Paul Schrader's 'slow' transcendental drama FIRST REFORMED w/ Ethan Hawke

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There’s an enormous sense of satisfaction I derive from First Reformed, because it pulls together threads of what I’ve been thinking and doing for almost 50 years. The first serious writing I did on film was about spiritual cinema, Transcendental Style. That was in 1972. From that point on, I became a screenwriter and director, and I never thought that I would make that type of film. I like those films, but those films are not for me. I was much more interested in action, empathy, sexuality, violence, and these really aren’t in the transcendental tool kit. So I went on and left that world behind. The first script I wrote was Taxi Driver (1976). Now, 45 years later, I have made a film that combines the thinking in that book with the narrative drive of Taxi Driver. So I have my first philosophical book and my first screenplay combined in this current film. That has been very intimidating because it’s a little difficult to think of what to do next. I hope that First Reformed is not my last film, but if it is, it’s a very good last film.

http://cinema-scope.com/cinema-scope-magazine/paul-schrader-deliberate-boredom-in-the-church-of-cinema/

Opens in US June 22.

ice cream social justice (Dr Morbius), Thursday, 22 March 2018 17:00 (eleven months ago) Permalink

i couldn't bring myself to watch dog eat dog on netflix. i'm still kinda mad at him for the terrible music in light sleeper as well.

scott seward, Thursday, 22 March 2018 17:04 (eleven months ago) Permalink

This is a diff kettle of fish for him; one of the best I saw last year.

ice cream social justice (Dr Morbius), Thursday, 22 March 2018 17:07 (eleven months ago) Permalink

you guys should poll post-light sleeper movies. 11 movies!

scott seward, Thursday, 22 March 2018 17:07 (eleven months ago) Permalink

one month passes...

first release moved up to next Friday

Bresson’s work is what made me think filmmaking might be possible for me. But I’m also inspired by his sense of time, which I understood only partly when my book first came out. I realized later, watching these films, that duration is phenomenological. In his films, he shows someone leaving a room — and then he holds on that closed door for three seconds. What’s happening? Well, nothing. Nothing’s happening, but the shot isn’t about the door. It’s about you watching the door. It’s an insight he picked up from the Neorealists — movies are time. And you can sculpt that time by using the scalpel of boredom.

https://www.villagevoice.com/2018/05/10/first-reformed-director-paul-schrader-talks-the-art-of-taking-gambles/

the ignatius rock of ignorance (Dr Morbius), Saturday, 12 May 2018 02:35 (ten months ago) Permalink

https://www.slantmagazine.com/film/review/first-reformed

"Schrader has returned to a more classical style of filmmaking, a style redolent of Ozu, Robert Bresson, and Carl Theodor Dreyer. First Reformed is his paean to slow cinema, a steadily simmering, unostentatious apogee collating the obsessions that have driven the filmmaker for 50 years."

this sounds good.

calzino, Wednesday, 16 May 2018 21:53 (ten months ago) Permalink

I’ve always been interested in Schrader, but I don’t think I’ve seen a film of his that I felt was really successful. Compelling ideas but just lacking the chops to pull it off. This sounds promising and I’m looking forward to it.

two cool rock chicks pounding la croix (circa1916), Thursday, 17 May 2018 01:54 (ten months ago) Permalink

I like about eight or nine of his movies, which makes him one of my favorite directors. Looking forward to this one.

grawlix (unperson), Thursday, 17 May 2018 02:06 (ten months ago) Permalink

I agree with the high placement of Light Sleeper.

morning wood truancy (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Thursday, 17 May 2018 02:31 (ten months ago) Permalink

Given the presence of Cedric the Entertainer in a major role in First Reformed, I was about to wonder how a serious director like Schrader feels about having to put the name "Cedric the Entertainer" in the credits, but I see that he's credited under his real name Cedric Kyles.

Hideous Lump, Thursday, 17 May 2018 03:52 (ten months ago) Permalink

and he's splendid!

Schrader said at the NYFF last year he likes working with actors who are comics or other kinds of performers (Pryor, Cedric, Joan Jett, uh that James Deen guy).

the ignatius rock of ignorance (Dr Morbius), Thursday, 17 May 2018 04:05 (ten months ago) Permalink

otm with the Light Sleeper ranking, it’s one of my personal comfort food films.

omar little, Thursday, 17 May 2018 04:16 (ten months ago) Permalink

i watched patty hearst the other day, that write-up of it in the rankings is good, though i prob wouldnt rank it quite that hi

johnny crunch, Wednesday, 30 May 2018 00:31 (nine months ago) Permalink

Bone chilling. One of the most disturbing movies I've seen in a long time.

flappy bird, Sunday, 3 June 2018 20:35 (nine months ago) Permalink

Agreed. I am carping at elements (especially the ending), but that's because I'm fighting against the power of the whole.

