is New York City dead?

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NYC seems genuinely out of fashion for the first time in my life, and maybe its history? Williamsburg is a punchline, Manhattan both above and below 14th St is just rich fuxors, seems like everything that used to happen in only NYC or LA now happens in LA or some other ascendant metropolis. I am not particularly worldly or sophisticated or mobile these days so I can't offer much more evidence, this is just my lay observation. What u think?

trife's rich padgett (rip van wanko), Tuesday, 6 February 2018 22:10 (one year ago) Permalink

New York isn't dead.
There are still lots of great things about this city.
The things I value might not be the same things others value, of course.

ian, Tuesday, 6 February 2018 22:12 (one year ago) Permalink

no you're dead

Fedora Dostoyevsky (man alive), Tuesday, 6 February 2018 22:13 (one year ago) Permalink

okay

trife's rich padgett (rip van wanko), Tuesday, 6 February 2018 22:16 (one year ago) Permalink

I mean, IDK, I was out in bushwick recently on a saturday night and it still seemed happening and teeming with young artsy cutting edge types brimming with energy. However it's been rough for a good amount of time now as far as being a city that young people without a bankroll or a professional job can live in, and that definitely cuts into the creative energy of the city some. I mean I don't even think the bronx offers the kinds of rents today that could be had 20 years ago in brooklyn.

Fedora Dostoyevsky (man alive), Tuesday, 6 February 2018 22:18 (one year ago) Permalink

like if you mean "dead" as in "no longer can birth a 'scene' the way it could in the 60s/70s/80s/90s, that might be true just because rents are so high.

Fedora Dostoyevsky (man alive), Tuesday, 6 February 2018 22:21 (one year ago) Permalink

I think that is what I mean. Although "scene" sounds a little tinny/reductive, scenes kind of matter. A city births a scene which creates stuff that matters.

trife's rich padgett (rip van wanko), Tuesday, 6 February 2018 22:23 (one year ago) Permalink

Is Paris dead? How about London? Those cities are pretty expensive too, and have been for some time. New York is still a place that attracts ambitious young people, including artists, and I don’t expect that to change anytime soon.

o. nate, Tuesday, 6 February 2018 22:25 (one year ago) Permalink

well yeah, I mean a scene as in the beats or the greenwich village folk scene or disco or no wave or whatever. Like the combination of cheap living and high density and educational and arts institutions and economic activity that allows for a scene that actually produces something of worth. Like I just don't think there are many corners of the city left where a bunch of musicians could live close to one another and work more or less full time on their music and pay rent waiting tables part time or whatever. And to the extent such pockets exist, they're scattered at the edges of the city instead of centralized.

Fedora Dostoyevsky (man alive), Tuesday, 6 February 2018 22:28 (one year ago) Permalink

All cities are dead because culture travels faster through the Internet than it ever could geographically.

treeship 2, Tuesday, 6 February 2018 22:28 (one year ago) Permalink

Rising rents making it hard for young people to live there unless they're being bankrolled is basically true for all major international cities now. Even Berlin's getting expensive these days.

Zelda Zonk, Tuesday, 6 February 2018 22:29 (one year ago) Permalink

But hey, there are always aspiring artists with trust funds, so the city will never die

Fedora Dostoyevsky (man alive), Tuesday, 6 February 2018 22:29 (one year ago) Permalink

i don't know the deal w/rents in NYC but i find it funny when people come out to L.A. from there and rhapsodize about how comparatively inexpensive the rent is here.

omar little, Tuesday, 6 February 2018 22:30 (one year ago) Permalink

I don't go out much anymore, so maybe there's some lively cheap shit I'm missing out on.

It's also really hard for some people in late middle age (w/out a LUCRATIVE CAREER) to live here.

ice cream social justice (Dr Morbius), Tuesday, 6 February 2018 22:30 (one year ago) Permalink

I'm also old and have a family and work a lot, and I just don't really know what's happening anymore. When we went out in Bushwick, we saw some local DJs/electronic artists in a little club and it was absurdly packed and seemed pretty alive.

Fedora Dostoyevsky (man alive), Tuesday, 6 February 2018 22:31 (one year ago) Permalink

I guess another thing I've noticed is that galleries tend to show artists from all over the US and world, and I'm guessing that's more true than it used to be. But that's also an internet-erasing-borders thing.

Fedora Dostoyevsky (man alive), Tuesday, 6 February 2018 22:33 (one year ago) Permalink

All cities are dead because culture travels faster through the Internet than it ever could geographically.

