NYRB Publishing

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I'm not sure when I specifically noticed that I had been buying and reading a lot of their books but probably a third of the books I have read this year have been reprints that NYRB Publishing have put out. They have clever covers. They're cheap. They're often books I should have read or one should have read some time ago if one were older. Has anybody else here taken notice of them?

Le présent se dégrade, d'abord en histoire, puis en (Michael White), Friday, 24 July 2009 15:29 (fourteen years ago) link

yah--Warlock by Oakley Hall and Sleepless Nights by Elizabeth Hardwick are favorites of mine

Mr. Que, Friday, 24 July 2009 15:34 (fourteen years ago) link

I'll have to check those out.

Le présent se dégrade, d'abord en histoire, puis en (Michael White), Friday, 24 July 2009 15:36 (fourteen years ago) link

yes i always take note of the books these guys put out--they tend to be good and all that ive read so far have had excellent introductions or forewords or afterwords or whatever

max, Friday, 24 July 2009 15:36 (fourteen years ago) link

also this sounds dumb but the paper they use is really nice--the pages don't fade like other trade paperbacks. also, the font they use is easy to read. totally stupid stuff, but these books are really well made.

Mr. Que, Friday, 24 July 2009 15:37 (fourteen years ago) link

http://www.nybooks.com/shop/product?usca_p=t&product_id=7933

^^ i picked this one up at the bookstore the other day and ended up reading almost half of it, really amazing

max, Friday, 24 July 2009 15:38 (fourteen years ago) link

Just enjoyed reading this one http://www.nybooks.com/shop/product?usca_p=t&product_id=7959. I managed to avoid contact with any plot summary beforehand. If you click on the link and the cover looks interesting, click right back to here and avoid reading the synopsis.

Horace Silver Machine (James Redd and the Blecchs), Friday, 24 July 2009 15:45 (fourteen years ago) link

but these books are really well made.

Not totally stupid. I'm not in publishing or anything but I read a healthy number of books and the fact that one new (to me, of course) house was putting out or re-publishing so many books that I enjoyed struck me as, if nothing else, good business. Reprints can't be all that expensive to get the rights to, the forwards are not inane nor spoiler-filled, the covers, font, and general quality are excellent. I don't mean to make a huge deal out of it but when a boutique-y place like this has provided me such pleasure, I figured I'd just see if anyone else liked them, too.

Le présent se dégrade, d'abord en histoire, puis en (Michael White), Friday, 24 July 2009 15:47 (fourteen years ago) link

i think i posted this cover on the moomin thread, but i will do so again. i would like a print of this.

http://www.nybooks.com/shop/product-file/31/thes7931/product.jpg

caek, Friday, 24 July 2009 15:48 (fourteen years ago) link

i have complained elsewhere that the john collier collection is among the worst books i have bought new in the past decade in terms of print quality and readability. typographically the forward is ok but looks like it was printed on a cheap laser printer. i assume this is how the other NYRB books look. but the content itself is awful. looks like they xeroxed a second hand copy (which is probably not far from the truth).

caek, Friday, 24 July 2009 15:50 (fourteen years ago) link

I've bought a bunch of these that I still haven't got around to including the L.P. Hartley trilogy, a Patrick Hamilton and one of those Corvo books. Oh yeah, and the Dud Avocado.

Horace Silver Machine (James Redd and the Blecchs), Friday, 24 July 2009 15:53 (fourteen years ago) link

but the content itself is awful

the appearance of the content, i mean. the stories are great.

caek, Friday, 24 July 2009 15:53 (fourteen years ago) link

(if a little racist)

caek, Friday, 24 July 2009 15:53 (fourteen years ago) link

i think a lot of them--and this seems to be true of a lot of smaller (and i assume poorer) boutique and academic publishers like verso--seem to just re-use the same type setting as whatever the last edition was, which can lead to v jarring differences in font, spacing, layout etc., among books ostensibly in the same series

max, Friday, 24 July 2009 15:56 (fourteen years ago) link

I love them. They are my favourite classics publishing house by some way. They are nice to look at and often to read, and just have the most interesting titles. Some random favourites: The Glass Bees, The Invention of Morel, The Lore and language of Schoolchildren, A Month in the Country, all that Simenon. But I'd have to look at my shelves. Oh - the Notebooks of Joseph Joubert. And yes, Tim Robinson, absolutely. And Kaputt!

(Londoners: generally a lot of NYRB remainders upstairs in the Gower St. Waterstone's)

woofwoofwoof, Friday, 24 July 2009 15:59 (fourteen years ago) link

thanks for the tip

caek, Friday, 24 July 2009 16:01 (fourteen years ago) link

i read the invention of morel and was not really feelin it tbh

max, Friday, 24 July 2009 16:01 (fourteen years ago) link

Really? THat's too bad. Love that one and The Glass Bees.

Good point about the jarring fonts of others. Also good point by M. White about the forewords and afterwords.

Horace Silver Machine (James Redd and the Blecchs), Friday, 24 July 2009 16:03 (fourteen years ago) link

One publishing house that I've gone off is Europa Editions. They've got some good Italian stuff, but a lot of what they put out is just kind of Euro-bestsellers with some dusting of intellectual pretension.

Horace Silver Machine (James Redd and the Blecchs), Friday, 24 July 2009 16:06 (fourteen years ago) link

Been meaning to read That Awful Mess, but I'm afraid it will just go on the shelf next to the others I've gotta get around to.

Horace Silver Machine (James Redd and the Blecchs), Friday, 24 July 2009 16:09 (fourteen years ago) link

multi-xp

I liked Morel a lot a few years ago - for me got the mix of reality-twisting oddness and 19th-century Stevenson-y island adventure about right (ie it worked as middle-distance Borges), but I think I was moping about unobtainable women at the time so I might find it a bit less appealing now.

Haven't got more than a few pages into his one about a dog though.

woofwoofwoof, Friday, 24 July 2009 16:12 (fourteen years ago) link

I enjoyed 'The Awful Mess...', but from what I gather, it's what Bierce disdainfully referred to as 'novel in dialect' - apparently Gaddo captured Roman slang really, really well though how you would translate that is a complete mystery to me.

Is 'Morel' by Bioy Casares? Wasn't he pals w/Borges or something?

Le présent se dégrade, d'abord en histoire, puis en (Michael White), Friday, 24 July 2009 16:14 (fourteen years ago) link

Yes, they were great mates I believe. Also collaborated with him on some stories. So Morel being Borges-y is very understandable, but I meant it's successful in that - doesn't seem like a rip, seems to be synthesising the same stuff well over a different length.

woofwoofwoof, Friday, 24 July 2009 16:23 (fourteen years ago) link

borges wrote an intro to morel, that i believe is included in the NYRB edition

i was disappointed by morel in part because it was recommended to me very highly--it had the borgesian plot mechanics w/out the economy of style that makes borges so gripping; i felt like the man himself could have done the same thing twice as well in half as many pages

max, Friday, 24 July 2009 16:25 (fourteen years ago) link

Well, that is Borges' forte, isn't it?

Le présent se dégrade, d'abord en histoire, puis en (Michael White), Friday, 24 July 2009 16:44 (fourteen years ago) link

i would read all these nyrb books.

seriously, they all look appealing to me. of the ones i've seen.

scott seward, Friday, 24 July 2009 18:39 (fourteen years ago) link

Well, that is Borges' forte, isn't it?

Indeed. He could have done it infinitely better with no pages.

Horace Silver Machine (James Redd and the Blecchs), Friday, 24 July 2009 18:40 (fourteen years ago) link

Warlock by Oakley Hall

^^^ i think this may be the only one of these i read but it was dope. oh - looking ive also read the stephen leacock nonsense novels, which was okay.

here comes the slug line (Lamp), Friday, 24 July 2009 18:47 (fourteen years ago) link

For those who enjoyed Morel, I also recommend his similarly Wells-ian Plan of Escape. His later stuff I don't like too much.

Horace Silver Machine (James Redd and the Blecchs), Friday, 24 July 2009 18:55 (fourteen years ago) link

Oh, Michael, I really liked The Dud Avacado -- you recommend the other Dundy as well?

It's true, these things have always looked a cut above, from the get-go.

nabisco, Friday, 24 July 2009 20:33 (fourteen years ago) link

Cesare Pavese - The Moon and the Bonfire

Really on the WILL WILL read: Victor Serge - The Unforgiving Years, and Henry De Montherlant

As for the Gadda - The 'mess' is part of the point and integral, but this seems amplified by the almost impossible job of translation of those linguistic puns! Still it does hold its fascination and the guy has written widely on a range of topics. I really hope that bringing this translation out will mean more novels and writings to come in English, but I do fear it was the wrong book of his to bring out, as much as I liked it.

xyzzzz__, Friday, 24 July 2009 20:36 (fourteen years ago) link

I really liked The Dud Avacado -- you recommend the other Dundy as well?

Yes! Unfortunately it's in England as opposed to France but the plot is neater and the ending far superior to the ending of TDA, which I found a little artlessly abrupt. You can tell that Dundy is more grown-up or something. It's a hoot.

I find Montherlant rather depressing. His prose is rather gorgeous in French but he's such a bitter misogynist.

I seriously, like scott seward, would read almost all of these (except for the translations from the French) but the one that's next for me is probably Zweig's 'The Post-Office Girl'.

It's a posthumous novel, just now translated into English and it's a 2009 PEN Translation Prize Finalist. Also, I just love Zweig.

Le présent se dégrade, d'abord en histoire, puis en (Michael White), Friday, 24 July 2009 20:45 (fourteen years ago) link

yah the zweig u linked sounds fantastic

here comes the slug line (Lamp), Friday, 24 July 2009 20:49 (fourteen years ago) link

turn yr zweig on

max, Friday, 24 July 2009 21:01 (fourteen years ago) link

The Post Office Girl is, indeed, fantastic. I love NYRB--beautiful books, and most of those I've read have been great.

When two tribes go to war, he always gets picked last (James Morrison), Saturday, 25 July 2009 02:40 (fourteen years ago) link

wasn't there a thread on this before?

i have read and enjoyed:

the Joyce Cary trilogy - Herself Surprised/The Horse's Mouth/To be A Pilgrim
Darcy O'Brien - A Way of Life Like Any Other
J.F. Powers - Morte D'Urban
Georges Simenon - Three Bedrooms In Manhattan

velko, Saturday, 25 July 2009 09:14 (fourteen years ago) link

oh yeah, High Wind In Jamaica - Richard Hughes too

and i have The Go-Between on my shelf,bought it a few years ago and forgot it so I will start that in the next couple of weeks

velko, Saturday, 25 July 2009 09:32 (fourteen years ago) link

Darcy O'Brien - A Way of Life Like Any Other

Seconding this. But don't make the same mistake I did and read his true crime books afterward. Which are well written, but will give you unpleasant heebie jeebies for a long time after reading.

Horace Silver Machine (James Redd and the Blecchs), Saturday, 25 July 2009 12:17 (fourteen years ago) link

Sleepless Nights by Elizabeth Hardwick
Seconding this one too. Will take this opportunity to recommend Great Granny Webster by Caroline Blackwood. I think they've got another one by her as well.

Horace Silver Machine (James Redd and the Blecchs), Saturday, 25 July 2009 12:24 (fourteen years ago) link

i really like the thing mentioned upthread, where the typesetting is a slightly wonky copy of the previous edition's. it's nice to have that reminder of er the history of the book you're reading as a series of previous physical objects

(/wank)

their children's books are occasionally quite gorgeous; i bought this for my nephew and never actually gave it to him

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/515bHOayxkL._SL500_AA240_.jpg

thomp, Saturday, 25 July 2009 15:22 (fourteen years ago) link

Didn't Buzzati write 'The Tartar Steppe'?

Le présent se dégrade, d'abord en histoire, puis en (Michael White), Saturday, 25 July 2009 17:19 (fourteen years ago) link

Think it was called The Desert of The Tartars but yeah, that's the same guy.

Found another one to recommend: The Waste Books by George Chistoph Lichtenberg. Perhaps will post some cherce nuggets in the near future.

Found a bunch more I've purchased but never gotten round to reading. It's a little depressing. Ah, M. White! Ah, humanity!

Horace Silver Machine (James Redd and the Blecchs), Saturday, 25 July 2009 22:41 (fourteen years ago) link

one month passes...

http://www.nybooks.com/shop/product-file/52/memo9152/product.jpg

!!!!! these dudes have been str8 killing it w/east european translation l8ly

also nice that they put out that mavis gallant collection - penguin canada had a slim and pretty collection of eight stories that i have but this one seems tighter and better chosen also bought memoirs of an anti-semite, vladimir sorkin's ice and the chrysalids (lol)

as the hart pants after the water brooks even so my blashphemous soul (Lamp), Wednesday, 23 September 2009 09:34 (fourteen years ago) link

That's just up my alley

xyzzzz__, Wednesday, 23 September 2009 20:48 (fourteen years ago) link

Memoirs of an Anti-Semite and The Chrysalids are arse-kickingly good. Must read Memories of the Future!

When two tribes go to war, he always gets picked last (James Morrison), Wednesday, 23 September 2009 23:43 (fourteen years ago) link

i would like to read memoirs of an anti-semite. i have a couple of these on my shelf that i haven't read (because they're on my shelf...). they're very pretty!

steamed hams (harbl), Wednesday, 23 September 2009 23:46 (fourteen years ago) link

I have been enjoying some of those mid-century novels of the American left, which I barely knew existed: "Clark Gifford's Body" by Kenneth Fearing; "The Unposessed" by Tess Schlesinger; "What's For Dinner" by James Schuyler, that Lionel Trilling novel, all variously fine, I'm sure there were one or two more.

I love publishing houses I can trust when I'm not sure whether to take a punt or not. I recently took a punt on "The Ten Thousand Things" by Maria Dermout, and I was pleased I did. It ended up reminding me of "Sleepless Nights" by E. Hardwick herself, which is somewhere near where we came in.

It's costing me money, though: now I want the nice NYRB editions not inferior editions from elsewhere. Time was I'd have been very pleased to pick up the Virago copy of "The Old Man And Me" available for pennies off Amazon...

Tim, Thursday, 24 September 2009 13:19 (fourteen years ago) link

After reading Stephen Vizinczey's review of The Death of My Brother Abel I don't plan to read anything by von Rezzori.

alimosina, Thursday, 24 September 2009 19:20 (fourteen years ago) link

haha that's funny because i got memoirs out today. but it was the viking edition :(

steamed hams (harbl), Thursday, 24 September 2009 19:39 (fourteen years ago) link

Really good turn for these guys to give away some of the essays for free -- really enjoyed reading Toni Morrison on Camara Laye.

Right now I really want to have a look at the Walser short story collection. Really.

One slight negative => Let me suggest the way its bound/the design of the books doesn't quite suit anything over 250 pages. But I speak as someone who has not given an awful lot of thought to the way books are designed.

xyzzzz__, Wednesday, 7 October 2009 21:28 (fourteen years ago) link

vladimir sorokin's ice

this was weird its not "good" but it was surprisingly tense and creepy. i missed my subway stop one night - sunday maybe? - reading part I and i wish that hed kept up with that. the socialist realist parody section was grating i mean i guess it was supposed to be? and the level of contempt is hard to forgive - it feels like a book that has everything figured out and doesnt really want to know its world any better just to heap derision on its many failings. also it was really violent...

im going to try some of the tatyana tolstaya stuff they have next

h3len k. (Lamp), Wednesday, 21 October 2009 03:35 (fourteen years ago) link

Anyone checked out Andrey Platonov? Read an intro to one of the books on the NYRB page, the translator does compare him to Musil/Proust elsewhere but those comparisons always come across as more like blind enthusiasm.

xyzzzz__, Wednesday, 21 October 2009 10:00 (fourteen years ago) link

I picked up the NYRB edition of the Opies' Lore and Language of Schoolschildren yesterday (which my Amazon reseller seems to have liberated from Newton le Willows library) which looks fantastic on first glance (includes an extensive etymology and mapping of the use of "fainites"!).

Stevie T, Wednesday, 21 October 2009 10:09 (fourteen years ago) link

Really on the WILL WILL read: Victor Serge - The Unforgiving Years

oh man this is so good, check out his Memoirs of a Revolutionary too.

I've read one Platonov for a class - The Foundation Pit. It's weird as hell and terribly sad. I think I liked it, I was probably the only person in class to finish it. I checked out one of his books of stories which I never really gave a chance to; about 20 pages in it was getting so over-the-top in Russian misery that I was having trouble not laughing, and then I had to return it to the library.

clotpoll, Wednesday, 21 October 2009 10:37 (fourteen years ago) link

I try to get these for the library whenever I see them. Lately we've gotten No Tomorrow by Vivant Denon, The Cost of Living by Mavis Gallant, and Hard Rain Falling by Don Carpenter.

Other paperback publishers who consistently make me happy: New Directions, Editions Gallimard.

Virginia Plain, Thursday, 22 October 2009 02:51 (fourteen years ago) link

I've read one Platonov for a class - The Foundation Pit. It's weird as hell and terribly sad. I think I liked it,

Read, not for a class, but for "fun" -- very sad, very odd, sometimes hard-going, I _think_ I liked it as well.

Summary: a bunch of Soviet workers are digging the foundations for a massive utopian communist self-contained city thing, but it may actually be a Stalinist mass grave

When two tribes go to war, he always gets picked last (James Morrison), Thursday, 22 October 2009 03:42 (fourteen years ago) link

i think Foundation Pit is one of Platonov weakest stories (actually, it's a novella) maybe cause it's super realistic,dry,too political and with too much dialouge while Platonov merits are in creating a poetic,lyrical,closed to surreal, but very gentle atmosphere, which is closer to Kafka, Schultz, Gombrowicz and a little Cortazar than anything else

Zeno, Thursday, 22 October 2009 08:33 (fourteen years ago) link

Well I do have a taste for political fiction -- I read the intro to Soul (the short story collection also bought out NYRB) and what did draw my attention was the politics (with one eye on the craft of writing; 'dry' and 'political' needn't necessarily go together), and that he wrote the majority of his works (which includes essays on many subjects, writers that do write really widely is a good sign to me) in that 1917-1929 period in Russian history, as I'm really interested in Russian fiction from that period.

It would probably be disappointing to me if it was some kind of Kafka knock-off.

xyzzzz__, Thursday, 22 October 2009 09:31 (fourteen years ago) link

it isn't a Kafka knock-off - it's very unique,though it resemble Kafka .
in a way,all of Platonov's writing is political, but the genius of his writing,imo,is when the political issues are the subtext of the story,not the story itself: isnt that (among other things) what makes a great art - the beauty of the transformation from "message" to "imagery"?
he did it not only because he was a talented writer but also because of the censorship and fear of the goverment,but sometimes,ironically those restaints produce great art..

Zeno, Thursday, 22 October 2009 11:39 (fourteen years ago) link

"Soul" is fantastic, Jules. Summary: geezer goes to be Soviet rep dude to some dwindling, semi-migratory tribe, goes fairly native. You can have a lend of my copy if you want (it's a Harvill not an NYRB, soz). It didn't feel like Kafka, to me. I liked "The Foundation Pit" too, and have read the stories in "The Return" and the feeling I came away with wasn't really gentleness but a slightly panicky inability to move.

(I note that in his Wikipedia page Andrey is being played by Denholm Elliott: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrei_Platonov.)

"The political issues are the subtext of the story, not the story itself" - yes, this, but (in "Soul" and "TFP" I think) it's a subtext which makes the story wrench and scream.

Tim, Thursday, 22 October 2009 11:51 (fourteen years ago) link

lolz I spent a good five mins trying to work the Denholm Elliott 'thing'. Thanks for the offer, Tim, I'll take.

I see that the translator himself 'comments' on the Amazon page for the book.

xyzzzz__, Thursday, 22 October 2009 16:51 (fourteen years ago) link

one month passes...

Book Court in Cobble/Boerum Hill has a whole shelf just of NYRB books.

the onimo effect (James Redd and the Blecchs), Thursday, 10 December 2009 21:54 (fourteen years ago) link

Book Court in Cobble/Boerum Hill has a whole shelf just of NYRB books.

the onimo effect (James Redd and the Blecchs), Thursday, 10 December 2009 21:54 (fourteen years ago) link

hey--does anyone know a place in brooklyn, say, in the cobble hill or boerum hill area, where i can find these books?

max, Thursday, 10 December 2009 21:56 (fourteen years ago) link

I think somebody might have posted about that way up thread.

the onimo effect (James Redd and the Blecchs), Thursday, 10 December 2009 22:03 (fourteen years ago) link

(Thought it wasn't supposed to let me do that.)

the onimo effect (James Redd and the Blecchs), Thursday, 10 December 2009 22:03 (fourteen years ago) link

seven months pass...

