is New York City dead?

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NYC seems genuinely out of fashion for the first time in my life, and maybe its history? Williamsburg is a punchline, Manhattan both above and below 14th St is just rich fuxors, seems like everything that used to happen in only NYC or LA now happens in LA or some other ascendant metropolis. I am not particularly worldly or sophisticated or mobile these days so I can't offer much more evidence, this is just my lay observation. What u think?

trife's rich padgett (rip van wanko), Tuesday, 6 February 2018 22:10 (eight months ago) Permalink

New York isn't dead.
There are still lots of great things about this city.
The things I value might not be the same things others value, of course.

ian, Tuesday, 6 February 2018 22:12 (eight months ago) Permalink

no you're dead

Fedora Dostoyevsky (man alive), Tuesday, 6 February 2018 22:13 (eight months ago) Permalink

okay

trife's rich padgett (rip van wanko), Tuesday, 6 February 2018 22:16 (eight months ago) Permalink

I mean, IDK, I was out in bushwick recently on a saturday night and it still seemed happening and teeming with young artsy cutting edge types brimming with energy. However it's been rough for a good amount of time now as far as being a city that young people without a bankroll or a professional job can live in, and that definitely cuts into the creative energy of the city some. I mean I don't even think the bronx offers the kinds of rents today that could be had 20 years ago in brooklyn.

Fedora Dostoyevsky (man alive), Tuesday, 6 February 2018 22:18 (eight months ago) Permalink

like if you mean "dead" as in "no longer can birth a 'scene' the way it could in the 60s/70s/80s/90s, that might be true just because rents are so high.

Fedora Dostoyevsky (man alive), Tuesday, 6 February 2018 22:21 (eight months ago) Permalink

I think that is what I mean. Although "scene" sounds a little tinny/reductive, scenes kind of matter. A city births a scene which creates stuff that matters.

trife's rich padgett (rip van wanko), Tuesday, 6 February 2018 22:23 (eight months ago) Permalink

Is Paris dead? How about London? Those cities are pretty expensive too, and have been for some time. New York is still a place that attracts ambitious young people, including artists, and I don’t expect that to change anytime soon.

o. nate, Tuesday, 6 February 2018 22:25 (eight months ago) Permalink

well yeah, I mean a scene as in the beats or the greenwich village folk scene or disco or no wave or whatever. Like the combination of cheap living and high density and educational and arts institutions and economic activity that allows for a scene that actually produces something of worth. Like I just don't think there are many corners of the city left where a bunch of musicians could live close to one another and work more or less full time on their music and pay rent waiting tables part time or whatever. And to the extent such pockets exist, they're scattered at the edges of the city instead of centralized.

Fedora Dostoyevsky (man alive), Tuesday, 6 February 2018 22:28 (eight months ago) Permalink

All cities are dead because culture travels faster through the Internet than it ever could geographically.

treeship 2, Tuesday, 6 February 2018 22:28 (eight months ago) Permalink

Rising rents making it hard for young people to live there unless they're being bankrolled is basically true for all major international cities now. Even Berlin's getting expensive these days.

Zelda Zonk, Tuesday, 6 February 2018 22:29 (eight months ago) Permalink

But hey, there are always aspiring artists with trust funds, so the city will never die

Fedora Dostoyevsky (man alive), Tuesday, 6 February 2018 22:29 (eight months ago) Permalink

i don't know the deal w/rents in NYC but i find it funny when people come out to L.A. from there and rhapsodize about how comparatively inexpensive the rent is here.

omar little, Tuesday, 6 February 2018 22:30 (eight months ago) Permalink

I don't go out much anymore, so maybe there's some lively cheap shit I'm missing out on.

It's also really hard for some people in late middle age (w/out a LUCRATIVE CAREER) to live here.

ice cream social justice (Dr Morbius), Tuesday, 6 February 2018 22:30 (eight months ago) Permalink

I'm also old and have a family and work a lot, and I just don't really know what's happening anymore. When we went out in Bushwick, we saw some local DJs/electronic artists in a little club and it was absurdly packed and seemed pretty alive.

Fedora Dostoyevsky (man alive), Tuesday, 6 February 2018 22:31 (eight months ago) Permalink

I guess another thing I've noticed is that galleries tend to show artists from all over the US and world, and I'm guessing that's more true than it used to be. But that's also an internet-erasing-borders thing.

Fedora Dostoyevsky (man alive), Tuesday, 6 February 2018 22:33 (eight months ago) Permalink

All cities are dead because culture travels faster through the Internet than it ever could geographically.

