can be exceptionally cheap. (1000 euros?)

Not going to watch this. Too triggering.

nathom, Friday, 29 November 2019 20:04 (two months ago) link

I don't have a non shitty link handy but the NYT op ed unfavourably comparing this to Kramer vs Kramer depressed me, and not in the intended fashion

― Simon H., Saturday, November 23, 2019 2:41 AM (six days ago) bookmarkflaglink

A 40-year-old movie proves more progressive about relationships than one from 2019.

This essay includes spoilers for “Marriage Story.”

In Noah Baumbach’s film “Marriage Story,” Nicole (Scarlett Johansson) explains to her divorce lawyer, Nora (Laura Dern), why she’s ending her marriage.

In the early stages of their relationship, Nicole abandoned an acting career in Hollywood to move to New York City with her husband, Charlie, an up-and-coming director, and star in his theater productions. She feels that the contributions from Charlie (Adam Driver) haven’t been equal. As his career ascended, she felt “smaller,” and he refused to support her desire to eventually move back to Los Angeles so she could be closer to her family and return to screen acting.

“It would be strange if he turned to me and said, ‘What do you want to do today?’” Nicole tells Nora.

“Marriage Story” depicts the couple’s dissolution as a bitter, emotional battle with yelling, tears and many monologues. Nicole moves back to Los Angeles with their 8-year-old son to shoot a TV pilot, and a bicoastal custody fight ensues. It’s less a film about one particular divorce and more a commentary on divorce itself. And in keeping with our era, a gender imbalance is the main topic of both conversation and controversy, and seems to be the main reason for Nicole and Charlie’s split.

“The idea of a good father was created, like, 30 years ago,” Nora declares as she preps Nicole for an interview with the case worker who will observe her and her son at home. Even so, Nora continues, society still sets impossibly high expectations for mothers while fathers get away with making mistakes and doing as little as possible. Perhaps unintentionally, “Marriage Story” reinforces that double standard: As a parent, Nicole is more present and attentive than Charlie, who is too wrapped up in his own grandiose artistic vision to consider the lives and perspectives of others — yet by the end of the film, Charlie hasn’t been forced to acknowledge his neglect as a husband or father.

Back in 1979, a good 10 years before Nora’s estimated emergence of the hands-on “good father” narrative, there was a film that critiqued culture’s archaic concept of the father as a stoic provider: Robert Benton’s divorce drama “Kramer vs. Kramer.” As Ted Kramer, Dustin Hoffman portrays a parent who learns from his mistakes and grows emotionally.

This new kind of father wasn’t created in a vacuum. Ted’s journey begins with his wife, Joanna (Meryl Streep), rejecting him and the gender divide within their marriage — she feels suffocated by her role as a wife and mother, and exhibits signs of extreme depression. As she stands in the hallway outside their apartment, she begs him not to stop her from leaving. “Don’t make me go in there,” she says. “If you do, I swear one day next week, maybe next year, I don’t know, I’ll go right out the window.”

Once Joanna is gone, Ted is forced to perform all the tasks he previously left to his wife. As he juggles child care and his career, he learns that parenting is, in fact, a full-time job.

One day, Ted is late to pick up his son, Billy, which leads to a tantrum. “All the other mothers were there before you,” Billy says while glaring at his father. Ted is softened by the outburst. He starts to take his parenting duties more seriously and finds himself bonding with another parent who was left by her spouse.

Chastened after yet another tantrum, Ted opens up to Billy about his shortcomings as a husband and father: “I think the reason Mommy left is because for a long time now I kept trying to make her be a certain kind of person, Billy, a certain kind of wife I thought she was supposed to be. And she just wasn’t like that.” Ted goes on to explain that he didn’t listen to her when she tried to talk about their problems because he was “too wrapped up” in thinking about himself.

Charlie exhibits no such self-reflection in “Marriage Story.” During one blistering argument, Nicole tries but fails to get him to acknowledge his neglect; it’s heartbreaking to watch her explain to Charlie how he steam-rolled her into staying in New York away from her family and the Hollywood career she desperately wanted to continue to pursue. It’s even sadder to watch as her mother and sister, who don’t understand why she’s leaving Charlie, encourage her to stay with him.

Nora is the only one in Nicole’s corner, pointing out her client’s contributions to Charlie’s work and her involvement as a parent. Nora acts as a cheerleader, reminding Nicole of her worth whenever she expresses doubt over Nora’s cutthroat methods. As Nora, Ms. Dern seems to delight in the opportunity to highlight the hypocrisy of men and their continued adherence to a sexist, classically heteronormative worldview.