Are there any shops that deal in books by New Directions in London?

xyzzzz__, Tuesday, 20 July 2010 13:46 (fourteen years ago) link

I think I've seen some of their stuff in Charing X Foyles. But maybe a while ago - have a half-sense that Foyles have made their stock-buying a bit less idiosyncratic - others might know more.

tetrahedron of space (woof), Tuesday, 20 July 2010 13:53 (fourteen years ago) link

Other thing is I don't see (unlike Dalkey and NYRB) a lot of New directions stuff 2nd hand. Maybe it just hasn't registered..

xyzzzz__, Tuesday, 20 July 2010 14:21 (fourteen years ago) link

have a half-sense that Foyles have made their stock-buying a bit less idiosyncratic

Been a while since I worked there, but even at the time it was part of the remit to move from the old (admittedly ludicrously haphazard and expensive) habits to the new ones. We were still encouraged to take a punt on eccentric hunches (my favourite was getting in a load of Anatomy of Melancholy when NYRB republished it - nowhere else in London got it in, and I took loads - bonanza) but, even if that doesn't go on any more (and after all the misses were greater than the hits), I think there's still a general attempt to take a more left-field approach to things. As much as anything this makes sound business sense, separating you out from competitors. Like anywhere else tho, it's the computer books and medical stuff that brings home the bacon. (Plus true crime and big big blockbusters). Any largish bookshop would be a fool to miss out on that.

Don't know about New Directions, mind, haven't been in for a while, but worth asking, as given a sympathetic ear, they might start getting them in to see how they sell, even if they haven't already.

GamalielRatsey, Tuesday, 20 July 2010 14:28 (fourteen years ago) link

That NYRB shelf at Book Court is so enticing. It makes me feel like there's this entire alternate universe of great literature I've never read.

surfer blood for oil (Hurting 2), Tuesday, 20 July 2010 16:19 (fourteen years ago) link

Thinking some more, it might have been Borders where I saw them - back in their UK heyday when they had lots of American books unavailable elsewhere (didn't use Amazon back then). The only things I know I've seen, though, are the Ezra Pound editions.

So that isn't very helpful.

tetrahedron of space (woof), Tuesday, 20 July 2010 16:37 (fourteen years ago) link

That's ok. So much of what's on their Latin American and Asian lists interests me.

I guess I'll eventually have to start buying things on amazon.

xyzzzz__, Wednesday, 21 July 2010 11:01 (fourteen years ago) link

two weeks pass...

they really are like the criterion collection of book publishers. the jg farrell ones are my favorite i've read thus far, particularly 'troubles'.

('_') (omar little), Wednesday, 4 August 2010 16:14 (thirteen years ago) link

That's an interesting comparison.

Un peu d'Eire, ça fait toujours Dublin (Michael White), Wednesday, 4 August 2010 16:17 (thirteen years ago) link

Thinking about getting Anatomy of Melancholy soon.

Generation Blecch (James Redd and the Blecchs), Wednesday, 4 August 2010 18:00 (thirteen years ago) link

they really are like the criterion collection of book publishers.

truth bomb

pies. (gbx), Wednesday, 4 August 2010 18:01 (thirteen years ago) link

A few NYRB favourites, pulled out of my head at random...

Any and all Tove Jansson and JG Farrell, as you said, plus Stefan Zweig

LJ Davis: A Meaningful Life -- black suburbanite comedy, very uncomfortably funny
Adolfo Bioy Cesares: The Invention of Morel -- clever, mind-twisting sci-fi
Christopher Priest: Even cleverer, more mind-twisting sci-fi
Harvey Swados: At Night in the Gardens of Brooklyn -- wonderful short story collection
JR Ackerley: My Dog Tulip, My Father and Myself, We Think the WOrld of You -- the first two are memoirs, the 3rd a novel, all great
William Attaway: Blood on the Forge -- savage, bleak, amazing story about two black brothers in the 1930s
Frigyes Karinthy: A Journey Round my Skull -- funny and fascinating memoir of brain injury
Dezső Kosztolányi: Skylark -- beautiful short book about doting parents whose daughter goes away on a holiday, causing them to break out as gamblers, drinkers, eaters, etc etc

Man, so many other gems, cant list them all. Am also especially looking forward to:

The Three Christs of Ypsilanti: "On July 1, 1959, at Ypsilanti State Hospital in Michigan, the social psychologist Milton Rokeach brought together three paranoid schizophrenics: Clyde Benson, an elderly farmer and alcoholic; Joseph Cassel, a failed writer who was institutionalized after increasingly violent behavior toward his family; and Leon Gabor, a college dropout and veteran of World War II.

The men had one thing in common: each believed himself to be Jesus Christ. Their extraordinary meeting and the two years they spent living together serves as the basis for this poignant and often hilarious investigation into the nature of human identity, belief, and delusion. With novelistic momentum and insight, Rokeach takes us into the lives of these three incredible and, despite their common claim, altogether singular personalities who find themselves “confronted with the ultimate contradiction conceivable for human beings: more than one person claiming the same identity.”

In scenes of remarkable power and vividness (“I'm telling you I'm God!” “You're not!” “I'm God, Jesus Christ and the Holy Ghost! I know what I am. . .”) we see the three Christs argue, proclaim, and soliloquize about the nature of their contentious divinity, and are given a window onto one of the most remarkable psychological case studies on record. "

The great big red thing, for those who like a surprise (James Morrison), Thursday, 5 August 2010 01:04 (thirteen years ago) link

Harvey Swados: At Night in the Gardens of Brooklyn -- wonderful short story collection

this is really terrific & its kinda so good that i think anything i cld say wld do it a disservice? its fantastic imo

if i were doing a pov i think id choose:

vladimir sorokin: ice - 'flat' kinda minimal russian horror + socialist realist parody + ad-speak parody
don carpenter: hard rain falling - impressionistic 50s crime novel really beautiful
mavis gallant short story collection - i just like her voice stark and knowing and terrible
stefan zweig: post-office girl - idk... unrelenting? really wonderful tho
gregor von rizzi: memoirs of an anti-semite - five interconnected stories abt a central european aristocrat 'dark and funny'

☼ (Lamp), Thursday, 5 August 2010 04:33 (thirteen years ago) link

hey lamp we were talking sorokin on the shakey hates books thread--if i read sacred book of the werewolf and found it readble and engaging but haaaaaated the buddhist theologizing, would i like ice

max, Thursday, 5 August 2010 04:38 (thirteen years ago) link

i like the opies' 'lore and language of schoolchildren' (mentioned above), it's got an amazing ethnographic touch. i only wish it were more about american children (or slightly latter-day ones).

their recent selection of thoreau's journals (chosen by damion searls, of the recent melville redaction) is very nice too.

j., Thursday, 5 August 2010 04:39 (thirteen years ago) link

i read like a quarter of 'the long ships' in the bookstore the other day it was so rad

max, Thursday, 5 August 2010 04:39 (thirteen years ago) link

ice is really readable and for the first third really riveting but he does sacrifice story/character/language for the sake of explicating the thematic/structural ideas hes interested in - i think maybe if you dont care much about post-stalin russian lit the middle section in particular might be a slog. i mean the arguments hes making arent as repetitive/textual as the ones in werewolf but they infect the very form hes using.

☼ (Lamp), Thursday, 5 August 2010 04:50 (thirteen years ago) link

im a lot more interested in post-stalin russian lit than a werewolf explaining buddhism 102

max, Thursday, 5 August 2010 05:48 (thirteen years ago) link

max werent you guys talking abt victor pelevin on the other thread, rather than sorokin? or are you just comparing the two

just sayin, Thursday, 5 August 2010 07:21 (thirteen years ago) link

lol

max, Thursday, 5 August 2010 07:27 (thirteen years ago) link

we were

max, Thursday, 5 August 2010 07:27 (thirteen years ago) link

all those russian "v"s

max, Thursday, 5 August 2010 07:27 (thirteen years ago) link

hahaha

just sayin, Thursday, 5 August 2010 07:29 (thirteen years ago) link

lets not tell anyone about this

max, Thursday, 5 August 2010 07:35 (thirteen years ago) link

two months pass...

Last night in Grand Central I picked up the The New York Stories of Elizabeth Hardwick and the one I've read so far is ace.

The Wayne Shorter Dinah Shore Test (James Redd and the Blecchs), Friday, 22 October 2010 17:13 (thirteen years ago) link

Picked up Paul Schmidt's The Stray Dog Cabaret last weekend.

http://www.cs.ucla.edu/~kohler/z/nyrb/stray-dog-cabaret.jpg

Ballard, Dick (Eazy), Friday, 22 October 2010 18:54 (thirteen years ago) link

their edition of félix fénéon's novels in three lines has a great introductory essay

======.======= (Lamp), Monday, 25 October 2010 00:03 (thirteen years ago) link

Yes. Was having trouble getting into that book- I usually avoid reading forewords and back cover summaries to avoid spoilers- but after reading your post I went back and read that intro and it is essential.

The Wayne Shorter Dinah Shore Test (James Redd and the Blecchs), Monday, 25 October 2010 15:05 (thirteen years ago) link

Couldn't get into Novels in Three Lines myself: principle + Santé enthused me, but Barnes in the LRB cooled me a little bit again - plus I wasn't enjoying the experience of reading it that much.

portrait of velleity (woof), Monday, 25 October 2010 16:41 (thirteen years ago) link

that barnes piece is sorta half right or maybe its right in letter but not in spirit. like santé (and the publishers) probably go too far in 'contextualizing' the work but its wrong to freight the thing with too much significance or 'meaning' either way. fénéon's life and his philiosophy were interesting to read about & some of santés parallels (like the futurists quote) seem correct, or at least illuminating. & really a beautiful turn of phrase, real wit, economy of form all these have value of their own - i dont think the collection needs to be 'ART' or w/e barnes wants it to be.

it also helps not to read them all at a time but just a page or two a day, i found.

soda lake swame (Lamp), Tuesday, 26 October 2010 23:39 (thirteen years ago) link

Reading Grossman's brilliant unfinished novel Everything Flows, might have to chase up on The Road.

xyzzzz__, Wednesday, 27 October 2010 19:49 (thirteen years ago) link

The Road's pretty great -- collection of stories, articles, letters -- the later stories especially are wonderful. I've not read any other Grossman, though 'Life and Fate' is looming hugely on a shelf

buildings with goats on the roof (James Morrison), Thursday, 28 October 2010 04:10 (thirteen years ago) link

we appear to have a bunch of remainders come in

thomp, Thursday, 28 October 2010 11:44 (thirteen years ago) link

I bought "In Hazard" by Richard Hughes for a couple of quid without any particularly high expectations (I like Richard Hughes a lot and I like NYRB but I'm not so hot on yer maritime novels) - it's really very tremendous indeed.

Tim, Thursday, 28 October 2010 11:57 (thirteen years ago) link

any recommendations from this lot?

stephen benatar, wish her safe at home
mavis gallant, the cost of living
geoffrey household, rogue male
jakov lind, soul of wood
guy de maupassant, afloat
audrey platonov, the foundation pit
victor serge, unforgiving years
francis wyndham, the complete fiction
stefan zweig, the post-office girl

thomp, Thursday, 28 October 2010 15:52 (thirteen years ago) link

francis wyndham, that sounds good. complete things are always better.

also, mavis gallant is a good name, and 'the cost of living' sounds like it could be about Important Things.

so i say those.

j., Thursday, 28 October 2010 17:23 (thirteen years ago) link

Unforgiving Years is great, but I haven't read many of those.

I read Season of Migration to the North a few months ago and really enjoyed it.

clotpoll, Thursday, 28 October 2010 17:34 (thirteen years ago) link

thomp, I read Gallant's "Paris Stories' a while back and I'm genuinely curious about 'The Cost of Living'.

A Reclaimer Hewn With (Michael White), Thursday, 28 October 2010 17:44 (thirteen years ago) link

Platonov and Serge, from that list.

The NYRB have done really well to assemble some of the really good stuff from the former USSR.

All we need now is the complete tales from Shalamov's Kolyma Tales cycle. xp

xyzzzz__, Thursday, 28 October 2010 17:47 (thirteen years ago) link

I really liked Platonov's Foundation Pit, but I think his collection of stories is better. Would like to read most of the rest of that list, thomp.

wmlynch, Thursday, 28 October 2010 21:11 (thirteen years ago) link

stephen benatar, wish her safe at home -- very good, very dark comedy - woman comes to own London house, goes mad
geoffrey household, rogue male -- superior adventure thriller about a big game hunter in the 1930s who decides to hunt down Hitler
jakov lind, soul of wood -- brutal but excellent
guy de maupassant, afloat -- lovely non-fictional record of boating trip
audrey platonov, the foundation pit -- brutal but excellent
francis wyndham, the complete fiction -- so, so, so good
stefan zweig, the post-office girl -- I love Zweig, and this is wonderful--sort of post WW1 Bonnie-and-Clyde in Germany, but with lots more to it

buildings with goats on the roof (James Morrison), Thursday, 28 October 2010 22:29 (thirteen years ago) link

I love Zweig, and this is wonderful--sort of post WW1 Bonnie-and-Clyde in Germany, but with lots more to it

I will definitely check this out.

A Reclaimer Hewn With (Michael White), Thursday, 28 October 2010 22:48 (thirteen years ago) link

yeah the zweig is fantastic but its p brutal throughout. i really like mavis gallant but cost of living is a weaker collection than any of 'paris stories', 'collected works' or the penguin collection (the best intro imo) - its all earlier stories and shes nowhere near as lean & unsentimental & wise in these stories as she becomes later. theyre kinda 'writerly' also so i dont know how much that will appeal...

'soul of wood' is the one id most like to read but havent

soda lake swame (Lamp), Friday, 29 October 2010 05:29 (thirteen years ago) link

two weeks pass...

god, oakley hall's warlock is good, isn't it? i can't get enough of it, but it can be so tense i have to stop sometimes. this is a cliched thing to say but it crackles with energy. smart without being ponderous. it feels like it "gets it." walks right up to the edge of romanticism and then rips your guts out. poor bud gannon.

max, Tuesday, 16 November 2010 21:08 (thirteen years ago) link

really need to restart that one. preferably on vacation

BIG MUFFIN (gbx), Tuesday, 16 November 2010 22:05 (thirteen years ago) link

i started reading it once but i didn't really know what i was reading.

j., Wednesday, 17 November 2010 00:50 (thirteen years ago) link

warlock. says so right on the cover

BIG MUFFIN (gbx), Wednesday, 17 November 2010 00:57 (thirteen years ago) link

two weeks pass...

man, i finished warlock a week or two ago and it was so good. waiting for the movie from netflix right now, kind of curious about how good it's going to be.

now i'm reading the big clock by kenneth fearing, don't know how into it i am but it's interesting and seems like a quick read so i'll probably keep going. kind of a noir with a very unappealing "hero" and a ridiculous plot and awkward writing.

congratulations (n/a), Wednesday, 1 December 2010 23:56 (thirteen years ago) link

wait there's a warlock movie??

BIG MUFFIN (gbx), Thursday, 2 December 2010 00:09 (thirteen years ago) link

starring richard widmark, henry fonda and anthony quinn, no less

congratulations (n/a), Thursday, 2 December 2010 00:10 (thirteen years ago) link

it was funny reading it thinking "huh it's weird no one's ever heard of this book" and then finding out about the movie and that the book was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize

congratulations (n/a), Thursday, 2 December 2010 00:12 (thirteen years ago) link

i read a thing the other day that noted most old-skool pulitzer nominees/winners were bestsellers in their day.

j., Thursday, 2 December 2010 02:59 (thirteen years ago) link

(and i guess, as a corollary, lots of bestsellers probably fall out of view pretty quickly. especially if their authors don't stay in the game somehow.)

j., Thursday, 2 December 2010 03:05 (thirteen years ago) link

The Big Clock has a very odd ending, kind of lame in a way, but it's interesting. I find Clark Gifford's Body, also by Fearing, totally fascinating and unique, though I still don't know quite what to make of it.

clotpoll, Thursday, 2 December 2010 05:20 (thirteen years ago) link

I thought I was going to hate "Clark Gifford's Body" and I ended up loving it. One of the things NYRB has done for me is intorduce me to some brilliant leftish US novels from the midele of the twentieth century, including "Clark Gifford's Body", "The Middle of the Journey" by Lionel Trilling, "What's for Dinner" by James Schuyler. Thanks, NYRB.

Tim, Thursday, 2 December 2010 12:00 (thirteen years ago) link

Currently reading a new NYRB: Iris Owens's 'After Claude', which I'm really enjoying, despite/because of the narrator being one of the most repellent people EVER.

buildings with goats on the roof (James Morrison), Thursday, 2 December 2010 22:33 (thirteen years ago) link

btw "Warlock" movie - not really recommended. They made a decent effort but had to cut a bunch of stuff (mostly for time, obviously, but also the entire mine union plot was taken out, probably due to the time/climate that it was made). Widmark is good, Fonda is good but doesn't really seem right for the part IMO. Seems like it would have been confusing to anyone who hadn't read the book.

Also they do a weird thing where at the beginning Blaisedell and Morgan ride into town together, like they've been traveling together as a team (unlike in the book, where Morgan's already in Warlock and running the saloon). But then all of a sudden Morgan has his own saloon, with no explanation of how he bought it so quickly or anything. Maybe I missed something.

congratulations (n/a), Monday, 13 December 2010 23:45 (thirteen years ago) link

Read a fair bit of Oakley Hall a few years ago (for a big thing on Warlock that got spiked – ashamed of parts of it now, screechy and ignorant about politics, America, not good enough on the history of the Western); didn't like any of his other books as much as Warlock - the Ambrose Bierce mysteries had their heart in the right place, couldn't get through that one about downhill skiers. It was enlightening about what happens to writers - I mean from a lot of perspectives it does look like Hall vanished after Warlock, but there he is, working hard for the rest of his life, right at the centre of West Coast creative writing and regional fiction.

portrait of velleity (woof), Tuesday, 14 December 2010 10:35 (thirteen years ago) link

i think hes "known" as a teacher more than an author. disappointing to hear that nothing else reaches warlock, though.

max, Tuesday, 14 December 2010 15:19 (thirteen years ago) link

the book store down the street was selling a bunch of these for 99 cents each! bought a bagful. then bought another bagful to give as christmas gifts. couldn't believe it.

scott seward, Tuesday, 14 December 2010 18:03 (thirteen years ago) link

so lucky! my most recent book score story - last time we were on holiday the local bookstore had those paris review interview collections for 50p each so of course i bought them all

just sayin, Tuesday, 14 December 2010 19:27 (thirteen years ago) link

i still need those!

scott seward, Wednesday, 15 December 2010 01:47 (thirteen years ago) link

Currently reading a new NYRB: Iris Owens's 'After Claude', which I'm really enjoying, despite/because of the narrator being one of the most repellent people EVER.

started this on the train today and lolled

mookieproof, Friday, 17 December 2010 22:16 (thirteen years ago) link

It's a lot of fun. The ending is pretty freaky.

buildings with goats on the roof (James Morrison), Monday, 20 December 2010 00:35 (thirteen years ago) link

two weeks pass...

http://blog.mpl.org/mke_reads/hard_rain.jpg

i keep seeing this and i wanna read it, it seems like something i would be into

plax (ico), Friday, 7 January 2011 22:49 (thirteen years ago) link

i havent seen that one before but yeah it also seems pertinent to my interests

just sayin, Friday, 7 January 2011 22:54 (thirteen years ago) link

ones i've read recently:
stoner by john williams - well-written but pretty depressing for my tastes
the quest for corvo by a.j.a. symons - conceptually cool, got kind of repetitive after a while and i stopped reading it about 50 pgs before the end
on the yard by malcolm braley - really awesome prison novel written by a dude who was in prison for like 20 years

congratulations (n/a), Friday, 7 January 2011 23:11 (thirteen years ago) link

Stephen Benatar - that's a name to conjugate with

the pinefox, Friday, 7 January 2011 23:33 (thirteen years ago) link

I like the John Collier a lot. Although I've only read, er, about eight stories since I bought it in 2006-ish. Seems like the perfect bathroom book to dip into once every 15 months for the rest of your life.

Chuck_Tatum, Monday, 10 January 2011 14:26 (thirteen years ago) link

i got 3 of these books in the mail. i just started tove janssssssson, the true deceiver. it sure is weird how all three have different typefaces!

positive reflection is the key (harbl), Friday, 14 January 2011 20:09 (thirteen years ago) link

Just picked up Platonov - The Fierce and Beautiful World. Guy at the bookstore really talked it up.

hey boys, suppers on me, our video just went bacterial (Hurting 2), Friday, 14 January 2011 20:17 (thirteen years ago) link

xpost Paris Review has a fair number of interviews archived on their site. C'mon and feel the exhilaration of getting away from writing via talking about writing (I do it too, but have to manage without an audience)

dow, Friday, 14 January 2011 21:35 (thirteen years ago) link

i finished the true deceiver. ouch! should i read warlock or beware of pity next, or flip a coin

positive reflection is the key (harbl), Monday, 17 January 2011 16:02 (thirteen years ago) link

warlock

max, Monday, 17 January 2011 16:57 (thirteen years ago) link

I feel like I should just read all of these NYRB Classic since I've dug every one I have read. The Outward Room by Millen Brand was pretty minimal, but hit me hard. I'm reading Vasily Grossman's "The Road" now.

