Impeach Trump Y/N

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Impeach Trump? or not?

Poll Results

OptionVotes
Yes, it is a priority 34
Sure, but other things are more important 13
I guess, whatever 13
No, its counter-productive 12


anvil, Saturday, 19 January 2019 08:52 (one year ago) link

Sure. But don't stop there.

resident hack (Simon H.), Saturday, 19 January 2019 08:56 (one year ago) link

Absolutely. If only because it would deal a massive blow to the GOP.

pomenitul, Saturday, 19 January 2019 10:12 (one year ago) link

No, it would be an absolute waste of time and 50/50 that it backfires when he isn't convicted - "See, folks, it was just a witch hunt, the Senate cleared me of everything. Everything!"

Two straight years of impeding him and investigation by the House is more useful.

louise ck (milo z), Saturday, 19 January 2019 10:40 (one year ago) link

I assume there can be no impeachment without a conviction, since the GOP needs to be on board as well, no? But I'm hardly an expert in these matters.

pomenitul, Saturday, 19 January 2019 10:50 (one year ago) link

"See, folks, it was just a witch hunt, the Senate cleared me of everything. Everything!"

Isn't it either that or "See, folks, it was just a witch hunt, 10,001 Angry Democrats wasting your money for years and no charges brought against me!"

Fuck a Pence though

nashwan, Saturday, 19 January 2019 11:42 (one year ago) link

If by 'impeach' you mean 'sew his asshole closed and keep feeding him and feeding him and feeding him' then I offer an enthusiastic yes.

A Nugatory Excrescence (Old Lunch), Saturday, 19 January 2019 13:35 (one year ago) link

Impeach Cobbler Y/N

have you ever seen a VONC's tears? (Noodle Vague), Saturday, 19 January 2019 13:36 (one year ago) link

it only backfired on the Repubs in the 90s because Kenneth Starr veered so far from his original purpose, it looked like he was 'hunting'.

the idea that we should wait 2 years while Trump's decisions harm actual living people rather than at least trying to hold him accountable, no matter how unlikely the success, seems off-putting to me.

It'd go to trial in the Senate after it easily passed the House, it isn't like it'd be over in 5 minutes with a Nelson "ha-ha!" laugh.

fuck the NRA (Neanderthal), Saturday, 19 January 2019 14:14 (one year ago) link

thank you for making "i guess, whatever" an option

democracy is a sham, who cares about another fucking piece of political theater

The Elvis of Nationalism and Amoral Patriotism (rushomancy), Saturday, 19 January 2019 14:36 (one year ago) link

I've always liked Derrida's notion that, for all its flaws, democracy is always yet to come because it is perfectible, which can't really be said for other systems of government.

pomenitul, Saturday, 19 January 2019 14:47 (one year ago) link

We should of course impeach the fascist president who committed—at the very least—federal campaign finance violations. What kind of precedent does it set to not start proceedings after all the pain he’s caused?

Trϵϵship, Saturday, 19 January 2019 14:49 (one year ago) link

Pence is a secondary concern, you deal with that when it comes up. The principle has to be that a person like Trump can’t use our system of government as a toy.

Trϵϵship, Saturday, 19 January 2019 14:50 (one year ago) link

the perfectibility of democracy is one of its greatest flaws imo, it leads those committed to the ideology to mentally swap out the reality for the idealized form. it encourages delusion.

The Elvis of Nationalism and Amoral Patriotism (rushomancy), Saturday, 19 January 2019 14:50 (one year ago) link

for the record "what kind of precedent does it set?" is pretty much the exact argument people used to _oppose_ nixon's impeachment

the "precedent" argument is inextricable from political theater. political theater will always be necessary and i'm not arguing against it, only that i'm not personally invested in what sort of puppet shows the plutocrats put on but in the underlying reality it's increasingly poorly masking.

The Elvis of Nationalism and Amoral Patriotism (rushomancy), Saturday, 19 January 2019 14:53 (one year ago) link

There is even more delusion involved in dictatorships, for example, if only as a coping mechanism.

xp

pomenitul, Saturday, 19 January 2019 14:55 (one year ago) link

yeah you make a good point. i frankly don't understand most of derrida, but is the idea that most forms of government present themselves as already perfect, divinely ordained, and the strength of democracy is that it isn't? it's an interesting argument but i've never known a form of democracy that didn't present itself as already perfect and divinely ordained.