But the director, Mr. Baumbach, casts Nora’s point of view in a harsh light, with her feminist speeches framed like villain monologues. In the last act of the film, Nora announces that she cut a deal with Charlie’s lawyers that gives Nicole custody 55 percent of the time whenever Charlie is visiting Los Angeles. “I didn’t want him to be able to say he got 50-50,” she says, gloating.

Even though “Marriage Story” is ostensibly on Nicole’s side, she isn’t given the same sympathy-churning emotional beats afforded to her ex-husband. Charlie never apologizes for his behavior, though he does perform “Being Alive,” from the Stephen Sondheim musical “Company.” In the show, the song finds the lead character at first rejecting commitment, but soon realizing that everything that makes a relationship challenging can also be fulfilling. Mr. Driver’s performance of the song is stirring, but its context feels unearned.

This isn’t surprising, considering Mr. Baumbach also made “The Squid and the Whale,” which also has a hard time humanizing its ex-wife character (played by Laura Linney). And if we look elsewhere in cinematic history, we can find many examples of women leaving their husbands and being depicted as cold for doing so: Francis Ford Coppola’s “The Rain People”; Woody Allen’s “Manhattan”; Danny DeVito’s dark comedy “The War of the Roses,” in which the wife’s desperate desire for independence is exhibited as a homicidal hatred for her controlling husband.

It can be disheartening to watch these tropes play out over and over again without filmmakers seriously reflecting on the men’s treatment of their spouses. That’s part of what makes “Kramer vs. Kramer” endure all these years later — it imagines a male character who learns to grow and recognizes the part he played in the dissolution of his marriage. Notably, Meryl Streep said she pushed for more nuance and sympathy for her character in the script, while dealing with on-set harassment from Mr. Hoffman, who unexpectedly slapped her before a scene.

That film’s troubling back story hews closely to the struggle of Nicole in “Marriage Story”: a woman fighting for autonomy under the watchful eye of a celebrated male artist in an industry that celebrates his volatility. In 2019, Mr. Baumbach’s meditationserves as a reminder of how little has changed for women, on and off screen.

Jourdain Searles (@jourdayen) is a writer and performer.

#FBPIRA (jim in vancouver), Friday, 29 November 2019 20:52 (two months ago) link

i kinda hate Baumbach's mannered fatuous style but i suppose i'll give this a try based on the strength of the casting.

Fuck the NRA (ulysses), Friday, 29 November 2019 20:55 (two months ago) link

I don't like Baumbach's film as a whole very much, but at least he seems to hate the father figure. The Squid and the Whale seemed a full on attack on the husband, and The Meyerowitz Stories kinda followed it up years later. I don't really get the argument, except that it's true his male characters often are too narcissistic to grow and reflect on what they've done.

Frederik B, Friday, 29 November 2019 22:39 (two months ago) link

Didn't know what to make of their cathartic, Virginia Woolf-like meltdown argument. (Unmarried me to my married friend: "Is this the kind of stuff you people suppress?")

Maybe it's different in Canada, but a sizable minority of the 'happily married' couples I've known have fought like dogs in front of me. Part of the charm of mating.

a Mets fan who gave up on everything in the mid '80s (Dr Morbius), Saturday, 30 November 2019 22:00 (two months ago) link

Lol that NYT piece is bullshit re: Kramer vs. Kramer - it’s more progressive because it makes Meryl Streep out to be the selfish, self-absorbed and absent parent? Wtf

Οὖτις, Saturday, 30 November 2019 22:08 (two months ago) link

(xpost) Obviously I've witnessed lots of marital sniping, among friends and, growing up, from my parents. I remember a friend and his wife visiting once where the back-and-forth was particularly unrelenting up-down/black-white one-upmanship. But Driver really takes it to another level towards the end of their big argument here. (They're alone, mind you, not arguing in front of other people.)

clemenza, Sunday, 1 December 2019 13:51 (two months ago) link

well it's more fraught than most of the other circumstances we're discussing

a Mets fan who gave up on everything in the mid '80s (Dr Morbius), Sunday, 1 December 2019 15:04 (two months ago) link

I added this to my queue but after watching the trailer it seems like it's going to be really stressful and annoying to watch. And I hate to be shallow but I am hoping there is a reason for Scarlett's terrible hair in the movie. I do love Merritt Wever though.