President Keyes, Tuesday, 18 January 2011 01:11 (thirteen years ago) link

two months pass...

cassandra at the wedding by dorothy baker, picked it up because of carson mccullers blurb & deb eisenberg's afterword, it was great. now starting warlock by oakley hall. i l u nyrb books

just sayin, Thursday, 7 April 2011 22:40 (thirteen years ago) link

so theyve collected vladimir sorokin's ice trilogy in one volume which includes 'ice' (as book 2).

recently read & loved:
- riders in the chariot
- an apartment in athens

─►.butt.tko (Lamp), Monday, 18 April 2011 20:18 (thirteen years ago) link

an apartment in athens is great. I've bought the Ice trilogy, but not tackled it yet.

You're fucking fired and you know jack shit about horses (James Morrison), Monday, 18 April 2011 23:59 (thirteen years ago) link

haha youve read everything!! is there anything youd recommend in particular, kinda outta stuff to read atm. also have had a not bad really but less enjoyable patch lately w/ nyrb i didnt really like williams 'stoner' & couldnt even finish gadda's 'that awful mess...' (which is staring reproachfully @ me as a type this) or sciascia's 'to each his own'. also was disappointed w/ 'the invention of morel' although i finished that one

S C R æ M (Lamp), Tuesday, 19 April 2011 07:47 (thirteen years ago) link

what did you not like about the gadda? i started it but it didn't grab me as promised, and i had other things to do.

j., Wednesday, 20 April 2011 03:28 (thirteen years ago) link

Have you read Clark Gifford's Body? Or The Strangers in the House, by Simenon? They're a couple of the most straightforward enjoyable ones I can think of.

clotpoll, Wednesday, 20 April 2011 04:21 (thirteen years ago) link

j i just found 'that awful mess' too dense & associative, i think? i had hard time following what was happening even while i was reading, my focus just sort of bouncing off the page. a lot of times id catch myself thinking abt something trivial and realize i couldnt recall anything that had happened in the last couple of pages

i might try 'clark gifford's body' but im not really in the mood for simenon atm

c( ☠_ ☠ ) ↄ (Lamp), Wednesday, 20 April 2011 06:45 (thirteen years ago) link

The same thing happened to me with the Gadda, it's fairly rare for me to abandon a book. Perhaps I should try again.

The two Elaine Dundy novels are light and enjoyable; I love "Hadrian The Seventh", I love "Ringolevio" (though my copy is Canongate / Rebel Inc. FOR SHAME) both political romps in their very different ways; I found "In Hazard" by Richard Hughes an absorbing and intense wonder; "Sleepless Nights" by Elizabeth Hardwick herself is an odd favourite of mine: it's wispy and intangible, I've read it a few times and each time I start thinking "oh there's nothing to this" and end in raptures of one kind or another. Again, my cop is a 1980s Virago Classic so perhaps I should just shut my mouth about it.

I'm reading "Warlock" and it keeps reminding me of the song "Pancho and Lefty". I think it's the phrase "he only did what he had to do". Sometimes I hear it in the voice of Emmylou Harris and sometimes in the voice of WIllie Nelson, but that doesn't seem to relate to the character speaking the words.

Tim, Wednesday, 20 April 2011 08:34 (thirteen years ago) link

The desert's quiet and Cleveland's cold.

the pinefox, Wednesday, 20 April 2011 10:36 (thirteen years ago) link

No spoilers.

Tim, Wednesday, 20 April 2011 10:53 (thirteen years ago) link

Acquainted with Grief -- the only other Gadda novel available in English -- is well worth tracking down. That Awful Mess... is, well, an actual mess -- intended by its author, and perhaps the execution of its translation added to this.

You and your Virago classics Tim! I think I've seen that Hardwick in a 2nd hand shop whenever I pass through...

xyzzzz__, Wednesday, 20 April 2011 19:09 (thirteen years ago) link

to go along with the hadrian the seventh recommendation, i see they also publish a.j.a. symonds' quest for corvo which is entertaining and well worth a read if you're into rolfe/corvo. don't think i've actually ever seen a nyrb publishing publication (though that radiguet cover looks familiar).

no lime tangier, Wednesday, 20 April 2011 20:13 (thirteen years ago) link

Actually you may well find Quest for Corvo fascinating, even if you know nothing about Corvo/Rolfe--I'd never read him when I read it, and really enjoyed it.

You're fucking fired and you know jack shit about horses (James Morrison), Thursday, 21 April 2011 00:06 (thirteen years ago) link

Other good and easy to get into NYRBS would be:

LJ Davis: A Meaningful Life (also very nastily funny)
Gifford's 'The Big Clock' (which is more immediate and less experimental than Clark Gifford's Body, though CGB is great stuff)
Barbara Comyns: The Vet's Daughter
John Wyndham: The Chrysalids

You're fucking fired and you know jack shit about horses (James Morrison), Thursday, 21 April 2011 00:09 (thirteen years ago) link

i mentioned jg farrell upthread, gonna mention him again. 'troubles' is weird and absurd and often hilarious. the story is not "funny" but the major's interior monologue of bafflement at what's going on around him is hysterical.

omar little, Thursday, 21 April 2011 00:15 (thirteen years ago) link

yeah i remember looking for the farrell around xmas time & only finding another edition - vantage mb? - i should see if i can pick that up tomorrow. was there a long write-up of elaine dundy in the newyorker? if thats who im thinking of than i think ill pick that up too

dearth of the hipster (Lamp), Thursday, 21 April 2011 00:28 (thirteen years ago) link

i dont think so - i've read some elaine dundy so i think i would remember

just sayin, Thursday, 21 April 2011 07:40 (thirteen years ago) link

(but who knows)

just sayin, Thursday, 21 April 2011 07:44 (thirteen years ago) link

one month passes...

I can't find a dedicated thread for the magazine, but: this is one of those issues where I want to read every article.

40% chill and 100% negative (Tracer Hand), Thursday, 26 May 2011 15:38 (thirteen years ago) link

two months pass...

i am reading a house and its head for book club

http://assets.nybooks.com/media/img/books/9780940322646.jpg

so far i am finding it infuriatingly badly written on a technical level, but quite funny.

caek, Wednesday, 17 August 2011 15:58 (twelve years ago) link

really? i remember your post asking about ivy c-b and hoping youd get a response since i picked up the nyrb edition of 'manservant and maidservant' but havent gotten around to reading it yet.

Monstrous TumTum (Lamp), Wednesday, 17 August 2011 16:02 (twelve years ago) link

to be fair to ivy c-b, i'm only 30 pages in.

caek, Wednesday, 17 August 2011 16:14 (twelve years ago) link

I've only read one Ivy CB, and had a similar reaction. Since several people told me that all of her books were basically the same, I never tried another.

not bulimic, just a cat (James Morrison), Wednesday, 17 August 2011 23:10 (twelve years ago) link

it's basically 200 pages of dialogue afaict. it's like reading a really long play, but it's even more exhausting because her style makes who is actually speaking terribly obscure.

caek, Thursday, 18 August 2011 08:17 (twelve years ago) link

i've read many of these but the ones that really stuck with me and still live on my shelf are

- radiance of the king

- adventures and misadventures of maqroll

- hindoo holiday

- a life like any other

- fancies and goodnights

- the bog people

- the world of odysseus

mr peabody (moonship journey to baja), Thursday, 18 August 2011 17:37 (twelve years ago) link

oh and warlock, duh

mr peabody (moonship journey to baja), Thursday, 18 August 2011 17:38 (twelve years ago) link

but it's even more exhausting because her style makes who is actually speaking terribly obscure.

Henry Green can be like that but when it clicks finally, it's kind of thrilling.

Cuius regio, eius radicchio (Michael White), Thursday, 18 August 2011 18:04 (twelve years ago) link

x-post I read the World of Odysseus recently and liked it a lot.

President Keyes, Thursday, 18 August 2011 23:34 (twelve years ago) link

<3 <3 <3 Maqroll the Gaviero! Other perennial NYRB favorites: Envy, Anatomy of Melancholy, and especially Memoirs of My Nervous Illness, one of the most heartbreaking and fucked up things ever written.

bentelec, Friday, 19 August 2011 00:22 (twelve years ago) link

well now i have to read it

based god #swag #lilb (Lamp), Friday, 19 August 2011 00:27 (twelve years ago) link

upcoming titles include 'the letter killers club' by sigizmund krzhizhanovsky which at least one ilxor is v excited about

Lamp, Tuesday, 23 August 2011 05:46 (twelve years ago) link

Also the stories of Robert Sheckley!

President Keyes, Tuesday, 23 August 2011 09:51 (twelve years ago) link

I'm another ilxor very excited about it (the krzhizhanovsky )!

Shecklety! THat's great!

not bulimic, just a cat (James Morrison), Tuesday, 23 August 2011 23:41 (twelve years ago) link

sheckley! at least my third or fourth favourite bad writer

thomp, Tuesday, 23 August 2011 23:41 (twelve years ago) link

fuck i can't type today

not bulimic, just a cat (James Morrison), Tuesday, 23 August 2011 23:42 (twelve years ago) link

i wasn't correcting your spelling, just exclaiming

thomp, Tuesday, 23 August 2011 23:48 (twelve years ago) link

it kind of words as one of those almost-after-the-fact bowdlerisations. like 'oh shhhugar.'

thomp, Tuesday, 23 August 2011 23:49 (twelve years ago) link

Sheckley? Really? Will there be any overlap with with The Masque of Mañana?

thomp, do you really consider Robert Sheckley a bad writer? If so, I believe you will bring the wrath of the Sluglords down on your head.

Viriconium Island Baby (James Redd and the Blecchs), Wednesday, 24 August 2011 01:58 (twelve years ago) link

sorry--didn't read it as a correction, it was just an xpost :)

not bulimic, just a cat (James Morrison), Wednesday, 24 August 2011 04:24 (twelve years ago) link

starting to get into the ivy cb a bit more. i still maintain that the style is totally exhausting and reader hostile for absolutely nothing in return, but she draws a good character, and it's very funny. almost like a victorian 'the office' at times.

caek, Wednesday, 24 August 2011 10:15 (twelve years ago) link

anyone read Hav, the Jan Morris travel fiction thing that they have forthcoming. Usually enjoy morris, am tempted.

you don't exist in the database (woof), Wednesday, 24 August 2011 15:00 (twelve years ago) link

insert question mark

you don't exist in the database (woof), Wednesday, 24 August 2011 15:00 (twelve years ago) link

Saw that on the website, with a blurb from UKLG.

Zingling Baby (James Redd and the Blecchs), Wednesday, 24 August 2011 15:06 (twelve years ago) link

Any good NYRB non-fiction recommendations along the lines of 'The World of Odysseus' & 'The Thirty Years War'?

& to hijack the NYRB thread with some Melville House, I was greatly entertained by slowly stumbling across these in the first large bookstore I've had the chance to visit in a while:
http://biblioklept.files.wordpress.com/2011/07/duel.jpg
(If I knew how to create a poll ...)

etc, Wednesday, 24 August 2011 19:46 (twelve years ago) link

I've read 4 of those before, and they were all excellent. The Conrad is also very funny.

not bulimic, just a cat (James Morrison), Wednesday, 24 August 2011 22:57 (twelve years ago) link

Henry Green can be like that but when it clicks finally, it's kind of thrilling.

― Cuius regio, eius radicchio (Michael White), Thursday, August 18, 2011 7:04 PM (1 week ago) Bookmark Suggest Ban Permalink

haha this has turned out to be otm.

caek, Sunday, 28 August 2011 14:36 (twelve years ago) link

another nice NYRB nonfiction is "the bog people"

mr peabody (moonship journey to baja), Sunday, 28 August 2011 16:50 (twelve years ago) link

ive been dipping in and out of "when the world spoke french" which is nice and has a lot of primary sources but seems to lose some of its impact due to... not being in french

max, Monday, 29 August 2011 20:47 (twelve years ago) link

three weeks pass...

anyone besides Michael White read The Unpossessed?

Anakin Ska Walker (AKA Skarth Vader) (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Monday, 19 September 2011 17:28 (twelve years ago) link

Thought about it, but no, not yet.

When I Stop Meming (James Redd and the Blecchs), Monday, 19 September 2011 17:37 (twelve years ago) link

was not able to finish. too bawdy for my taste.

mr peabody (moonship journey to baja), Monday, 19 September 2011 17:39 (twelve years ago) link

Fwiw, I'm presently reading 'Quand l'Europe parlait français'.

em vee equals pea queue (Michael White), Monday, 19 September 2011 17:48 (twelve years ago) link

"bawdy" ooh la la!

Anakin Ska Walker (AKA Skarth Vader) (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Monday, 19 September 2011 17:51 (twelve years ago) link

It was just bawdy enough for me as I recall.

em vee equals pea queue (Michael White), Monday, 19 September 2011 17:54 (twelve years ago) link

Elizabeth Hardwick introduction + similarities to my beloved Dawn Powell = easy sell

Anakin Ska Walker (AKA Skarth Vader) (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Monday, 19 September 2011 17:57 (twelve years ago) link

I enjoyed it, Alfred.

em vee equals pea queue (Michael White), Monday, 19 September 2011 17:58 (twelve years ago) link

Just read the NYRB collection of Elizabeth Hardwick's stories, which was really excellent (although the last few were a bit too similar stylistically to be best enjoyed all read together).

not bulimic, just a cat (James Morrison), Monday, 19 September 2011 23:42 (twelve years ago) link

Just picked up the Theophile Gautier book, My Fantoms.

Work Hard, Flunky! (R Baez), Monday, 19 September 2011 23:55 (twelve years ago) link

Read the first few stories in the collection James M just mentioned and yes, they were all aces

When I Stop Meming (James Redd and the Blecchs), Tuesday, 20 September 2011 00:36 (twelve years ago) link

Which I probably said upthread in exactly the same words

When I Stop Meming (James Redd and the Blecchs), Tuesday, 20 September 2011 00:50 (twelve years ago) link

Maybe it was another thread

When I Stop Meming (James Redd and the Blecchs), Tuesday, 20 September 2011 01:19 (twelve years ago) link

Fwiw, I'm presently reading 'Quand l'Europe parlait français'.

I just got this from the library.

tokyo rosemary, Tuesday, 20 September 2011 04:15 (twelve years ago) link

three months pass...

the recent run of titles over the last month has been so excellent. i guess it was in one of the 'what are you reading' threads and not here but i also wanted to thank ilb for mentioning albert cossery which lead me to pick up the latest one theyve published, 'proud beggars'.

0010101 (Lamp), Tuesday, 3 January 2012 22:07 (twelve years ago) link

considering signing up for this: http://www.nybooks.com/books/imprints/classics/the-nyrb-book-club/

max, Tuesday, 3 January 2012 22:08 (twelve years ago) link

i shoulda got it for my girlfriend for christmas or something

max, Tuesday, 3 January 2012 22:08 (twelve years ago) link

i finished "red shift" a little bit ago and loved it, absolutely fantastic

been dipping in and out of the dwight macdonald collection too, kinda hit and miss but most is very good

just picked up this one: http://www.nybooks.com/books/imprints/classics/fatale/ and this one: http://www.nybooks.com/books/imprints/classics/stones-of-aran-pilgrimage/

on the "to buy and read" list: letter killers, hav, ice trilogy, three christs

max, Tuesday, 3 January 2012 22:11 (twelve years ago) link

Looking forward to the upcoming Store of the Worlds: The Stories of Robert Sheckley

WATERMELON MAYNE aka the seed driver (James Redd and the Blecchs), Tuesday, 3 January 2012 22:12 (twelve years ago) link

i am very tempted by that but theres also at least one release each month i have zero interest in... idk might still sign up anyway.

lol ive read everything on your 'to buy and read' list. 'letter killers club' is the sort of thing im tempted to force on ppl at parties w a desperate and wild 'you have to read this' i liked it so much. i have the dwight macdonald collection but i havent started it yet. hit or miss is a good way of describing 'growing up absurd' which i more wanted to like than really enjoyed? i mean mostly i just wanted to mail it to hoos so he could stop reading like hayek and richard florida or w/e but i figure hes probably already read it.

ive also got 'the enchanted april' and 'mr. fortune' laying around unread.

0010101 (Lamp), Tuesday, 3 January 2012 22:16 (twelve years ago) link

lol we need to intervene with hoos and all his libertarian girlfriends

max, Tuesday, 3 January 2012 22:17 (twelve years ago) link

Red Shift is awesome

Have just got Letter Killers and Hav. Three Christs is very interesting but ultimately too long

Didn't know about the Sheckley--that is great!!!

Not only dermatologists hate her (James Morrison), Tuesday, 3 January 2012 22:17 (twelve years ago) link

i suppose i didnt mention on this thread but c.v. wedgwood's 30 years war is an NYRB book and boy is it good, cracking good i would say

max, Tuesday, 3 January 2012 22:18 (twelve years ago) link

got Red Shift for my sister, kinda wish i'd gotten it for my girlfriend instead so there'd be a copy close at hand

JoeStork, Tuesday, 3 January 2012 23:50 (twelve years ago) link

what is letter killers actually about? i added to my amazon basket a while ago because i liked the title ( + probably because one of the last things i read in nyrb wz 'the post office girl', and there was a subliminal connection there ) and i have no idea

oh my god the red shift you're talking about is the alan garner novel!! that is so weird

thomp, Wednesday, 4 January 2012 00:32 (twelve years ago) link

do they reproduce the secret message inside the covers??

thomp, Wednesday, 4 January 2012 00:33 (twelve years ago) link

what is letter killers actually about?

its one of krzhizhanovsky's strange allegories stretched out uncomfortably long - its about a group of artists who decide to create basically conceptual art projects and then instead of making them describe them to one another at club meetings, leaving no trace in order to preserve their purity and integrity. its sort of 'about' the impossibility of art under the soviets, i think? but theres a bunch of stuff abt the club members and moscow in the 20s and its really really good

bohumil (harbl) (Lamp), Wednesday, 4 January 2012 00:41 (twelve years ago) link

it doesnt really match the heights of mania, clarity and despair that the best few stories from 'memories of the future' reach but its still p incredible and thoughtful and idk perceptive? gah i want to do it justice but im too fanish abt it, i think...

bohumil (harbl) (Lamp), Wednesday, 4 January 2012 00:47 (twelve years ago) link

i have never read or heard of krzhizhanovsky otherwise -- that does sound kind of awesome though -- i suspect soviet era fiction is my favourite thing i know almost nothing about -- oy

thomp, Wednesday, 4 January 2012 00:48 (twelve years ago) link

do they reproduce the secret message inside the covers??

― thomp, Tuesday, January 3, 2012 7:33 PM (33 minutes ago) Bookmark Suggest Ban Permalink

yes!

max, Wednesday, 4 January 2012 01:07 (twelve years ago) link

it seems so weird that that could be a book that could need specialist republishing, or even go out of print

thomp, Wednesday, 4 January 2012 01:27 (twelve years ago) link

I know--in the UK it's pretty much constantly in print (though as a children's book)

Not only dermatologists hate her (James Morrison), Wednesday, 4 January 2012 22:24 (twelve years ago) link

it might be a little "dark" for US kids? i dunno

max, Wednesday, 4 January 2012 22:45 (twelve years ago) link

that being said i liked it at a lot at 26, probably would have liked it even more at 13

max, Wednesday, 4 January 2012 22:45 (twelve years ago) link

i think it's probably too "dark" for US parents, kids like all kinds of dark stuff

congratulations (n/a), Wednesday, 4 January 2012 22:47 (twelve years ago) link

i haven't read it, just assuming based on context

congratulations (n/a), Wednesday, 4 January 2012 22:47 (twelve years ago) link

sorry yeah thats what i meant

max, Wednesday, 4 January 2012 23:04 (twelve years ago) link

also i think it assumes/requires a certain baseline of knowledge about england and the english civil war that american kids wont have

max, Wednesday, 4 January 2012 23:05 (twelve years ago) link

one month passes...

god, warlock is so good

JoeStork, Sunday, 12 February 2012 03:06 (twelve years ago) link

Can someone tell me where I can find these books again?

Only the RONG Survive (James Redd and the Blecchs), Sunday, 12 February 2012 03:45 (twelve years ago) link

where do you usually find books?

President Keyes, Sunday, 12 February 2012 04:03 (twelve years ago) link

There's a place called Book Court on Court Street in Cobble Hill that I go to now and again, I wonder if they might have a volume or two.

Only the RONG Survive (James Redd and the Blecchs), Sunday, 12 February 2012 06:02 (twelve years ago) link

I love this series.

Exile in lolville (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 25 February 2012 14:33 (twelve years ago) link

spent way too much money on that sale yesterday :-/ also i appear to have signed myself up for the six month subscription

max, Saturday, 25 February 2012 14:50 (twelve years ago) link

Just about all of Victor Serge now in print

Exile in lolville (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 25 February 2012 15:00 (twelve years ago) link

i went to city lights when i visited SF last month and they've got a whole section devoted to these. had trouble restraining myself from buying 10 of them.

(The Other) J.D. (J.D.), Saturday, 25 February 2012 19:55 (twelve years ago) link

ive heard theres a bookstore in cobble hill that has a nice selection

max, Saturday, 25 February 2012 19:57 (twelve years ago) link

If only I could remember where that place was.