The Elvis of Nationalism and Amoral Patriotism (rushomancy), Saturday, 19 January 2019 15:10 (one year ago) link

If the Republican senate wasn't brainwashed into following his every whim I would think it was inevitable and necessary to impeach an active criminal in the White House. Not sure if that is giving them anywhere near enough accountability for their own actions but can't really see what's in it for them in the long run otherwise.

Am hoping this is a last conservative stand before inevitable diversity increase. & i can't see how it can be sustained in their favour.

Would love to see this guy stripped of all power and having to face up to the results of his own actions.
But until you can get that Senate majority it might just backfire and lead to a further 4 years of continual nightmare and this time with him feeling even more confident in whatever whim being followed.
Hoping for a return to sanity and the current incumbency going down in history as a warning, not a guideline for what can be got away with if you just tidy it up a little.

Stevolende, Saturday, 19 January 2019 15:12 (one year ago) link

I don’t know what the outcome of impeaching him and having him not convicted in the senate would be. That way of thinking seems too consequentialist though—if he committed crimes he shouldn’t have his office, it’s the right thing to do.

Trϵϵship, Saturday, 19 January 2019 15:18 (one year ago) link

stevolende, it's not a matter of "return to a senate majority" - impeachment requires a _supermajority_ the sort of which would require at least some senate republicans to abandon the president. impeachment at this point would not be aimed at a conviction, but it would be a sort of public show trial aimed at breaking the wall of inflexible and dogmatic support for the president (about, as best as we can estimate, 40% of the american people). if republican support for the president diminishes to the point where voting for removal _isn't_ a threat to the electoral prospects of republican senators, they will flip on him, as they obviously have no moral principles or backbone whatsoever. this could work or it could not - nothing that's been tried to this point, obviously, has had any lasting effect.

my personal belief is that the idea we can "return to normalcy" from this point is a liberal fantasy and that globalist capitalist democracy is essentially finished, though i guess anything's possible. i'm mostly waiting it out to see what comes next.

The Elvis of Nationalism and Amoral Patriotism (rushomancy), Saturday, 19 January 2019 15:27 (one year ago) link

is the idea that most forms of government present themselves as already perfect, divinely ordained, and the strength of democracy is that it isn't?

Yeah, that's how I interpret it. 'Perfectible' implies that it's never quite perfect, i.e. it's always in the process of seeking perfection, whereas autocraties claim to have achieved it already. You're right, though, that democracy is often taken, in the Western collective unconscious, to be definitive in and of itself, but this line of argumentation is perhaps a trick used by reactionary forces – they deliberately conflate the status quo with democracy, as though it were impossible to change the former while preserving the latter. Sorry if this comes across as muddled – it's not a topic I'm too familiar with.

pomenitul, Saturday, 19 January 2019 15:28 (one year ago) link

You think this idiot destroyed global capitalist democracy?

Trϵϵship, Saturday, 19 January 2019 15:29 (one year ago) link

More like a marker along the road of it's decay

Tho I suspect it's more like a balloon that will inflate and deflate many times, possibly with a burst at the end

have you ever seen a VONC's tears? (Noodle Vague), Saturday, 19 January 2019 15:32 (one year ago) link

Yeah, that makes more sense

Trϵϵship, Saturday, 19 January 2019 15:33 (one year ago) link

re. Derrida, i always linked his thinking on democracy to benjamin’s and the concept of “weak messianism.” The concept holds open a promise that will never be delivered, always deferred, but its being-open is the condition of possibility of progressive change.

Trϵϵship, Saturday, 19 January 2019 15:36 (one year ago) link

I've come to think of the specific government programmes/manifestos of left or "progressive" parties needing to be like this: acknowledging fluidity and progress and always open to further demands/further movement towards economic and social democracy - in fact those demands should always be advancing

have you ever seen a VONC's tears? (Noodle Vague), Saturday, 19 January 2019 15:40 (one year ago) link

Like, the state can't be "fixed" in any sense, and to want to do that is inherently conservative small c

have you ever seen a VONC's tears? (Noodle Vague), Saturday, 19 January 2019 15:42 (one year ago) link

Definitely, treesh, Benjamin is a touchstone here – Derrida explicitly discusses weak messianism in Spectres of Marx.

pomenitul, Saturday, 19 January 2019 15:42 (one year ago) link

You bet he does

Trϵϵship, Saturday, 19 January 2019 15:45 (one year ago) link

Impeach him. I don't care if the Senate doesn't convict. A failure to convict will not lead to a sudden explosion in his popularity.

