EIGHTH GRADE (2018, written & directed by Bo Burnham, starring Elsie Fisher)

Message Bookmarked
Bookmark Removed

Don't miss this... I think it's an astonishing movie, easily one of the best coming of age movies to come out this decade. Perhaps not saying much, but Burnham's script & direction are subtler and more deft than I would have ever expected he was capable of judging by his comedy, and Elsie Fisher's performance is just remarkable. Some familiar tropes and notes hit through the first half, but the second half veers off into its own very quiet and intense thing. There's so much dignity and courage in Fisher's character and Burnham doesn't linger on or milk what you'd expect: the absent parent, the awkward sexual encounter, the first crush, the active shooter drill (!). The closing father-daughter speech by the fire at the end is as powerful as the end of Call Me By Your Name. It just wrecked me.

flappy bird, Wednesday, 1 August 2018 00:06 (seven months ago) Permalink

Thanks for the reminder--want to see this (as a movie, as a teacher).

clemenza, Wednesday, 1 August 2018 00:13 (seven months ago) Permalink

flappy otm, except for rating the "I'm so proud of you, I hella wanted to suck dicks when I was your age but was kajagoogoo" speech from CMBYN

16, 35, DCP, Go! (sic), Wednesday, 1 August 2018 00:33 (seven months ago) Permalink

flappy otm, except for rating the "I'm so proud of you, I hella wanted to suck dicks when I was your age but was kajagoogoo" speech from CMBYN


guess I don’t need to see this, now

beard papa, Wednesday, 1 August 2018 00:52 (seven months ago) Permalink

I liked i].

morning wood truancy (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Wednesday, 1 August 2018 00:55 (seven months ago) Permalink

that’s a pretty harsh reading of the CMBYN speech but I will say the speech in Eighth Grade is probably better because it’s so understated and simple while still being immensely moving - the CMBYN speech was very loaded with “this is serious this is serious this is so serious PAY ATTENTION and cry”

flappy bird, Wednesday, 1 August 2018 01:14 (seven months ago) Permalink

also when Kayla stands up to Kennedy >>>>>>>>>>>>

flappy bird, Wednesday, 1 August 2018 01:15 (seven months ago) Permalink

I like to think that Leave No Trace is the secret sequel to this.

Philip Nunez, Wednesday, 1 August 2018 01:26 (seven months ago) Permalink

they both have really tight scripts and manage to be really emotional without ever becoming hysterical. they underplay it, like Lady Bird did but with none of the quirkiness. EG and LMT are very realistic and all the better for it.

flappy bird, Wednesday, 1 August 2018 01:58 (seven months ago) Permalink

directed by Bo Burnham is hard to get by but this sounds good

The Desus & Mero Chain (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Wednesday, 1 August 2018 02:46 (seven months ago) Permalink

Burnham's script & direction are subtler and more deft than I would have ever expected he was capable of judging by his comedy

glad to hear that this is good; i really want to see it. i thought his interview on Fresh Air was really good, and then, yeah, i looked up his comedy and i began to have second thoughts. i will try to catch this on the big screen while i still can.

Karl Malone, Wednesday, 1 August 2018 03:01 (seven months ago) Permalink

directed by Bo Burnham is hard to get by but this sounds good


Believe you me, this was a hard sell knowing his work. But I liked the trailer and three people I know who saw it before me all had different reactions to it, so I had to see it. Glad I did.

flappy bird, Wednesday, 1 August 2018 04:12 (seven months ago) Permalink

i didn't know his work, but alamo had a pre-show with clips of his live act as well as him talking to the camera about the movie. it all made me worry i had made a terrible mistake buying a ticket (and also did too much this-is-what-the-movie-is-about framing) but then the movie was great. lotta realness. the dad stuff felt a little more forced or "movie-like" to me but all the stuff with the kids struck me as dead on.

one small thing i really liked - not my favorite thing in the movie but just something you don't see enough - was the rick and morty references/impressions. kids talk about and quote their favorite shows all the time and most movies about kids fail to get this, i assume either for rights reasons or because the script is too focused on the plot or the emotional arc. i totally believe that these two kids would have that exact conversation about rick and morty.

This is a total Jeff Porcaro. (Doctor Casino), Wednesday, 1 August 2018 04:37 (seven months ago) Permalink

otm!