― treeship 2, Tuesday, February 6, 2018 3:28 PM (thirteen minutes ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

this is pretty otm

sleepingbag, Tuesday, 6 February 2018 22:43 (eight months ago) Permalink

it's all about the rust belt, my friend

we eat the cheeses here too

they are artisanal

our cities are the envy of all, their livability is primo

j., Tuesday, 6 February 2018 22:48 (eight months ago) Permalink

Here's how I think about New York, after my last visit there last summer:

New York is good and the only actual large city in America on the metric of everything existing there. Big cities are the ones where there is everything; you can tell Seattle is a small city because there are things that are not here.

New York is bad in that it smells of garbage. In the summer, hot garbage.

If more American cities grow to populations in the millions, New York will be more dead by comparison due declining uniqueness. Is this going to happen? Who knows.

direct to consumer online mattress brand (silby), Tuesday, 6 February 2018 22:52 (eight months ago) Permalink

i kinda want to leave, but i have a job i like okay and an unusually fortuitous living situation. there's no real reason for me to be here; i don't partake of the cultural opportunities available

it'll probably be the subway that finally drives me away

mookieproof, Tuesday, 6 February 2018 22:57 (eight months ago) Permalink

NYC: where if you can make it there as a successful artist, you can also have a successful time crowdfunding your medical bills.

Yerac, Tuesday, 6 February 2018 23:21 (eight months ago) Permalink

Telecommuting will finish it off.

omar little, Tuesday, 6 February 2018 23:23 (eight months ago) Permalink

Less of a joke, not as dead as San Francisco?

Feels like people have been waiting for a rust belt/flyover city to take over since our traditional metropolises are more 'playground for the rich' than ever but I still don't hear kids looking to move to Columbus or Pittsburgh.

louise ck (milo z), Tuesday, 6 February 2018 23:27 (eight months ago) Permalink

Have the media decided where the New Portland is?

louise ck (milo z), Tuesday, 6 February 2018 23:29 (eight months ago) Permalink

There was a Tooze tweet recently, where he showed stats on how professional actors in the USA, vastly outnumber coal miners. I forgot by much, but it was significantly much.

calzino, Tuesday, 6 February 2018 23:30 (eight months ago) Permalink

I do hear murmurings about ppl aspiring to move to Pittsburgh, Detroit, Denver, a few others

trife's rich padgett (rip van wanko), Tuesday, 6 February 2018 23:31 (eight months ago) Permalink

According to @BLS_gov and @TheEconomist there are 51,200 people employed as coal miners in the US v. 785k in 1920. In 2017 there are more florists, actors and personal fitness instructors than miners. pic.twitter.com/m913tHokI2

— Adam Tooze (@adam_tooze) January 2, 2018



I was misquoting it slightly

calzino, Tuesday, 6 February 2018 23:33 (eight months ago) Permalink

Less of a joke, not as dead as San Francisco?

Feels like people have been waiting for a rust belt/flyover city to take over since our traditional metropolises are more 'playground for the rich' than ever but I still don't hear kids looking to move to Columbus or Pittsburgh.

― louise ck (milo z), Tuesday, February 6, 2018 6:27 PM (seven minutes ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

I hear rumblings about Pittsburgh now and then. Also tons of my friends moved to Philly over the years and it did seem to be producing bands at a good clip for a while.

Fedora Dostoyevsky (man alive), Tuesday, 6 February 2018 23:35 (eight months ago) Permalink

And no one talks about how many administrative assistant, secretarial and receptionist jobs were lost in NYC due to automation, because... women, a lot of woc. Breadwinners for their families. Fuck coal miners and their sooty tears.

Yerac, Tuesday, 6 February 2018 23:37 (eight months ago) Permalink

I’m moving back to new york soon bc of my job but it’s not a nice place to live.

treeship 2, Tuesday, 6 February 2018 23:39 (eight months ago) Permalink

I still have my apartment in Astoria. But I really don't want to go back. I dread having to deal with the subway.

