an attempt at a general "What are you currently digging re. classical music" thread

Message Bookmarked
Bookmark Removed

Okay so this is really just an excuse for me to pontificate on composers I'm enjoying at the moment, as I usually listen to just one exclusively for a week or two to get a good feeling for their style.

I've been listening to this set of orchestral pieces by Hindemith:

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/4131GR7WV9L._SL500_AA240_.jpg

Lots of fun. Only occasionally does he bog down in "let's see how much I can milk from this single theme" stylistic exercises, but several pieces (Nobilissima Visione, the Op. 50 Konzertmusik) are very near being great. Even when the musical material is slightly less-inspiring his orchestration and unique harmonic language (tonal afaik, but extremely extended) at least make it *sound* interesting.

Daruton, Thursday, 3 December 2009 20:22 (eleven years ago) link

Mathis der Maler symphony is great.

Henry Frog (Frogman Henry), Thursday, 3 December 2009 20:35 (eleven years ago) link

Nearly everything by Arthur Kreiger.
This is the best currently available collection; a few other pieces are scattered across compilations.
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41K5W0FG79L._SS500_.jpg
Meeting Places

This recent collection of pieces by David Rakowski.
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51EqHtb8DfL._SS500_.jpg
Winged Contraption

Paul in Santa Cruz, Thursday, 3 December 2009 20:39 (eleven years ago) link

I've been digging Ligeti's Chamber Concerto, Mendelssohn's Lieder ohne Worte and Purcell odes.

On the radio I heard Verdi's string quartet, and I thought that was really good.

Henry Frog (Frogman Henry), Thursday, 3 December 2009 20:39 (eleven years ago) link

i just keep listening to more and more brahms. like a crazy person or something.

i was gonna start a rolling classical thread. glad someone did it. cheers!

scott seward, Thursday, 3 December 2009 20:46 (eleven years ago) link

Paul, the samples on that Rakowski disc sound really interesting. I'd never heard of him until now.

Daruton, Thursday, 3 December 2009 20:49 (eleven years ago) link

I have been listening to Winterreise a lot lately.

twice boiled cabbage is death, Thursday, 3 December 2009 21:17 (eleven years ago) link

I've been listening to Xenakis a fair bit. Planning on going on a Messaien kick.

sarahel, Thursday, 3 December 2009 21:22 (eleven years ago) link

bought a ton of records for the store and ended up with, like, a couple hundred albums that are all classical piano. really been enjoying them. i'll post here when i hear things i really like.

scott seward, Thursday, 3 December 2009 21:40 (eleven years ago) link

Kancheli - Abii Ne Viderem
Ligeti - Piano Etudes

zappi, Thursday, 3 December 2009 21:43 (eleven years ago) link

Rebecca Clarke / Sonata for viola & piano
Schubert / Piano Quintet in A major (Trout)
Schnittke / Concerto grosso no. 3
Florence Price / Mississippi River Suite
Ellen Taaffe Zwilich / 'Lament' for solo piano
Sylvie Bodorová / Terezín Ghetto Requiem

Salvador Dali Parton (Turangalila), Thursday, 3 December 2009 22:04 (eleven years ago) link

+1 on those Ligeti Piano Etudes.

Just spent a month with Sibelius Symphonies and their scores. Unbearable to see how simple his writing really is... so precise.

Tourtière (Ówen P.), Thursday, 3 December 2009 22:10 (eleven years ago) link

I'm really happy people are actually responding to this thread btw.

Owen, which is your favorite? I keep vacillating between the 4th and the 6th. Both are arguably his "darkest" pieces. I won't say much about him other than I want The Oceanides played at my funeral.

Daruton, Thursday, 3 December 2009 22:15 (eleven years ago) link

I'm not sure this classifies as "classical" in the sense you mean, but in fall -- winter, I listen to Gavin Bryars/Philip Jeck/Alter Ego's version of The Sinking Of The Titanic all the time.

Daniel, Esq., Thursday, 3 December 2009 22:29 (eleven years ago) link

I had an adolescent crush on #1 so that will forever be my favourite, but as a study piece I thought 4th was crazily informative.