Your sweetie-pie-coo-coo I love ya (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 19 January 2019 15:50 (one year ago) link

Like, the state can't be "fixed" in any sense, and to want to do that is inherently conservative small c

― have you ever seen a VONC's tears? (Noodle Vague)

yes, but any notion of "progress" must also account for the demands of the people, which are very often small-c conservative. the only way to bring about lasting progressive change is often through duplicity - for instance the augustan project of revolutionary governmental change under the pretense of "restoration". there is no reason for any radical to _not_ cast themselves instead as a "restorer".

The Elvis of Nationalism and Amoral Patriotism (rushomancy), Saturday, 19 January 2019 15:52 (one year ago) link

^

Trϵϵship, Saturday, 19 January 2019 15:52 (one year ago) link

Sorry meant to one up soto not you

Trϵϵship, Saturday, 19 January 2019 15:52 (one year ago) link

Idk rush, duplicity and strategic compromise haven’t served the left well. It’s put them in a reactive position a lot of the tiem, responding to the new reality the right creates. I like the sanders approach of somewhat naively just laying out the policies that he thinks are better, overton window be damned. It’s worked too—nj just passed a $15 minimum wage

Trϵϵship, Saturday, 19 January 2019 15:55 (one year ago) link

My feeling is that impeachment would have the effect of taking the spotlight off Trump himself and on to the proceedings instead. This would make it harder for him to muddle and confuse. I think if Americans had what we already know stitched together for them without distractions, Trump would be even less popular.

And if the Senate doesn't convict in the face of the evidence -- which will surely include things we don't yet know -- that will be a millstone for those senators and the Republican party.

fajita seas, Saturday, 19 January 2019 16:03 (one year ago) link

I'm not a big fan of trying to "outsmart" the electorate either rush but I feel like I'm derailing this thread so I'll maybe pick at this another time somewhere else

have you ever seen a VONC's tears? (Noodle Vague), Saturday, 19 January 2019 16:11 (one year ago) link

I think Trump is already a 2020 millstone. The question is whether he can take any GOP senators down with him.

Josh in Chicago, Saturday, 19 January 2019 16:15 (one year ago) link

(Or maybe he'll win and they'll make gains!)

Josh in Chicago, Saturday, 19 January 2019 16:16 (one year ago) link

I mean saying "don't impeach him, it won't work and could backfire" just gives the Prez carte blanche to keep breaking the law. If the Repubs were actually holding the fucker accountable, then it would be better to slow down the pace of proceedings. But they aren't and never will.

fuck the NRA (Neanderthal), Saturday, 19 January 2019 16:20 (one year ago) link

I don’t think you can predict the effect it will have. But it’s still the right thing.

Trϵϵship, Saturday, 19 January 2019 16:22 (one year ago) link

Yea i mean that's the reason to do it too! Tired of every act having to be measured by what it might mean 2 months from now. All that leads to is capitulation.

fuck the NRA (Neanderthal), Saturday, 19 January 2019 16:23 (one year ago) link

The upside of the way he runs things and the state of the country as a whole is that when every day brings a new disaster, time becomes meaningless. No one remember what he did a week ago, let alone a month ago, let alone a year ago. There is no downside to going at him hard, because if anything it slows the clock down and forces him to take some damage. He's like a shark who must keep swimming forward, and if he stops he dies.

Josh in Chicago, Saturday, 19 January 2019 16:26 (one year ago) link

We're still at the investigation phase, largely because the last Congress refused to do a proper job of it and Mueller's investigation continues to be a black box except when he drops an indictment here or there. When a coherent, evidence-based and properly corroborated narrative is constructed and out in the open, then it will be time to draw up suitable articles of impeachment for the House to debate and the public to consider. This stuff is serious business and you need a strong scaffolding if you're going to hang a president.