Yerac, Tuesday, 6 February 2018 23:41 (eight months ago) Permalink

The subway is inexcusably unpleasant

treeship 2, Tuesday, 6 February 2018 23:44 (eight months ago) Permalink

i get more anxious/aggro in nyc in my old age. i don't know what it is. impatient. people bug me more. i think its just a case of the olds. i will always love the city though. in general. i've loved hanging out there my whole life.

it really is me being set in my ways. we stayed in brooklyn one summer with the kids and i seriously didn't want to leave the hotel room. get on a subway to go to a museum in manhattan? kill me now.

scott seward, Tuesday, 6 February 2018 23:45 (eight months ago) Permalink

Everything here is comically more stressful than any other place.

treeship 2, Tuesday, 6 February 2018 23:45 (eight months ago) Permalink

I car commute to the suburbs now and it's glorious to not be taking the subway anymore

Fedora Dostoyevsky (man alive), Tuesday, 6 February 2018 23:45 (eight months ago) Permalink

Why is the ceiling always dripping down there?

treeship 2, Tuesday, 6 February 2018 23:47 (eight months ago) Permalink

Second and third tier cities could attract people by just showing how messed up the MTA is in their promo material.

I haven't lived in nyc full time for almost two years now. I miss it, but I really don't miss it. Just the thought of having to take the subway to work gives me anxiety.

Yerac, Tuesday, 6 February 2018 23:48 (eight months ago) Permalink

Part of me really regrets accepting another job here. As a teen my dream was living here but it’s not that fun.

treeship 2, Tuesday, 6 February 2018 23:49 (eight months ago) Permalink

NYC misses Yerac and Znarf

ian, Tuesday, 6 February 2018 23:52 (eight months ago) Permalink

Fix the subway and get rid of GOP madness and I am there!

Yerac, Tuesday, 6 February 2018 23:55 (eight months ago) Permalink

fuck the subway, i drive most places now. and when i do take the subway it's in the middle of the day.
sorry can't do anything about the GOP.

ian, Tuesday, 6 February 2018 23:57 (eight months ago) Permalink

Do you have to go in and out of manhattan a lot or no?

treeship 2, Tuesday, 6 February 2018 23:59 (eight months ago) Permalink

I remember taking the subway maybe 1-2 times a month when I worked in Williamsburg. It was the best. My tweety truck got sold like 3 years ago.

Yerac, Wednesday, 7 February 2018 00:00 (eight months ago) Permalink

i've honestly not experienced the subway horrors that many have, but i will say that the subway is nearly unusable on nights and weekends

hoooyaaargh it's me satan (voodoo chili), Wednesday, 7 February 2018 00:01 (eight months ago) Permalink

just not enough trains

hoooyaaargh it's me satan (voodoo chili), Wednesday, 7 February 2018 00:01 (eight months ago) Permalink

I want to get myself to love it again.

treeship 2, Wednesday, 7 February 2018 00:03 (eight months ago) Permalink

Not the subway—the city

treeship 2, Wednesday, 7 February 2018 00:03 (eight months ago) Permalink

The last job I had there, I almost had a breakdown every time I took the subway. I would sometimes using the plodding R so I wouldn't have to deal with the insaneness of the 4,5,6 during rush hour. That train really has the worst people to be stuck with in the tunnel.

Yerac, Wednesday, 7 February 2018 00:03 (eight months ago) Permalink

I do drive into the city regularly. Many mornings I drive in and drop my wife off at work and then drive home. It helps that we live near the Manhattan Bridge and her office is in chinatown. We also might drive in and park for any number of special events.

ian, Wednesday, 7 February 2018 00:06 (eight months ago) Permalink

Ive been a non-car-owning adult in Seattle for over 5 years now! And we barely have any trains at all.

direct to consumer online mattress brand (silby), Thursday, 8 February 2018 22:35 (eight months ago) Permalink

I also didn't own a car when I last lived in Northampton MA tbh but I was unemployed

direct to consumer online mattress brand (silby), Thursday, 8 February 2018 22:36 (eight months ago) Permalink

You don't need a car if there's nowhere you want to go, is the thing.

direct to consumer online mattress brand (silby), Thursday, 8 February 2018 22:36 (eight months ago) Permalink

(nearly) all my Indian meals come from Kinara in Pk Slope

ice cream social justice (Dr Morbius), Thursday, 8 February 2018 22:39 (eight months ago) Permalink

Re: Los Angeles, the big difference is there are things you really *want* to do, reasons people move to LA for in the first place, like the ocean (or yeah, Venice, Santa Monica, Malibu, etc.), the mountains and the desert, that take a long time to get to, and only by car, and typically in traffic. Vs. something like Fort Tryon, which I just had to google (looks neat!).

Amazingly, I know an increasing number of people in NY (mostly Brooklyn and Queens) with kids. I have no idea how they do it. Kids without a car seems really hard to me.