Talk to me about Rekašius. I heard one thing once and it sounded like clarinetists warming up.

Tourtière (Ówen P.), Thursday, 3 December 2009 22:39 (eleven years ago) link

Mm, Villa-Lobos's been capturing my senses lots, lately. Yeah sure, Bachianas Brasileiras, mainly, but also some other chamber music pieces of his...

Ligeti - last night, CD 5 of The Ligeti Project series (Tledec/ Warner): Aventures, Nouvelles Aventures, Artikulation for tape, Eight pieces from "Musica ricercata", etc.

Also the recently-relseased-on-ReR ondes Martenot-piano music album: pieces by Messiaen , Charpentier, Murail.

t**t, Thursday, 3 December 2009 22:42 (eleven years ago) link

Sibelius is my favorite composer for orchestra. Of the symphonies 4, 6, and 7 share favorite status about equally, along with Tapiola, the Tempest music, and the so-called 'Lemminkainen Suite'.

When I first listened to the 6th and Tapiola abt 13 years ago there was an intense sens of recognition like 'this is my music. I can live here.'

Scott I am glad you are on a brahms jag. I go on those, usually within the inexhaustible realm of his chamber music. And please do post about your new solo piano trove. That's probably my biggest area of concentration in classical music.

Elric Harris and Dylan Kobold (Jon Lewis), Thursday, 3 December 2009 22:46 (eleven years ago) link

xpost you must hear the series of Choros!!! A set of these has been recently been completed on the BIS label. Especially in the longer Choros installments, Villa-Lobos really goes nuts, some of the craziest folk-modernist composing I've ever heard.

Elric Harris and Dylan Kobold (Jon Lewis), Thursday, 3 December 2009 22:48 (eleven years ago) link

Re: Rakowski, glad to have introduced his music to someone. He's a Boston-based composer with a great sense of rhythm and sonority. His Piano Etudes (which currently outnumber Ligeti's) are also recommended.

Monophonic Spree (Paul in Santa Cruz), Thursday, 3 December 2009 22:53 (eleven years ago) link

brahms killing me most recently: complete trios for piano,violin,cello (isotomin-stern-rose trio. vinyl set.) (i find myself saying: um, did i just play the first side of this record five times in a row? maybe i should try the other side!)

scott seward, Thursday, 3 December 2009 22:58 (eleven years ago) link

Digging all the classical samples mentioned in this blog post. Odd things -- e.g., interviews, movie soundtracks -- function as gateways into classical music for me.

Daniel, Esq., Thursday, 3 December 2009 23:02 (eleven years ago) link

xpost The trios are soooooo awesome. Have a listen to the Supraphon recordings by the Suk Trio if you come across them.

Elric Harris and Dylan Kobold (Jon Lewis), Thursday, 3 December 2009 23:06 (eleven years ago) link

ive realised just how brilliant the brahms symphonies are recently. took me a good long while (except for no 4 which i have loved for years).

Henry Frog (Frogman Henry), Thursday, 3 December 2009 23:09 (eleven years ago) link

xpost Alan Gilbert seems cool. I heard him conduct Mahler's 1st in Central Park during the summer and I liked his interpretation a lot. The final movement got rained/lightninged out but you can hardly complain about the 'storm' movement of a symphony summoning a real storm. Will probably get his Stockholm Mahler 9th from emusic soon.

Elric Harris and Dylan Kobold (Jon Lewis), Thursday, 3 December 2009 23:10 (eleven years ago) link

I'm still stuck on Brahms 1st whenever I reach for symphonic Brahms. Such a great opening. I hear clear pre-echoes of Mahler in this piece (even though Mahler claimed to have no use whatsoever for Brahms).