Another influence I haven't seen cited elsewhere: Tarkovsky's The Sacrifice.

Polly of the Pre-Codes (j.lu), Sunday, 3 June 2018 21:44 (nine months ago) Permalink

I don’t think I’ve seen a film of his that I felt was really successful

I'll vouch for Mishima. It's probably missing a lot of Japanese context, but it must be one of the most successful biographics of an author.

Bad wig continuity (Sanpaku), Monday, 4 June 2018 18:22 (nine months ago) Permalink

I know almost nothing about the real Mishima but the movie is pretty great.

Simon H., Monday, 4 June 2018 18:24 (nine months ago) Permalink

got the new blu ray sitting at home, was gonna watch yesterday after First Reformed but my soul was still too bleached to engage with another Schrader for the day.

flappy bird, Monday, 4 June 2018 18:27 (nine months ago) Permalink

This movie is pretty amazing. I'm not sure every aspect of it completely works, but man is it sticking with me.

JRN, Friday, 15 June 2018 01:14 (nine months ago) Permalink

Agreed!.

morning wood truancy (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 15 June 2018 01:16 (nine months ago) Permalink

Light Sleeper is on MUBI now. Perhaps will give it another try.

And Nobody POLLS Like Me (James Redd and the Blecchs), Friday, 15 June 2018 01:40 (nine months ago) Permalink

As I said on the 2018 movies thread, it took a second viewing for it to really work for me. Once I had advance knowledge of where it was headed, the trajectory felt more natural.

Simon H., Friday, 15 June 2018 01:49 (nine months ago) Permalink

I’ve already forgotten almost all of it, so don’t know how that will work for me.

And Nobody POLLS Like Me (James Redd and the Blecchs), Friday, 15 June 2018 01:52 (nine months ago) Permalink

“Already” meaning a quarter century after viewing it when it came out

And Nobody POLLS Like Me (James Redd and the Blecchs), Friday, 15 June 2018 01:53 (nine months ago) Permalink

lol I was referring to the new one

Simon H., Friday, 15 June 2018 01:56 (nine months ago) Permalink

i got a free pass for cineplex, was thinking of going to this...good idea?

sunburst N snowblind (Ross), Friday, 15 June 2018 02:16 (nine months ago) Permalink

Yes.

Simon H., Friday, 15 June 2018 02:22 (nine months ago) Permalink

Definitely

flappy bird, Friday, 15 June 2018 02:46 (nine months ago) Permalink

thought this was good btw, impressed w schraders restraint in a way

johnny crunch, Friday, 22 June 2018 12:49 (eight months ago) Permalink

Second viewing, still strong, and underrated for deadpan humor (Hawke v/o of Thomas Merton on prayer, while Toller is on his knees... puking into the commode).

Spoiler-laden PS interview:

If the question is “can God forgive us,” the secular answer is he has to; that’s why we made him. That’s his job. But the Earth is just fine: 50,000 years after all-out nuclear holocaust, it will be up and running without the virus of humanity, and maybe he’ll take a better evolutionary course next time....

You’re withholding things that people have come to expect even if they don’t know it. But they know something is different. They know you’re not adjusting the camera. They know they’re not getting the musical cues. The tricky dance is how to keep the viewer coming toward you as you’re moving away.

One day I said to the cameraman, let’s bring out the rail, and he said, but we don’t do dolly shots. I said, today is a day to break the rule. You can break it because you created it. We might need to tell the audience, see, there are rules here; this is something that we’re not doing.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/20/movies/first-reformed-paul-schrader.html

the ignatius rock of ignorance (Dr Morbius), Sunday, 1 July 2018 00:45 (eight months ago) Permalink

well i should've looked 2 posts up, sorry

the ignatius rock of ignorance (Dr Morbius), Sunday, 1 July 2018 00:46 (eight months ago) Permalink

Is Amanda Seyfried in any movies where her boyfriend isn't a fuck-up?