I really liked how they handled the absence of the mother, there was literally one reference to it in the whole movie, I was hoping it would go by unmentioned but "since your mother left" is so much better & more vague than "since your mother died" or any more time spent on the subject.

flappy bird, Wednesday, 1 August 2018 04:43 (seven months ago) Permalink

tt and I started watching a Burnham stand-up routine on Netflix and were enjoying its gay misanthropy, but then we got suspicious and looked him up only to discover that he wasn't gay, which completely ruined it

imago, Wednesday, 1 August 2018 08:34 (seven months ago) Permalink

I have a crush on Josh Hamilton and his dad body.

morning wood truancy (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Wednesday, 1 August 2018 11:15 (seven months ago) Permalink

directed by Bo Burnham is hard to get by but this sounds good

My exact first thought, but then I read the New Yorker profile and he seemed uncommonly thoughtful. And then I heard him on NPR and he was really smart there, too. There was a great exchange where Terry Gross plays his dumb breakthrough "I'm Gay" song (or whatever it was), and after she asks him if he's worried it might come off homophobic. And his response was an honest "I don't know that it isn't," and then he explained how important it was for him to leave his formative adolescent work online and not try to brush it aside, to show that people can change and get better and try to be better themselves. I'm paraphrasing, of course, but he was very earnest and had given a lot of thought to a lot of things.

Josh in Chicago, Wednesday, 1 August 2018 11:56 (seven months ago) Permalink

sorry elmo! one speech isn't most of the film though

16, 35, DCP, Go! (sic), Wednesday, 1 August 2018 20:28 (seven months ago) Permalink

This was excellent. And let me just say, as the father of a 13-year old girl that just finished middle school and is about to enter high school, a lot of this shit was downright uncanny. Off the top of my head I honestly can't think of any remotely similar movie that gets so much right (at least from my perspective).

Josh in Chicago, Friday, 3 August 2018 02:42 (seven months ago) Permalink

otm

morning wood truancy (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 3 August 2018 03:25 (seven months ago) Permalink

Didn't like this as much as what's above, but it is ambitious--it wants to be the definitive film on the subject, and to get a film like that into theatres, into wide release even, is admirable. Three things I did like: the wording of the forced invitation to the pool party, "Orinoco Flow" (a song I have not heard nor thought about even once, literally, since it was out in the world; thought of it as an interesting curiosity at the time, like "Royals" or something), and Elsie getting her future self as her high-school shadow.

clemenza, Friday, 3 August 2018 21:28 (seven months ago) Permalink

Kayla, not Elsie--got the character and the actress mixed up.

clemenza, Friday, 3 August 2018 21:42 (seven months ago) Permalink

Did you know that Enya, despite selling millions of records, has never toured?

Josh in Chicago, Friday, 3 August 2018 21:48 (seven months ago) Permalink

No--I guess that explains in part why she vanished from my radar. I did like how the film used that song (recognized it immediately but took a few seconds--till the vocal--to put a name to it).

One question (which has nothing to do with my overall feelings--just curious): do schools in the States ever run simulations of school shootings that graphic? I can't imagine anything like that up here, but then the problem isn't as prevalent up here (we've had them, obviously). I would think a readiness drill like the one in the film would be traumatic in and of itself.

clemenza, Friday, 3 August 2018 21:55 (seven months ago) Permalink

My instinct is to say no, but I wouldn't be surprised if the answer is yes. Certainly my kids (one about to start high school, one about to start middle school) know the drill, so to speak.

Josh in Chicago, Friday, 3 August 2018 22:19 (seven months ago) Permalink

man the high school kids were SO good, almost more believably written and naturally acted than the eighth-graders.

This is a total Jeff Porcaro. (Doctor Casino), Friday, 3 August 2018 22:20 (seven months ago) Permalink

The shadowing reminded me of Dazed and Confused, although in Linklater's film, the high school students weren't one-on-one shadows, and most of them wanted to make your life miserable. But a couple of them did take the younger kids under their wing, invited them to tag along, etc.

clemenza, Friday, 3 August 2018 22:24 (seven months ago) Permalink

and Elsie getting her future self as her high-school shadow.


Whoa, didn’t make that connection but otm

flappy bird, Friday, 3 August 2018 23:54 (seven months ago) Permalink

man the high school kids were SO good, almost more believably written and naturally acted than the eighth-graders.

― This is a total Jeff Porcaro. (Doctor Casino), Friday, August 3, 2018 5:20 PM (yesterday) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

otm, would watch a movie about them finishing senior year. but then again, that movie has been made many times before.

ant banks and wasp (voodoo chili), Saturday, 4 August 2018 04:07 (seven months ago) Permalink

I tried to resist this (critical nature, slight aversion to Bo Burnham) but eventually fell completely under its spell. What a treat. Amazing that this was showing at the megaplez just down the road and not at the art houses exclusively.