Josh in Chicago, Thursday, 8 February 2018 22:41 (eight months ago) Permalink

I have a car shhhhhh

Fedora Dostoyevsky (man alive), Thursday, 8 February 2018 22:43 (eight months ago) Permalink

when i see 2 to 3 family members teaming up to hump a military grade stroller sideways down the subway stairs, as a queue of blocked impatient randos accumulates upstream of them, I just think no X 1000

Winter. Dickens. Yes. (Jon not Jon), Thursday, 8 February 2018 22:58 (eight months ago) Permalink

lived in NYC for 28 years: '89 to 2012 in the EV, and since then in Ditmas park/ Kensington (Morbius said at some point that he lives nearby). While living there in the 2000s, I began to hate Manhattan so much that going to visit girlfriends and most of my friends in Slope area was incredibly refreshing, And now living past the Slope and on the bleeding edge after which beards and warby Parkers are unheard of is so different from my life in the EV that it seems like I have moved very far away.

I never thought I wanted to have a baby here and would move before then. But my wife's job is good, so we stayed when my daughter was born last december. We had a car because I thought we would need it and from this part of brooklyn to coney island, everyone has a car and can easily deal with it.

Then this past October, said car caught fire with me and the baby inside on the BQE right before the Kiucsyncki (however the fuck you spell it) Bridge and soon totally immolated. a subaru, safest car on the market. It's really something to walk around on the breakdown lane of the BQE, cradling your infant daughter while other motorists scream curses at you. Well before that, I had long thought that an area where NYC still has a so-called edge of dickishness is with drivers and driving.

veronica moser, Thursday, 8 February 2018 23:02 (eight months ago) Permalink

Xpost: men with beards in Borough park and Midwood are of a different stripe than what I refer to above

veronica moser, Thursday, 8 February 2018 23:04 (eight months ago) Permalink

veronica, i'm kensington; where at?

Chocolate-covered gummy bears? Not ruling those lil' guys out. (ulysses), Friday, 9 February 2018 00:11 (eight months ago) Permalink

oh wait, we've done this i think

Chocolate-covered gummy bears? Not ruling those lil' guys out. (ulysses), Friday, 9 February 2018 00:11 (eight months ago) Permalink

Man I am sorry about that automotive ordeal that sounds fucking awful and scary

Winter. Dickens. Yes. (Jon not Jon), Friday, 9 February 2018 00:17 (eight months ago) Permalink

fwiw the oceans (or the beach towns) are not something i particularly want to go to. they're certainly not why i moved to LA they're just not a part of life for me in LA (or most of my acquaintances), in the same way that the beach (or tbh, manhattan) wasn't for me in new york. i go to them when i have visitors, in the same way i went to midtown when i had visitors in new york. if you've moved to LA for the ocean (or a job in santa monica or whatever), you live near the ocean.

𝔠𝔞𝔢𝔨 (caek), Friday, 9 February 2018 00:32 (eight months ago) Permalink

The internet does have the weird effect of letting you just parachute into any scene you want with no prior knowledge. Pre-internet I never would have found BNSC and been able to show up on a random saturday night as probably the oldest person there by 5-10 years. I still suspect people largely do stuff in the immediate neighborhoods around them though, bc cabs are expensive and the subway takes forever

― Fedora Dostoyevsky (man alive), Thursday, February 8, 2018 3:33 PM (four hours ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

fwiw the new trend in cool parties is to have 0 social media presence and spread only by word of mouth. in part a response to police busting afterhours spots & underground venues, in part response to this

flopson, Friday, 9 February 2018 00:40 (eight months ago) Permalink

People constantly looking for something else to do as soon as they get to the first thing because they know there is something else going on and it's easy enough to get there. Vs. Los Angeles, which requires a certain commitment, due to travel times.

i think this happens everywhere. or at least, it did in montreal. which is p dense so i guess yeah. a friend in my early twenties was infamous for a zeligish ability to be at every part in the city every night, pronouncing each of them 'dead' within minutes of arrival

flopson, Friday, 9 February 2018 00:46 (eight months ago) Permalink

oh god I both understand that because the ability to hop around until you find something that is great is justifiable when you can do it

but some people just do that every time, like a night out means just rotating to a new location every X minutes until bar close

mh, Friday, 9 February 2018 02:08 (eight months ago) Permalink

And now living past the Slope and on the bleeding edge after which beards and warby Parkers are unheard of is so different from my life in the EV that it seems like I have moved very far away.

This very much describes where I live. The only vintage clothing I see in my neighborhood is worn by central asian jews without any fashion intent.