Yerac, Monday, 9 December 2019 14:58 (two months ago) link

what reason would satisfy you

johnny crunch, Monday, 9 December 2019 19:04 (two months ago) link

Awful

flappy bird, Monday, 9 December 2019 19:10 (two months ago) link

colin jost's mom gave her a welcome to Staten Island haircut before filming? xpost

Yerac, Monday, 9 December 2019 19:11 (two months ago) link

moralism is kinda silly to use on Baumbach and not, say, Bergman, who wasn't unimpeachably noble toward his women in his life

a Mets fan who gave up on everything in the mid '80s (Dr Morbius), Monday, 9 December 2019 19:12 (two months ago) link

i'm less concerned by the moralism and more by the navel-gazing and woe-is-me rich white guy meanderings. great actors help but you better have a REALLY good script and i don't think baumbach generally does much better than okay.

Fuck the NRA (ulysses), Monday, 9 December 2019 19:14 (two months ago) link

this was better than OK. It's true he tends to make films about well-off artists, that's whatcha get.

then again i thought Meyerowitz had a sterling Sandler performance.

a Mets fan who gave up on everything in the mid '80s (Dr Morbius), Monday, 9 December 2019 19:16 (two months ago) link

(and a family w/ members at differing levels of financial/professional security)

a Mets fan who gave up on everything in the mid '80s (Dr Morbius), Monday, 9 December 2019 19:16 (two months ago) link

Well-off artists are his bread and butter. It would be weird to see him make a movie about people who are genuinely struggling to get by and I doubt it'd be any good. (The solution of course is to let more working-class ppl make movies that get distributed, but good luck with that.)

Simon H., Monday, 9 December 2019 19:21 (two months ago) link

my issue is the writing as well- the movie is so jejune and MOR in its content & conclusions, coming from a guy whose personal life is way more fucked up and interesting. I just think it's a cowardly film, especially seeing it a week after Shia LaBeouf's Honey Boy, which isn't entirely successful, but it's much more interesting and unique and affecting, and really fucking brave.

flappy bird, Monday, 9 December 2019 19:26 (two months ago) link

I haven't seen Honey Boy yet but I don't really buy the autobiographical readings this movie is getting

Simon H., Monday, 9 December 2019 19:28 (two months ago) link

also: the way Baumbach choreographs the kitchen scene in which ScarJo's sister is supposed to serve him.

― TikTok to the (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Tuesday, December 10, 2019 7:41 AM (five minutes ago) bookmarkflaglink

this is SO good

american bradass (BradNelson), Tuesday, 10 December 2019 14:47 (two months ago) link

honestly I could have used more of everyone in this movie who wasn't ScarJo/Driver

Simon H., Tuesday, 10 December 2019 14:49 (two months ago) link

really any scene with Julie Hagerty, whose comic style depends on a hyper-posed airheadedness.

TikTok to the (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Tuesday, 10 December 2019 14:50 (two months ago) link

one of the strongest supporting casts i can think of

american bradass (BradNelson), Tuesday, 10 December 2019 15:01 (two months ago) link

the actual camerawork and staging was great, and yeah I agree the whole ensemble is great

I saw it at a theater

flappy bird, Tuesday, 10 December 2019 19:08 (two months ago) link

btw i would like to disagree thoroughly with the idea that this movie is an exculpation of the bad behavior of the dude. absolutely not

american bradass (BradNelson), Tuesday, 10 December 2019 21:28 (two months ago) link

I think it would be really funny to go on Twitter and yell at this movie for being "MRA propaganda"

The Mandymoorian (Whiney G. Weingarten), Tuesday, 10 December 2019 21:29 (two months ago) link

I loved that Alan Alda said the system was stacked against the father, but that was as it should be, because it was to protect mistreated women. Had that scene been mishandled, yeah, it's MRA propaganda.

Frederik B, Tuesday, 10 December 2019 21:33 (two months ago) link

yeah I don't think it is either, it's not specific enough. he's made movies about divorce, he's familiar with the material.

thinking more about it, I keep coming back to Wiseman. the thoroughness in showing each step of the process reminded me of Juvenile Court, Public Housing, some others... Baumbach isn't for me but I feel better about this movie now, I think there's more going for it than I initially thought.

xxp

flappy bird, Tuesday, 10 December 2019 23:32 (two months ago) link

Can only imagine the eureka moment when someone thought of that Serious Moonlight costume.