A is for (Aimless), Saturday, 19 January 2019 17:30 (one year ago) link

I mean saying "don't impeach him, it won't work and could backfire" just gives the Prez carte blanche to keep breaking the law. If the Repubs were actually holding the fucker accountable, then it would be better to slow down the pace of proceedings. But they aren't and never will.

― fuck the NRA (Neanderthal)

yeah thinking about it the "don't impeach" argument just doesn't hold water. all of these theoretical political considerations are secondary, america's potential future status as a 'failed state' is secondary. there is ample evidence that the president is guilty of high crimes and misdemeanors for the house to impeach, sufficient evidence that failure to impeach would in fact constitute dereliction of a professional duty. it might not work, it might backfire, but none of that means that impeachment is a bad idea or that it shouldn't be done.

oh, to clarify, i wasn't arguing for kissinger-style realpolitik, more that "restoration" is just as much a utopian myth as the progressive utopia, and that an effective politician will appeal to both instincts. we're very far from the place where progress can come about by saying "fuck america, we can come up with something better than that".

The Elvis of Nationalism and Amoral Patriotism (rushomancy), Saturday, 19 January 2019 18:32 (one year ago) link

read anything about Mike Pence and his views on lgbt people and record wrt them and Trump being impeached seems a lot less exciting

( ͡☉ ͜ʖ ͡☉) (jim in vancouver), Monday, 21 January 2019 19:53 (one year ago) link

As I've pointed out before, if articles of impeachment against Trump were not merely referred to the Senate, but he was successfully removed from office as a result, then the political damage inflicted upon the Republicans would be sufficient to prevent Pence from accomplishing much of his agenda. He'd be a lame duck from day one.

A is for (Aimless), Monday, 21 January 2019 19:58 (one year ago) link

Also it’s not like trump is serving as a liberal voice of reason in the administration.

Trϵϵship, Monday, 21 January 2019 20:02 (one year ago) link

here's the case that i can see for leaving trump in place: as bad as he is he is equally incompetent at executing his vision. it could be suffering through him two more years will be preferable to putting someone more competent in charge. he seems unable to work within the gov apparatus to effectively promote his agenda. he gets into fights with his subordinates, inspires resistances and undermining of his authority, doesn't fully understand the mechanics of the apparatus he seeks to control -- like i'm not even sure he could start a new war if he wanted one. (nb he could still be a rubber stamp on a military that wanted a particular war but so many were.) this is an [overly] optimistic analysis i admit - it assumes he won't be able to do real serious lasting damage before 2020 because of these deficiencies, and that his failure to effectively run the country won't lead to an exceptional catastrophe either. otoh all this suggests is that you'd rather have trump in office for two more years than two more years of gwb or of cruz or pence or even rubio any of these psychos who have the will and the means to destroy the world not just the will.

Mordy, Monday, 21 January 2019 20:09 (one year ago) link

if charges emerge against trump that are serious enough to result in his conviction by the full Senate, then not moving forward with impeachment because of the kind of calculations put forward in mordy's post would be both morally wrong, but a profound political misjudgment.

the usual trump v. pence arguments all seem to rest on the idea that a successful impeachment or forced resignation would rest on somewhat ambiguous grounds that would leave the country much as it was prior to trump leaving office. it would not be like that. it would be a political earthquake of the highest magnitude and leave everything in government badly shaken up.

A is for (Aimless), Monday, 21 January 2019 20:17 (one year ago) link

Impeaching Trump = Raise the chance of another republican president in the 2020 election

nostormo, Monday, 21 January 2019 20:19 (one year ago) link

and they won't hear it if they keep getting to pee or say sup to Laura Ingraham on camera.

TikTok to the (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Thursday, 23 January 2020 14:50 (yesterday) link

if for no other reason to than to sustain the illusion of SC impartiality and its role in all this I really wish Roberts would admonish these shits to remain seated and pay attention, that it's their job

"upon pain of imprisonment" lol what weak sauce all around

Suggest Banshee (Hadrian VIII), Thursday, 23 January 2020 14:52 (yesterday) link

apparently the ratings are good, to put this on a trumpian level

a Mets fan who gave up on everything in the mid '80s (Dr Morbius), Thursday, 23 January 2020 15:13 (yesterday) link

the NYT ran a story yesterday in which the jus' folks interviewed knew exactly what the House charged the president with.