― treeship 2, Tuesday, February 6, 2018 3:28 PM (thirteen minutes ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

this is pretty otm

sleepingbag, Tuesday, 6 February 2018 22:43 (one year ago) Permalink

it's all about the rust belt, my friend

we eat the cheeses here too

they are artisanal

our cities are the envy of all, their livability is primo

j., Tuesday, 6 February 2018 22:48 (one year ago) Permalink

Here's how I think about New York, after my last visit there last summer:

New York is good and the only actual large city in America on the metric of everything existing there. Big cities are the ones where there is everything; you can tell Seattle is a small city because there are things that are not here.

New York is bad in that it smells of garbage. In the summer, hot garbage.

If more American cities grow to populations in the millions, New York will be more dead by comparison due declining uniqueness. Is this going to happen? Who knows.

direct to consumer online mattress brand (silby), Tuesday, 6 February 2018 22:52 (one year ago) Permalink

i kinda want to leave, but i have a job i like okay and an unusually fortuitous living situation. there's no real reason for me to be here; i don't partake of the cultural opportunities available

it'll probably be the subway that finally drives me away

mookieproof, Tuesday, 6 February 2018 22:57 (one year ago) Permalink

NYC: where if you can make it there as a successful artist, you can also have a successful time crowdfunding your medical bills.

Yerac, Tuesday, 6 February 2018 23:21 (one year ago) Permalink

Telecommuting will finish it off.

omar little, Tuesday, 6 February 2018 23:23 (one year ago) Permalink

Less of a joke, not as dead as San Francisco?

Feels like people have been waiting for a rust belt/flyover city to take over since our traditional metropolises are more 'playground for the rich' than ever but I still don't hear kids looking to move to Columbus or Pittsburgh.

louise ck (milo z), Tuesday, 6 February 2018 23:27 (one year ago) Permalink

Have the media decided where the New Portland is?

louise ck (milo z), Tuesday, 6 February 2018 23:29 (one year ago) Permalink

There was a Tooze tweet recently, where he showed stats on how professional actors in the USA, vastly outnumber coal miners. I forgot by much, but it was significantly much.

calzino, Tuesday, 6 February 2018 23:30 (one year ago) Permalink

I do hear murmurings about ppl aspiring to move to Pittsburgh, Detroit, Denver, a few others

trife's rich padgett (rip van wanko), Tuesday, 6 February 2018 23:31 (one year ago) Permalink

According to @BLS_gov and @TheEconomist there are 51,200 people employed as coal miners in the US v. 785k in 1920. In 2017 there are more florists, actors and personal fitness instructors than miners. pic.twitter.com/m913tHokI2

— Adam Tooze (@adam_tooze) January 2, 2018



I was misquoting it slightly

calzino, Tuesday, 6 February 2018 23:33 (one year ago) Permalink

Less of a joke, not as dead as San Francisco?

Feels like people have been waiting for a rust belt/flyover city to take over since our traditional metropolises are more 'playground for the rich' than ever but I still don't hear kids looking to move to Columbus or Pittsburgh.

― louise ck (milo z), Tuesday, February 6, 2018 6:27 PM (seven minutes ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

I hear rumblings about Pittsburgh now and then. Also tons of my friends moved to Philly over the years and it did seem to be producing bands at a good clip for a while.

Fedora Dostoyevsky (man alive), Tuesday, 6 February 2018 23:35 (one year ago) Permalink

And no one talks about how many administrative assistant, secretarial and receptionist jobs were lost in NYC due to automation, because... women, a lot of woc. Breadwinners for their families. Fuck coal miners and their sooty tears.

Yerac, Tuesday, 6 February 2018 23:37 (one year ago) Permalink

I’m moving back to new york soon bc of my job but it’s not a nice place to live.

treeship 2, Tuesday, 6 February 2018 23:39 (one year ago) Permalink

I still have my apartment in Astoria. But I really don't want to go back. I dread having to deal with the subway.