Philip Nunez, Sunday, 1 July 2018 01:57 (eight months ago) Permalink

My attention never flagged, and obviously a major improvement on that crazy film with the porn star from a few years ago (the last one I saw, I think). Maybe the best first impression I've had from any Schrader film other than Affliction. It's been ages since I saw Diary of a Country Priest, though, and I think it would help to see that again--not sure if First Reformed is just a well-made gloss on that or if there's more to it. (There are certainly other movies in there, Taxi Driver and Night of the Hunter most obviously.) The two most out-there scenes...I don't know; I liked the Magical Mystery Tour (oh, now they're going to have sex--wrong movie), iffier on Hawke's Jesus Christ Pose. That was David Strathairn with the organ joke, right?

clemenza, Sunday, 1 July 2018 02:10 (eight months ago) Permalink

Not sure it shares much with The Night of the Hunter besides using that hymn (as the Coens did in their True Grit). Schrader programmed this series of related films a few weeks back:

https://quadcinema.com/program/origin-stories-paul-schraders-footnotes-to-first-reformed/

That was not David Strathairn, who is pushing 70, but a younger actor.

the ignatius rock of ignorance (Dr Morbius), Sunday, 1 July 2018 02:59 (eight months ago) Permalink

i've only seen Amanda Seyfried before in that Baumbach film While We're Young, the Linda Lovelace biopic she starred in, and last year's Twin Peaks, so you may be on to something, P Nunez.

the ignatius rock of ignorance (Dr Morbius), Sunday, 1 July 2018 03:03 (eight months ago) Permalink

A lot of the shots in the church are very much like Winter Light, as is the couple in crisis.

the ignatius rock of ignorance (Dr Morbius), Sunday, 1 July 2018 03:04 (eight months ago) Permalink

I don't think Seyfried's character had a boyfriend in Mean Girls.

JRN, Sunday, 1 July 2018 03:42 (eight months ago) Permalink

haven't seen Winter Light but have heard a lot of people compared FR to it. I don't see Night of the Hunter similarities either - that movie's about the kids.

flappy bird, Sunday, 1 July 2018 04:04 (eight months ago) Permalink

a movie i find first reformed similar to is taxi driver

flopson, Sunday, 1 July 2018 04:05 (eight months ago) Permalink

imho they should have just boned in the magical mystery tour scene then had a different ending

flopson, Sunday, 1 July 2018 04:07 (eight months ago) Permalink

It's been ages since I saw Diary of a Country Priest, though, and I think it would help to see that again--not sure if First Reformed is just a well-made gloss on that or if there's more to it.

FR is a definite bite on DoaCP, although I don't remember the diary sequences as being so annoying and self-conscious.

imho they should have just boned in the magical mystery tour scene then had a different ending

They might as well have banged in that sequence; it's a wholesale ripoff of The Sacrifice.

Polly of the Pre-Codes (j.lu), Sunday, 1 July 2018 04:10 (eight months ago) Permalink

All I meant by Night of the Hunter was the song--it can't not be a conscious reference for Schrader.

clemenza, Sunday, 1 July 2018 05:00 (eight months ago) Permalink

The environmentalist concerns of youth in FR seems partly an echo of The Devil, Probably, though the camera flying over natural landscapes that dissolve into landfills is aesthetically closer to Koyaanisqatsi.

eatandoph (Neue Jesse Schule), Sunday, 1 July 2018 14:36 (eight months ago) Permalink

The audience yesterday gasped several times, not just where you'd expect but when Toller told the choir director "I despise you." I didn't because I despised her too.

the ignatius rock of ignorance (Dr Morbius), Sunday, 1 July 2018 15:17 (eight months ago) Permalink

i think i gasped at that, or maybe laughed can’t recall. it was p harsh

flopson, Monday, 2 July 2018 00:48 (eight months ago) Permalink

There's a line in Hereditary that elicited a similarly shocked audience response. It's always nice when dialogue can do that.

Simon H., Monday, 2 July 2018 00:50 (eight months ago) Permalink

I watched Diary of a Country Priest last Monday for the first time in 20 years and was, in a sense, almost relieved Schrader borrowed so much from it. The villagers tend to be a more malevolent bunch of assholes.

morning wood truancy (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Monday, 2 July 2018 00:59 (eight months ago) Permalink

i was shocked that the dreadfully earnest protest song at the funeral was by Neil Young

the ignatius rock of ignorance (Dr Morbius), Tuesday, 3 July 2018 13:47 (eight months ago) Permalink

Confrontation with the choir director felt straight out of Winter Light. She even looked like Ingrid Thulin in that film.

Chris L, Tuesday, 3 July 2018 13:56 (eight months ago) Permalink

three weeks pass...