Can You Please POLL Out Your Window? (James Redd and the Blecchs), Saturday, 25 February 2012 20:11 (twelve years ago) link

gd i wish i didnt have to pay rent

99x (Lamp), Sunday, 26 February 2012 03:06 (twelve years ago) link

didn't know there was an nyrb edition, but jean stafford's the mountain lion is an awesome, creepy book and is on sale.

horseshoe, Sunday, 26 February 2012 20:10 (twelve years ago) link

http://www.nybooks.com/books/imprints/classics/the-mountain-lion/

horseshoe, Sunday, 26 February 2012 20:11 (twelve years ago) link

seriously why is my cats food like $70

a life ___________ (Lamp), Sunday, 26 February 2012 20:12 (twelve years ago) link

haha i know i am just lalala pretending that sale isn't happening btw

horseshoe, Sunday, 26 February 2012 20:12 (twelve years ago) link

I was gonna say go to libraries or something, but then I realized I always return my books late so that doesn't really help w/ $$$$

puff puff post (uh oh I'm having a fantasy), Sunday, 26 February 2012 20:14 (twelve years ago) link

books are like one of the few things i think are really worth spending money on but i already spent soo much money this month on like sweaters and plane tickets

a life ___________ (Lamp), Sunday, 26 February 2012 20:14 (twelve years ago) link

I was gonna say go to libraries or something, but then I realized I always return my books late so that doesn't really help w/ $$$$

― puff puff post (uh oh I'm having a fantasy), Sunday, February 26, 2012 3:14 PM (25 seconds ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

i just paid $40 in late fees for library books. :( i am a deadbeat and only finished half of them, too.

horseshoe, Sunday, 26 February 2012 20:15 (twelve years ago) link

i havent taken anything out of the library since the summer because i have $24.56 in late fees

a life ___________ (Lamp), Sunday, 26 February 2012 20:16 (twelve years ago) link

Was thinking about The Mountain Lion while reading the recently revived Harper's thread. Back in the 80s, when Michael Kinsley was editing it (and well!), James Wolcott wrote about Stafford, who I (and all the people I mentioned the article to) had forgotten mostly forgotten about. To us, she was mostly the wife whose nose was broken twice by hubby Robert Lowell, as graphically described in Ian Hamilton's Lowell bio.Stafford also got some material, for both fiction and poetry, I think out of those experiences; don't know Lowell's confessional verses go that far, but he also became literally a textbook example of bipolarity)Nevertheless, Wolcott got us into The Mountain Lion, Boston Adventure (novel), and I still need to read the non-fiction A Mother In History, Stafford's encounters with Lee Harvey's mom. Way later, an interviewer mentioned this column, and Wocott said people were still thanking him for it. As well they might. the main character of The Mountain Lion seems like somebody you might never want to bother having compassion for, but she compells it, a sympathetic sub-villain (maybe like Lowell to her? Although she did get the hell out--the mother in Boston Adventure is somewhat similar)

dow, Sunday, 26 February 2012 20:33 (twelve years ago) link

sorry about stupid typos

dow, Sunday, 26 February 2012 20:34 (twelve years ago) link

i've never read Boston Adventure! i should check it out. i think of Molly as a character that defies any attempt at readerly sentimental identification, but i don't know if she's a villain, exactly. she's terrifying.

horseshoe, Sunday, 26 February 2012 20:43 (twelve years ago) link

She does defy it, and she's scary, but o shit, where Stafford takes her and the reader, the ending o shit

dow, Sunday, 26 February 2012 21:00 (twelve years ago) link

paging scott seward btw; have you read jean stafford? i think you would enjoy jean stafford.

horseshoe, Sunday, 26 February 2012 21:01 (twelve years ago) link

I saw The Mountain Lion at my local bookstore last year and didn't buy it -- a mistake. Should I start with that one or BA?

Exile in lolville (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Sunday, 26 February 2012 21:04 (twelve years ago) link

Hard to say--The Mountain Lion is shorter, not as dense, which might be good or bad; you can't forage for so many consolation prizes if you get tired of the main line of development. Boston Adventure starts like its title suggests, oh a plucky underdog's gonna make it after all. Might have some tense moments, but some wry me resolutions, not so unusual then. Probably got into some school libraries that way. But it keeps tunneling into, for instance, scenes with a mental mother, very convincing, beyond standard coming of age etc novels then; It's not only about such relationships, doesn't settle even for them, though could have, re merited reviewer-bait.

dow, Sunday, 26 February 2012 21:27 (twelve years ago) link

Oh yeah, and here's an description, for non-subscribers like me, of a Stafford collection's title story:
http://www.newyorker.com/archive/1948/02/21/1948_02_21_023_TNY_CARDS_000214532

dow, Sunday, 26 February 2012 21:31 (twelve years ago) link

Weirdly, all 3 of Lowell's ex-wives are now published by NYRB: Jean Stafford, Caroline Blackwood, Elizabeth Hardwick. All 3 are really great writers, too

Not only dermatologists hate her (James Morrison), Sunday, 26 February 2012 23:03 (twelve years ago) link

Don't know Blackwood's work, is it good?

dow, Sunday, 4 March 2012 20:13 (twelve years ago) link

The one I read was good, and others here have repped for some of the others.

Why Does Redd People Never Want To Blecch? (James Redd and the Blecchs), Sunday, 4 March 2012 20:17 (twelve years ago) link

Oh yeah, now I see mention of Great Granny Webster, what's the writing like?

dow, Sunday, 4 March 2012 20:33 (twelve years ago) link

Remember it being witty and funny, byt it was a while ago, I couldn't tell you more. Maybe I should read this copy of Corrigan sitting right here.

Why Does Redd People Never Want To Blecch? (James Redd and the Blecchs), Sunday, 4 March 2012 20:49 (twelve years ago) link

Please do! I'll look around online when not so lazy.

dow, Sunday, 4 March 2012 20:51 (twelve years ago) link

Yeah, Blackwood is witty and funny and often pretty dark, too. Good stuff.

Not only dermatologists hate her (James Morrison), Sunday, 4 March 2012 22:38 (twelve years ago) link

Forgot to mention the darkness. Enjoying first pages of Corrigan. May stick with it

Why Does Redd People Never Want To Blecch? (James Redd and the Blecchs), Sunday, 4 March 2012 23:16 (twelve years ago) link

four weeks pass...

'an ermine in czernopol' is just really, really good

Lamp, Tuesday, 3 April 2012 02:22 (twelve years ago) link

one month passes...

anyone read Hav, the Jan Morris travel fiction thing that they have forthcoming. Usually enjoy morris, am tempted.

― you don't exist in the database (woof), Wednesday, August 24, 2011 11:00 AM (8 months ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

just read this, really enjoyed it. its actually two books in one -- one set in 1985 and one in 2005 -- the first is better but the second works fine as a companion piece

max, Wednesday, 9 May 2012 02:50 (twelve years ago) link

Oh yeah, I gotta have Hav. The travel non-fiction I've read was rich, dense but very clear, very careful, with no hesitation.Comes from climbing all those mountains, incl the ones w streets. Also liked Conundrum, re the sex change. Haven't read the pre-op, Desmond era adventures, but I better.

dow, Monday, 14 May 2012 21:19 (twelve years ago) link

Lethem praises Patrick Hamilton's NYRB editions in current Rolling Stone, mentions that Hamilton provided the basis of Hitchcock's Gaslight and Rope (the latter with a little help from Leopold and Loeb, or so I assumed)

dow, Friday, 25 May 2012 19:59 (twelve years ago) link

reading the sheckley story collection right now, very fun

congratulations (n/a), Friday, 25 May 2012 20:13 (twelve years ago) link

Patrick Hamilton is so much one of my favourite writers

seven league bootie (James Morrison), Sunday, 27 May 2012 04:21 (twelve years ago) link

from http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/books/2012/06/bookexpo-america.html

I also discovered that, starting this fall, N.Y.R.B. is launching a new e-book-only imprint, made up of literary novels and books in translation singled out by the writer Sue Halpern. “Our logic is very simple,” Halpern writes. “Since, as the argument goes, it is too risky and expensive to bring out these sorts of books, we will take advantage of digital’s lower costs to expand the reading universe.” The first three offerings will be Lindsay Clarke’s “The Water Theatre” (September); Zena el Khalil’s “Beirut, I Love You: A Memoir” (October), and Yoram Kaniuk’s “1948” (November). The project is one answer to the lament about print’s demise; think of what’s now possible in the cheaper e-book form.

congratulations (n/a), Thursday, 7 June 2012 18:19 (twelve years ago) link

Patrick Hamilton is so much one of my favourite writers

Me too, and I think I first heard of him on ILB.

That ebook thing sounds excellent.

franny glass, Friday, 8 June 2012 15:50 (twelve years ago) link

one month passes...

Anybody get Ride a Cockhorse? The original novel was published in '91.

a regina spektor is haunting europe (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Sunday, 8 July 2012 23:36 (twelve years ago) link

I've ordered it, but it hasn't come in yet--looks good, though

an inevitable disappointment (James Morrison), Monday, 9 July 2012 00:12 (twelve years ago) link

struggling with the wedgwood

I keep reading sentences but they're not going in; she has an imperceptibly queer style. lots of sentences seem straightforward but don't seem to make a lot of sense. maybe I'm just in the wrong headspace rn

skrill xx (cozen), Wednesday, 18 July 2012 12:11 (twelve years ago) link

finished reading 'the mountain lion' which i liked a lot and thought felt kinda sui generis like it wasnt really a story about childhood or coming-of-age but it also wasnt a fable, really, although it has strong elements of both?

i think of Molly as a character that defies any attempt at readerly sentimental identification, but i don't know if she's a villain, exactly. she's terrifying.

she is terrifying! i didnt hate her and they way stafford slopes in and out of her pov, mixing her and her brother up makes it hard to get a real sense of her somehow? idk i almost felt like despite everything she was still a mystery to me, nothing she did would surprise but everything seemed uncertain and unpredictable too.

Lamp, Tuesday, 24 July 2012 04:08 (eleven years ago) link

ten months pass...

i've been going to the park on my lunch breaks and reading renata adler's 'speedboat' over and over because parts of it stick in my mind w/o really holding shape or meaning so i keep reading it and bits pieces and puzzling over it and i think i'm somewhat obsessed with it in a shameful sort of way, i want to start to talking and writing the way she does but not really having the knack for it, the ear for it i guess and no one i know has read it or wants to talk about it at all and every mention of her on ilx is either in relation to pauline kael (christ) or feminism (jeez) and i mean

Lamp, Sunday, 2 June 2013 06:23 (eleven years ago) link

Or about the ponytail.

Roddenberry Beret (James Redd and the Blecchs), Sunday, 2 June 2013 12:00 (eleven years ago) link

Reading/enjoying Elizabeth David's A Book of Mediterranean Food. Written as a kind of food/luxury porn in 1940s food-rationed Britain, full of then-obscure ingredients like cilantro. Recipes in prose form. Fun.

The End**^ (Eazy), Sunday, 2 June 2013 14:17 (eleven years ago) link

If my shopping trip today is anything to go by cilantro is still obscure in Britain. wtffffff

I recently finished Varieties of Exile by Mavis Gallant. It was enjoyable but a lot of the stories are the sort that I think I'd get more out of if I had ppl to discuss them with. I have The Tenants of Moonbloom waiting to be read now, which I'm looking forward to.

salsa shark, Sunday, 2 June 2013 15:25 (eleven years ago) link

speedboat was on sale at my favourite local bookstore i`ll see what i can do

flopson, Sunday, 2 June 2013 17:33 (eleven years ago) link

Salsa - not sure where you are in the UK but cilantro is generally un-obscure here. We do call it coriander, mind.

Tim, Sunday, 2 June 2013 17:46 (eleven years ago) link

so annoyed to have been beaten to that

the bitcoin comic (thomp), Sunday, 2 June 2013 18:22 (eleven years ago) link

(Psst. Don't tell salsa shark about the rocket/arugula thing just yet)

Roddenberry Beret (James Redd and the Blecchs), Sunday, 2 June 2013 18:32 (eleven years ago) link

Speedboat was great. I read it around a month ago.

mimicking regular benevloent (sic) users' names (President Keyes), Sunday, 2 June 2013 20:40 (eleven years ago) link

Haha! Okay this is dumb but I had no idea that cilantro = coriander. For some reason it never even occurred to me that they might be the same thing (yes, obv idiotic since they look exactly the same, I just thought it was a coincidence). Well, thanks for that. :$

salsa shark, Monday, 3 June 2013 07:01 (eleven years ago) link

Reading/enjoying Elizabeth David's /A Book of Mediterranean Food/. Written as a kind of food/luxury porn in 1940s food-rationed Britain, full of then-obscure ingredients like cilantro. Recipes in prose form. Fun.

cooked suleiman's pilaf just last night - one of my all time favourite dishes.

Fizzles, Tuesday, 4 June 2013 07:52 (eleven years ago) link

one month passes...

summer sale: http://www.nybooks.com/books/summersale/

congratulations (n/a), Wednesday, 17 July 2013 15:37 (eleven years ago) link

what should i get?

max, Wednesday, 17 July 2013 17:14 (eleven years ago) link

stoner!

caek, Wednesday, 17 July 2013 17:17 (eleven years ago) link

Stoner shook me quite a bit last summer.

Try Apartment in Athens too.

first I think it's time I kick a little verse! (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Wednesday, 17 July 2013 17:17 (eleven years ago) link

alfred you've read most of those amis ones, right?

caek, Wednesday, 17 July 2013 17:18 (eleven years ago) link

apart from lucky jim, which would you recommend?

caek, Wednesday, 17 July 2013 17:19 (eleven years ago) link

the two from "gritty american novels" i've read (nightmare alley and on the yard) are both pretty incredible

thought about ordering the picture book collection for my daughter's bday but i think she's still a little young for them

congratulations (n/a), Wednesday, 17 July 2013 17:19 (eleven years ago) link

also: all those K. Amis titles (I haven't read The Alteration)

first I think it's time I kick a little verse! (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Wednesday, 17 July 2013 17:20 (eleven years ago) link

The Green Man is good. So is The Old Devils but it's ponderous in spots.

first I think it's time I kick a little verse! (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Wednesday, 17 July 2013 17:21 (eleven years ago) link

The Alteration is great. So are the Esther Averill children's books.

ashcans (askance johnson), Wednesday, 17 July 2013 17:24 (eleven years ago) link

does nyrb have a bookshop in manhattan or am i imagining that? the google maps result for it looks like offices.

caek, Wednesday, 17 July 2013 17:25 (eleven years ago) link

Don't know about Manhattan but I believe there are places with a lot of their books in some of the other boroughs

Orpheus in Hull (James Redd and the Blecchs), Wednesday, 17 July 2013 17:31 (eleven years ago) link

ha thx. i think i had probably confused nyrb and lrb.

caek, Wednesday, 17 July 2013 17:33 (eleven years ago) link

is stoner really good

auscozeichnet (cozen), Wednesday, 17 July 2013 17:37 (eleven years ago) link

I liked it up until the end which kind of ruined it for me.

Orpheus in Hull (James Redd and the Blecchs), Wednesday, 17 July 2013 17:38 (eleven years ago) link

i am 20pp in so who knows, but it comes recommended by tom hanks and time magazine, and i have seen about five people reading it on the columbia campus in three weeks.

caek, Wednesday, 17 July 2013 17:38 (eleven years ago) link

the international rise in the prominence of stoner is fascinating/weird.

ashcans (askance johnson), Wednesday, 17 July 2013 17:40 (eleven years ago) link

you forgot morris dickstein. (xp)

Orpheus in Hull (James Redd and the Blecchs), Wednesday, 17 July 2013 17:40 (eleven years ago) link

I liked Stoner enough to read his novel on Augustus lol

first I think it's time I kick a little verse! (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Wednesday, 17 July 2013 17:43 (eleven years ago) link

I still need to read warlock and 30 years war

auscozeichnet (cozen), Wednesday, 17 July 2013 17:43 (eleven years ago) link

i read stoner a year or two ago and honestly have very little memory of it. read warlock instead (or first, at least).

congratulations (n/a), Wednesday, 17 July 2013 17:44 (eleven years ago) link

You guys have sold me on Warlock but but never got around to reading the library copy I had. Still gotta finish The Long Ships.

Orpheus in Hull (James Redd and the Blecchs), Wednesday, 17 July 2013 17:47 (eleven years ago) link

oh god i didnt realize stoner was by the guy who wrote augustus! i liked augustus, actually

max, Wednesday, 17 July 2013 17:51 (eleven years ago) link

the best nyrb book I've read is The Fountain Overflows, you should all read it.

ashcans (askance johnson), Wednesday, 17 July 2013 17:51 (eleven years ago) link

oh god i didnt realize stoner was by the guy who wrote augustus! i liked augustus, actually

I did too but I had to overcome my addition to Vidal's approach to history (specifically in Julian).

first I think it's time I kick a little verse! (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Wednesday, 17 July 2013 17:53 (eleven years ago) link

Argh, I tried to read Augustus and hated it so fucking much. I hope Stoner is better.

i don't even have an internet (Hurting 2), Wednesday, 17 July 2013 19:01 (eleven years ago) link

i didnt like 'stoner' at all, probably because its deeply stupid

'speedboat' was the best of the recentish stuff i've read from them. i'd also recommend 'the murderess'

google glasses (Lamp), Wednesday, 17 July 2013 19:08 (eleven years ago) link

I admired its modest attempt to sketch the life of a mediocrity.

first I think it's time I kick a little verse! (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Wednesday, 17 July 2013 19:16 (eleven years ago) link

Was hoping Stoner would get some tough love from his creator near the end but as it turned out any pretense of authorial distance collapsed completely. (xp)

Orpheus in Hull (James Redd and the Blecchs), Wednesday, 17 July 2013 19:17 (eleven years ago) link

Ah, Stoner! Ah, Humanity!

Orpheus in Hull (James Redd and the Blecchs), Wednesday, 17 July 2013 19:18 (eleven years ago) link

i've got speedboat and pitch dark lined up to read soon

congratulations (n/a), Wednesday, 17 July 2013 20:03 (eleven years ago) link

you're all stoners

auscozeichnet (cozen), Wednesday, 17 July 2013 22:35 (eleven years ago) link

the two from "gritty american novels" i've read (nightmare alley and on the yard) are both pretty incredible

Hard Rain Falling is great as well, haven't read Nightmare Alley

JoeStork, Wednesday, 17 July 2013 23:55 (eleven years ago) link

Nightmare Alley was incredible--the movie was pretty good too

mimicking regular benevloent (sic) users' names (President Keyes), Thursday, 18 July 2013 00:22 (eleven years ago) link

Film of Nightmare Alley is pretty great, believe it was some sort of vanity project for Tyrone Powers, afraid the book won't live up.

Orpheus in Hull (James Redd and the Blecchs), Thursday, 18 July 2013 01:18 (eleven years ago) link

oh, the book was better

mimicking regular benevloent (sic) users' names (President Keyes), Thursday, 18 July 2013 01:21 (eleven years ago) link

OK, it's going back into the indefinite detention center holding pen book pile reading list.

Orpheus in Hull (James Redd and the Blecchs), Thursday, 18 July 2013 01:24 (eleven years ago) link

Has anyone read The Three Christs of Ypsilanti?

Orpheus in Hull (James Redd and the Blecchs), Thursday, 18 July 2013 01:25 (eleven years ago) link

I added an 's' to Tyrone Power's name, sorry.

Orpheus in Hull (James Redd and the Blecchs), Thursday, 18 July 2013 01:28 (eleven years ago) link

xpost granted I hadn't seen the film yet when I read the book, so when I saw the movie I was looking through those "they left out that part I liked" glasses

mimicking regular benevloent (sic) users' names (President Keyes), Thursday, 18 July 2013 01:28 (eleven years ago) link

Note that J. Hoberman said that the film "is neither a great movie nor even a classic noir but it has a great ambition to be daring and, once seen, is not easily forgotten."

Orpheus in Hull (James Redd and the Blecchs), Thursday, 18 July 2013 01:31 (eleven years ago) link

Has anyone read The Three Christs of Ypsilanti?

It's interesting and distressing in equal parts, but also a bit too long--skimmed the second half. Hard for any book to match up to its premise, to be fair: 'True story of 3 mental patients who all believe they're Jesus sharing a house! Hijinks ensue!'

ornamental cabbage (James Morrison), Thursday, 18 July 2013 02:10 (eleven years ago) link

i don't really know anything about searls still, but as far as i'm concerned he is probably 100% otm from being editor/selector of thoreau's journals:

http://conversationalreading.com/damion-searls-top-ten-nyrb-classics/

To avoid needless repetition, please cut and paste in your mind the following sentence into all ten descriptions below: “It passes the bounds of human understanding how good this book is.”

j., Saturday, 27 July 2013 04:24 (ten years ago) link

the patrick leigh fermor books are all so so so great

caek, Saturday, 27 July 2013 04:26 (ten years ago) link

^^ agree

Aimless, Saturday, 27 July 2013 04:38 (ten years ago) link

The Broken Road: From the Iron Gates to Mount Athos Hardcover
Patrick Leigh Fermor (Author)

This title will be released on September 12, 2013.

caek, Saturday, 27 July 2013 04:45 (ten years ago) link

that's the uk edition. hope there's an nyrb ed too

caek, Saturday, 27 July 2013 04:45 (ten years ago) link

one month passes...