Elric Harris and Dylan Kobold (Jon Lewis), Thursday, 3 December 2009 23:12 (eleven years ago) link

xpost. re: Villa-Lobos "choros" - yeah thanks for the reminder, Elric/Jon. Must listen to that, certainly. Havn't so far.

t**t, Thursday, 3 December 2009 23:13 (eleven years ago) link

okay, in honor of this thread i just threw on some liszt piano stuff. dgg boxed set of annees de pelerinage. never heard it before. (lazar berman on piano.)

with all that piano stuff i bought came a buttload of rachmaninoff. never really listened to the rach that much, but i think i own just about everything he ever wrote now!

scott seward, Thursday, 3 December 2009 23:16 (eleven years ago) link

I've said on more than one occasion that the Brahms Piano Trio No. 1 (in its revised version) is my "favorite tonal piece". The best recorded performance in my view is Isaac Stern / Pablo Casals / Dame Myra Hess -- although the slower tempos can take some getting used to.

Monophonic Spree (Paul in Santa Cruz), Thursday, 3 December 2009 23:21 (eleven years ago) link

Re: Rakowski, glad to have introduced his music to someone. He's a Boston-based composer with a great sense of rhythm and sonority. His Piano Etudes (which currently outnumber Ligeti's) are also recommended.

― Monophonic Spree (Paul in Santa Cruz), Thursday, December 3, 2009 10:53 PM (25 minutes ago)

I know a 30-second sample isn't exactly representative, but I immediately thought "Boulez" when I heard it. P'raps you can verify/debunk this.

Daruton, Thursday, 3 December 2009 23:22 (eleven years ago) link

Allclassical.org

This is the only radio I listen to while driving. I've heard so many great pieces on there.

They ran a fantastic Ravel Daphne & Chloe the other night.

Nate Carson, Thursday, 3 December 2009 23:23 (eleven years ago) link

I think the Rakowski <-> Boulez association is a bit misleading. Rakowski has closer ties to American post-serialists like Martino and Imbrie, with a clearer sense of pulse and syncopations that make some contact with jazz (versus the metrical obscurity of some Boulez). You don't find things like Boulez's radically volatile dynamics (variation between loud and soft on a note-by-note basis) or the sometimes pointillistic textures, or the resistance to melody-plus-accompaniment textures. But Rakowski's harmonic sense is as refined as Boulez, and he has a similar knack for effective orchestration.

Monophonic Spree (Paul in Santa Cruz), Thursday, 3 December 2009 23:29 (eleven years ago) link

Scott I am a molelike obsessive when it comes to Liszt's ocean-sized piano oeuvre. So so much to discover with him. That Lazar Berman box is a good intro to the Annees De Pelerinage. Berman is especially good in 'Year One'. In Year Two I like Brendel a little more. Follow up Year One with Year Three if you want to hear the stark difference between wide-eyed young philosopher Liszt and weird, bitter yet beatific late Liszt.

There's another not-uncommon Lazar Berman 2LP on Columbia/Melodiya of Liszt's famous 'Transcendental Etudes'-- quite a raging roaring performance if you want to hear the hyper-virtuoso flip side of the Liszt coin.

Elric Harris and Dylan Kobold (Jon Lewis), Thursday, 3 December 2009 23:31 (eleven years ago) link

T**t-- start with the longer Choros first (can't remember which numbers in the series exactly) if you wanna hear the wildest stuff.

They're on emusic, FYI.

Elric Harris and Dylan Kobold (Jon Lewis), Thursday, 3 December 2009 23:33 (eleven years ago) link

'key! Thanx. :)

t**t, Thursday, 3 December 2009 23:34 (eleven years ago) link

Oh-also: Bach pieces arranged by John Lewis, for MJQ, I've enjoyed greatly too. Think that counts as classicak, too. At least partly.

t**t, Thursday, 3 December 2009 23:36 (eleven years ago) link

("classickal", was wot i meant)

t**t, Thursday, 3 December 2009 23:37 (eleven years ago) link

I think the Rakowski <-> Boulez association is a bit misleading. Rakowski has closer ties to American post-serialists like Martino and Imbrie, with a clearer sense of pulse and syncopations that make some contact with jazz (versus the metrical obscurity of some Boulez). You don't find things like Boulez's radically volatile dynamics (variation between loud and soft on a note-by-note basis) or the sometimes pointillistic textures, or the resistance to melody-plus-accompaniment textures. But Rakowski's harmonic sense is as refined as Boulez, and he has a similar knack for effective orchestration.