Yerac, Tuesday, 6 February 2018 23:41 (one year ago) Permalink

The subway is inexcusably unpleasant

treeship 2, Tuesday, 6 February 2018 23:44 (one year ago) Permalink

i get more anxious/aggro in nyc in my old age. i don't know what it is. impatient. people bug me more. i think its just a case of the olds. i will always love the city though. in general. i've loved hanging out there my whole life.

it really is me being set in my ways. we stayed in brooklyn one summer with the kids and i seriously didn't want to leave the hotel room. get on a subway to go to a museum in manhattan? kill me now.

scott seward, Tuesday, 6 February 2018 23:45 (one year ago) Permalink

Everything here is comically more stressful than any other place.

treeship 2, Tuesday, 6 February 2018 23:45 (one year ago) Permalink

I car commute to the suburbs now and it's glorious to not be taking the subway anymore

Fedora Dostoyevsky (man alive), Tuesday, 6 February 2018 23:45 (one year ago) Permalink

Why is the ceiling always dripping down there?

treeship 2, Tuesday, 6 February 2018 23:47 (one year ago) Permalink

Second and third tier cities could attract people by just showing how messed up the MTA is in their promo material.

I haven't lived in nyc full time for almost two years now. I miss it, but I really don't miss it. Just the thought of having to take the subway to work gives me anxiety.

Yerac, Tuesday, 6 February 2018 23:48 (one year ago) Permalink

Part of me really regrets accepting another job here. As a teen my dream was living here but it’s not that fun.

treeship 2, Tuesday, 6 February 2018 23:49 (one year ago) Permalink

NYC misses Yerac and Znarf

ian, Tuesday, 6 February 2018 23:52 (one year ago) Permalink

Fix the subway and get rid of GOP madness and I am there!

Yerac, Tuesday, 6 February 2018 23:55 (one year ago) Permalink

fuck the subway, i drive most places now. and when i do take the subway it's in the middle of the day.
sorry can't do anything about the GOP.

ian, Tuesday, 6 February 2018 23:57 (one year ago) Permalink

Do you have to go in and out of manhattan a lot or no?

treeship 2, Tuesday, 6 February 2018 23:59 (one year ago) Permalink

I remember taking the subway maybe 1-2 times a month when I worked in Williamsburg. It was the best. My tweety truck got sold like 3 years ago.

Yerac, Wednesday, 7 February 2018 00:00 (one year ago) Permalink

i've honestly not experienced the subway horrors that many have, but i will say that the subway is nearly unusable on nights and weekends

hoooyaaargh it's me satan (voodoo chili), Wednesday, 7 February 2018 00:01 (one year ago) Permalink

just not enough trains

hoooyaaargh it's me satan (voodoo chili), Wednesday, 7 February 2018 00:01 (one year ago) Permalink

I want to get myself to love it again.

treeship 2, Wednesday, 7 February 2018 00:03 (one year ago) Permalink

Not the subway—the city

treeship 2, Wednesday, 7 February 2018 00:03 (one year ago) Permalink

The last job I had there, I almost had a breakdown every time I took the subway. I would sometimes using the plodding R so I wouldn't have to deal with the insaneness of the 4,5,6 during rush hour. That train really has the worst people to be stuck with in the tunnel.

Yerac, Wednesday, 7 February 2018 00:03 (one year ago) Permalink

I do drive into the city regularly. Many mornings I drive in and drop my wife off at work and then drive home. It helps that we live near the Manhattan Bridge and her office is in chinatown. We also might drive in and park for any number of special events.

ian, Wednesday, 7 February 2018 00:06 (one year ago) Permalink

I don’t get why the mega powerful developers seem to think that New York needs more upscale malls. Doesn’t Hudson Yards have a mall too? Don’t they know that malls never did well in the city even when the rest of the country loved them?

o. nate, Friday, 10 May 2019 22:20 (two weeks ago) Permalink

Does anyone who really lives in ny actually go to these malls to buy things? Or even to brick and mortar retail stores regularly? All this stuff is for tourists.

Yerac, Friday, 10 May 2019 22:21 (two weeks ago) Permalink

Like, how many times a year does one really need to go to uniqlo (it's 2 for me). I guess maybe it's a cheap pastime for all the NYU students.

Yerac, Friday, 10 May 2019 22:24 (two weeks ago) Permalink

"This place is the worst" / "This place is better than all other places"

being a NYer is the ability to hold these two thoughts simultaneously, ime

― One Eye Open

this kind of thinking is literally how certain forms of clinical depression work

Burt Bacharach's Bees (rushomancy), Saturday, 11 May 2019 00:16 (one week ago) Permalink

I lived in NYC from '99-'11 in every borough save SI. Longest run was in Bushwick but my fondest memories are from the South Bronx in 2004. Got robbed by kids for groceries and accosted by cops thinking I was lost/buying drugs but it was super cheap (900/month for a 1200sf loft) and pretty convenient via the 4/5/6. My spot was 112th and Liberty (near Bruckner). I don't even want to look up what it's like now.