TikTok to the (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Thursday, 23 January 2020 15:17 (yesterday) link

An under-appreciated aspect of this clusterf*ck is John Roberts solidifying his status as the blander and smarmier version of Melville Fuller https://t.co/Mf5EHgQI4o

— Kevin Gannon (@TheTattooedProf) January 23, 2020

TikTok to the (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Thursday, 23 January 2020 15:59 (yesterday) link

The Melville Fuller!?

Josh in Chicago, Thursday, 23 January 2020 16:07 (yesterday) link

better mustache than Roberts imo

TikTok to the (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Thursday, 23 January 2020 16:07 (yesterday) link

hadda look him up; pro-trust tool of a CJ

dignity, always dignity

a Mets fan who gave up on everything in the mid '80s (Dr Morbius), Thursday, 23 January 2020 16:08 (yesterday) link

ignoring the news for months

I am mildly conflicted because for normal citizens this may be a good sanity move, for a senator it smacks of dereliction tho

Okay, you're an ambulance (Ye Mad Puffin), Thursday, 23 January 2020 16:21 (yesterday) link

The senators are sworn into silence yet they're all on teevee.

Such schmucks.

TikTok to the (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Thursday, 23 January 2020 16:22 (yesterday) link

Dereliction? In our senators?

Dr. Teeth and the Women (Old Lunch), Thursday, 23 January 2020 16:23 (yesterday) link

help them out by muting them

a Mets fan who gave up on everything in the mid '80s (Dr Morbius), Thursday, 23 January 2020 16:24 (yesterday) link

why isn't the sergeant-at-arms cuffing those dopes? still on Zoloft?

a Mets fan who gave up on everything in the mid '80s (Dr Morbius), Thursday, 23 January 2020 17:18 (yesterday) link

There are less than 10 Republican Senators that may possibly be swayed on basic rules questions about witnesses and evidence, and probably far fewer on actual removal. Not sure that the fuss over a bunch of Senators who clearly don't give a crap makes sense.

Mario Meatwagon (Moodles), Thursday, 23 January 2020 17:20 (yesterday) link

21 Senators flouting the rules, which forbid them leaving the room or talking, with penalties up to imprisonment (lols yea right). it's a giant "fuck you" to Schiff and the trial and basically saying "this is a sham trial, we don't have to obey the rules".

your Law and Order party, folks. Dems need to use this in their campaigns as well. keep pointing out how often the Law and Order party flouts the law as it doesn't apply to them.

i've seen no good people (Neanderthal), Thursday, 23 January 2020 17:23 (yesterday) link

21 Senators: A GOP-centric 21 Pilots tribute band.

a bevy of supermodels, musicians and Lena Dunham (C. Grisso/McCain), Thursday, 23 January 2020 17:26 (yesterday) link

"Heathens' would make sense

i've seen no good people (Neanderthal), Thursday, 23 January 2020 17:27 (yesterday) link

The fact that a lot of these Senators are being exposed to the House's case for the first time is the more wtf aspect of this for me.

Mario Meatwagon (Moodles), Thursday, 23 January 2020 17:29 (yesterday) link

tbh i've yet to come to terms with the fact that Donald fucking Trump is the president of these united states

Fuck the NRA (ulysses), Thursday, 23 January 2020 17:35 (yesterday) link

Would be curious to know what % of those 21 senators are staunch pro-lifers who have at some point coerced someone they impregnated into getting an abortion.

Dr. Teeth and the Women (Old Lunch), Thursday, 23 January 2020 17:39 (yesterday) link

would safely put the over/under at 75%

Suggest Banshee (Hadrian VIII), Thursday, 23 January 2020 17:40 (yesterday) link

the Senators walking out is infuriating, I thought this was the party of LAW AND ORDER & DO YOUR JOB

frogbs, Thursday, 23 January 2020 17:41 (yesterday) link

The fact that a lot of these Senators are being exposed to the House's case for the first time is the more wtf aspect of this for me.