I though the first 15 minutes were weak and was tempted to walk out (after the lady in the film said "lit" and then the teacher dabbed upon entering the classroom) but then immediately followed the most extraordinary stretch of film in recent memory with the dinner scene and the enya scene.

I am too far removed from 8th grade to even trust my sense that some things were overwrought but it did feel that way.

No one got up when the credits started rolling, good sign.

rip van wanko, Saturday, 4 August 2018 23:06 (seven months ago) Permalink

My oldest kid is literally starting 8th grade on Wednesday, so I couldn't resist the synchronicity of taking him to this today. He was sort of intrigued -- by the R rating and because he knew Burnham had started as a YouTuber -- and sort of resistant, because of the potential cringe factor. But we both ended up really liking it. Elsie Fisher is great, and it all felt grounded and, even to an actual 13-year-old, totally convincing.

a man often referred to in the news media as the Duke of Saxony (tipsy mothra), Sunday, 5 August 2018 01:01 (seven months ago) Permalink

And yes, his school has active shooter drills. Not with a guy actually dressed as a shooter, but it wouldn't surprise me if some places are doing that.

a man often referred to in the news media as the Duke of Saxony (tipsy mothra), Sunday, 5 August 2018 01:05 (seven months ago) Permalink

loved it overall. certainly surpassed this to become bo burnham's greatest film.

ant banks and wasp (voodoo chili), Sunday, 5 August 2018 05:31 (seven months ago) Permalink

I’ve long hated Burnham’s musical comedy steeze and I’m not sure I can ever watch this and appreciate it as its own thing.

circa1916, Sunday, 5 August 2018 05:41 (seven months ago) Permalink

I'll see it, but not in the theater. He seems to have matured/grown up vs. whatever he was doing a few years back, though. Good for him.

Johnny Fever, Sunday, 5 August 2018 05:46 (seven months ago) Permalink

I’ve long hated Burnham’s musical comedy steeze and I’m not sure I can ever watch this and appreciate it as its own thing.

― circa1916, Sunday, August 5, 2018 1:41 AM (fifty-one minutes ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

missing out! this isn't like his comedy at all

flappy bird, Sunday, 5 August 2018 06:34 (seven months ago) Permalink

Will def check it out when it’s streaming somewhere. Heard an interview with him recently that kinda punctured my image of what he was about. Just hard to shake vivid memories of a real corny roommate of a friend who would put on one of BB’s DVDs repeatedly and how it made me want to throw the TV out of a window.

circa1916, Sunday, 5 August 2018 06:53 (seven months ago) Permalink

Haven't seen it yet but really enjoyed this interview with Burnham where he talks about growing up with social media: https://www.theatlantic.com/amp/article/566579/?__twitter_impression=true

Roz, Sunday, 5 August 2018 07:25 (seven months ago) Permalink

xpost This has nothing to do with this dude's comedy. It's earnest, it's empathetic, it's lovely and loving. And it's almost documentary like in its restraint and approach, so much so that I would not come close to branding it a comedy. It's got some awkward laughs in it (like life), but there's almost nothing in it that does not ring true or seem like it does not come from the honest perspective of an eighth grade girl (which is something, coming from a 28 year old first time director with a background in dumb comedy). While I can see waiting for it to come to TV, I do recommend seeing it in a theatre with other people, likely of other generations, just to see how they react and what gets reactions. The giggles of recognition from the high school girls behind us were different from the solo 60 year old dude in front of us. My older daughter is at summer camp right now, but when she comes back I think my wife is going to take her, to hear her side. I'll report back.

Interesting Bo Burnham stuff: he plays a well meaning but crap comedian in "The Big Sick," and (as I learned from the New Yorker profile), he directed Chris Rock's most recent special, at Rock's request.