― Monophonic Spree (Paul in Santa Cruz), Thursday, December 3, 2009 11:29 PM

Ah okay thanks. I'm actually bent on exploring that generation of US composers (Carter, Babbitt, Martino, Shapey, maybe Wuorinen should be included, et al) at the mo'. One hears this stuff called "academic" and "dry" all the time so I take it as a challenge to prove them wrong.

AFA Boulez goes I tend to like his sensory overload early-mid pieces (that would fit your description) like Structures and le marteau more than his friendlier new stuff like Répons (though "explosante-fixe" might be my absolute favorite Boulez).

Daruton, Thursday, 3 December 2009 23:38 (eleven years ago) link

Pangs of regret dept-- There was an all-Kajia Saariaho concert at Columbia's Miller Theater a couple weeks ago in their Composer Portraits series and I couldn't go. So bummed. I think she's my favorite working composer right now (of those I've heard). Any fans of Saariaho up in this piece?

Elric Harris and Dylan Kobold (Jon Lewis), Thursday, 3 December 2009 23:39 (eleven years ago) link

xpost explosante-fixe is v v beautiful.

Elric Harris and Dylan Kobold (Jon Lewis), Thursday, 3 December 2009 23:40 (eleven years ago) link

Big fan of those same American composer you mention! Mel Powell is especially bright star in the same constellation. (And I sort of lump Wolpe in, too, although he's sort of European?)

And my Boulez picks are pretty much the same as yours -- with a soft spot especially for the first two piano sonatas.

Monophonic Spree (Paul in Santa Cruz), Thursday, 3 December 2009 23:42 (eleven years ago) link

My fave Saariaho is Lichtbogen, although I've just now realised I haven't heard a note she's written since 2000. Any recently highlights I should seek out?

Monophonic Spree (Paul in Santa Cruz), Thursday, 3 December 2009 23:44 (eleven years ago) link

As seldom as I get the urge to actually throw on any of my Boulez discs, I would go see a performance of any of his big pieces in a hot minnit. Also, I really want to see the guy conduct before he can't any longer...

Elric Harris and Dylan Kobold (Jon Lewis), Thursday, 3 December 2009 23:45 (eleven years ago) link

xpost I really like Graal-Theatre, which I THINK is after 2000...

Elric Harris and Dylan Kobold (Jon Lewis), Thursday, 3 December 2009 23:45 (eleven years ago) link

Owen, re: Rekašius. Haha I think what you heard might have been "Still not enough" (Saxophone concerto) which mostly fits that description and is of course awesome. Here's an okayish rip of his 7th Symphony, which is one of my favorites, esp. the 3rd movement:

Symphony No. 7, Op. 31 (1987) 'In Memoriam' (perf. by The Lithuanian Philharmonic Orchestra, Juozas Domarkas conducting)

A weirdly translated interview:
http://www.bruceduffie.com/rekasius.html

Here's a very sad article on his death:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/entertainment/3168842.stm

Salvador Dali Parton (Turangalila), Thursday, 3 December 2009 23:46 (eleven years ago) link

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41W5z6LJetL._SL500_AA240_.jpg

M.V., Thursday, 3 December 2009 23:50 (eleven years ago) link

Really enjoying Sergio Fiorentino right now.

ogmor, Thursday, 3 December 2009 23:57 (eleven years ago) link

Also, I really want to see the guy conduct before he can't any longer...

I really regret that I won't be moving to Chicago in time to see him do The Firebird. I just hope there's a "next time". :\

Daruton, Friday, 4 December 2009 00:21 (eleven years ago) link

"There's another not-uncommon Lazar Berman 2LP on Columbia/Melodiya of Liszt's famous 'Transcendental Etudes'"

i have this! haven't played it yet. i'll play it tommorow at the store.

hope nobody minds if i occasionally babble about the sonics/sound of my vinyl. i've got about a thousand classical albums and every once in a while i'll pull something out that has me slack-jawed and drooling. right now that is a columbia 360 sound stereo pressing of bernstein/stern doiing bartok's two rhapsodies for violin and orchestra and berg's violin concerto. not only is the music amazing, but gaaaaaaaaaaaaaa the recording is just staggering. the brightness of stern's violin in tandem with the new york phil...if you ever wonder why people still shell out big bucks for vinyl, well, here ya go. and its not a big bucks album. but its worth its weight in gold.

scott seward, Friday, 4 December 2009 00:56 (eleven years ago) link

That's interesting cuz those 60s ny phil columbia recordings took a looong time (i.e. many remastering iterations) before sounding good on CD. As recently as like 2000 they were still putting out newly-remastered bernstein/nypo CDs which did not sound great.