... (Eazy), Wednesday, 11 December 2019 03:38 (two months ago) link

this was good, alternately funny and moving, cast is uniformly excellent and keeps things interesting. Plot was kind of inert and I kept thinking Driver was too young for the role (which is odd given that ScarJo is the same age, I guess she's just been around longer and I assumed she was older). Visually it's workmanlike, as is par for the course with Baumbach. Didn't strike me as a departure or exceptional - there's other stuff of his I found more engaging (Frances Ha, While We're Young, Greenberg, Squid and the Whale) - but at least he's consistent and I get why ppl/critics are grateful for a guy that just makes regular movies about adults adulting.

Οὖτις, Wednesday, 11 December 2019 16:30 (two months ago) link

*Shakey wanders to microwave with lunch*

TikTok to the (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Wednesday, 11 December 2019 16:32 (two months ago) link

I admit I wanted to know the punchline to Alda's joek

Οὖτις, Wednesday, 11 December 2019 16:35 (two months ago) link

https://decider.com/2019/12/09/alan-alda-joke-marriage-story/

Simon H., Wednesday, 11 December 2019 16:37 (two months ago) link

not a full enough version imho (ie, "it was great, the hotel renovation was done...")

a Mets fan who gave up on everything in the mid '80s (Dr Morbius), Wednesday, 11 December 2019 16:40 (two months ago) link

It’s a good joke!

Fuck the NRA (ulysses), Wednesday, 11 December 2019 16:46 (two months ago) link

definitely worth paying legal fees for imo

Οὖτις, Wednesday, 11 December 2019 16:50 (two months ago) link

it's kind of indulgent in the movie cuz it's unfinished AND I don't see how it applies to the Driver character

a Mets fan who gave up on everything in the mid '80s (Dr Morbius), Wednesday, 11 December 2019 16:53 (two months ago) link

joke + ticking clock is probably my favorite scene in the movie

alda and driver play wonderfully off of each other

american bradass (BradNelson), Wednesday, 11 December 2019 17:01 (two months ago) link

it's kind of indulgent in the movie cuz it's unfinished AND I don't see how it applies to the Driver character

― a Mets fan who gave up on everything in the mid '80s (Dr Morbius

That's the point, though? We've all been in scenarios with inapposite jokes told by people trying to make us comfortable.

TikTok to the (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Wednesday, 11 December 2019 17:03 (two months ago) link

the goy? who cares!

Οὖτις, Wednesday, 11 December 2019 17:05 (two months ago) link

but yeah the point is that Alda is wasting Driver's time by being diversionary

Οὖτις, Wednesday, 11 December 2019 17:06 (two months ago) link

well yes, go for shark Liotta

The real problem with MARRIAGE STORY discourse is this is the first Ray Liotta meme I've seen and the only memes I want to see from this movie are Ray Liotta memes. https://t.co/1rbSiFcNSr

— Peter Labuza (@labuzamovies) December 11, 2019

a Mets fan who gave up on everything in the mid '80s (Dr Morbius), Wednesday, 11 December 2019 17:14 (two months ago) link

I know Liotta's not looking fit lately, but, boy, are the ruddy face, choice of ties, and bludgeoning voice perfect for this kind of showboating fraud (who happens to be very good at his job).

TikTok to the (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Wednesday, 11 December 2019 17:15 (two months ago) link

Sometimes it’s nice to be indulgent in movies

The Mandymoorian (Whiney G. Weingarten), Wednesday, 11 December 2019 17:16 (two months ago) link

i don't disagree

a Mets fan who gave up on everything in the mid '80s (Dr Morbius), Wednesday, 11 December 2019 17:18 (two months ago) link

this was excellent. that fight! Adam Driver's singing scene!

akm, Wednesday, 11 December 2019 22:59 (two months ago) link

I liked this too! (although the Driver drywall scene should've gone in a different direction, agreed.)

xpost I also thought the lighting and color was weird. It looked like it was shot in a Gap dressing room.

Yerac, Thursday, 12 December 2019 02:36 (two months ago) link

the discourse around this movie is fuckin excruciating

american bradass (BradNelson), Thursday, 12 December 2019 21:40 (two months ago) link

No part of the discourse has prepared me for everyone binge watching a Noah Baumbach movie IMMEDIATELY and then making memes about it like it’s the Avengers disintegration scene or something

The Mandymoorian (Whiney G. Weingarten), Thursday, 12 December 2019 23:17 (two months ago) link

where are you seeing the memes

TikTok to the (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Thursday, 12 December 2019 23:18 (two months ago) link

Twitter

The Mandymoorian (Whiney G. Weingarten), Thursday, 12 December 2019 23:19 (two months ago) link

It maybe drives home the sad point that people on/around media and/or weird twitter are often too lazy or don’t make enough money to look at anything that isn’t on Netflix

The Mandymoorian (Whiney G. Weingarten), Thursday, 12 December 2019 23:23 (two months ago) link

I think we've identified the source of your problem

Οὖτις, Thursday, 12 December 2019 23:23 (two months ago) link

is there a meme around the scene where Wallace Shawn seems to say he got a beej from Streep?

a Mets fan who gave up on everything in the mid '80s (Dr Morbius), Thursday, 12 December 2019 23:27 (two months ago) link

Yes!