Josh in Chicago, Sunday, 5 August 2018 13:48 (seven months ago) Permalink

I hate being the guy who's less than enthusiastic about something everybody else on the thread loves, but, while I did like some things about this film (see above), some of it didn't ring true to me--from unimportant nit-picky stuff (I can't imagine any middle school giving recognition at a school assembly for something based on physical appearance--informally in a yearbook, yes, not an officially sanctioned award/certificate) to maybe the most central fact of the film, the father-daughter relationship. I'm not a father--if anyone wants to bat away this objection with "If you were a father, you'd understand," feel free. But when the father gives his big speech about how much of a joy his daughter is, I wish the director had actually given us some reason to believe this. I mean, I know these characters have entire lifetimes behind that assertion that we don't see, and of course any father would feel that way, but all we've seen is 90 minutes of his daughter pretty much treating him like dirt, and him smiling and bumbling and making self-deprecating jokes in response. In Six Feet Under, by way of contrast, we see the daughter treat the mom the same way (or in Roseanne, when Darlene goes through her season-in-black phase), but before they have a similarly emotional rapprochement, we get the expected exasperation/anger/silence/confrontation from the mom (and also from dad on Roseanne). So when they finally do come out the other side, the bond there feels very real to me. Here, when the father speaks of the wonder of his daughter, I just thought "Really?" I found the father a real cipher in Eighteen.

clemenza, Sunday, 5 August 2018 15:12 (seven months ago) Permalink

As a dad I kind of agree with some of that and mentioned it to my wife on the way home, that he was a little too idealized (because kids are fucking hard). It did capture the vibe of unconditional love, though, the way you can look at your kid and see nothing wrong, even when they are internally tormented by all sorts of drama. But as my wife pointed out, the girl in this is *not* some mere wallflower or shut-in. She, begrudgingly or not, actually follows her dad's advice. She goes to parties she does not want to go to, she follows his phone restrictions (clearly more limited during the week), she stands up for herself and confronts people when she feels she is wronged, she builds up her courage and does karaoke in front of people that don't like her. And she's not afraid to contact dad for help or rides and stuff, and he is very accommodating. This is an instance of something being a little between the lines but totally clear: she listens to him because she loves and trusts him. They have a great relationship, and that is something else I loved about this movie. They did not mine their relationship for conflict. Her problems have nothing to do with her supportive dad, and she knows that, which is a lovely twist on these things (and yet something else that sets it apart from Ladybird, which is specifically about mother/daughter conflict and a reason I thought it felt a little more TV-y to me.)

Josh in Chicago, Sunday, 5 August 2018 15:40 (seven months ago) Permalink

You're right that conflict is the default setting in these films. There's a third way, too, but you don't see it very often: the Ridgemont High thing where the parents are virtually absent. (The most extreme example I can think of--pretty sure you don't see or hear a single parent in Heckerling's film). The kids work out everything themselves.

clemenza, Sunday, 5 August 2018 15:58 (seven months ago) Permalink

I really hate to keep harping on this but everything about this sounds absolutely unappealing to me

• It's the auteur statement from a stand-up
• That stand-up is ironic rap YouTube funnyman Bo Burnham
• It's called 'Eighth Grade'
• It's about social media
• People in this very thread are saying thinks like "It just wrecked me"

This could very well be an excellent, smart, awesome movie, but that is ... a lot of hurdles for me to jump

5th Ward Weeaboo (Whiney G. Weingarten), Sunday, 5 August 2018 16:08 (seven months ago) Permalink

yeah

though honestly I really was not a fan of Donald Glover's comedy or music and Atlanta is fast becoming one of my favorite shows of all time

The Desus & Mero Chain (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Sunday, 5 August 2018 16:17 (seven months ago) Permalink

xpost people in this very thread are also telling you they were suspicious of burnham, didn't like his comedy etc., and yet found the movie very good. maybe instead of telling us that our being moved by it makes you not want to see it (because, i guess, we are all dummies whose opinions are always wrong), you should just see it, and post to the thread afterwards.

mortal kombats fill your eyes (Doctor Casino), Sunday, 5 August 2018 16:17 (seven months ago) Permalink

well it's also like, OK, even if this movie is NOTHING LIKE his shitty, quasi-racist chive-y videos, he wouldn't have even had the chance to make this auteur indie-cinema without years of building his brand from -- and these quotes are straight from Wikipedia --

Burnham wrote and released songs about white supremacy, Helen Keller's disabilities, homosexuality, and more.[1]

When speaking with The Detroit News about his rapping, he expressed his intent to honor and respect the perspective and culture of hip-hop music.[3]

Comedy Central Records released Burnham's first EP, the six-song Bo Fo Sho, as an online release-only album on June 17, 2008.[13]

It feels when people are wowed by Vice News doing some interesting reporting when their entire infrastructure was built on ironic racism and rape jokes. Again, if this guy turned over a smart/funny leaf somewhere, it's news to me.

5th Ward Weeaboo (Whiney G. Weingarten), Sunday, 5 August 2018 16:22 (seven months ago) Permalink

maybe instead of telling us that our being moved by it makes you not want to see it (because, i guess, we are all dummies whose opinions are always wrong), you should just see it, and post to the thread afterwards.