Elric Harris and Dylan Kobold (Jon Lewis), Friday, 4 December 2009 01:09 (eleven years ago) link

The early generation CDs (like mid 80s) of classical Columbia stuff are some of the worst sounding classical CDs imo.

Elric Harris and Dylan Kobold (Jon Lewis), Friday, 4 December 2009 01:10 (eleven years ago) link

go to the source! the berg is friggin' transcendent!

scott seward, Friday, 4 December 2009 01:14 (eleven years ago) link

who DID know how to transfer analog recordings to digital successfully in the 80's anyway? maybe the japanese...

scott seward, Friday, 4 December 2009 01:16 (eleven years ago) link

I got interested in the '30s and '40s music by Gian Francesco Malipiero and bought one of the Naxos CDs that has a couple of his symphonies from that period on it (<a href="http://www.naxos.com/catalogue/item.asp?item_code=8.570879";>this one, with Symphonies 1 & 2</a>).

Also bought old Nonesuch LP with madrigals from Monteverdi's Book VIII a week or so ago.

timellison, Friday, 4 December 2009 01:17 (eleven years ago) link

I left a lot of classical vinyl behind when i moved from the South to NYC in '03, sigh...

Anyway, haha I knew you would have that Transcendental Etudes 2LP! Yeah bump that shit in your store. It will annoy people! Filling out Side 4 on that is the Rhapsodie Espagnole, an absolutely preposterous, outrageous barnstormer in Liszt's best freakout mode, and that recording of it is one of the most notorious.

Berman died a couple of years ago... he never really recorded regularly after the 70s when he was first let loose from the USSR and was an exciting novelty in the west.

Bring me Sanka or Tetley (Jon Lewis), Friday, 4 December 2009 01:21 (eleven years ago) link

xp I fuking love monteverdi Book 8. that's some of the best vocal music ever.

Bring me Sanka or Tetley (Jon Lewis), Friday, 4 December 2009 01:22 (eleven years ago) link

Scott no one did it awesomely in the 80s but i feel like Sony/CBS were among the worst.

Bring me Sanka or Tetley (Jon Lewis), Friday, 4 December 2009 01:23 (eleven years ago) link

Sorry my link didn't work. It's this:

http://www.naxos.com/catalogue/item.asp?item_code=8.570879

timellison, Friday, 4 December 2009 01:23 (eleven years ago) link

Gian Francisco Malipiero

Discovered his six string quartets earlier this year and found them enjoyable if not really memorable. Oddly the biggest influence I heard in those pieces was Debussy (odd b/c of his reputation as one of the "back to Bach" composers). I will have to give them a relisten this week.

C.T. Dalton (Daruton), Friday, 4 December 2009 01:26 (eleven years ago) link

I'm so ignorant of 20c italian composers. I know Busoni and that's about it. Well, Berio...

Bring me Sanka or Tetley (Jon Lewis), Friday, 4 December 2009 01:29 (eleven years ago) link

The only one I really listen to is Scelsi. ._.