WmC, Thursday, 12 December 2019 23:36 (two months ago) link

(not really)

WmC, Thursday, 12 December 2019 23:36 (two months ago) link

wallace shawn was my favorite character in this

akm, Friday, 13 December 2019 00:46 (two months ago) link

I watch almost everything on netflix because it's the only service I have. I guess I would have to pick "lazy".

The serving scene was my favorite too. There was such an ease with all the actors.

Yerac, Friday, 13 December 2019 01:11 (two months ago) link

xps I thought he said 4 time Oscar winner in that scene (though I’d have to go back and check) - which would mean it was K Hepburn, not Streep.

monotony, Saturday, 14 December 2019 12:33 (two months ago) link

even stranger

a Mets fan who gave up on everything in the mid '80s (Dr Morbius), Saturday, 14 December 2019 14:15 (two months ago) link

two weeks pass...

Wouldn't put this on a year end list or anything but I liked it fine. Worst thing I can say about it is I thought Scarlett Johansson had some super clunky acting moments, and just generally seemed really not up to a lot of the demands of this kind of really talky material. Particularly stood out for me in her monologue in Laura Dern's office, which played like an awkward rehearsal, she seemed really at sea. Maybe the years she's spent doing superhero stuff have left her rusty w/r/t the demands of this kind of material.

Thought the big fight scene was definitely affected in that predictable Method-y way but it still worked for me within the film. Wouldn't have been as kind to Driver's song - great song, great singing, but no idea why the movie had to come to a full stop for him to sing it, especially after we'd already crossed the 2-hour mark.

warn me about a lurking rake (One Eye Open), Monday, 30 December 2019 16:17 (one month ago) link

Also I am ready for movies to find a different way of signaling that characters are smart & talented in a creative field than having them get a macarthur grant.

warn me about a lurking rake (One Eye Open), Monday, 30 December 2019 16:19 (one month ago) link

we have different definitions of "a full stop"

a Mets fan who gave up on everything in the mid '80s (Dr Morbius), Monday, 30 December 2019 16:25 (one month ago) link

Wondering what made you feel that way about the Laura Dern office monologue scene.

Evan, Monday, 30 December 2019 16:28 (one month ago) link

Monologues definitely happen when unhappy people finally have someone who is listening to them. Nothing felt false or out of place there to me. It might have sounded like an awkward rehearsal because it was -- Nicole's been writing these lines and this is her first table read.

Miami weisse (WmC), Monday, 30 December 2019 16:32 (one month ago) link

the character herself is at sea. scarjo turned in a credible performance throughout imo, i didn’t once think “wow scarjo is trying really hard,” i just kept thinking about nicole

american bradass (BradNelson), Monday, 30 December 2019 16:52 (one month ago) link

The scene itself as-written made sense and was fine imo, I just feel like Johansson didn’t stick the landing. It’s written as a really stagy technically demanding huge chunk of dialogue, and requires her to naturalistically do a lot of these deceptively hard actor-tricks, having stuff pop into her head, getting caught off guard by emotions that are appearing unexpectedly, having it look real while also making sure she’s getting across what is basically exposition, while also getting through this huge mouthful of articulate dialogue. I think she’s really good and but i just didn’t think she was 100% up to it, I could see her grinding her gears & felt like I was just kind of watching an actress really energetically recite a whole bunch of lines. Ymmv though

warn me about a lurking rake (One Eye Open), Monday, 30 December 2019 16:56 (one month ago) link

I don't think it's a 100% "maturalistic" film.

a Mets fan who gave up on everything in the mid '80s (Dr Morbius), Monday, 30 December 2019 17:04 (one month ago) link

yeah i feel that. like i said, didn't ruin the movie or anything but couldn't help but notice it. Driver's chops as a stage actor really stood out in comparison imo.

Now that I'm thinking about it, realizing that's her biggest scene without Driver - they def elevate each other in their scenes together.

warn me about a lurking rake (One Eye Open), Monday, 30 December 2019 17:11 (one month ago) link


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