It's meant less to call people dummies and more like "I don't like going to see movies that make me sad"

5th Ward Weeaboo (Whiney G. Weingarten), Sunday, 5 August 2018 16:23 (seven months ago) Permalink

Again, the movie could be totally fine, we'll see how bored I get. I'd rather go see Blindspotting and Blackkklansman if given the choice tho

5th Ward Weeaboo (Whiney G. Weingarten), Sunday, 5 August 2018 16:25 (seven months ago) Permalink

ah okay. well that's more understandable, sorry.

mortal kombats fill your eyes (Doctor Casino), Sunday, 5 August 2018 16:26 (seven months ago) Permalink

I've been avoiding the acclaimed Mr. Rogers doc too because the innocence of kids sometimes depresses me on a deep level

5th Ward Weeaboo (Whiney G. Weingarten), Sunday, 5 August 2018 16:28 (seven months ago) Permalink

sweet baby jesus thank you for no fb snapchat or twitter in the 90s

rip van wanko, Sunday, 5 August 2018 18:33 (seven months ago) Permalink

I found the father a real cipher in Eighteen.

we don't see any of his life outside of Kayla, because we're only seeing her life. but we see how the mother's absence has deeply shaped his approach to parenting, his remaining single, his balancing empathy and discipline and fear of overstepping. it's a fantastically drawn (part of a) character and performance.

16, 35, DCP, Go! (sic), Sunday, 5 August 2018 18:35 (seven months ago) Permalink

Ambivalence noted, I would recommend that everyone see this and put aside whatever you already know about the director. On that count, I’m lucky. I knew nothing about the director going in--had never even heard of him (in no rush now to familiarize myself with his earlier work).

Less helpful was re-watching 20th Century Women a few days before seeing Eighth Grade, a strong contender right now as my favourite film of the decade. I took that into the theatre with me--I’m rarely able to see films without comparing them to other films, especially one fresh in my mind. The mother-son relationship in 20th Century Women starts from the same basic place as the father-daughter relationship in Eighth Grade: the son wants to communicate to the mother that she needs to leave him alone, he’s doing just fine. (He’s a couple of years older than Kayla.) For me, their relationship was infinitely more shaded, though, in terms of what we actually see on the screen, as opposed to taking the complexity on faith, as a given. There’s an incredible scene in 20th Century Women where the son, seemingly in an effort to let his mom know that he understands how she’s feeling, reads aloud to her a passage from Zoe Moss’s “It Hurts to Be Alive and Obsolete” (which I’m really anxious to read, but nothing online, and I’m not quite ready to pay a small fortune for Sisterhood Is Powerful on Amazon). He’s trying to be sympathetic, but the words he reads seem to cut dangerously close: Annette Bening dismisses them with a curt “And that’s how you see me?” There are so many levels to that scene, and it’s difficult for me to watch (difficult in the good sense: too real)--in the immediate shadow of that, the Eighth Grade version felt hollow. I realize that mother-son isn’t father-daughter, 15 isn’t 13, and 1979 isn’t 2018.

clemenza, Sunday, 5 August 2018 19:24 (seven months ago) Permalink

And again, isn't that a movie about their relationship? At the least, I think it probably *is* more complex, more novelistic, more ... written. Eighth Grade is not about the relationship between Kayla and her dad. It's pretty much just about Kayla and her coping with her immediate, in the moment surroundings.

Josh in Chicago, Sunday, 5 August 2018 19:38 (seven months ago) Permalink

Not as central, probably, but it did feel to me like the dad, even when he wasn't there, was kind of guiding Kayla's decisions (as you point out above, he was the impetus for her "putting herself out there," going to the party, etc.). And there's lots else going in 20th Century Women, too (which is at least as much about Bening as the son, so in that sense, no, it's not a fair comparison).

clemenza, Sunday, 5 August 2018 19:49 (seven months ago) Permalink

"going on in"

clemenza, Sunday, 5 August 2018 19:49 (seven months ago) Permalink

you want to see a burnham-free, social media-free version of this movie, leave no trace is still playing, I think.

Leave No Trace is definitely at least 9x better than this

16, 35, DCP, Go! (sic), Sunday, 5 August 2018 19:50 (seven months ago) Permalink

Whiney it’s not a sad movie. It wrecked me because it was so moving and life affirming, like I said. You can be like me and see Eighth Grade and Blindspotting. It’s almost like my op was a preemptive response to exactly what you said.

flappy bird, Sunday, 5 August 2018 19:52 (seven months ago) Permalink

Yeah, moving and life-affirming is a great way to encapsulate it. We know in the end it has a happy ending, or at least something approximating it, cuz most of us have been to 8th grade, and most of us made it through the other side. But at the time things can seem pretty uncertain and ugly and scary and confusing.