Another Melville House hijack - anyone had the chance to look at their Neversink Library titles?

http://www.mhpbooks.com/series/the-neversink-library/?id=506

etc, Sunday, 1 September 2013 21:41 (ten years ago) link

Definitely seek out the Irmgard Keun, Ödön von Horváth, Raymond Radiguet, Simenon and the Strugatsky Bros books. I have a couple of the others but haven't read them yet.

ornamental cabbage (James Morrison), Monday, 2 September 2013 00:01 (ten years ago) link

two months pass...

3 NYRBC books on the Kindle Daily Deal today: Stoner, Inverted World, and Rogue Male

I got the glares, the mutterings, the snarls (President Keyes), Saturday, 9 November 2013 10:54 (ten years ago) link

Stoner is marvelous.

the objections to Drake from non-REAL HIPHOP people (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 9 November 2013 12:36 (ten years ago) link

i'm reading one on kindle now. fatale by jean-patrick manchette. it's short.

single white hairball (harbl), Saturday, 9 November 2013 14:05 (ten years ago) link

stoner and rogue male are both fantastic if very different.

adam, Saturday, 9 November 2013 15:49 (ten years ago) link

Came to say Inverted World is a popular title around here.

The Killer Inside Meme (James Redd and the Blecchs), Saturday, 9 November 2013 15:54 (ten years ago) link

One thing I like about the NYRB ebooks is that they have the same cover art and intros and afterwords and such as the print version, so you really are giving up as little as possible. Might end up buying the ebook and hand my print copy over to a lucky ilxor.

I Wanna Be Blecch (James Redd and the Blecchs), Saturday, 9 November 2013 21:11 (ten years ago) link

That edition of Inverted World and its afterward by John Clute really made me want to read anything by Christopher Priest, M. John Harrison or J. G. Ballard and anything praised by John Clute. OK, maybe it is hard to read all of Ballard and maybe Clute gives out too many positive reviews but I don't think I was too far off.

I Wanna Be Blecch (James Redd and the Blecchs), Saturday, 9 November 2013 21:47 (ten years ago) link

Just picked up Skylark by Dezső Kosztolányi after reading bits of the intro (Peter Esterhazy): the world of Musil (Kakania) via Chekhov (banality is amazing if you look hard enough). Reading as I have been, the first 50 pages just now, I find this Hungarian sensibility hardening in my mind for a facility and dexterity in a way in which they spin a tale, Arabian Nights fashion might be close, but really no cigar.

Another passage from the intro is the praising of Kosztolányi as a rhymer of words, of an ability to cut to the chase, be sharp and direct. I find that also a very Hungarian thing too, maybe something that was in much medieval and Renaissance lit but then was lost by all many regions but somehow kept going by that region we now call Hungary, I don't know.

Perhaps Hrabal has that too, and he's Czech. Its a thing...whatever it is its very compulsive.

xyzzzz__, Sunday, 10 November 2013 19:28 (ten years ago) link

Seriously, the only bad novel by a Hungarian I've read was some crap by Peter Nadas--the rest of these guys really know/knew how to write.

ornamental cabbage (James Morrison), Sunday, 10 November 2013 22:35 (ten years ago) link

See also: Miklos Banffy, Sandor Marai, Antal Szerb, Imre Kertesz, Frigyes Karinthy, Ferenc Karinthy, Zsigmond Móricz, Gyula Krudy, Lajos Zilahy, Tibor Dery, László Krasznahorkai

Hmm. Obviously I need to find some female Hungarian writers, too.

ornamental cabbage (James Morrison), Sunday, 10 November 2013 22:40 (ten years ago) link

At the end of Skylark I thought that well this is the closest the circus must be like as a book, and that's what Kosztolányi, Marai, Krudy, Dery and maybe Szerb do. Comes through a town spreading joy and leave everyone with a hint of sadness when they go away.

Krasznahorkai and Kertsz are v different to that.

xyzzzz__, Monday, 11 November 2013 21:33 (ten years ago) link

Great description!

Yeah, Krasznahorkai is never going to be compared to a circus.

ornamental cabbage (James Morrison), Tuesday, 12 November 2013 10:24 (ten years ago) link

Special Film Forum tie-in screening of Nightmare Alley tonight.

Skatalite of Dub (James Redd and the Blecchs), Monday, 25 November 2013 18:07 (ten years ago) link

i started reading that just recently, it's terrific. i cant really think of anyone id give it to as an xmas gift, though

johnny crunch, Wednesday, 4 December 2013 19:18 (ten years ago) link

i usually this version in uk bookshops rather than the nyrb one -

http://theasylum.files.wordpress.com/2009/10/stoner.jpg

just sayin, Wednesday, 4 December 2013 22:40 (ten years ago) link

Hmm. Obviously I need to find some female Hungarian writers, too.

https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-51wZVF16wq8/TskkXCsPq-I/AAAAAAAAABg/ooXEBISUysQ/s640/vampir_noemi.jpg

alimosina, Wednesday, 11 December 2013 03:17 (ten years ago) link

Nice - is she from Transylvania too?

There is a piece by Julian Barnes on Stoner today.

The re-issue of the forgotten American novels, mostly from the 20s and 30s (Glenway Wescott), is the one bit from NYRB 'programme' that I find it hard to muster any interest in.

I actually think Stoner will be boring and actually dull. It might also be that I really dislike some of the people that have gone for this (the Barnes piece is like 'oh I am sent books all the time but more than one of my buddies told me to read it' I mean plz fuck off!) Maybe I should stop doing that, but I suspect I'll just get worse..

xyzzzz__, Saturday, 14 December 2013 12:14 (ten years ago) link

I've enjoyed that end of the catalogue, funnily enough: James Schuyler, Kenneth Fearing, JF Powers, Elaine Dundy. Think you might like "Tenants of Moonbloom" by Edward Lewis Wallant and "The Unpossessed" by Tess Slesinger, xyzzz. These were all things I knew nothing about before taking NYRB-related punts.

Tim, Saturday, 14 December 2013 12:46 (ten years ago) link

Can't speak for those others, xyzzzz__, but your instinct about Stoner is correct.

The Glam Of That All The Way From Memphis Man! (James Redd and the Blecchs), Saturday, 14 December 2013 13:52 (ten years ago) link

Nah, read it. I recoil from fiction about the groves of academe but this novel works -- and a quick read.

the objections to Drake from non-REAL HIPHOP people (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 14 December 2013 14:17 (ten years ago) link

Ah yes I remember liking this piece on Schuyler so I'll try and give him a go for a start and if I can find some of the others...tx.

xyzzzz__, Saturday, 14 December 2013 22:38 (ten years ago) link

Like that guy who wrote the review you just linked, Michael Hofmann, both his translations from German and his own stuff.

The Glam Of That All The Way From Memphis Man! (James Redd and the Blecchs), Saturday, 14 December 2013 22:45 (ten years ago) link

Both myself and James Morrison agree he's great yeah. We disagree on his essay on Zweig tho'.

From the translation work the Joseph Roth is awesome, as is Keun's Child of all Nations. Muller and Junger didn't leave an impression but I think this is to do with the works themselves. Love to read his Kafka translation sometime.

xyzzzz__, Saturday, 14 December 2013 22:53 (ten years ago) link

I've read his Kafka 'Metamorphosis & Other Stories' with the groovy Sammy Harkham cover:
http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_hvV0JHPYX_I/SpSRJd5394I/AAAAAAAAGEg/lgPAkGzr_-U/s1600/pg+%281%29.jpg

ornamental cabbage (James Morrison), Monday, 16 December 2013 00:43 (ten years ago) link

I was just re-reading Benjamin's essay on Kafka (as a result of my above remarks.) Its great he has translated those stories, will look!

xyzzzz__, Monday, 16 December 2013 11:16 (ten years ago) link

To further clarify this is all I thought he had translated.

xyzzzz__, Monday, 16 December 2013 11:19 (ten years ago) link

one month passes...

Looking at the 'forthcoming' section and I have to say I am excited about this book:

http://www.nybooks.com/books/imprints/classics/last-words-from-montmartre/

xyzzzz__, Sunday, 19 January 2014 11:16 (ten years ago) link

Has anyone here tried to suggest anything to them? I sent a horrible rambly suggestion of John Galt's _The Entail_ a while back, but never got any sort of response. I do occasionally think of other works I'd love to see republished, but ehhh, I'm not too tempted to try to send more suggestions to what may well be a bit bucket.

Øystein, Sunday, 19 January 2014 12:03 (ten years ago) link

Who is John Galt? Sorry, couldn't resist, but also it's a real question & please state yr case for The Entail, thx. Seems like we're due for an Ivy Compton-Burnett revival too, or have they already done that?

dow, Sunday, 19 January 2014 14:51 (ten years ago) link

they definitely read them, not sure how many from that suggestion box they actually follow up on

max, Sunday, 19 January 2014 15:15 (ten years ago) link

My interest in Galt came about thanks to a set of posts on the blog Wuthering Expectations. There's a bunch on Galt, but the three on _The Entail_ start here: The Entail, Galt's best book (hit "newer" post to keep going, or click the John Galt label to see the rest of the posts.)
I've read parts of it on Project Gutenberg and really wanted to keep going, but I don't enjoy reading longform on a screen, and don't have an ereader. If I remember correctly, my suggestion primarily consisted of quotes from the book and some links (including the above). Probably some embarrassing, daffy rambling, as is my wont.
I guess a suggestion from someone who hasn't read a book isn't likely to weigh too heavily.

Dunno about revival, but they have released some Compton-Burnett. I enjoyed _Manservant and Maidservant_ a lot, but haven't picked up anything else yet. I keep thinking I'm not a fan of dialogue-heavy novels, but that novel is a good case against that belief.

Øystein, Sunday, 19 January 2014 15:22 (ten years ago) link

I just now enjoyed all those Galt quotes, descriptions and speculations. Checked my local library online: no Galt, but they do have Castle Rackrent, in an Edgeworth twofer with Ennui. That's another promising title, re the attitude in the Wuthering commentator's Castle quotes.

dow, Sunday, 19 January 2014 16:08 (ten years ago) link

nyrb is pretty responsive on twitter too

max, Sunday, 19 January 2014 16:09 (ten years ago) link

Nah, read it. I recoil from fiction about the groves of academe but this novel works -- and a quick read.

― the objections to Drake from non-REAL HIPHOP people (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, December 14, 2013 8:17 AM (1 month ago)

i think i had heard of the reissue before i was privy to a talk by a MORAL PHILOSOPHER all about STONER and what a etc. etc. example it was, the whole thing (the talk i mean) seemed to be an exercise in academic narcissism ('oh i found this book… how coincidental that it is about unsatisfying academic life…')

… so i kind of felt like that was a red flag

j., Sunday, 19 January 2014 16:39 (ten years ago) link

Would have preferred it if the tone was somewhat different, maybe black comedy too much to ask, but perhaps something more muted than the "Ah Stoner, Ah humanity!" that we get.

Wild Mountain Armagideon Thyme (James Redd and the Blecchs), Sunday, 19 January 2014 17:03 (ten years ago) link

Reading speedboat right now and loving it

max, Sunday, 19 January 2014 17:13 (ten years ago) link

yeah, just read it, so good.

JoeStork, Sunday, 19 January 2014 20:00 (ten years ago) link

also reading Speedboat. This might be my new favourite sentence of all time:

"I stole a wash cloth once from a motel in Angkor Wat."

the Shearer of simulated snowsex etc. (Dwight Yorke), Sunday, 19 January 2014 20:32 (ten years ago) link

i should reread that book some less sad weekend than the one i read it

♛ LIL UNIT ♛ (thomp), Sunday, 19 January 2014 23:32 (ten years ago) link

A quick search on Qiu Miaojin brings up:

http://intranslation.brooklynrail.org/chinese/notes-of-a-crocodile

^ Reading p good so far.

xyzzzz__, Tuesday, 21 January 2014 10:54 (ten years ago) link

Has anyone here tried to suggest anything to them?

Yes, had a friendly email exchange with an editor there - I was pushing Image of a Drawn Sword by Jocelyn Brooke but it stalled somewhere up or down the editorial line.

woof, Tuesday, 21 January 2014 11:25 (ten years ago) link

I loved John Galt's 'The Member' -- very cynical political satire

ornamental cabbage (James Morrison), Wednesday, 22 January 2014 10:04 (ten years ago) link

I read "The Siege of Krishnapur" by J.G. Farrell, checked it out from the library solely bc it was a NYRB but wasn't sure about it because it looked like bland historical fiction. I ended up loving it, it's incredibly dark comedy - basically all these British people get trapped in their compound in India during a mutiny and things get more and more disgusting and terrible.

Immediate Follower (NA), Wednesday, 22 January 2014 15:23 (ten years ago) link

Farrell is the best, check out The Singapore Grip and Troubles. The latter won the Lost Booker prize a while back and is every bit as good as Siege...

Kim Wrong-un (Neil S), Wednesday, 22 January 2014 15:25 (ten years ago) link

I had "The Singapore Grip" out from the library too but didn't get to it before the due date.

Immediate Follower (NA), Wednesday, 22 January 2014 15:26 (ten years ago) link

It's more expansive than the previous two novels and does a better job with the colonial "other", who are just shadowy presences in Siege... and Troubles. It does sacrifice some of the claustrophobia and hysteria of the other two, though.

Kim Wrong-un (Neil S), Wednesday, 22 January 2014 15:31 (ten years ago) link

i bought siege because hilary mantel said it was one of her favorite historical novels

max, Wednesday, 22 January 2014 15:37 (ten years ago) link

description makes it sound good!! i hadn't figured it was comedy. i don't know what i thought it was. the british edition's cover is v offputting though

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51Talock3zL._BO2%2C204%2C203%2C200_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-click%2CTopRight%2C35%2C-76_AA300_SH20_OU02_.jpg

♛ LIL UNIT ♛ (thomp), Wednesday, 22 January 2014 19:05 (ten years ago) link

its 'black comedy' i think. i liked 'singapore grip' better fwiw, thought the characters were better and the story a little more engaging

Lamp, Wednesday, 22 January 2014 19:41 (ten years ago) link

i read like a quarter of 'the long ships' in the bookstore the other day it was so rad

― max, Thursday, August 5, 2010 12:39 AM (3 years ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

ha i just came here to ask whether you had read it because it seemed like your cup of tea.

did you finish? recommended?

caek, Thursday, 23 January 2014 17:35 (ten years ago) link

its on my to-read list. ari read it and loved it

max, Thursday, 23 January 2014 17:48 (ten years ago) link

it's not young adult, is it?

caek, Thursday, 23 January 2014 18:34 (ten years ago) link

ari is an adult woman

max, Thursday, 23 January 2014 18:36 (ten years ago) link

stop bragging

caek, Thursday, 23 January 2014 18:37 (ten years ago) link

six months pass...

so "speedboat" is good?

the late great, Sunday, 27 July 2014 23:56 (nine years ago) link

discussed on this thread

renata adler

i didn't love it fwiw

caek, Monday, 28 July 2014 04:01 (nine years ago) link

it's real good

famous instagram God (waterface), Monday, 28 July 2014 13:56 (nine years ago) link

http://nyrbclassics.tumblr.com/tagged/Classics-and-Coffee-Club

so, re nyrb classics, this makes me not like them

♛ LIL UNIT ♛ (thomp), Monday, 28 July 2014 20:42 (nine years ago) link

It's having its intended effect on me. Makes me want to go out and read a bunch of NYRB classics.

o. nate, Monday, 28 July 2014 20:49 (nine years ago) link

i mean that's kinda my default state so

♛ LIL UNIT ♛ (thomp), Monday, 28 July 2014 20:54 (nine years ago) link

anyone read Olivia Manning?

guess that bundt gettin eaten (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Monday, 28 July 2014 21:08 (nine years ago) link

Hilarious

When I get round to Memoirs of a Revolutionary I am so reading that passage in a coffee chain.

xyzzzz__, Tuesday, 29 July 2014 09:36 (nine years ago) link

It'll be postmodern. Therefore right.

xyzzzz__, Tuesday, 29 July 2014 09:36 (nine years ago) link

Olivia Manning is pretty good--her two war trilogies (Balkan and Levant) are extremely readable

ornamental cabbage (James Morrison), Wednesday, 30 July 2014 02:23 (nine years ago) link

Which trilogy to read first, assuming one has time to read?

Dr. Winston O'Boogie Chillen' (James Redd and the Blecchs), Wednesday, 30 July 2014 03:24 (nine years ago) link

Balkan comes first--lead-up to the war (WW2)--then Levant which is mostly during WW2 in Egypt, etc

ornamental cabbage (James Morrison), Wednesday, 30 July 2014 03:43 (nine years ago) link

three months pass...

I just recommended they re-publish Sir Thomas Urquhart's translation of Rabelais. Would be good alongside Florio and Burton.

xyzzzz__, Saturday, 8 November 2014 13:46 (nine years ago) link

man if they would put out the rest of the florio i would be so delighted

it seems it's out of print anywhere : (

j., Saturday, 8 November 2014 15:00 (nine years ago) link

I've got a modern library edition somewhere that (I think) used to be cheap and findable second-hand, but it's £30+ on abe now.

woof, Saturday, 8 November 2014 15:17 (nine years ago) link

Interesting article on Florio and Shakespeare.

If Florio was indeed involved in the Folio, a number of other passages may well be his work. It is well known that Gonzalo's utopian vision in The Tempest is lifted from Florio's translation of Montaigne's essay "Of Cannibals". The standard view has been that this represents Shakespeare's borrowing from Montaigne; the alternative is that it might represent Florio borrowing from himself.

Which somewhat weakens the claim in the re-issue as Shakespeare's Montaigne.

xyzzzz__, Sunday, 9 November 2014 23:02 (nine years ago) link

In all, the OED ascribes 1,224 first usages to Florio – words such as "judicious", "management" and "transcription", but also "masturbation" and "fucker". In this, he is matched only by Chaucer and Shakespeare.

truly our god

j., Sunday, 9 November 2014 23:22 (nine years ago) link

From recently published NYRB Jessica Mitford collection: "The Best of Frenemies"---JM may have invented the term, way before Sex In The City:
http://nyrb.typepad.com/classics/2010/10/making-frenemies-with-jessica-mitford.html

dow, Thursday, 20 November 2014 17:07 (nine years ago) link

five months pass...

Heard this morning that NYRB is republishing The Go-Between and Eustace and Hilda, with the former being "one of the best novels of the 20th Century." I've never read either; how are they?

dow, Thursday, 7 May 2015 13:12 (nine years ago) link

You've gotta read The Go-Between, don. Own the NYRB Eustace and Hilda, but only read the first few chapters, which were grebt. If you want to start a reading group...

Thank You For Talking Machine Chemirocha (James Redd and the Blecchs), Thursday, 7 May 2015 13:26 (nine years ago) link

Thanks! I would, but since my library doesn't have any Hartley, and I don't have much of a book budget currently, will take a while (though I may ask librarian to order those).

dow, Thursday, 7 May 2015 13:49 (nine years ago) link

Go-Between is ace. Apparently Hartley misunderstood his own book, though--without spoilering the plot, he thought the prejudices of all the non-central characters were perfectly correct
Is E&H the first book only, or the whole trilogy? Book 1 is good, haven't tackled the rest

as verbose and purple as a Peter Ustinov made of plums (James Morrison), Thursday, 7 May 2015 23:22 (nine years ago) link

Trilogy

two months pass...

Talk sounds intriguing:

http://www.nyrb.com/collections/classics/products/talk/?variant=1094931493

... (Eazy), Friday, 31 July 2015 17:29 (eight years ago) link

there's an excerpt from it here: http://lithub.com/talk/

wmlynch, Friday, 31 July 2015 18:19 (eight years ago) link

yeah i really wanna read this

tender is the late-night daypart (schlump), Friday, 31 July 2015 19:25 (eight years ago) link

Does anyone what happened to Ginzburg's "A Family Lexicon"?

http://www.nyrb.com/collections/natalia-ginzburg/

They are building a healthy stable in Spanish lit titles. Want to get hold of Ocampo. Arlt and Di Benedetto forthcoming

xyzzzz__, Saturday, 1 August 2015 07:43 (eight years ago) link

Wanna check this! http://www.nyrb.com/products/the-woman-who-borrowed-memories/?variant=1094932805

dow, Saturday, 1 August 2015 13:24 (eight years ago) link

one month passes...