UNREFORMED

Paul Schrader took himself to a Taylor Swift concert for his 72nd birthday and posted a selfie on Facebook. pic.twitter.com/CMJ5u9Jx9x

— Jeff (@DenverCinephile) July 23, 2018

a Mets fan who gave up on everything in the mid '80s (Dr Morbius), Tuesday, 24 July 2018 20:13 (seven months ago) Permalink

my man

johnny crunch, Tuesday, 24 July 2018 20:37 (seven months ago) Permalink

"Oh my God... it's my DAUGHTER!"

a Mets fan who gave up on everything in the mid '80s (Dr Morbius), Tuesday, 24 July 2018 20:39 (seven months ago) Permalink

lol

devvvine, Tuesday, 24 July 2018 21:04 (seven months ago) Permalink

I liked this a lot. Hell, I've loved his last three films. Ethan Hawke almost a doppelganger for Gerard Blain these days.

An Uphill Battle For Legumes (Capitaine Jay Vee), Friday, 3 August 2018 02:22 (seven months ago) Permalink

This was brilliant.

circa1916, Thursday, 9 August 2018 03:15 (seven months ago) Permalink

superb film. a bit Taxi Driver wearing a soutane but so much more. career best acting from Ethan Hawkman

. (Michael B), Thursday, 9 August 2018 09:21 (seven months ago) Permalink

I wasn't mad about the denouement, but the Hawkman puts a right shift in there!

calzino, Thursday, 9 August 2018 09:32 (seven months ago) Permalink

I actually had to walk out of this after about an hour yesterday afternoon, as I just wasn't in the right mental space to deal with it.

Not just the script and acting, but overall feel of the film with its bleak lack of bright colours and absolutely everything looking incredibly dull and lifeless. Fell a bit bad about it as Hawke's performance was great.

Luna Schlosser, Thursday, 9 August 2018 10:14 (seven months ago) Permalink

one month passes...

Rolled my eyes at the dippy Magical Mystery sequence, and I have questions about the ending (mostly I'm disappointed in Schrader's unwillingness to see the political implications of his story to the very end; see Alfred's linked review upthread for a far better elucidation of this than I can provide) but otherwise this was fantastic. Beautifully filmed, with perfectly tuned dialogue and performances; I don't anticipate seeing Hawke take home an Oscar for this next year, but I'll still be pissed about it. By far the better of the two recent de facto Taxi Driver remakes--I'm in the minority on Lynne Ramsay's You Were Never Really Here, but I'm right with the critical consensus on this one.

Engles in the Outfield (cryptosicko), Tuesday, 18 September 2018 15:34 (six months ago) Permalink

two months pass...

Man, this just felt so on the nose to me. Gorgeous to watch, but it all felt so telegraphed and didactic. Sure, influenced by Bresson, Dreyer, Bergman, Tarkovsky, but their faith-crisis films have depths and complexities I didn’t feel here. Nothing against E.H., he’s good in the role.

I realize I’m in the minority, and I respect the movie and I believe it speaks to some people. Just not to me.

a man often referred to in the news media as the Duke of Saxony (tipsy mothra), Saturday, 15 December 2018 07:03 (three months ago) Permalink

The didacticism is part of the point, imo: the film stays steady in its view of the world, patiently waiting for Hawke to catch up with it.

sans lep (sic), Saturday, 15 December 2018 08:28 (three months ago) Permalink

I'll buy that it's intentional, it just struck me as overdetermined. Like a movie made from a kit. "Priest whose son died in an unjust war" "Pregnant woman named Mary" "Chekhov's suicide vest" etc.

a man often referred to in the news media as the Duke of Saxony (tipsy mothra), Saturday, 15 December 2018 14:10 (three months ago) Permalink

The didacticism is part of the point


Yeah the schematic way this laid things out was a fundamental part of what made it compelling. Very intentional. Options A, B, C... choose B, now options D, E, F. Elements of apologetics and catechism in it. Cold reason applied to faith.

circa1916, Sunday, 16 December 2018 03:27 (three months ago) Permalink

I'll buy that it's intentional, it just struck me as overdetermined. Like a movie made from a kit. "Priest whose son died in an unjust war" "Pregnant woman named Mary" "Chekhov's suic
I'll buy that it's intentional, it just struck me as overdetermined. Like a movie made from a kit. "Priest whose son died in an unjust war" "Pregnant woman named Mary" "Chekhov's suicide vest" etc.