All members of Congress have only so many hours in a day and must prioritize very strictly. For example dialing for dollars takes up 2-4 hours a day. Then there are the delegations of business owners to meet, lobbyists to strategize with, staff meetings, publicity-seeking events, and numberless cocktail parties to attend. Who has time for reading transcripts or understanding the details of the president's venal political maneuvers?

A is for (Aimless), Thursday, 23 January 2020 17:42 (yesterday) link

speaking as a former US Senator, i can say with confidence that it is pretty easy to assign some go-getter underling to pay attention to the whole "the president is an active crook" thing and have them brief you on the most important items every few weeks

But guess what? Nobody gives a toot!😂 (Karl Malone), Thursday, 23 January 2020 17:52 (yesterday) link

frankly, at this point i am very impressed whenever one of the house reps or senators displays any sort of knowledge for any of the issues on hand, on anything. i assume that they are constantly synthesizing information from briefings from all their staff, who are the people who actually know things. in general, the politician's job (imo) is to try not to be a tremendous dick, to listen to subject matter experts, to select qualified people to serve as subject matter experts/staff, and offer some version of a coherent viewpoint when chuck fucking todd's chipmunk face looks in your direction

But guess what? Nobody gives a toot!😂 (Karl Malone), Thursday, 23 January 2020 17:56 (yesterday) link

Really, though, what incentive would they even have had to engage to that extent, assuming the party line (explicitly-stated or no) has long been that this would be a show trial with no action on the part of the senate?

It may be interesting to see if the trial moves the needle at all with any of their constituents and that winds up prompting them to take things a little more seriously. Although the trial will likely be too short and their constituents too unfocused for any potential threat to their reelection to develop in time.

Dr. Teeth and the Women (Old Lunch), Thursday, 23 January 2020 18:01 (yesterday) link

xpost

Dr. Teeth and the Women (Old Lunch), Thursday, 23 January 2020 18:01 (yesterday) link

Come ON, folks; they are allowed to go to the bathroom.

Presumably where "go to the bathroom" means an hour of playing Angry Birds, an hour being interviewed by Fox, and an hour of drunkenly groping a dewy intern or two.

Okay, you're an ambulance (Ye Mad Puffin), Thursday, 23 January 2020 18:24 (yesterday) link

Leave us be charitable and assume that they're just locked in a protracted battle with their rapidly-aging bowels.

Dr. Teeth and the Women (Old Lunch), Thursday, 23 January 2020 18:29 (yesterday) link

and that at the time the reporter did the headcount, 21 republicans were battling their decrepit bowels while only 2 democrats were.

But guess what? Nobody gives a toot!😂 (Karl Malone), Thursday, 23 January 2020 18:32 (yesterday) link

Per CNN, Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) spent more time out of his seat than in it Wednesday night. Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) also left for stretches, while Sen. Cory Booker (D-NJ) could be seen using his iPhone in the Democratic cloakroom (electronics are banned from the chamber during the trial).

Meanwhile, some of those who may have the most to lose by being sequestered stayed securely in place for the duration on Wednesday. According to CNN, Sens. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) and Amy Klobuchar (D-MN), both running for President, stayed in the chamber for the entirety of the proceedings. They were reportedly joined by Sens. Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) and Susan Collins (R-ME), two of the most scrutinized lawmakers due to their past willingness to vote with Democrats.

...Sen. John Cornyn (R-TX) told CNN that senators are struggling to understand why they have to sit there in the first place, accusing Democrats of presenting the “same arguments over and over and over again.”

But guess what? Nobody gives a toot!😂 (Karl Malone), Thursday, 23 January 2020 18:33 (yesterday) link

Really, though, what incentive would they even have had to engage to that extent, assuming the party line (explicitly-stated or no) has long been that this would be a show trial with no action on the part of the senate?

maybe I'm being naïve here but I think this is something that really *has* changed in the Trump era, 10 years ago they'd at least pretend to care

frogbs, Thursday, 23 January 2020 18:34 (yesterday) link

senators are struggling to understand why they have to sit there in the first place

Sen. John Cornyn (R-TX) conclusively demonstrates that he is unfit to sit on any jury anywhere for any purpose. But I bet he could wax on at length about the need for naturalized US citizens to demonstrate a deep knowledge of and commitment to their civic duty.