Yelploaf, Saturday, 11 May 2019 00:27 (one week ago) Permalink

It's the repertory movie theaters and the restaurants that are keeping me here

Josefa, Saturday, 11 May 2019 01:13 (one week ago) Permalink

Still Sh1tty, nothing to worry about

calstars, Saturday, 11 May 2019 01:29 (one week ago) Permalink

I have fantasized about living in New York since college years ago, but every time I get down to the details it seems like too much and I lose interest. It's great to visit though

I love my goddaughter and her parents. They live in a fantastic apartment on one of the High Line blocks in West Chelsea, but it still feels kind of industrial to me - no trees and lots of galleries and storage businesses. My friends who have apartments on Sutton Place on the East River are living in the best version of NY imo

Dan S, Saturday, 11 May 2019 01:31 (one week ago) Permalink

chose terrible shops to go inside it not including the Cole Haan shoe store who's interior signage and window displays are produced very well considering the extremely tight turnaround given no doubt due to an extremely capable team of production artists with excellent mechanical skills and print knowledge.

dan selzer, Saturday, 11 May 2019 04:29 (one week ago) Permalink

I feel no need to kvetch about present-day NY anymore. I’m well through the several stages of grief. But the NY I started visiting in ‘75, age 11, and then throughout the late seventies into the eighties, was an indescribable metropolis beyond dreams. NY is definitely not dead now, far from it, but it’s certainly more prosaic, more commonplace, cleaner (in more ways than one), and tamer... not just a matter of degrees, but really a profound qualitative difference; a separate ontological plane dare I say.

never have i been a blue calm sea (collardio gelatinous), Saturday, 11 May 2019 05:08 (one week ago) Permalink

lol dan

Lil' Brexit (Tracer Hand), Saturday, 11 May 2019 09:03 (one week ago) Permalink

Being real, if this was 1980 there is a zero percent chance I would live in Williamsburg and maybe a 10% chance I’d lcie in the city at all.

Trϵϵship, Saturday, 11 May 2019 15:40 (one week ago) Permalink

Which makes me part of the problem.

I felt Williamsburg was slightly more exciting when I’d visit in 2009/2010 but that could have just been youth.

Trϵϵship, Saturday, 11 May 2019 15:41 (one week ago) Permalink

I was apologizing for living in williamsburg back in 2003. I should've saved a lot of them up.

Yerac, Saturday, 11 May 2019 15:46 (one week ago) Permalink

I felt Williamsburg was slightly more exciting when I’d visit in 2009/2010 but that could have just been youth.

― Trϵϵship, Saturday, May 11, 2019 8:41 AM (five minutes ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

nah it's practically unrecognizable from what it was then

american bradass (BradNelson), Saturday, 11 May 2019 15:48 (one week ago) Permalink

feels like an extension of manhattan now

american bradass (BradNelson), Saturday, 11 May 2019 15:49 (one week ago) Permalink

you don't have to go toooo far out of the bedford/driggs stop bubble to get back to something that looks not too different than it has for a long time.

dan selzer, Saturday, 11 May 2019 17:14 (one week ago) Permalink

I live off grand

Trϵϵship, Saturday, 11 May 2019 17:15 (one week ago) Permalink

There are good bars around. I like greenpoint a lot too and its close—my brother lives over there

Trϵϵship, Saturday, 11 May 2019 17:15 (one week ago) Permalink

you don't have to go toooo far out of the bedford/driggs stop bubble to get back to something that looks not too different than it has for a long time.

― dan selzer, Saturday, May 11, 2019 10:14 AM (eleven minutes ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

this is also true enough!

american bradass (BradNelson), Saturday, 11 May 2019 17:26 (one week ago) Permalink

i miss Domsey's :(

Lil' Brexit (Tracer Hand), Saturday, 11 May 2019 18:05 (one week ago) Permalink

i got mugged coming back from Galapagos

/90s

Lil' Brexit (Tracer Hand), Saturday, 11 May 2019 18:06 (one week ago) Permalink

an in-law lives in that Kushner building on Kent and there is no deeper pit in hell. apart from what they're planning to go right next to it, which looks literally like it belongs in Dubai. that building on Kent isn't even nice. yes there's a gym etc but the reception area, hallways, all the unavoidable PUBLIC SPACE of even a place like that has the same shitty lack of attention that typifies every other public place in New York. the corridors feel like JFK.