I mean, yes. But imo all of that’s actually really interesting in the hands of someone who knows what they’re doing.

circa1916, Sunday, 16 December 2018 03:32 (three months ago) Permalink

Some insight:

A24 podcast: This Is How It Should End with Paul Schrader & Sofia Coppola

Sanpaku, Sunday, 16 December 2018 13:26 (three months ago) Permalink

this was excellent

jolene club remix (BradNelson), Sunday, 23 December 2018 04:38 (two months ago) Permalink

favorite shot was the peptol bismol bloom in the whiskey

jolene club remix (BradNelson), Sunday, 23 December 2018 04:42 (two months ago) Permalink

What a triumph! I felt the need to note down some thoughts, though they echo a lot of what's already been said. (Massive spoilers ahead)

First Reformed is a film about mutuality and the benefits and dangers therein. In this light, scenes were often redolent of the therapeutic encounter, with Hawke's Reverend Toller as tentative analyst, watchful of his own and others' seductive influence as ghosts converge on his resolve and render his capacity for rational thought less and less reliable. It is equally about a retreat from the shared into the illusory safety of the self. It catalyses our contemporary environmental struggle through the personal demons of one man, forming a chilling precipitate. Will God forgive us? What is repressed collective guilt over the destruction of the planet capable of doing to society?

"There's just no middle ground with these kids. Everything is so extreme", complains Toller about halfway through the film. Pastor Jeffers counters that such a position brings young people a feeling of comforting certainty in the face of fear. It is nonetheless Hawke's own inability to fuse the light and the dark into a healthy harmony that leads to his extremism as the film unfolds and he is further plagued with a disguised guilt over his son's death (reawakened by the suicide of Mary's husband) that gets split off into the moral certainty he feels over seeking vengeance on environmental criminals.

The final resolution for all Schrader's cinematic (and performative) asceticism is still fraught with paradox, in which the most cathartic ending for the audience would also have been the most reprehensible. First Reformed is reminiscent of Mishima throughout: the inconsequentialness of figures silhouetted and superseded by buildings and landscapes that belong to different timelines, the sublimely hysterical skies, the stoic mania and masochism of enforced boundaries, the intoxicating descent into fanaticism... There's even the same build to a suicidal resolution, complete with shaving and meticulous dressing ritual...except this time there's the charge and retreat, broken by a single human connection, which, tenuous and ambivalent as it may be, hints at the hopefulness of shared lives as something to cling to and not destroy. A holding vessel into which all the persecutory anxieties of the film's duration can be poured in hopes of salvation; the aforementioned bloom of heartful pink to neutralise the acid; the dyad floating across a blissful and dreadful nospace. A reminder of choice and the powers of retaining connectivity in the light of darkness.

tangenttangent, Wednesday, 26 December 2018 16:26 (two months ago) Permalink

well said

flappy bird, Wednesday, 26 December 2018 16:40 (two months ago) Permalink

that was lovely tt

jolene club remix (BradNelson), Wednesday, 26 December 2018 16:42 (two months ago) Permalink

i also saw this and defer to tt's superior analysis; mine was just going to be some variant of 'i spent the last 40 minutes in profound panic, i'm still shaking now, film of the year'

imago, Wednesday, 26 December 2018 17:04 (two months ago) Permalink

Interesting interview with Ethan Hawke.

Almost watched this last night on Amazon. I'm definitely gonna get to it soon.

grawlix (unperson), Friday, 4 January 2019 19:58 (two months ago) Permalink

I re-watched it last night on Amazon and -- well, "enjoyed" doesn't suit the material, but the last thirty minutes were clearer in intention. That first conversation between Toller and the environmental loony is impressively paced.

Your sweetie-pie-coo-coo I love ya (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 4 January 2019 20:03 (two months ago) Permalink

lotsa good stuff here, from Kael's dictatorial status in the '70s to the ending of FR...

[What we’re discussing is] part of the larger question of the de-fraction of culture. The fact that there’s no center. There’s no Johnny Carson, there’s no Walter Cronkite, there’s no Bruce Springsteen. There’s no fucking center to popular culture. The atrium where everyone would get together to talk is now dozens of little rooms.

So back in the ’60s and ’70s, if you wanted to talk about the culture, and what was happening around us, you were going to have to talk about Bonnie and Clyde. Or The Wild Bunch. That was part of the conversation. And so, if you look back through that period, almost every week something came out that would give a critic a bone to chew on. If it had substance in it, you know. It’s taken 50 years for those opposed to the counterculture to finally win. To make sure that 1969 could never happen again.