Btw, yet another way this movie subverted expectations, or at least my expectation, is that the high school kid she meets doesn't blow her off and genuinely seems to enjoy her company. I was waiting for the humiliation or heartbreak that never came.

Josh in Chicago, Sunday, 5 August 2018 20:53 (seven months ago) Permalink

Leave No Trace is definitely at least 9x better than this

Leave No Trace left no trace in my BRANE. LNT is a more measured, more mature, less auteurish movie, probably with a superior young female lead. But, eh, it just felt like the 116th movie I've now seen about how the war fucked a guy up.

rip van wanko, Sunday, 5 August 2018 21:10 (seven months ago) Permalink

yeah that's pretty much how I felt. LNT is great, probably the best Iraq PTSD movie or one of the best, but damn, dour much?

flappy bird, Sunday, 5 August 2018 21:17 (seven months ago) Permalink

yeah Josh that the high school girl was very nice was so great - as clemenza said, it was as if she were shadowing her future self.

flappy bird, Sunday, 5 August 2018 21:18 (seven months ago) Permalink

Had Jason Reitman written or directed this, he would have turned the high school girl into a hypocrite.

morning wood truancy (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Sunday, 5 August 2018 21:31 (seven months ago) Permalink

David Edelstein's the only film critic I periodically check in with anymore--his very positive review:

http://www.vulture.com/2018/07/bo-burnham-eighth-grade-movie-review.html

He reminded of a couple of other things I liked...and a couple more I didn't.

clemenza, Sunday, 5 August 2018 21:32 (seven months ago) Permalink

I understand the movie not resonating with some people. Lady Bird, e.g., did not particularly resonate with me. But resonant or not, both are smart and sensitive movies that prioritize the POVs of their young, awkward protagonists in a way I respect.

a man often referred to in the news media as the Duke of Saxony (tipsy mothra), Monday, 6 August 2018 00:04 (seven months ago) Permalink

Saw this with my 13-y-o son, I think he liked it but I liked it more than he did? A bit hard for me to watch as Kayla is surely meant to be the viewpoint character but very hard for me NOT to occupy the viewpoint of the dad.

Because I was watching it with my son I sort of wished there were one sort-of-OK boy in it. (I don't really think Gabe was a sort-of-OK boy.)

The way I knew this movie was good was that the parts of it that were objectively kind of on-the-nose (ending with the video to the high school self, the dad's speech) I totally bought.

My son and I both agreed it was very nicely handled that you could see somehow that the Spongebob was important but not why at first.

Guayaquil (eephus!), Tuesday, 7 August 2018 05:02 (seven months ago) Permalink

Gabe rules, he's blithely living all the self-confident talk-to-people true-to-yourself aphorisms from Kayla's youtubes

16, 35, DCP, Go! (sic), Tuesday, 7 August 2018 07:29 (seven months ago) Permalink

Gabe is a dork and not super great at listening/communicating but he's nice and wants to be friends and it seems like he'll turn out okay. Of course, he reminded me of me at that age so I might be biased.

mortal kombats fill your eyes (Doctor Casino), Tuesday, 7 August 2018 12:08 (seven months ago) Permalink

xpost When she first took Spongebob out of the box and stared at it I thought it was because she recognized that she looked a little like Spongbob! Big blue eyes, sort of crooked teeth, spots, "yellow" hair/skin ... When they revealed what it was later it was another "aha!" moment for me.

Josh in Chicago, Tuesday, 7 August 2018 12:12 (seven months ago) Permalink

That's an excellent read on Spongebob, Josh.

However I think it's nuts to describe this movie as "not a comedy'!

I didn't realize the shitty comedy songs I'd seen of Bo Burnham were from when he was 18, that makes it make monumentally more sense he could make this movie, I have to admit I too was like "seriously? THAT guy??"

Guayaquil (eephus!), Tuesday, 7 August 2018 12:52 (seven months ago) Permalink

two months pass...