Lil' Brexit (Tracer Hand), Saturday, 11 May 2019 18:18 (one week ago) Permalink

Galapagos was cool

calstars, Saturday, 11 May 2019 18:21 (one week ago) Permalink

Now I'm reminiscing about Williamsburg. Anyone remember Kokie's. That must now be an Amazon locker.

Yelploaf, Saturday, 11 May 2019 23:40 (one week ago) Permalink

Still the Levee I think.

dan selzer, Sunday, 12 May 2019 00:30 (one week ago) Permalink

Does anyone who really lives in ny actually go to these malls to buy things? Or even to brick and mortar retail stores regularly? All this stuff is for tourists.

I guess you're right. Time Warner Center is another one. I was there today. For all the local character of the place, you could be in LA or Dubai or anywhere. It's probably reassuring to the rich tourists who just want to have all the high-end shops collected in one convenient place.

o. nate, Sunday, 12 May 2019 01:50 (one week ago) Permalink

I went to the Metropolitan Club in NY for dinner with friends a few weeks ago, after a lecture on Hoyle and a miniature book exhibition at The Grolier Club (a truly fantastic place). it was a very "old NY" experience, the rooms at both locations were incredibly evocative and the food was really good. I don't have any illusions about who would belong in places like this (not me), but I kept thinking I wouldn't have any experiences like these anywhere else in the world

Dan S, Sunday, 12 May 2019 02:19 (one week ago) Permalink

One thing I learned when I briefly lived in New York is that the places in New York that, when I was a tourist, I rigorously avoided as being "for tourists only" are, in fact, filled with New Yorkers who were less uptight than I was.

Guayaquil (eephus!), Sunday, 12 May 2019 02:20 (one week ago) Permalink

i also miss galapagos. interviewed there once!

Fuck the NRA (ulysses), Sunday, 12 May 2019 12:23 (one week ago) Permalink

Lol Kokie’s. I’ve read about it.

Trϵϵship, Sunday, 12 May 2019 12:59 (one week ago) Permalink

The Levee is, or was, functionally the same as Kokie's though Kokie's was clearer in its intent. They sold only the finest laxatives that helped one talk out of turn.

Yelploaf, Sunday, 12 May 2019 16:44 (one week ago) Permalink

Having never lived in nyc proper but been a frequent visitor over the last 20 years, i've definitely noticed a change over the years in the way people I know there (older and younger, different walks of life) talk about the city and their relationship to it... a gradual transition from a sort of fun-cynical "this city is fucked up and everything is hard and all the good stuff is gone and i love it" to depressed-cynical "this city is fucked up and everything is hard and all the good stuff is gone and i wish more than anything that i could leave but i am stuck here".

Last time I was there it was almost surreal, everyone I spent time with, inevitably at some point they would circle around to the universal topic of how badly they wanted to leave, "we're thinking about in the next year or so", etc... wistfully telling stories of people they know who've left in the same way folks talk about survivors of risky operations: "she's doing FINE now, I just talked to her the other day and she says she's NEVER FELT BETTER, honestly!" Definitely some kind of slow psychic change that has not been super fun to observe from a distance.

One Eye Open, Sunday, 12 May 2019 17:15 (one week ago) Permalink

Live in New York City once, but leave before it makes you hard
live in Northern California once, but leave before it makes you soft

nonsense upon stilts (Sanpaku), Sunday, 12 May 2019 18:27 (one week ago) Permalink

Last time I went to NYC was 2005. Stayed with my sister who was on a business trip at some fancy hotel near Grand Central, visited friends in Astoria & Park Slope, saw Jonathan Richman play (!) somewhere in Williamsburg. W’burg felt measurably busier than when I was last there in 2002, but everything still seemed cool and New Yorky as a tourist might want to experience it. Has much changed since then?

Chuck_Tatum, Sunday, 12 May 2019 18:48 (one week ago) Permalink

I worked on Bedford for about 3 years in the mid 2000s. You could still walk around normally to grab lunch, find quiet moments, there would be maybe a smattering of japanese street photographers. Now it's a throng of euro/asian tourists, recent transplants, a Chase, Whole Foods, Sephora, Apple Store all in a row. Oddly enough Sea and Earwax are still around.