C.T. Dalton (Daruton), Friday, 4 December 2009 01:33 (eleven years ago) link

okay, here is my project for the year. i have a book entitled *The Collector's 20th-Century Music In The Western Hemisphere* by Arthur Cohn. It came out in 1961. anyway, every chapter is devoted to a composer and MANY of them i've never heard. so, i'm gonna try and look out for the stuff i've never heard this year. here is the full list in the book of composers that cohn feels are important:

samuel barber (i'm a fan.)

ernest bloch (have some stuff, but need to listen more.)

elliott carter (i'm a fan.)

carlos chavez (???)

aaron copland (dig him.)

henry cowell (dig him.)

paul creston (???)

norman dello joio (have a record that i like of his stuff. but not really familiar.)

irving fine (???)

lukas foss (dig him a bunch.)

alberto ginastera (???)

howard hanson (have a symphony i like a lot. but that's it.)

roy harris (???)

alan hovhaness (big fan! one of my big discoveries of recent years. always need more.)

charles ives (charles ives/youth of today/bunnybrains my danbury connecticut holy trinity.)

leon kirchner (???)

gian-carlo menotti (only know the music appreciation stuff like the medium.)

walter piston (???)

silvestre revueltas (???)

wallingford riegger (???)

william schuman (???)

roger sessions (heard him, but...???)

harold shapero (???)

virgil thomson (dig him.)

edgar varese (big fan.)

heitor villa-lobos (dig him lots.)

ben weber (???)

so, if you have anything to say about any of my question marks, go right ahead! or anything about any of them if you feel like it.

scott seward, Friday, 4 December 2009 02:45 (eleven years ago) link

Ginastera — I know two ballets and two piano concertos. The ballets (Panambi, Estancia) are brash, opulently orchestrated, but maybe owe a bit too much to Ravel/Stravinsky.

The first PC was made semi-famous by Emerson Lake and Palmer who did a version of the Toccata movement. Neither PC is IMO very memorable, but I pretty much dislike piano concertos as a rule.

C.T. Dalton (Daruton), Friday, 4 December 2009 03:27 (eleven years ago) link

I predict that Revueltas will be the most fun of those question marks to explore. Mexican mid-century modernist, one-of-a-kind.

I know folks who will rep for the Harris symphonies; they're skillfully written, and the guy had a flair for long, flowing melodies, but they don't appeal to me all that much. The Schuman symphonies do a bit more for me, although I haven't listened in ages -- along the lines of more abstract Copland. Meat and potatoes music.

I associate Riegger with the Crawford/Seeger/Ruggles/Becker group. He was not very prolific, mainly because he died an early death (bizzare cause: he was caught in the middle of a fight between two leashed dogs).

I feel like there's no point in commenting on the rest -- I don't have strong opinions and Arthur Cohn presumably does!

Monophonic Spree (Paul in Santa Cruz), Friday, 4 December 2009 03:39 (eleven years ago) link

Re: Revueltas, "Ocho por radio" is a good place to start

Re: Composers who died bizarre deaths, sorry to drift off topic, but three stick in my mind together: along with Riegger there's Charles Alkan (crushed by a falling coat rack) and Ernst Chausson (lost control of his bicycle on a steep hill)

Monophonic Spree (Paul in Santa Cruz), Friday, 4 December 2009 03:44 (eleven years ago) link

Claude Vivier being murdered by a male prostitute is pretty bizarre.

C.T. Dalton (Daruton), Friday, 4 December 2009 03:50 (eleven years ago) link

Indeed! Adding him to my mental list...

Monophonic Spree (Paul in Santa Cruz), Friday, 4 December 2009 03:56 (eleven years ago) link

What about composers who killed other people? All I can think of is Gesualdo.

C.T. Dalton (Daruton), Friday, 4 December 2009 04:01 (eleven years ago) link

Scriabin (died of an infected zit on his lip)

Berlioz was all set to kill his mistress and her lover, then decided not to go through with it. If you believe Berlioz on the matter...

Bring me Sanka or Tetley (Jon Lewis), Friday, 4 December 2009 04:06 (eleven years ago) link

Oh and of course one of the most tragic of these unusual deaths is Anton Webern, who stepped out onto his porch after curfew for a smoke and was shot by an American soldier. Which brings me back on topic a bit. I had always ignored the two late cantatas of Webern but have recently fallen in love with both. I only know them from the Boulez/Sony box set recordings, which seem fine. Still haven't studied the scores.

Monophonic Spree (Paul in Santa Cruz), Friday, 4 December 2009 04:17 (eleven years ago) link

Yes, I've been giving the late opus numbers another try after thinking them dry hitherto. I especially like the string trio and the Op. 28 quartet. At first the relative rhythmic stodginess put me off, but now I see it as just another attribute rather than a failing. It's almost like an aural equivalent of those Klee paintings that are just regular grids of colors with varying hues and brightnesses.