Oh wow---NYRB Classics Book Club. I might do this. Have to think about it:
https://subscribe.nybooks.info/ecom/NYB/app/live/subscriptions?org=NYB&publ=BC&key_code=EVAXWWW&type=S&gift_key=GVAXWWW

dow, Saturday, 12 September 2015 21:33 (eight years ago) link

one month passes...

http://www.nyrb.com/collections/forthcoming/products/the-white-stones?variant=6572997249

^ wow

Also love the idea of the Calligrams series. Need to get around Chinese lit and poetry.

xyzzzz__, Wednesday, 14 October 2015 15:33 (eight years ago) link

I stumbled upon this last year while in Mexico, I'd never heard of her and only read it because I was there but it turned out to be one of my favourite pieces of travel writing:

http://www.nyrb.com/collections/forthcoming/products/a-visit-to-don-otavio?variant=6568056129

.robin., Thursday, 15 October 2015 18:08 (eight years ago) link

Her novels, which are mostly heavily autobiographical, are excellent, too

as verbose and purple as a Peter Ustinov made of plums (James Morrison), Friday, 16 October 2015 00:14 (eight years ago) link

four months pass...

'a way of life, like any other' by darcy o'brien is really, really good i thought

extremely online (Lamp), Thursday, 10 March 2016 09:18 (eight years ago) link

hell of a title

carly rae jetson (thomp), Thursday, 10 March 2016 09:44 (eight years ago) link

That book is great.

Jesperson, I think we're lost (James Redd and the Blecchs), Thursday, 10 March 2016 11:00 (eight years ago) link

Yes, love it. Looked for more by him, and they all seemed to be true crime books, which is not USUALLY my bag. Has anyone read any of them?

like Uber, but for underpants (James Morrison), Thursday, 10 March 2016 11:49 (eight years ago) link

Yes, I read two of them, the one about the Hillside Stranglers and the one about Little Egypt. Both were extremely well done but left me feeling weird for a long while, because true crime.

Jesperson, I think we're lost (James Redd and the Blecchs), Thursday, 10 March 2016 11:59 (eight years ago) link

Realized that the regular crime novel is usually reassuring because whatever bad stuff happens there is always some rhyme or reason, some pattern some style, whereas true crime opens up a rent in the curtain to peek into the void.

Jesperson, I think we're lost (James Redd and the Blecchs), Thursday, 10 March 2016 12:01 (eight years ago) link

do you two have any other nyrb recommendations? i havent been reading much so far this year

extremely online (Lamp), Thursday, 10 March 2016 23:19 (eight years ago) link

Have you read The Go-Between?

Jesperson, I think we're lost (James Redd and the Blecchs), Thursday, 10 March 2016 23:49 (eight years ago) link

Of the top of my head...

If you like beautifully written, somewhat elliptical Middle Europeans, try Skylark or Sunflower
If realistic, gritty and Beautifully written, maybe Fat City
For energetic pulpy fun, Black Wings Has My Angel
For fascinating memoirs, The Burning World
For groovy SF, The Inverted World or The Chrysalids

like Uber, but for underpants (James Morrison), Friday, 11 March 2016 03:06 (eight years ago) link

Is there anyone left on this borad who hasn't read Inverted World?

Jesperson, I think we're lost (James Redd and the Blecchs), Friday, 11 March 2016 03:34 (eight years ago) link

got it from library years ago, but it didn't hook me & I returned it unread

bernard snowy, Friday, 11 March 2016 07:11 (eight years ago) link

the closest two NYRBs from where I'm sitting is a collection of Tatyana Tolstaya stories. I've also got Geoffrey Household's Rogue Male stashed somewhere, that's a good'un; & Silvina Ocampo's volume of stories is out in the car I think. I had A High Wind in Jamaica, but I hawked it one summer, during a particularly slow week for sandwich delivery driving

bernard snowy, Friday, 11 March 2016 07:16 (eight years ago) link

Recently scored a 2nd hand copy of The Unknown Masterpiece by Balzac, which is probably the first of these I read.

Thinking we could run a poll of favourite titles. Like a Top 25.

xyzzzz__, Friday, 11 March 2016 09:40 (eight years ago) link

warlock or 30 years war would walk it surely

cozen, Friday, 11 March 2016 17:52 (eight years ago) link

30 yrs war and novels in three lines is all i've read /noob

goole, Friday, 11 March 2016 19:57 (eight years ago) link

both rule hard tho

goole, Friday, 11 March 2016 19:57 (eight years ago) link

the closest two NYRBs from where I'm sitting is a collection of Tatyana Tolstaya stories. I've also got Geoffrey Household's Rogue Male stashed somewhere, that's a good'un; & Silvina Ocampo's volume of stories is out in the car I think. I had A High Wind in Jamaica, but I hawked it one summer, during a particularly slow week for sandwich delivery driving

Yeah, all these are awesome in quite different ways. I guess there's a common strangeness to some of the Tolstaya and Ocampo, but very different sensibilities.

like Uber, but for underpants (James Morrison), Saturday, 12 March 2016 01:23 (eight years ago) link

was gifted 30 Years War this past Xmas on request off the back of that fascinating thread and for w/e reason (quite possibly i was igonorantly ripe for it and simply required a catalyst to get me moving) i've gone on a history reading tear in a bunch of different directions ever since, think it would be cool if ilx occasionally took time out of its busy schedule to discuss some minor and overlooked period/event in world history and recommend excellent books upon the subject.

Windsor Davies, Saturday, 12 March 2016 01:42 (eight years ago) link

Maqroll the gaviero

the late great, Saturday, 12 March 2016 08:51 (eight years ago) link

Before the current What Are You Reading thread sinks into the archive, here's a NYRB thing I posted there

NYRB Winter Sale---50 books at 50% off (wondering about Poets In A Landscape and Pages From The Goncourt Journals)(maybe the Cendrars)

http://www.nyrb.com/collections/winter-sale?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=NYR%20Winter%20Sale&utm_content=NYR%20Winter%20Sale+CID_093896182073cb3e11f6921e1ab46742&utm_source=Newsletter&utm_term=Browse%20the%20books

dow, Saturday, 12 March 2016 23:16 (eight years ago) link

And some responses:

Started on The Goncourt Journal! Its compulsive reading atm: a mixture of acid bitchyness, passges of excellent crit (the way they lay into Flaubert after a reading of Salammbo, whom they otherwise have much affection for). Also has plenty of misogny - which in turn reflects on various inadequacies - the men as portrayed here can't stop talking about women. Must've been a key text for Proust.

― xyzzzz__, Tuesday, February 16, 2016 4:17 PM (3 weeks ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

There's a really virtuosic pastiche of the Goncourt journals late in Recherche, iirc. (I mean, I think it's virtuosic but haven't read enough of the actual brothers to properly judge.)

― one way street, Tuesday, February 16, 2016 5:20 PM (3 weeks ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

dow, Saturday, 12 March 2016 23:19 (eight years ago) link

So I finished Pages from the Goncourt Journals. So much in here, even though its very much the chronicle of two people who gave their lives to one thing: literature - partly because that's what they were good at (and not much else; women were such an obsession because they were a mystery - almost alien beings), but also because the stuff they were writing about like Flaubert and Zola was the stuff that 'won'. So while the subject is cult (Lit in general is a minority interest) they display a tabloid-like ear for both dialogue and speculation - people's lives and tribulations. A snatch of conversation that lingers on for long after you've read it. Something from his cousin:

Just imagine: they [the cousin's rural family] are people who for five generations have married for love

But there is are bits indicating a panorama of Paris in the 19th Century: one of the brothers - Jules - dies (at 39) Edmond carries on (3/4 of this is Edmond) and the entries surrounding his brother's death are touching and dignified. The Paris Commune starts up and this is chronicled as engagingly as what he is usually interested in.

But literature is what they gave themselves and there are insights at what the coming century will bring. The feud with Maupassant (his descent into madness and death doesn't stop Edmond from pissing away in his grave, but the charge of Flaubert minus sticks). There are snatches of a hilarious portrait of Mallarme, just this person that is beyond any comprehension. Edmond notes the weirdness of Baudelaire and so on. And then:

I am interested in novels in which I can feel the transcription in print, so to speak, of creatures in flesh and blood, in which I can read a little or a great deal of the memoirs of a life that has been lived

Where so much 20th century fic goes to (and where these Journals have been in although ironically you get a sense the life is often frustrating, in a they-are-rich-but-are-they-happy sorta way)

and regarding novels about high society:

...but unfortunately, to write novels or plays about that world you mustn't belong to it
Which is basically Proust.

― xyzzzz__, Sunday, February 28, 2016 6:02 PM (1 week ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

dow, Saturday, 12 March 2016 23:36 (eight years ago) link

The Goncourt Journals is vital and glad its there but like so much in the NYRB stack its a reissue (I actually read it as a hardback of the OUP ed. from '78 I got at the library and looked the NYRB ed in a bookshop).

Serge's Memoirs of a Revolutionary comes with extra bits and so it would've been a nice thing to do to as much of their reissues, esp Goncourt since its by no means complete and yet you probably don't need to read it all. Thinking they could've commissioned a translation of different bits and re-select. Not just reissue.

Maqroll the gaviero

― the late great, Saturday, March 12, 2016 Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

Loved this in parts - had too much going on while I picked this up so had a stop/start experience with it. But its in line with what I was talking about - I think the previous edition didn't have the complete books so NYRB got the full set out there.

xyzzzz__, Sunday, 13 March 2016 08:17 (eight years ago) link

s1ocki chatting with nyrb on twitter has brought this, which looks cool, to light: http://www.nyrb.com/collections/forthcoming/products/the-glory-of-the-empire?variant=6567691777

mookieproof, Tuesday, 15 March 2016 16:19 (eight years ago) link

What?

SIGSALY Can't Dance (James Redd and the Blecchs), Tuesday, 15 March 2016 16:21 (eight years ago) link

a bit surprised to see some 60s J H Prynne (The White Stones) coming out in their poetry imprint

woof, Tuesday, 15 March 2016 16:40 (eight years ago) link

Its pretty exciting. Really looking forward to that.

xyzzzz__, Tuesday, 15 March 2016 16:47 (eight years ago) link

yeah early parsable Prynne is great. it's in the big Poems, though, so I may skip it.

woof, Tuesday, 15 March 2016 16:51 (eight years ago) link

William Sloane- The Rim of Morning is a Kindle Daily Deal today

Blowout Coombes (President Keyes), Tuesday, 22 March 2016 00:53 (eight years ago) link

picked up copies of fat city and black wings has my angel thx to James' recs upthread... started the latter on my busride home this evening, hoo boy

flopson, Tuesday, 22 March 2016 00:59 (eight years ago) link

Just finished An Empty Room by Mu Xin which I bought on a whim, has anyone read it?

Highly recommended, its a series of stories which are somewhere between fiction and essays, some of them brutal short stories about war and oppression, others reminiscent of Robert Walser in going for a stroll mode.

.robin., Tuesday, 22 March 2016 03:53 (eight years ago) link

That's on New Directions.

I read Jejuri by Arun Kolatkar last night and its fantastic. Its a pre-NYRB poets edition (and I haven't read it in that edition either but doing it as part of the complete poems).

Very inspired pick-up from NYRB. Kolatkar was very reluctant to issue any of his work (the previous edition was on a small label in the late 70s and back then it was his only book) (he only allowed a re-print on NYRB and further things to come out as he was dying)

xyzzzz__, Tuesday, 22 March 2016 09:24 (eight years ago) link

that william sloane was really fun, highly recommended

adam, Tuesday, 22 March 2016 11:07 (eight years ago) link

Yeah, Jejuri is really good

like Uber, but for underpants (James Morrison), Tuesday, 22 March 2016 21:19 (eight years ago) link

Oops, meant to post it in the general thread.

.robin., Wednesday, 23 March 2016 04:06 (eight years ago) link

where does prynne stop being parseable? asking for a friend

carly rae jetson (thomp), Wednesday, 23 March 2016 06:11 (eight years ago) link

i deeply regret having not picked up the goncourt journals at the blackwells charing cross stock clearance--i bought a whole bunch of NYRBS, pretty much at random, and i can't remember what the others were (stefan zweig?)--but whatever they were, i feel the goncourts would have been the better choice. not least because i remember when i was staying up at gatwick, having got in early morning, and finishing proust, in costa coffee, and reaching the goncourt pastiche, and thinking, what in fuck is this? and then, on looking it up, remembering, clearly, my choice to return the goncourt volumes to the shelf.

carly rae jetson (thomp), Wednesday, 23 March 2016 06:13 (eight years ago) link

has there been any discussion here of what we take the er ethos of the nyrb imprint to be, because i think on a certain level it actually kinda sucks

carly rae jetson (thomp), Wednesday, 23 March 2016 06:14 (eight years ago) link

Like a comma overload now and then.

I saw the OUP edition of the Goncourts 2nd hand last weekend but the spine was damaged so no go.

The NYRB ed has an intro from fucking Geoff Dyer which is a bit off-putting.

re: ethos. Certainly more of a discussion I'd like to see...especially now as its expanding from its early days: NYRB Poets and the Calligrams series. Some of the reissues are lazy others inspired.

I was thinking if you look at Archipelago they have much more of a vision for certain kinds of literature, like their Nerval translation and almost all of the items from German literature proved to be a valuable guide for me.

xyzzzz__, Wednesday, 23 March 2016 09:20 (eight years ago) link

Not just a guide but pretty much vital, whereas its pockets of stuff from NYRB (although the Hungarian section is quite strong)

xyzzzz__, Wednesday, 23 March 2016 09:25 (eight years ago) link

Yes, their Hungarian and other Central European stuff is a goldmine.

like Uber, but for underpants (James Morrison), Wednesday, 23 March 2016 09:59 (eight years ago) link

has there been any discussion here of what we take the er ethos of the nyrb imprint to be, because i think on a certain level it actually kinda sucks

― carly rae jetson (thomp), Wednesday, 23 March 2016 06:14 (7 hours ago) Permalink

what do you mean?

flopson, Wednesday, 23 March 2016 13:35 (eight years ago) link

Pretty covers aren't enough.

xyzzzz__, Wednesday, 23 March 2016 13:42 (eight years ago) link

"er ethos"?

Blowout Coombes (President Keyes), Wednesday, 23 March 2016 14:06 (eight years ago) link

pretty covers not enough, but good selection and decent forewords is imo (what more can you ask for?)

curious though, on what level does it actually suck?

flopson, Wednesday, 23 March 2016 14:39 (eight years ago) link

Yes, their Hungarian and other Central European stuff is a goldmine.

― like Uber, but for underpants (James Morrison), Wednesday, 23 March 2016 Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

Btw what other Central Euro? The stuff from the Czechs is just (or mostly) re-publishing Hrabal which lots of ppl are hitting on day and night. The Richard Weiner issue on Two Lines showed them up.

The 10 paperbacks from the Penguin Central Euro series (despite the wacky covers) took some risks and it was interesting.

xyzzzz__, Wednesday, 23 March 2016 14:55 (eight years ago) link

The other non-Hungarian Central Europeans I'm thinking of are Gregor von Rezzori, Aleksander Wat, Aleksandar Tišma, Peter Handke, Bolesław Prus, plus Robert Walser depending on how wide your "Central" definition grows. And their German, Italian, Dutch and French resurrections are pretty good too.

But yes, those Penguin Central European books were great, and I wish they had been followed up with more.

like Uber, but for underpants (James Morrison), Wednesday, 23 March 2016 23:19 (eight years ago) link

on what level does the term 'classic' in 'nyrb classics' operate

carly rae jetson (thomp), Thursday, 24 March 2016 06:32 (eight years ago) link

i guess if they called it 'nyrb hiply curated list of sort of interesting mostly novels' i wouldn't have any problems

carly rae jetson (thomp), Thursday, 24 March 2016 06:32 (eight years ago) link

I think it has the same meaning it has for every other publisher in the known world, ie 'books that have been published before, and are now being reprinted/translated i to english because we think they're good'

like Uber, but for underpants (James Morrison), Thursday, 24 March 2016 08:44 (eight years ago) link

The other non-Hungarian Central Europeans I'm thinking of are Gregor von Rezzori, Aleksander Wat, Aleksandar Tišma, Peter Handke, Bolesław Prus, plus Robert Walser depending on how wide your "Central" definition grows. And their German, Italian, Dutch and French resurrections are pretty good too.

Its erratic for me.

I've looked at some of that and I dunno, its kinda interesting-ish stuff I'll never get round to. Don't see the big deal with Handke (so he's some kind of fascist like Celine without the writing). Love Walser and there is a new volume of his stuff this year (and I like how they just bother with the short fragments/stories).
I've kinda avoided lots of their German stuff for similar reasons. Don't know if I'll ever care for Jakov Lind.
Issued the wrong Gadda, also hate the Selected works of Pavese. That's no way to treat a master - Peter Owen editions are the way.

Positives:

The Doblin reissues are looking good.
Reissuing Genet's The Prisoner of Love (although I don't own it) was a great move. Balzac's Unknown Masterpiece is one of the great early books from them (lol don't know if I need anything else by him). It was great reading Simenon's Tropic Moon. All the Serge (lol idk what I feel about the rescuing him from the Commie press vibe tho').
Malaparte revival! Nice to see Sciascia although I own these in different covers.

xyzzzz__, Thursday, 24 March 2016 09:33 (eight years ago) link

yeah ok james very good, now analyse 'we' and 'good'

carly rae jetson (thomp), Thursday, 24 March 2016 16:57 (eight years ago) link

zzz

flopson, Thursday, 24 March 2016 17:00 (eight years ago) link

nyrb classics: you could get to grips with the canon, but the binding on these is so much nicer

carly rae jetson (thomp), Thursday, 24 March 2016 17:04 (eight years ago) link

Oh thompaws

Woke Up Scully (James Redd and the Blecchs), Thursday, 24 March 2016 17:07 (eight years ago) link

it's a step up from Capuchin Classics

woof, Thursday, 24 March 2016 19:17 (eight years ago) link

where does prynne stop being parseable? asking for a friend

I don't know his stuff super-well, but the difficulty seems to ramp up over the 70s & turn into a different kind of opacity - by The Oval Window I think you're somewhere else.

woof, Thursday, 24 March 2016 19:27 (eight years ago) link

NYRB young adult classics

k3vin k., Friday, 1 April 2016 18:19 (eight years ago) link

Note the date.

o. nate, Friday, 1 April 2016 18:20 (eight years ago) link

hmm

k3vin k., Friday, 1 April 2016 18:21 (eight years ago) link

lol smh @ me

k3vin k., Friday, 1 April 2016 18:22 (eight years ago) link

Black Wings Has My Angel rocked my world. Thanks James

de l'asshole (flopson), Friday, 1 April 2016 18:40 (eight years ago) link

Any new plans?

We are doing something we don’t do very often which is reissuing all of a writer’s work—in this case the novels of Henry Green.

cozen, Friday, 8 April 2016 06:35 (eight years ago) link

Not sure why - all of them are available. iirc Dalkey issued them all already in the US?

Not a bad interview, and I love how he recognises some of my favourite writers in the series: Pavese, Krudy (I'd love it if they commissioned more translations from him), the modern Russians.

Plenty of stuff that I won't get around -- at some point you know The Door and Stoner might be fine and accomplished but not something you'll ever need. Time is short.

xyzzzz__, Friday, 8 April 2016 11:42 (eight years ago) link

man you read like 6 books for every one i read lol

de l'asshole (flopson), Friday, 8 April 2016 12:07 (eight years ago) link

shame Paris Review didn't ask Frank to unpack "we" and "good"

de l'asshole (flopson), Friday, 8 April 2016 12:08 (eight years ago) link

I don't think did Dalkey did all the Henry Greens - just the later ones? Still, seems an odd choice, but maybe I am just getting old and have seen too many Henry Green pushes. Or it's more that I thought the internet had helped flatten out the sudden attention spikes he used to get - like most people who should know about Henry Green will probably run into him nowadays.

(but people should read Henry Green, obviously)

woof, Friday, 8 April 2016 13:39 (eight years ago) link

i read party going last year, it was pretty hard to find. wonder if the nyrb editions will give the burst of interest needed to get NRQ's film adaptation off the ground

de l'asshole (flopson), Friday, 8 April 2016 14:13 (eight years ago) link

woof - sorry yes the last four of his books have been issued by Dalkey. Really one of the very best things they've done.

Agree Henry Green has to be read but idk, rather they translated more Krudy. I was just thinking "great if you like Krudy so much why don't you issue more". I told 'em to put together a translation of Rosa's Grande Sertão: Veredas but they won't listen to me.

What's "NRQ's film adaptation", flopson?

xyzzzz__, Friday, 8 April 2016 14:30 (eight years ago) link

LOL, gotta say that would get a Henry Green revival going far more than re-issuing these in NYRB covers.

xyzzzz__, Friday, 8 April 2016 14:50 (eight years ago) link

I want the Gallant, and have ordered Houses. The Giono looks good, but I already have several by him I haven't got round to, so it will have to wait.

I am going to read The Door, because wahay Hungarian, but definitely back xyzzzz in his calls for more Krudy

shame Paris Review didn't ask Frank to unpack "we" and "good"

you're all aesthetically bankrupt whores. hey xyzzzz thanks for the heads up on the gower st waterstones, i'd been meaning to pick up a copy of lolly willowes on this trip and hadn't even realised it was in nyrb. very fortuitous.

carly rae jetson (thomp), Thursday, 14 April 2016 09:01 (eight years ago) link

They do her Summer Will Show, too, if you can lower yourself

And "Mr Fortune's Maggot", though they called it "Mr Fortune" (I think they appended another related short story?).