Yerac, Sunday, 12 May 2019 19:56 (one week ago) Permalink

I still have a velvet suit jacket I bought new off the rack at Domsey's. It's been a while.

There's more Italy than necessary. (in orbit), Monday, 13 May 2019 14:26 (one week ago) Permalink

they used to have racks of old tuxedo jackets, pants, etc! i was an idiot for not buying that stuff. oh wait, not an idiot just broke.

Lil' Brexit (Tracer Hand), Monday, 13 May 2019 14:54 (one week ago) Permalink

It would be hard to convince me that NYC has not become a bland, (even more!) expensive and sad shadow of what it was even ten years ago.

Carly Jae Vespen (Capitaine Jay Vee), Monday, 13 May 2019 17:24 (one week ago) Permalink

It’s been hit hard by the “death of retail”. Lots of empty storefronts in central-ish Manhattan neighborhoods. Perhaps more noticeable than in car-centric cities where the downtowns were hollowed out a long time ago.

o. nate, Monday, 13 May 2019 18:01 (one week ago) Permalink

i got drunk and threw up in Max Fish. That was my first NYC experience in the 90's. Every subsequent visit has been tamer and less interesting.

akm, Monday, 13 May 2019 19:34 (one week ago) Permalink

It’s been hit hard by the “death of retail”. Lots of empty storefronts in central-ish Manhattan neighborhoods. Perhaps more noticeable than in car-centric cities where the downtowns were hollowed out a long time ago.


I think manhattan has weathered this better than most places because it can support far more cafes, bars, restaurants.

iatee, Monday, 13 May 2019 19:45 (one week ago) Permalink

and the packed subways are very efficient!

a Mets fan who gave up on everything in the mid '80s (Dr Morbius), Monday, 13 May 2019 19:59 (one week ago) Permalink

i remember reading some article a couple of years ago that claimed Bleecker St mainly hosts "performative" retail now. that rents are so astronomical, only companies able to take on losses purely for the cachet of having an address on Bleecker can afford to open up a shopfront there.

Lil' Brexit (Tracer Hand), Monday, 13 May 2019 20:06 (one week ago) Permalink

I was reading a thing too where most landlords jack the prices up so much now to inflate the property value so that they can take cash money out to invest elsewhere (if they can't land the uber corporate tenant of their dreams).

Yerac, Monday, 13 May 2019 20:20 (one week ago) Permalink

i remember reading some article a couple of years ago that claimed Bleecker St mainly hosts "performative" retail now. that rents are so astronomical, only companies able to take on losses purely for the cachet of having an address on Bleecker can afford to open up a shopfront there.


this ran in december. the lede is about the founder of horrible new york society chronicler guest of a guest! god bless people with money i suppose

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/12/04/style/bleecker-street-storefronts.html

Gone are the big-name luxury labels like Marc Jacobs, Michael Kors and Ralph Lauren. The last of the bunch, Brunello Cucinelli, closed its doors in October. In their stead are young, digitally native brands, many of them run by women.

Aside from Lingua Franca and Bonberi, there is Hill House Home, Margaux, the Daily Edit, St. Frank, Huckberry, Naadam, Slightly Alabama and Buck Mason. They are a well-curated mix of small brands with big ideas, and beloved online customer bases, eager to experience them in real life.

This was exactly the thinking of Brookfield Properties, the real estate company behind Brookfield Place, the commercial complex in Lower Manhattan. Last April, after exorbitant rents and a dearth of shoppers had driven out most of the businesses along an expanse of Bleecker, Brookfield bought four retail properties with seven storefronts, and immediately set to work rethinking the landscape.

...

“Bad retail is dead,” said Ms. Diamond, whose business has grown fast since its introduction in 2016, buoyed by a new generation of shoppers.

Instagram has been especially important. “That’s basically where all the magic happens for us,” she said, noting that she conducts polls on Insta Stories before offering products like $88 white Turkish cotton towel sets debossed with the words “Soap” and “Water,” released last month.

maura, Monday, 13 May 2019 21:41 (one week ago) Permalink

just tra lala dee fuckin la, apparently, is how it goes, for some people

Lil' Brexit (Tracer Hand), Monday, 13 May 2019 22:07 (one week ago) Permalink

NYC is a vanity project.

Yerac, Monday, 13 May 2019 22:44 (one week ago) Permalink

I think I'm moving to the Bronx!

chinavision!, Tuesday, 14 May 2019 00:12 (one week ago) Permalink


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