And of course, we could talk for days about the cowboy atmosphere we’re in now. Nothing we’ve learned in the last 100 years is of much value. We don’t know what a movie is anymore. We don’t know how long it is, we don’t know where you see it, we don’t know how you monetize it. What if it’s a net series? That is half hours, or 15 minutes. What if it’s 115 minutes, you know? That’s still a movie, isn’t it? Yes, it is. Mad Men is a movie — a 79-hour movie.

https://www.vulture.com/2019/01/paul-schrader-in-conversation.html

a Mets fan who gave up on everything in the mid '80s (Dr Morbius), Thursday, 10 January 2019 19:06 (two months ago) Permalink

Yeah, it's a good interview. I'm glad he mentioned Light Sleeper, rarely cited among his best.

Your sweetie-pie-coo-coo I love ya (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Thursday, 10 January 2019 19:18 (two months ago) Permalink

Well … I’ve seen Diary of a Country Priest a few times, you know?
Yeah, but it’s the main character from Country Priest, it’s the setting from Winter Light, it’s the ending from Ordet, it’s the levitation from The Sacrifice and it’s all wrapped together with the barbed wire of Taxi Driver.

I wish you never told me that. One of the things I really like about the movie is that it’s really sufficiently updated to now.
But, it’s a mistake when you think that any of us do anything new. All we do is reassemble our montages. If you reassemble in an interesting enough way, it will become something new. What I added — which I didn’t quite realize while I was making the film, I realized in the editing — was the monomaniacal obsession of Taxi Driver. The other films don’t have that. The editor said to me in the editing room, “You know, there’s a lot of Taxi Driver in this film.” And I said, “Yeah, I know, I put it in there.” He said, “No, no. There’s not a little, there’s a lot.” And I started to realize that it had gotten infused with that same thought pattern I used 45 years before. Because I thought I was making a slow movie. And I first screened it for people and I said, “I warned you, this is a slow movie. It’s going to take its time, don’t rush it.” Then afterward someone said, “That’s not a slow movie.”

loved this

jolene club remix (BradNelson), Thursday, 10 January 2019 19:41 (two months ago) Permalink

Why was he so prissy about being told? The influences are obvious.

Your sweetie-pie-coo-coo I love ya (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Thursday, 10 January 2019 19:48 (two months ago) Permalink

It's Schrader listing the influences, not the interviewer!

Great stuff

imago, Thursday, 10 January 2019 20:17 (two months ago) Permalink

uh that's what I meant -- why was the interviewer so prissy about it? It's not like it's a secret.

Your sweetie-pie-coo-coo I love ya (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Thursday, 10 January 2019 20:27 (two months ago) Permalink

I guess they wanted to match crank with crank, except Schrader only pretends to be a crank?

imago, Thursday, 10 January 2019 20:32 (two months ago) Permalink

the interviewer also insisted first reformed was a remake of diary of a country priest before that which i thought was pretty silly

schrader's a good interview bc a few of these questions are dead-enders and he still manages to answer them with substance or at least substantial related anecdotes. you can tell he was/is a critic, i'm really into that

jolene club remix (BradNelson), Thursday, 10 January 2019 20:33 (two months ago) Permalink

one month passes...

Film Comment:

“WILL GOD FORGIVE US?” asks Paul Schrader’s First Reformed (of Ethan Hawke’s Oscar snub). Schrader’s newly announced film sounds like another exercise in the transcendental, described by the filmmaker as being: “Basically, if you took a script from 1956 that Budd Boetticher made with Randolph Scott, and you asked Terry Malick and David Lynch to come in and take a shit on the script, you would have the movie I’m making.”

a Mets fan who gave up on everything in the mid '80s (Dr Morbius), Wednesday, 20 February 2019 16:41 (one month ago) Permalink

FIRST REFORMED (2018)

⛪️

😕⛪️

👱🏻‍♀️👋🏻

😕⛪️

👱🏻‍♀️💬🧔🏻=😩

😕⛪️

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🧔🏻👉🏻📉

🧔🏻💬🏭

🧔🏻💬🌍🌡

🧔🏻💬🔥🌍🔥

😕

😕🥃

😕👋🏻👨🏾

👨🏾💬⛪️+$=👌🏻

😕

🧔🏻📱

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😕

👨🏾👉🏽💵

😕🥃

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😕💡!

😕💣⛪️

👱🏻‍♀️👋🏻

🍆🧞‍♂️

— Eric Allen Hatch (@ericallenhatch) August 28, 2018

flappy bird, Wednesday, 27 February 2019 06:18 (three weeks ago) Permalink


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