Fedora Dostoyevsky (man alive), Friday, 9 February 2018 03:52 (eight months ago) Permalink

I mean not literally, but there is maybe like 1 remotely hipstery or trendy person for every 50 of those.

Fedora Dostoyevsky (man alive), Friday, 9 February 2018 03:52 (eight months ago) Permalink

kensington is newly hipster infiltrated and i'm aware i'm part of the problem but it's mostly families of the type that can't afford park slope or who have been here for a long time or (more commonly) folks who own. living across the street from a school, between a graveyard and park, just far enough away from the main drags where nobody much drives through and on a block where all the businesses close at ten is a tremendous blessing.

Chocolate-covered gummy bears? Not ruling those lil' guys out. (ulysses), Friday, 9 February 2018 04:02 (eight months ago) Permalink

Since this is the most active New York thread I'll just ask here...

A bit hard to describe what I'm looking for. Recommendations for calm-ish bars or venues playing good music at non-deafening levels. The kinds of places where you could sit and drink and read or write at the end of a day of traipsing around the city. Places playing ambient, drones, minimal techno, minimal anything really.

I know about Nowadays in Queens which looks promising.

Hans Holbein (Chinchilla Volapük), Friday, 9 February 2018 08:46 (eight months ago) Permalink

seattle was quite walkable but not as much as NYC. NYC not a patch on basically any european/UK city tho obv

||||||||, Saturday, 10 February 2018 14:12 (eight months ago) Permalink

I can't with Nowadays. It's outdoors, right? You pay money to get inside the fence and then sit outside and then you pay money for the food and drinks? Edited to add: I guess they have an indoors now.

Anyway. Biking is so great in New York if you're not spread out over the entire city! Like between the LES and North Brooklyn, or getting around within a few miles' span. Not as much when you're in, say, Gowanus, and talking about going to the city at 1am, like some fashionable people I overheard last weekend on the sidewalk. I have so many great memories of riding between Crown Heights and Wburg over the years, mostly to meet ilxors tbh.

Conic section rebellion 44 (in orbit), Saturday, 10 February 2018 15:28 (eight months ago) Permalink

Then I got a scooter and basically stopped biking. I miss it sometimes but the scooter life is so amazing. You can get places not-sweaty!

Conic section rebellion 44 (in orbit), Saturday, 10 February 2018 15:31 (eight months ago) Permalink

i wanna get an e-bike except dickhead de blasio is intent on outlawing them for some reason

, Saturday, 10 February 2018 15:53 (eight months ago) Permalink

Nowadays has an indoors and a full soundsystem and kitchen and everything.

dan selzer, Saturday, 10 February 2018 16:01 (eight months ago) Permalink

(of course I haven't been though)

dan selzer, Saturday, 10 February 2018 16:01 (eight months ago) Permalink

There was no cover when I was there.

Fedora Dostoyevsky (man alive), Saturday, 10 February 2018 16:09 (eight months ago) Permalink

e-bikes are being subsidized this year by my city, up to 600 euros! but the new docked bikeshare bikes (as opposed to all the new non-docked bikeshare bikes all over the place like gobee & ofo, which interest me too) are e-bikes so that might suffice for me. at least for side-ish streets, I'm not gonna bike on well-trafficked streets here, because they're pretty narrow yet people find ways to fit multiple lanes of traffic.

droit au butt (Euler), Saturday, 10 February 2018 16:31 (eight months ago) Permalink

ofo needs its own thread. I think they might be the locusts the bible refers to in revelation

trife's rich padgett (rip van wanko), Saturday, 10 February 2018 16:36 (eight months ago) Permalink

Nowadays is very nice imo and feels hip without being vibey or exclusionary at all. I haven’t been since they added the indoors though, apparently.

Fedora Dostoyevsky (man alive), Saturday, 10 February 2018 17:14 (eight months ago) Permalink

You don't need a car if there's nowhere you want to go, is the thing.

^^^ gets it

j., Saturday, 10 February 2018 17:39 (eight months ago) Permalink

Relevant to this thread.

grawlix (unperson), Saturday, 10 February 2018 19:41 (eight months ago) Permalink

Also relevant, I hope:
Redd's Roster of Restaurants of the Old Weird New York

Psmith, Pharmacist (James Redd and the Blecchs), Saturday, 10 February 2018 19:43 (eight months ago) Permalink