I kinda feel like a party pooper, but I found this pretty mediocre. It was hard for me to watch it without thinking of similar recent movies that I liked a lot better--Lady Bird, obviously, but also the possibly-even-better The Edge of Seventeen--but even on its own it felt kind of thin. One quibble that will probably seem pedantic, but which I kept coming back to (and which is especially surprising considering the filmmaker's social media past): her YouTube videos look *nothing* like the way any of the videos I've seen produced by young people. Granted, my only experiences with this genre(?) are BookTube things, but these tend to be really energetically paced and quickly edited, not at all like the generally lo-fi and staid videos that Kayla produces. It could be argued that her videos reflect her personality, but I suspect that someone who makes these videos would be more tuned into/trying to mimic the (for the lack of a better term) YouTube aesthetic.

I did like her Diane Franklin-ish high school friend, and the final scene with Gabe ("I like all the sauces equally"). The movie could have used more of his character, especially.

Timothée Charalambides (cryptosicko), Saturday, 3 November 2018 16:14 (four months ago) Permalink

That's fascinating because The Edge of Seventeen felt too Hollywood broad.

I like queer. You like queer, senator? (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 3 November 2018 16:16 (four months ago) Permalink

I guess its broad in that its aiming for certain comic and emotional points, but I thought it hit most of them. It wasn't as popular among critics as Lady Bird or Eighth Grade, both of which are more low-key in a way that I'm assuming strikes a lot of critics and viewers as more "authentic."

Timothée Charalambides (cryptosicko), Saturday, 3 November 2018 18:43 (four months ago) Permalink

I've seen a lot of videos on YT that looked a lot like Kayla's.

But it's the "Gucci!" That got me! She seems way too aware for that. I think there was something that hinted that she was getting a little embarrassed by it as time passes but I'm not sure

rip van wanko, Saturday, 3 November 2018 19:28 (four months ago) Permalink

The Edge of Seventeen also had a different look, a more MOR mis en scene. "Hollywood broad" is otm, and I think that's why it slipped by so many people who liked the more stylized and auteurist Lady Bird and Eighth Grade.

flappy bird, Sunday, 4 November 2018 05:07 (four months ago) Permalink

and its distribution was completely different - EO17 played at multiplexes, 8G and LB played art houses.

flappy bird, Sunday, 4 November 2018 05:08 (four months ago) Permalink

I saw Eighth Grade and Lady Bird in multiplexes

Sing The Mighty Beat (sic), Sunday, 4 November 2018 05:33 (four months ago) Permalink

(RIP, Moviepass)

Sing The Mighty Beat (sic), Sunday, 4 November 2018 05:33 (four months ago) Permalink

I rewatched bits of this movie before returning the disc to the library today, and I'll concede that the things I like in the movie are enough to push my feelings on it up from a mildly negative to a mildly positive. Part of my problem with the film that I am realizing just now is that most of the good stuff in the film is in its second half, so it feels a bit unevenly weighted and, as a result, poorly paced. That said, the father's speech still doesn't jerk my tears the way I think it was supposed to--I have the same reaction to the father's speech in CMBYN; Jennifer Garner's speech to her son in Love, Simon honestly moved me far more than either.

My favourite thing about the movie remains: I would be first in line from a sequel/spin-off about Gabe.

Timothée Charalambides (cryptosicko), Monday, 5 November 2018 19:19 (four months ago) Permalink

Anna Meredith made this movie.

change display name (Jordan), Monday, 5 November 2018 19:29 (four months ago) Permalink

two weeks pass...

i saw this and felt neither moved nor life-affirmed but it was enjoyable to see an 8th grader's mental state portrayed effectively in the modern era. i didn't relate to her youtubing or her relationship with her dad or virtually anything that made this movie good/life-affirming, but i did relate to the stifling pettiness of 8th grade, her documentation of her life via the time capsules, and that feeling that things are hopefully going to get better. things don't always get better but the optimism resonated with me. i thought her budding friendship with gabe was cute but also probably doomed. that was definitely realistic! i guess i enjoyed it? oh and that scene in the backseat of the car made me SO nervous. everything about that was very relatable.

weird woman in a bar (La Lechera), Sunday, 25 November 2018 21:32 (three months ago) Permalink

Probably brought it up upthread but there are a handful of horrible things that seemed telegraphed to happen, from a school shooting to suicide to that back seat scene gone worse to the high school girl blowing her off and so on. And ... none of it happens. I've got to assume that was intentional, to underscore all these perpetual latent threats just lurking there at every turn.