Tim, Thursday, 14 April 2016 09:46 (eight years ago) link

three weeks pass...

http://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0726/9203/products/Memories_from_Moscow_to_the_Black_Sea_2048x2048.jpg?v=1460057487

EMORIES
FROM MOSCOW TO THE BLACK SEA
by Teffi, a new translation from the Russian by Robert Chandler and Elizabeth Chandler, Irina Steinberg, and Anne Marie Jackson, introduction by Edythe Haber

$11.87 $16.95
(30% off)
Available as E-BookBiography & MemoirInternational LiteratureRussian Literature
PAPERBACK

Available as an e-book from these retailers
An NYRB Classics Original

Considered Teffi’s single greatest work, Memories: From Moscow to the Black Sea is a deeply personal account of the author’s last months in Russia and Ukraine, suffused with her acute awareness of the political currents churning around her, many of which have now resurfaced.

In 1918, in the immediate aftermath of the Russian Revolution, Teffi, whose stories and journalism had made her a celebrity in Moscow, was invited to read from her work in Ukraine. She accepted the invitation eagerly, though she had every intention of returning home. As it happened, her trip ended four years later in Paris, where she would spend the rest of her life in exile. None of this was foreseeable when she arrived in German-occupied Kiev to discover a hotbed of artistic energy and experimentation. When Kiev fell several months later to Ukrainian nationalists, Teffi fled south to Odessa, then on to the port of Novorossiysk, from which she embarked at last for Constantinople. Danger and death threaten throughout Memories, even as the book displays the brilliant style, keen eye, comic gift, and deep feeling that have made Teffi one of the most beloved of twentieth-century Russian writers.
PRAISE

I never imagined such a memoir could be possible, especially about the Russian Civil War. Teffi wears her wisdom lightly, observing farce and foible amid the looming tragedy, in this enthralling book.
—Antony Beevor

Teffi demonstrates a profound sympathy for the ordinary people among whom she counts herself, swept along by cataclysmic events. While she sympathises with those who cannot help themselves, she is not afraid to look into the depths of what human beings can do to one another and what happens when civilisation breaks down.
—Virginia Rounding, Financial Times

The book is expertly and collectively translated by Robert Chandler, Elizabeth Chandler, Anne Marie Jackson and Irina Steinberg. It reads extremely easily and well in English and is furnished with an introduction, translators’ afterword and copious notes to explain references and allusions now lost to time.
—William Boyd, Sunday Times

Memories is an astonishing work that, like Sholokhov’s Quiet Flows the Don, and for many of the same reasons, deserves to be turned into a film. It is both a thriller and an unforgettably personal account of one of the worst periods in Russian history.
—Catherine Brown, Literary Review

An] astonishingly vivid memoir...Wittily, wryly, wistfully, but never self-indulgently, Teffi tells the story of her escape from Moscow to Kiev to Odessa and onto a dodgy boat to cross the Black Sea as the country she loves is turned upside down in the aftermath of the Bolshevik revolution.
—Ysenda Maxtone Graham, Country Life

A vividly idiosyncratic personal account of the disintegration - moral, political, strategic - of Tsarist Russia after the Revolution, as alive to the farcical and the ridiculous as it is to the tragic; a bit like what Chekhov might have written if he had lived to experience it.
—Michael Frayn


Related Books
SALE

TOLSTOY, RASPUTIN, OTHERS, AND ME
THE BEST OF TEFFI
by Teffi, a new translation from the Russian by Robert Chandler, Rose France, and Anne Marie Jackson

$10.47 $14.95
(30% off)
Available as E-BookInternational LiteratureRussian Literature
PAPERBACK

Available as an e-book from these retailers
Early in her literary career Nadezhda Lokhvitskaya, born in St. Petersburg in 1872, adopted the pen-name of Teffi, and it is as Teffi that she is remembered. In prerevolutionary Russia she was a literary star, known for her humorous satirical pieces; in the 1920s and 30s, she wrote some of her finest stories in exile in Paris, recalling her unforgettable encounters with Rasputin, and her hopeful visit at age thirteen to Tolstoy after reading War and Peace. In this selection of her best autobiographical stories, she covers a wide range of subjects, from family life to revolution and emigration, writers and writing.

Like Nabokov, Platonov, and other great Russian prose writers, Teffi was a poet who turned to prose but continued to write with a poet’s sensitivity to tone and rhythm. Like Chekhov, she fuses wit, tragedy, and a remarkable capacity for observation; there are few human weaknesses she did not relate to with compassion and understanding.

PRAISE

Nearly all her portraits – both of ‘famous historical figures’ and of ordinary people – are sharp and vivid. There is only one person in Teffi’s autobiographical prose who we are not really allowed to see. This is Nadezhda Lokhvitskaya, carefully concealed by her witty, observant and humane alter ego –Teffi.
—Masha Karp, The World Today

Teffi is an inimitable presence in Russian literature, a genuine wonder.
—Georgy Ivanov

Teffi can write in more registers than you might think, and is capable of being heartbreaking as well as very funny. I wish she were still alive, and I could have met her. But then I realised she would have seen right through me. I can’t recommend her strongly enough.
—Nicholas Lezard, The Guardian

dow, Tuesday, 10 May 2016 22:13 (eight years ago) link

Haven't read that one, but based on the collection of her stuff that came out last year from Pushkin Press, 'Subtly Worded', it would be well worth getting

two months pass...

Summer Sale

40% off 44 titles

http://www.nyrb.com/pages/nyrb-summer-sale

flopson, Tuesday, 9 August 2016 20:54 (seven years ago) link

one month passes...

Also wondering about this one:

The English biographer, naturalist, philosopher and convivial wit John Aubrey (1626-97) did not leave a diary behind, to the dismay of those who admire his writing about other people. In an ingenious new book titled “John Aubrey: My Own Life,” the historian Ruth Scurr has made one for him, and it is a thoroughgoing delight. Ms. Scurr has rummaged through Aubrey’s letters, books and unpublished manuscripts. She has isolated his writing about his own life and set it in chronological order, modernizing spellings and adding discreet commentary when necessary...She has done the world a service in compiling “John Aubrey: My Own Life.” This is a funny book, and a wise and moving one, that delivers to us a man in full.
—Dwight Garner, The New York Times

quoted here:
http://www.nyrb.com/products/john-aubrey-my-life?variant=16330445255&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Ruth%20Scurr%202&utm_content=Ruth%20Scurr%202+CID_f57492bfc3db8da5e050bf3840e94475&

dow, Thursday, 15 September 2016 23:30 (seven years ago) link

That come out last year in the UK, was raved about everywhere

I hear from this arsehole again, he's going in the river (James Morrison), Thursday, 15 September 2016 23:39 (seven years ago) link

Got my eye on Zama by Antonio Di Benedetto: proto-Bolano. I certainly need it.

xyzzzz__, Saturday, 17 September 2016 20:32 (seven years ago) link

That does look good, came across this article last week:

An Argentinian Novelist, Out of Oblivion

by the light of the burning Citroën, Saturday, 17 September 2016 20:42 (seven years ago) link

tx, gd rev

xyzzzz__, Saturday, 17 September 2016 21:05 (seven years ago) link

Zama is very much worth your time

I hear from this arsehole again, he's going in the river (James Morrison), Saturday, 17 September 2016 23:26 (seven years ago) link

http://www.nyrb.com/collections/forthcoming/products/the-invisibility-cloak

The Ge Fei'll be their first work by a living Chinese writer, right?

An art/comics-world friend who's never read any NYRB titles has been raving about the selections in the NYR Comics series, but haven't seen anything in the shops down my way.

etc, Sunday, 18 September 2016 06:17 (seven years ago) link

The Invisibility Cloak looks promising. I read one other Ge Fei book, https://penguin.com.au/books/flock-of-brown-birds-9780734399601
Which seemed a bit hackneyed in its postmodernism, but it was originally from the 1980s, and apparently it was a big deal in Chinese lit at the time

I hear from this arsehole again, he's going in the river (James Morrison), Sunday, 18 September 2016 21:48 (seven years ago) link

On the Aubrey book, the LRB was a bit sceptical - sounds like there's a lot of silent prose-tidying.

woof, Sunday, 18 September 2016 22:00 (seven years ago) link

three months pass...

hey--does anyone know a place in brooklyn, say, in the cobble hill or boerum hill area, where i can find these books?

Nope, not any more

The Magnificent Galileo Seven (James Redd and the Blecchs), Monday, 2 January 2017 13:48 (seven years ago) link

two weeks pass...

Benjamin Kunkel reviews Zama by Antonio Di Benedetto. sounds great http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2017/01/23/a-neglected-south-american-masterpiece

flopson, Thursday, 19 January 2017 15:36 (seven years ago) link

Such a beautiful review (also Coetzee writes an OK rev in the NYRB). Its great to see that Esther Allen is working on more translations and there is also a film of it to be released later this year apparently.

xyzzzz__, Thursday, 19 January 2017 23:29 (seven years ago) link

two weeks pass...

The Calligrams series...haven't bought anything from this however Francois Chang's study looks like a good primer.

xyzzzz__, Saturday, 4 February 2017 14:59 (seven years ago) link

hmm, will prob get Red Shift, Platonov, Rosenkrantz (i LOVE dialogue) and the J.R. Ackerley (i read We Think The World Of You last year)

if anyone says nice things about any of the other books I am easily convinced :)

flopson, Saturday, 11 February 2017 20:04 (seven years ago) link

Haven't read it since my smoggy early twenties, but Growing Up Absurd brought some focus (no small feat at the time).

dow, Saturday, 11 February 2017 20:11 (seven years ago) link

huh, can't believe I've never heard of this guy! added to the pile

flopson, Saturday, 11 February 2017 20:20 (seven years ago) link

Ordering Chocky and Human Comedy, plus Pinocchio for my kid. Was tempted by Red Shift and Growing Up Absurd as well...

o. nate, Saturday, 11 February 2017 20:35 (seven years ago) link

if i weren't broke i would be all over the two walser volumes!

re: goodman, not published by nyrb but his series of novels published together as empire city is quite interesting and feeds into his philosophical writings.

no lime tangier, Saturday, 11 February 2017 21:03 (seven years ago) link

Oh yeah, and he co-authored the groundbreaking Gestalt Therapy, which I thought useful (also in my twenties). He was also kind of Chomsky before (well-known) Chomsky, lefto-anarchist-wise, but with more range. This is weirdly "organized", but works more info into the eventual rehash:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Goodman

dow, Saturday, 11 February 2017 22:07 (seven years ago) link

ha, as it happens i think the first book of goodman's i read included an attack on chomsky's linguistic theories!

no lime tangier, Saturday, 11 February 2017 22:18 (seven years ago) link

said on said book: http://www.nytimes.com/books/99/10/03/specials/said-goodman.html

no lime tangier, Saturday, 11 February 2017 22:19 (seven years ago) link

might get the Arlt, too. i'm a sucker for proto-Cortazar gods of Argentine lit with hyperbolic quotes by contemporary Lat Am writers (Bolano: "Let's say, modestly, that Arlt is Jesus Christ")

flopson, Saturday, 11 February 2017 22:34 (seven years ago) link

Yeah, that arlt is calling to me

I hear from this arsehole again, he's going in the river (James Morrison), Saturday, 11 February 2017 22:45 (seven years ago) link

man, with shipping i only save like 5$ vs going downtown to buy these brick-and-mortar >:(

flopson, Saturday, 11 February 2017 22:51 (seven years ago) link

I scored a 2nd hand copy of the Valle-Inclan today.

Agostino is fantastic.

xyzzzz__, Sunday, 12 February 2017 00:06 (seven years ago) link

Yeah, shipping for me was more than cost of books, so much for that

I hear from this arsehole again, he's going in the river (James Morrison), Sunday, 12 February 2017 01:52 (seven years ago) link

Agree re agostino

I hear from this arsehole again, he's going in the river (James Morrison), Sunday, 12 February 2017 01:52 (seven years ago) link

Both those Walsers, right?

dow, Sunday, 12 February 2017 04:30 (seven years ago) link

Yes, get any and all walsers

I hear from this arsehole again, he's going in the river (James Morrison), Sunday, 12 February 2017 09:23 (seven years ago) link

the Calligrams series...haven't bought anything from this however Francois Chang's study looks like a good primer.

― xyzzzz__, Saturday, February 4, 2017 2:59 PM (two weeks ago)

Yeah, the Francois Cheng looks fantastic; think I'll grab that & Hawkes' A Little Primer of Tu Fu when the former's released next month. In a similar vein, New Directions reissued Eliot Weinberger's Nineteen Ways of Looking at Wang Wei late last year.

etc, Thursday, 23 February 2017 01:14 (seven years ago) link

one month passes...

NYRB Classics‏Verified account @nyrbclassics 14m14 minutes ago
More
The final two Henry Green novels we’ll be publishing feature original art by Amy Sillman.
https://www.nyrb.com/collections/forthcoming (lotta goodies)

dow, Friday, 14 April 2017 17:21 (seven years ago) link

don't see it listed there, but they're also putting out leonora carrington's down below which hasn't been available since the eighties (as far as i know)

no lime tangier, Friday, 14 April 2017 21:44 (seven years ago) link

https://www.nyrb.com/products/typewriters-bombs-jellyfish

does anyone know if and if so where the essay on Delilo mentioned above was published? and if it's possible to find online? *bats eyelashes*

flopson, Tuesday, 18 April 2017 19:13 (seven years ago) link

quick google says it's the one titled 'nothing will have taken place except the place,' and it may have started as a lecture and/or a traveling exhibition, but i don't see any publication info.

wmlynch, Tuesday, 18 April 2017 22:58 (seven years ago) link

one month passes...

We’re pleased to announce that Ian Buruma has been named editor of The New York Review of Books https://t.co/ImtnNnW9Vt

— NY Review of Books (@nybooks) May 18, 2017

cool.

mookieproof, Thursday, 18 May 2017 18:51 (seven years ago) link

Ugh

The Pickety 33⅓ Policeman (James Redd and the Blecchs), Thursday, 18 May 2017 19:00 (seven years ago) link

Huh, I guess I just thought they'd carry on, spreading responsibilities among the junior editors, or promoting from within. This is a surprise. I like Buruma's articles, so color me cautiously optimistic.

o. nate, Friday, 19 May 2017 00:28 (seven years ago) link

I really should buy the nyrb DUD AVOCADO.

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2011/aug/26/dud-avocado-elaine-dundy-rereading

the pinefox, Wednesday, 24 May 2017 09:15 (seven years ago) link

It's very good.

Tim, Wednesday, 24 May 2017 09:33 (seven years ago) link

The Virago edition of The Dud Avocado was widely remaindered; think it lacks the new afterword by Dundy that's in the NYRB edition, but might otherwise be the cheaper option.

As I mentioned elsewhere, I read and enjoyed The Dud Av quite recently myself. It was interesting then going on to read Breakfast at Tiffany's for the first time - both books published in the same year, w/ superficially similar lead characters. The retrospective structure of B at T's perfectly suits Capote's melancholy cast of mind - but Dundy's book is funnier, more sympathetic to her heroine, and quite a lot less racist too (tho it is not wholly unblemished in that regard.)

Bernie Lugg (Ward Fowler), Wednesday, 24 May 2017 10:36 (seven years ago) link

three months pass...

End of 2017: Melville by Jean Giono, Chateubriand's Memoirs from Beyond the Grave, Tsvetaeva's Earthly Signs, maybe Hardwick's essays.

2018 is looking very strong:

Uwe Johnson's Anniversaries is going to be published next year.

Also, just as excitingly, we'll have Shamalov's Kolyma Tales. I've read the previous translation, hoping there will be more.

And poetry by Alvaro Mutis.

xyzzzz__, Wednesday, 30 August 2017 21:53 (six years ago) link

Anniversaries looks great; I'll probably buy it immediately and then take 8 years to get around to it

Are these different Kolyma Tales to the current Penguin edition? Or a whole new set to get spiritually destroyed by?

Mince Pramthwart (James Morrison), Thursday, 31 August 2017 00:44 (six years ago) link

It's a different translator so bound to be some diffs. I asked NYRB via twitter with no reply.

I think that such greatness came out of so much pain is uplifting to me.

Wanted to read Anniversaries for a while so really happy to see this. Another year to wait but I see there is some available Johnson in English so might chase.

xyzzzz__, Thursday, 31 August 2017 08:54 (six years ago) link

Chateubriand's Memoirs from Beyond the Grave
Think this is the one by C. quoted by Proust (and noted by Vintage Deluxe translator as important influence on P.) in Finding Time Again---intriguing if high-flown quote, is the book good?

dow, Thursday, 31 August 2017 14:50 (six years ago) link

Well maybe not "influence", but (Penguin Modern Classic, not Vintage Deluxe) translator Ian Patterson says such passages in it seem to anticipate Proust's understanding of spontaneous memory.

dow, Thursday, 31 August 2017 14:55 (six years ago) link

Had an answer from NYRB:

We don't yet have a side-by-side comparison of the contents of the older translation with ours. We will be publishing two vols, and…

…according to the translator, when both publish, it will double the amount of Shalamov's work available in English. Stay tuned!

xyzzzz__, Thursday, 31 August 2017 21:04 (six years ago) link

^^^^ good news!

Mince Pramthwart (James Morrison), Friday, 1 September 2017 01:45 (six years ago) link

Casey Affleck to star in adaptation of 'Stoner' https://t.co/nrTM4HOlDq

— L.A. Times Books (@latimesbooks) September 6, 2017

mookieproof, Wednesday, 6 September 2017 18:52 (six years ago) link

i would prefer someone less handsome but ok

flopson, Thursday, 7 September 2017 01:33 (six years ago) link

On the dawning of the Buruma era at NYRB: https://nyti.ms/2xVDaQl

o. nate, Tuesday, 12 September 2017 00:26 (six years ago) link

Once again recommending you guys track down video of MoMA interview in which Peter Handke gets annoyed at him.

Star Star City Slang (James Redd and the Blecchs), Tuesday, 12 September 2017 02:57 (six years ago) link

ten months pass...

Elizabeth Hardwick books on sale today in honor of her birthday

3-Way Tie (For James Last) (James Redd and the Blecchs), Friday, 27 July 2018 17:46 (five years ago) link

one month passes...

They released their 500th title a few months ago. I've definitely read over 50, must be close to 100 of these (although not in an NYRB edition). Maybe we should pick some all-time favourites and (for me) talk about what does and doesnt't work.

For next year: Victor Serge's Notebooks, Benjamin's Storyteller Essays sounds like an inspired collection, an edition of Vasko Popa's poetry, a reissue of Tucholvsky's wonderful Castle Gripsholm and Vasily Grossman's Stalingrad.

Of ppl I haven't read before Riberyo's The Word of the Speechless and Gabriele Tergit's Käsebier Takes Berlin look good!

xyzzzz__, Thursday, 13 September 2018 09:39 (five years ago) link

Ooh, that's a good idea. I hadn't realized they'd been around for so long. Looking through their site, they've published so much more than I thought.

Some favourites would include Gillian Rose's Love's Work, Adolfo Bioy Casares' Invention of Morel, and Victor Serge's Memoirs of a Revolutionary.

I got the new translation of Berlin Alexanderplatz earlier this year and am looking forward to reading it. Also am intrigued by their upcoming publication of Uwe Johnson's epic, Anniversaries. Still haven't gotten around to either Stoner or Renata Adler. I've added Castle Gripsholm and Vasily Grossman on the to-read list, thanks for sharing those.

Federico Boswarlos, Thursday, 13 September 2018 18:14 (five years ago) link

My dad, a huge Serge fan, had been in touch with NYRB about their plans to reprint The Long Dusk, but that seems to have fallen by the wayside.

JoeStork, Thursday, 13 September 2018 23:29 (five years ago) link

now rumored on twitter that the nyrb has jian ghomeshi doing a cover story

mookieproof, Friday, 14 September 2018 00:25 (five years ago) link

Yeah I saw some tweets last night. These are the same ppl who published the job on Ferrante last yr so if nothing else its consistent.

I want to resist linking to a blog from a guy with a CV but this is a run down of THe Long Dusk. Hadn't heard of it before.

http://adamdavidmorton.com/2012/11/6-on-victor-serge-and-a-requiem-for-paris-the-long-dusk/

xyzzzz__, Friday, 14 September 2018 09:30 (five years ago) link

The Fall of Men, are you fucking kidding me? pic.twitter.com/T4p7hCybQM

— Mark Krotov (@markkrotov) September 14, 2018

xyzzzz__, Friday, 14 September 2018 16:41 (five years ago) link

You say it’s not your “concern,” but it is your concern. If you knew the allegations were true, I assume you would not have run the piece.

Well, it depends what the allegations are. What you were saying just now was rather vague.

Punching women against their will.

Those are the allegations, but as we both know, sexual behavior is a many-faceted business. Take something like biting...