A is for (Aimless), Thursday, 23 January 2020 18:37 (yesterday) link

accusing Democrats of presenting the “same arguments over and over and over again.”

unlike the president, who famously referred to his phone call as perfect only once, suggested that we read the transcript only once.

his impressive restraint in suggesting that we "lock her up" *precisely once* was and is a model of statesmanlike oratorical concision

Okay, you're an ambulance (Ye Mad Puffin), Thursday, 23 January 2020 18:46 (yesterday) link

remember that time he talked about building a wall?

Muswell Hillbilly Elegy (President Keyes), Thursday, 23 January 2020 19:12 (yesterday) link

I don't think that was widely publicized

the public eating of beans (Sparkle Motion), Thursday, 23 January 2020 19:20 (yesterday) link

Addressing Trump’s assertion that a president must violate a statute to be impeached, Nadler played a clip of Graham from when he was a House manager in the Clinton impeachment.

“What’s a high crime?” Graham said. “How about if an important person hurts somebody of low means? It’s not very scholarly. But I think it’s the truth. I think that’s what they meant by high crime. It doesn’t even have to be a crime. It’s just when you start using your office and you’re acting in a way that hurts people. You’ve committed a high crime.”

Graham had exited the chamber by the time the clip of his remarks was being played.

lindsey sure does have to use the restroom a lot, weird

But guess what? Nobody gives a toot!😂 (Karl Malone), Thursday, 23 January 2020 20:47 (yesterday) link

Santorum is a harsh mistress.

A perfect transcript of a routine post (Dan Peterson), Thursday, 23 January 2020 20:59 (yesterday) link

the “same arguments over and over and over again.”

about toilets and dishwashers

a Mets fan who gave up on everything in the mid '80s (Dr Morbius), Thursday, 23 January 2020 21:04 (yesterday) link

i love that schiff is literally reading the transcript, as the entire trumposphere has been begging for months, and annotating it with his thoughts

But guess what? Nobody gives a toot!😂 (Karl Malone), Friday, 24 January 2020 03:22 (two hours ago) link

schiff doing a fantastic job

But guess what? Nobody gives a toot!😂 (Karl Malone), Friday, 24 January 2020 03:29 (two hours ago) link

it's his "Have You No Sense of Decency?" argument

But guess what? Nobody gives a toot!😂 (Karl Malone), Friday, 24 January 2020 03:32 (two hours ago) link

Schiff's exceeded my expectations.

TikTok to the (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 24 January 2020 03:33 (two hours ago) link

that was very academy award-nominated last 10 minutes of the legal drama monologue, i loved it

But guess what? Nobody gives a toot!😂 (Karl Malone), Friday, 24 January 2020 03:34 (two hours ago) link

That was powerful. If that’s all we’re gonna get out of this, the effort was worthwhile.

Suggest Banshee (Hadrian VIII), Friday, 24 January 2020 03:35 (two hours ago) link

After Wednesday’s presentation, Sen. Lindsey Graham—one of Trump’s fiercest advocates in the Senate and a House manager in the last impeachment trial, of Bill Clinton—went up to Schiff to applaud him for a job well done. “He’s well spoken, he did a good job of creating a tapestry, taking bits and pieces of evidence and emails and giving a rhetorical flourish, making an email come alive, sometimes effectively, sometimes a little over the top,” Graham told reporters on Thursday morning. “But quite frankly I think they did a good job of taking bits and pieces of the evidence and creating a quilt out of it.”

symsymsym, Friday, 24 January 2020 03:53 (two hours ago) link

Nice compliment there from Sen. Graham. But he'll still vote the party line to stonewall, cover up, and acquit. I ardently hope that all these yahoos will pay a heavy price at their next election, however unlikely that outcome may seem atm.

A is for (Aimless), Friday, 24 January 2020 04:32 (one hour ago) link

DC’s WTOP coverage sure wants to try and make this seem like it COULD GO EITHER WAY

El Tomboto, Friday, 24 January 2020 05:13 (forty minutes ago) link

10 or 11 plane crashes and maybe

... that's Traore! (Neanderthal), Friday, 24 January 2020 05:15 (thirty-eight minutes ago) link


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