Josh in Chicago, Sunday, 25 November 2018 21:56 (three months ago) Permalink

and sometimes they do happen, either to the same person later when they aren't expecting it or to someone else. they just didn't happen to her that particular time. i'm not sure what this is supposed to signify or mean cinematically or narratively.

weird woman in a bar (La Lechera), Sunday, 25 November 2018 22:35 (three months ago) Permalink

When I was in 8th grade I had the impression that every girl had her shit together and was happy

rip van wanko, Sunday, 25 November 2018 23:05 (three months ago) Permalink

i thought this was a powerful film. as josh says, nothing that terrible happens (except the harassment in the car, although that could have gone far worse, but it's still incredibly painful to watch. it reminded me that life is painful.

Trϵϵship, Sunday, 25 November 2018 23:10 (three months ago) Permalink

i was impressed with elsie fisher's performance. the discomfort and self-consciousness was palpable.

Trϵϵship, Sunday, 25 November 2018 23:12 (three months ago) Permalink

two months pass...

we just saw this! excellent. as treesh was the last poster and my thoughts mirror his, i'll say treesh otm

imago, Saturday, 2 February 2019 23:32 (one month ago) Permalink

i loved this

the awkwardness & false bravado felt so real at times i had to look away & just hear what was happening because it was so uncomfortable & familiar & gave me a lot of overwhelming feels

everything under the desk during the shooting drill & then her looking up oral video tutorials online & the banana...exaggerated but oh god, so familiar

and i’ve seen ppl elsewhere with the takeaway of how damaging social media is etc which sure i dont disagree, but it wasn’t that obvious for me? for me i saw the movie as a leveller, to remind us BEING A TEEN SUCKS IN EVERY DECADE because IT SUCKS

Squeaky Fromage (VegemiteGrrl), Saturday, 2 February 2019 23:56 (one month ago) Permalink

yes

flappy bird, Sunday, 3 February 2019 00:16 (one month ago) Permalink

i know we all know this but i just need to blarp more:

imo whatever media in your decade you engaged with as a teen, it always found a way to mine your anxiety & insecurity & make you think you had to be someone you could never be

and 100 years ago when there wasn’t media there was still class structure & materialism

being a teenager is like, idk, you are 100% exposed flesh & raw nerves, no protective layer of skin at all.
everything is abrasive. life is abrasive. ithe smallest innocuous things cause inner pain or anxiety & you legitimately doubt WHAT you are, forget about “your changing body” or whatever. but that too.
and ~everyone your age~ is existing in similar raw, exposed, anxious painful self-doubting ways.
existing ~against~ each other.
feeling WAY too much all the time.

it’s crazy when you think about it.

Squeaky Fromage (VegemiteGrrl), Sunday, 3 February 2019 00:42 (one month ago) Permalink

I just saw this today and realized i love Hal Hartley movies but hate every movie that reminds me of a Hal Hartley movie. I am pretty sure I hated this. But the main actress was good.

Yerac, Sunday, 3 February 2019 04:05 (one month ago) Permalink

this was... fine

the dorko kid was great, even moreso his deleted scene doing magic

a Mets fan who gave up on everything in the mid '80s (Dr Morbius), Sunday, 3 February 2019 04:13 (one month ago) Permalink

Yeah, pretty sure this was really terrible, but props that Bo Burnham got people to love it.

Yerac, Sunday, 3 February 2019 04:13 (one month ago) Permalink

I was really expecting to hate this but it was fucking surprisingly good. Little heavy handed at points, sure, but I was legit struck by the aesthetic decisions. “Bo Burnham ~film auteur~” seemed like a comically outlandish concept, but damn, maybe he’s got it.

circa1916, Sunday, 3 February 2019 06:56 (one month ago) Permalink

Lot of shots and music choices in this that felt really sharp.

circa1916, Sunday, 3 February 2019 06:58 (one month ago) Permalink

yeah

this really did seem to get how the new generation live, for all its universal teenage appeal

imago, Sunday, 3 February 2019 08:31 (one month ago) Permalink

Got me real choked up tbh.

That pool party scene with the Anna Meredith song was absolutely brilliant.

circa1916, Sunday, 3 February 2019 18:11 (one month ago) Permalink

Oh!! We remembered it as Holly Herndon. Whoops. Great song/scene anyway

imago, Sunday, 3 February 2019 18:16 (one month ago) Permalink

one month passes...

I watched this today and noticed that Lori Loughlin's daughter is the makeup youtuber in the opening credits

Jeff Bathos (symsymsym), Wednesday, 13 March 2019 07:24 (one week ago) Permalink

Her mother submitted a screen test that got her the part.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TxMDlgFwNXg

clemenza, Thursday, 14 March 2019 04:38 (one week ago) Permalink


You must be logged in to post. Please either login here, or if you are not registered, you may register here.