Chuck_Tatum, Friday, 14 September 2018 23:23 (five years ago) link

Christ, what an asshole

faculty w1fe (silby), Friday, 14 September 2018 23:39 (five years ago) link

canceled subscription –– and explained why. jerkwads.

remy bean, Friday, 14 September 2018 23:56 (five years ago) link

Last question: If—

Many last questions.

xyzzzz__, Saturday, 15 September 2018 11:54 (five years ago) link

it's one thing a good editor defending running a strong piece of writing that argues a very bad political line (perhaps even an evil one?): but here we have a self-confessedly* bad editor NOT really defending an eye-stretchingly BAD piece of writing arguing nothing more than he jian ghomeshi is the real victim here.

*buruma stating in public that the facts in the case are "not my concern" undermines all his staff and all his writers, and (obviously) spits in the face of his readers, who have the absolutely right to expect otherwise. he might as well have said "i am entirely incompetent and very out of my depth." if he doesn't resign pretty quickly it will destroy the magazine i think.

mark s, Saturday, 15 September 2018 12:10 (five years ago) link

trying to think which of the Great Liberal Institutions in magazine terms actually now *has* a good editor these days:

certainly not the new yorker
nor the atlantic
new republic has a miserable past to recover from and (under j.j.gould) is perhaps somewhat doing so?
the nation: katrina vanden heuvel trundles on, but i don't remember the last time i bothered read anything there
LRB: mary kay wilmers shakily past her best i feel (she's 80 and there are more blunders than there were)

mark s, Saturday, 15 September 2018 12:24 (five years ago) link

NYRB vs LRB and its neither. In fact its the TLS atm who is doing fine work oh wait

xyzzzz__, Saturday, 15 September 2018 13:37 (five years ago) link

no LRB no Lanchester-blogging from fizzles so this is a tough call

mark s, Saturday, 15 September 2018 13:41 (five years ago) link

Eh David Remnick is fine, the Bannon thing is whatever.

faculty w1fe (silby), Saturday, 15 September 2018 14:03 (five years ago) link

Anyway, we already had a whole generation of liberal institutions become neoconservative institutions, surely some new ones will arise to disappoint us later. Heck, Jacobin is already disappointing everyone!

faculty w1fe (silby), Saturday, 15 September 2018 14:06 (five years ago) link

NYRB editor Ian Buruma will be appearing Sunday at the Brooklyn Book Festival: https://t.co/dBBxaB4mo5

— Melissa Gira Grant (@melissagira) September 15, 2018

𝔠𝔞𝔢𝔨 (caek), Saturday, 15 September 2018 14:13 (five years ago) link

The only good coming out of the Bannon 'thing' was how they cancelled his appearance 24 hours later. Even then inviting him was an error and not fine.

xyzzzz__, Saturday, 15 September 2018 14:18 (five years ago) link

i wasn't even thinking of the stupid bannon thing: remnick is a not-great and very self-congratulatory writer who tackles big topics that deserve better (ali, russia, obama) and two out of every three longform NY pieces i read needed to go back to the writer with editor's notes requiring better unpacking of some sections and less glib handwavey assumption overall -- not everything the magazine runs needs to be heavyweight, the light-hearted scan is right there in the eustace tilley DNA and that's fair enough, but my overall mark for DR's reign as editor is "dude, could do better"

also:
https://i.imgur.com/FGL4WOu.jpg

mark s, Saturday, 15 September 2018 14:29 (five years ago) link

I assume Borowitz is someone’s unacknowledged child and employed by the magazine as a sop to keep him quiet.

faculty w1fe (silby), Saturday, 15 September 2018 18:21 (five years ago) link

it calls everything else into question. like someone you're dating wondering how we can really 'know' vaccines are safe

illegal economic migration (Tracer Hand), Saturday, 15 September 2018 21:23 (five years ago) link

borowitz really brings the hits to the website, apparently. at least they don't put him in the magazine (to my knowledge)

mookieproof, Saturday, 15 September 2018 21:28 (five years ago) link

this thread is about nyrb *publishing* can u talk about john gomeshi somewhere else

flopson, Saturday, 15 September 2018 21:28 (five years ago) link

what about borowitz?

mark s, Saturday, 15 September 2018 21:32 (five years ago) link

new yorker thread

flopson, Saturday, 15 September 2018 22:14 (five years ago) link

If the magazine shuts down it may take nyrb publishing with it. It doesn't really matter, its not like its a huge derail.

xyzzzz__, Monday, 17 September 2018 10:00 (five years ago) link

”It was unclear if Mr. Buruma resigned or was fired. He did not respond to a phone call and email seeking comment.” https://t.co/fyBrhZI8Oy

— Davey Alba (@daveyalba) September 19, 2018

𝔠𝔞𝔢𝔨 (caek), Wednesday, 19 September 2018 19:50 (five years ago) link

being discussed here Book Reviews? LRB vs the failing New York Review of Books vs ... ?

Uhura Mazda (lukas), Wednesday, 19 September 2018 19:57 (five years ago) link

ah thanking you

𝔠𝔞𝔢𝔨 (caek), Wednesday, 19 September 2018 20:04 (five years ago) link

If the magazine shuts down it may take nyrb publishing with it. It doesn't really matter, its not like its a huge derail.

― xyzzzz__, Monday, September 17, 2018 6:00 AM (two days ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

i think publishing would survive

flopson, Wednesday, 19 September 2018 21:36 (five years ago) link

It would, but i would be sad. NYRB books are great.

Mince Pramthwart (James Morrison), Wednesday, 19 September 2018 23:30 (five years ago) link

Think maybe I’d better get me a copy of Moderan before they go under.

Harper Valley CTA-102 (James Redd and the Blecchs), Thursday, 20 September 2018 01:06 (five years ago) link

Mine just arrived today. It has a LOT of stories--contents list is 3p long--for a 320p book.

Mince Pramthwart (James Morrison), Thursday, 20 September 2018 02:16 (five years ago) link

A great NYRB book:

https://www.nyrb.com/products/store-of-the-worlds

the pinefox, Thursday, 20 September 2018 12:27 (five years ago) link

Their sci-fi selections in general are few and eclectic but very high-quality.

Mince Pramthwart (James Morrison), Friday, 21 September 2018 00:43 (five years ago) link

Among which is the ILBeloved Inverted World

Harper Valley CTA-102 (James Redd and the Blecchs), Friday, 21 September 2018 00:46 (five years ago) link

three months pass...

https://www.latimes.com/projects/la-et-jc-nyrb-covers

mookieproof, Friday, 4 January 2019 16:15 (five years ago) link

one month passes...

https://www.theparisreview.org/blog/2019/02/06/fat-city-fifty-years-later-an-interview-with-leonard-gardner/

good new interview with leonard gardner about "fat city"

na (NA), Wednesday, 6 February 2019 22:50 (five years ago) link

thanks. really loved that one

flopson, Wednesday, 6 February 2019 23:34 (five years ago) link

btw someone wrote a biography of john williams, author of noted ILB text 'stoner'

https://lareviewofbooks.org/article/a-substantially-good-book-on-charles-j-shieldss-life-of-john-williams

mookieproof, Thursday, 7 February 2019 00:36 (five years ago) link

two weeks pass...

Since this seems to be the de facto John Williams thread:

https://www.theparisreview.org/blog/2019/02/20/mrs-stoner-speaks-an-interview-with-nancy-gardner-williams/

o. nate, Thursday, 21 February 2019 20:27 (five years ago) link

Too many good lines to quote from that interview. Mrs Williams seems like a very cool lady.

o. nate, Thursday, 21 February 2019 20:34 (five years ago) link

a dissent

Novelist John Williams is enjoying a bit of a revival. There’s just one problem: his books are not good. https://t.co/ZSomxtafwt

— The Baffler (@thebafflermag) February 22, 2019

mookieproof, Friday, 22 February 2019 16:42 (five years ago) link

counterpoint: i've read all of his books, they're fuckin good

jolene club remix (BradNelson), Friday, 22 February 2019 17:03 (five years ago) link

His books are also misogynistic. Women in his novels are frigid, they are bitches, they are, usually, stupid; at their best, they are a liability

ctrl+f "augustus" "julia"

jolene club remix (BradNelson), Friday, 22 February 2019 17:05 (five years ago) link

His newfound popularity has also coincided—again, not surprisingly—with the fetishization of the book as an object. This kind of book-fervor is a few years old now, but as the recent backlash to Marie Kondo’s dry suggestion that most people only need thirty books indicates, it’s far from gone. Books now exist as book-objects; they are written by writers, loved by “book lovers,” made into lists, declared important. As objects they can be staged, as purveyors of relatability they can be used. But there’s a pervasive sense that they aren’t really meant to be read, critically evaluated, hated, or loved.

also weird tangential paragraph talking about something old as if it is new: dud

jolene club remix (BradNelson), Friday, 22 February 2019 17:09 (five years ago) link

actually i've never read nothing but the night but if you have to base the majority of your criticism on a book he disowned then

jolene club remix (BradNelson), Friday, 22 February 2019 17:14 (five years ago) link

I’ve only read Stoner, so I can’t comment on the other books, but I do think that reviewer is getting at something kind of odd about the interior void and fatalism in the character of Stoner, except I guess I thought it was interesting and they hated it.

o. nate, Friday, 22 February 2019 17:16 (five years ago) link

i mean yes the writer definitely approaches the point of the books and says "i don't like the point of these books"; the interiority hinted at but never quite described bc we're just skating over the surface of stoner's actions, the way it suddenly rears up in the otherwise stiff undecorated prose like we've been sucked backwards into a dream state (the scene where he looks through his office window at the snow-covered campus for instance), the way he only seems to come close to approaching himself in (spoiler but... imo it doesn't matter) death

augustus is probably truly his best book bc it breaks out of that third person swinging between stiff observation and dreamy suspended light configurations to dwell richly in character, in the simultaneous performance of identity and narrative that makes up someone's perspective. but the former approach i rarely encounter in books i guess? the tense bridge they walk between intimacy and distance, between the ordinary and the brutal

jolene club remix (BradNelson), Friday, 22 February 2019 17:26 (five years ago) link

anyway i love that the piece admits that augustus might legitimately be good but it never appears again in the piece as if it might compromise the integrity of the argument somehow

jolene club remix (BradNelson), Friday, 22 February 2019 17:29 (five years ago) link

This guy was the Paul Auster of his generation.

Only a Factory URL (James Redd and the Blecchs), Friday, 22 February 2019 18:15 (five years ago) link

savage

mookieproof, Friday, 22 February 2019 18:19 (five years ago) link

NEW YORK – Monday, February 25, 2019 — Rea Hederman, the publisher of The New York Review of Books, announced today that Emily Greenhouse and Gabriel Winslow-Yost have been named co-editors of the magazine, the leading English-language journal of literary criticism and ideas with a worldwide circulation of approximately 150,000. The editors will be joined by longtime contributor Daniel Mendelsohn in the newly created position of editor at large.

mookieproof, Monday, 25 February 2019 16:52 (five years ago) link

one month passes...

ian buruma, still clueless

https://www.ft.com/content/7d47be7e-4efb-11e9-b401-8d9ef1626294

mookieproof, Friday, 29 March 2019 19:10 (five years ago) link

if you're paywalled, you may be able to get at that by opening this in an incognito window https://t.co/pzRImMAurH

𝔠𝔞𝔢𝔨 (caek), Friday, 29 March 2019 19:15 (five years ago) link

one month passes...

I'm reading Nothing But the Night. Another fifty pages to go. Augustus and Stoner are superior but not by much.

recriminations from the nitpicking woke (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Monday, 27 May 2019 14:35 (five years ago) link

four months pass...

Great photo of NYRB Classics editor Edwin Frank:

https://www.instagram.com/p/B3p-59Chhri/?igshid=1aq5rmoqlfqk2

... (Eazy), Tuesday, 15 October 2019 22:46 (four years ago) link

legend

flopson, Wednesday, 16 October 2019 18:45 (four years ago) link

three months pass...

Wonderful achievement for NYRB to bring these out:

https://www.theparisreview.org/blog/2020/01/21/a-slap-in-the-face-of-stalinism/

xyzzzz__, Friday, 24 January 2020 11:32 (four years ago) link

Definitely! Although I read the less complete but still huge Penguin version years ago and am not strong enough to tackle them a second time.

Tsar Bombadil (James Morrison), Friday, 24 January 2020 23:34 (four years ago) link

Yeah that vol (tr. John Glad) was great, and it's good to see his poetry mentioned. There are 20/30 pages on the Penguin Russian Poetry that were a revelation to me. We need a solid edition of those poems.

xyzzzz__, Saturday, 25 January 2020 10:03 (four years ago) link

Oh man,just now at the library I longread a very appealing deacription of this, with strong support from quotes (fave went with reviewer comment along the lines of "This blow, late in the book, breaks open the cloistered atmosphere and charges it with danger"--something like that! Good set-up, author):
https://www.nyrb.com/products/abigail?variant=14728981020724 Will link review if can get it past paywall, as occasionally happens.

dow, Saturday, 25 January 2020 19:52 (four years ago) link

It's Szabo, it'll be great.

Tsar Bombadil (James Morrison), Monday, 27 January 2020 06:28 (four years ago) link

four weeks pass...

https://d1w7fb2mkkr3kw.cloudfront.net/assets/images/book/lrg/9781/6813/9781681372013.jpg

this is a really fun one

na (NA), Tuesday, 25 February 2020 15:09 (four years ago) link

eight months pass...

Asked the question. This is excellent news.

I’ve translated both. The Silentiary will come out from @nyrbclassics in fall 2021, and The Suicides thereafter (no set pub date yet). Thanks for asking! https://t.co/mgqu7qBbpE

— Esther Allen (@estherlallen) November 20, 2020

xyzzzz__, Friday, 20 November 2020 20:15 (three years ago) link

There's a Flash Sale at NYRB publishing right now. 20% off two titles. 30% off three. 40% off four or more.

The Solace of Fortitude (Aimless), Monday, 23 November 2020 04:25 (three years ago) link

i recommend ‘we think the world of you’ by j.r. ackerley off the sale list. ‘inverted world‘ and ‘party going’ are on there too but most ilxors have read those

flopson, Monday, 23 November 2020 06:40 (three years ago) link

Looked at four I wanted however shipping to the UK is pretty much the 40% saving lol

xyzzzz__, Monday, 23 November 2020 10:57 (three years ago) link

five months pass...

Before the pandemic I'd circle my uni library's original printing of Thomas Mann's Reflections of a Nonpolitical Man. Leave it to fucking NYRB to finally release its first paperback edition, like, ever:

https://www.nyrb.com/products/reflections-of-a-nonpolitical-man

I pick up a copy at my local bookstore tomorrow.

So who you gonna call? The martini police (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 22 May 2021 19:49 (three years ago) link

Is that his ‘Actually, it was me, not Heinrich, who was brave all along? ‘ book?

Tsar Bombadil (James Morrison), Monday, 24 May 2021 01:24 (three years ago) link

lol the og 'actually, I was brave and right to support the invasion of Iraq'

one year passes...

What was that in the sky? A flash? Must be the NYRB Classics Summer Flash Sale! Up to 40% off list price. Free shipping on orders of $50 or more within the US. https://t.co/cMPrY3Wl6c pic.twitter.com/kBisVepIxZ

— NYRB Classics (@nyrbclassics) June 30, 2022

deep luminous trombone (Eazy), Monday, 4 July 2022 19:17 (two years ago) link

three months pass...
eight months pass...

Very funny bitching about nyrb.

https://www.tabletmag.com/sections/arts-letters/articles/lament-for-susan

xyzzzz__, Tuesday, 18 July 2023 14:07 (one year ago) link

Review of the novel was fairly convincing tbh.

As to the bitching it was just something to put upfront. Publishing is looking to make stuff happen. Which includes some forgotten things, if you feel they are now again the fashion.

xyzzzz__, Tuesday, 18 July 2023 14:10 (one year ago) link

What the editors declare a “classic” is almost certainly a subcanonical instance of Europe’s endlessly dying modernism or its American imitations.

Sounds great to me.

This relentless pushing of Elizabeth Taylor novels -- I feel smothered.

— Moderna Love Gets Me to the Church on Time (@SotoAlfred) July 18, 2023

the dreaded dependent claus (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Tuesday, 18 July 2023 14:16 (one year ago) link

that Tablet piece is like a book world version of "Pitchfork is Dumb..."

I'd rather they publish more translation than reissue Anglo literary writing but they are already doing a lot.

xyzzzz__, Tuesday, 18 July 2023 14:37 (one year ago) link

pic.twitter.com/wK664Lxobf

— Chris (@CMccafe) July 17, 2023

mookieproof, Tuesday, 18 July 2023 22:32 (one year ago) link

The resolution of the photo is so bad I can't read most of the titles . . . or maybe it's just my eyes. At any rat, I do see that The House of Mirth is the bottom title. I'd be OK being ruled over by Edith Wharton.

immodesty blaise (jimbeaux), Tuesday, 18 July 2023 23:43 (one year ago) link

*rate

immodesty blaise (jimbeaux), Tuesday, 18 July 2023 23:43 (one year ago) link

Actually, it's The New York Stories of Edith Wharton lol

immodesty blaise (jimbeaux), Tuesday, 18 July 2023 23:44 (one year ago) link

Start of that Tablet piece is so astonishingly dumb, can't imagine why you'd want to read to the end.

Tsar Bombadil (James Morrison), Wednesday, 19 July 2023 00:01 (one year ago) link

Edith Wharton would have no problem ruling over us all tbc

the dreaded dependent claus (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Wednesday, 19 July 2023 00:02 (one year ago) link

I tried to read the Susan Tubes novel Divorcing, referenced in the review xyzz posted. A very sixties experimental stream of consciousness novel, which sounds good on paper but I found it just too baggy, verbose, formless. Maybe I just wasn't in the mood for that kind of thing at the time. The story around it is an eye-opener though, she committed suicide 2 weeks after publication - possibly because of a bad review in the NYT, and Susan Sontag identified the body!

Zelda Zonk, Wednesday, 19 July 2023 00:10 (one year ago) link

Taubes not Tubes, thanks autocorrect

Zelda Zonk, Wednesday, 19 July 2023 00:11 (one year ago) link

Is Inverted World in there?

Live and Left Eye (James Redd and the Blecchs), Wednesday, 19 July 2023 00:11 (one year ago) link

While browsing in bookstores, I always get fooled by those red-spine Vintage classic paperbacks that look identical to NYRB paperbacks from the spine, with same typeface and everything. I guess its an intentional homage?

o. nate, Friday, 28 July 2023 18:40 (eleven months ago) link

A few favourites that I don't think have been mentioned so far:

Emmanuel Bove - My Friends
Friedrich Reck-Malleczewen - Diary of a Man in Despair
Alberto Moravia - Boredom and Contempt
Ivo Andric - Omer Pasha Latas
G B Edwards - The Book of Ebenezer Le Page
Rose Macaulay - The Towers of Trebizond

gravalicious, Sunday, 30 July 2023 13:14 (eleven months ago) link

Ebenezer Le Page is amazing.

JoeStork, Sunday, 30 July 2023 16:27 (eleven months ago) link

finally read it a couple of years ago, & yes^

no lime tangier, Sunday, 30 July 2023 23:21 (eleven months ago) link

Since twitter is wild west at the moment, I'm going to pipe up to say that those of you who are dragging Tove Jansson for not being sufficiently "adult" in her writing are showing if not your whole ass, a good portion of it.

— NYRB Classics (@nyrbclassics) August 11, 2023

That poll has been quite something..

It's not even wild west, it's just "book twitter".

xyzzzz__, Sunday, 13 August 2023 10:24 (eleven months ago) link

I'd rather they publish more translation than reissue Anglo literary writing but they are already doing a lot.

they do pretty good though on the translation front imo -- they can't be selling too much Ivo Andric but there he is! tons of super edgelord lit types like to hate on nyrb for what amount imo to not being edgelordy enough

J Edgar Noothgrush (Joan Crawford Loves Chachi), Sunday, 13 August 2023 13:54 (eleven months ago) link

I love this review of Johnson's Anniversaries. It's very good at describing the book, gives a sense of the achievement as well as it's potential flaws, and does this with a good level of precision. It matches a lot of my reading of it.

https://4columns.org/scribner-charity/anniversaries

xyzzzz__, Sunday, 13 August 2023 21:49 (eleven months ago) link

xp - is edgelord lit like William Burroughs/the Beats?

xyzzzz__, Monday, 14 August 2023 10:11 (eleven months ago) link

nah yknow I mean this is now a v dated reference but ny tyrant types, of whom there are a good handful

J Edgar Noothgrush (Joan Crawford Loves Chachi), Monday, 14 August 2023 10:42 (eleven months ago) link

wild western canon still includes blood meridian

close encounters of the third knid (darraghmac), Monday, 14 August 2023 11:15 (eleven months ago) link

three weeks pass...

The Alvaro Mutis is all time.

May the memory of Edith Grossman be a blessing! What a dear professor, and an incredible titan in world literature. Her translations provided terrifying and melancholic worlds. pic.twitter.com/ZCbfYHMCui

— Zach Issenberg (@ZIssenberg) September 4, 2023

xyzzzz__, Tuesday, 5 September 2023 08:11 (ten months ago) link


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