No blight is as depressing as rent blight :(

direct to consumer online mattress brand (silby), Saturday, 10 February 2018 21:11 (eight months ago) Permalink

belatedly: the subways may be hell but so far the buses are not, at least not in my area

algorithm is a dancer (katherine), Sunday, 11 February 2018 02:14 (eight months ago) Permalink

visiting nyc last year I was able to walk or hit up the subways for everything I wanted to do, mostly work in midtown manhattan but stayed in the east village for a bit and travelled to brooklyn for a show. the subway system routes were ok but the state of them made me sad, as if the system was there for what I wanted but my needs were scorned

mh, Sunday, 11 February 2018 02:19 (eight months ago) Permalink

the bus system is not in freefall but it is in real trouble - ridership is in decline despite population growth, and mostly people seem to be chalking it up to the unreliability of service, which in turn is largely due to the difficulty of implementing any major changes which would actually fix things, like truly dedicated bus lanes and signal prioritization. anecdotally I've had a ton of issues in the last six months to a year with late and bunched buses.

Doctor Casino, Sunday, 11 February 2018 03:34 (eight months ago) Permalink

to compare again, the extent to which London public transport is great is basically the extent to which its buses are great. dedicated bus/bike/taxi lanes on most big roads, the congestion charge obv. relatively nice vehicles. you rarely need to wait more than 6 or 7 minutes. it doesn't feel low-rent to take a bus, it feels normal

illegal economic migration (Tracer Hand), Sunday, 11 February 2018 11:23 (eight months ago) Permalink

The Paris bus system is also very good, matching what you said about London’s. I take it as often as I can over the metro because I’m lazy about stairs; this is why its ridership leans older than the metro’s.

droit au butt (Euler), Sunday, 11 February 2018 14:32 (eight months ago) Permalink

I mean, I've never taken the bus during morning rush hour because it already takes long enough to get to work via the subway, but I take the M4 and M5 all the time coming home and compared to the 1 they're both absolutely delightful

algorithm is a dancer (katherine), Monday, 12 February 2018 00:46 (eight months ago) Permalink

Xpost that is the other thing for us. K cannot drive so moving to any other city equals in her mind, perhaps correctly, isolation and loss of independence.

― Winter. Dickens. Yes. (Jon not Jon), Thursday, February 8, 2018 4:37 AM (four days ago)

Jon I don't know how long you've been with your partner or where she's lived but you used to be in Seattle! you can walk almost anywhere, or catch a bus to where you can walk to the other bits. the tram has opened up a few neighbourhoods but will take another decade and drivers aging out of the population (so that funding can go back to transit) to be as transformative as it should be already.

I doubt any city in the world could beat NYC for film.

Haribo Hancock (sic), Monday, 12 February 2018 08:14 (eight months ago) Permalink

We’ve been together 14 years, so no, not stretching back to my Seattle days. But you make a good point. Manageable size, good transit, car not needed, pre-built friend pool due to comics scene. Is it much cheaper than nyc/sf these days though?

Winter. Dickens. Yes. (Jon not Jon), Thursday, 15 February 2018 16:28 (eight months ago) Permalink

Rent has been climbing like wild for years but the trend may be finally leveling off. Unlike San Francisco there are actually new apartment buildings being built, though we still haven’t got the political will to start bulldozing single family homes.

direct to consumer online mattress brand (silby), Thursday, 15 February 2018 16:39 (eight months ago) Permalink

Doesn’t Seattle have more working cranes on high rise construction sites than any city in the us?

𝔠𝔞𝔢𝔨 (caek), Thursday, 15 February 2018 17:38 (eight months ago) Permalink

*Flintstones voice* eh, it's a living

Number None, Thursday, 15 February 2018 18:24 (eight months ago) Permalink

When a man is tired of London etc.

Moo Vaughn, Monday, 26 February 2018 20:09 (seven months ago) Permalink

four months pass...

A little bit of apocalypse that doesn't involve the subway, for once

http://gothamist.com/2018/07/19/exploded_steam_pipe_asbestos.php

Exhibit C: there is LITERALLY a man on a @CitiBikeNYC commuting to work out of a plume of steam in this video https://t.co/eCLCizPdXC

— Rebecca (@RebeccaEgler) July 19, 2018

the ignatius rock of ignorance (Dr Morbius), Thursday, 19 July 2018 20:15 (three months ago) Permalink

All,

Further update:

Please advise your employees to steer clear of the area on 5th Avenue between 19th St and 22nd St. due to environmental concerns related to the material that was dispersed from the explosion. Office of Emergency Management is currently involved in the cleanup and environmental testing to ensure there is no additional danger.

Thank you,

Anthony

dan selzer, Thursday, 19 July 2018 23:59 (three months ago) Permalink


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