C.T. Dalton (Daruton), Friday, 4 December 2009 04:22 (eleven years ago) link

"I feel like there's no point in commenting on the rest -- I don't have strong opinions and Arthur Cohn presumably does!"

felt like that's what was interesting about the book. how many of those guys would be in a similar book about 20th century composers today? like, half? and the other half would be...um, glass, crumb, feldman, cage, uh, i'm blanking on popular late-20th century north american types, but stuff like that.

scott seward, Friday, 4 December 2009 04:27 (eleven years ago) link

lots of arvo part lately, esp 'fratres' and 'alina'
i picked up a valentin silvestri cd the other day
gorecki's 'miserere'

omar little, Friday, 4 December 2009 04:29 (eleven years ago) link

speaking of 20th century north american types, i need more lou harrison in my life. i haven't heard enough. i dig his stuff.

scott seward, Friday, 4 December 2009 04:39 (eleven years ago) link

@Daruton - that's a very good analogy with Klee. It does for him what it does for Webern, foregrounding (visual or harmonic) color and pattern. I've always like this quality in the first movement of the Variations for Piano, and the first Cantata has passages that seem to work very similarly. But the second cantata, like the Variations for Orchestra immediately before it, is leaner and more fragmented again.

Monophonic Spree (Paul in Santa Cruz), Friday, 4 December 2009 04:45 (eleven years ago) link

With Harrison, my favorite recorded pieces are scattered across various CDs. Also, there is a tendency for every Harrison CD to be a compilation of pieces in very different styles, off from completely different phases in his career (e.g., a 1940s percussion piece, a semi-traditional piece for symphony and oratorio, and a piece for microtonal guitar). I wish there were more recordings where like material was grouped with like material, because I don't remotely like all his sub-styles equally. Maybe there are now, I haven't been keeping track. I'm at work, but from what little I listened to it with the volume way down, that live recording you just posted sounds lovely, Paul.

scott, you have or have heard "Three Pieces for Gamelan," I assume? That was on a CRI compilation. "Perilous Chapel" is good, esp. the version of an Albion records compilation. Also Rhymes with Silver is good overall. I can't remember in detail what I like and don't like about it, but it works better as a listen straight through than most of the other Harrison collections I have.

_Rudipherous_, Friday, 4 December 2009 05:03 (eleven years ago) link

i've heard gamelan stuff, but not sure of the title? sounded very cool. i will definitely look for the cri album. found this online and might download tomorrow:

http://vaubu.blogspot.com/2009/03/lou-harrison.html

scott seward, Friday, 4 December 2009 05:10 (eleven years ago) link

I think I have that first collection of compositions on a different compilation (not sure if they're the same recordings). I don't care for them quite as much as "Three Pieces for Gamelan" (I don't know if that's the actual composition title--I don't think so--or if they were just put out like that as an EP (?) so to speak.)

_Rudipherous_, Friday, 4 December 2009 05:12 (eleven years ago) link

i have a great record of concertos for violin and percussion and organ and percussion. like that a lot. later compositions, i think. i'm guessing he was big on the + percussion combo. guitar and percussion. flute and percussion. which is cool, cuz i'm big on that combo too! (what can i say? i'm a rockhead.)

scott seward, Friday, 4 December 2009 05:22 (eleven years ago) link

Percussionists = by far the biggest beneficiaries of 20th century classical composing. There have to have been hundreds of pieces with prominent/wild/unusual percussion parts written in the last 100 years.

(My fave max-out-on-the-percussion composer is Crumb).

Bring me Sanka or Tetley (Jon Lewis), Friday, 4 December 2009 06:21 (eleven years ago) link

It's a Brahms chamber music thanks to Skot. Piano Quartet #1 (Tamas Vasary/members Berlin Phil/DG) followed by the Clarinet Quintet (Thea King et al/Hyperion). These are both nearly ideal performances of these pieces I gotta say. Skot I'll bet you have this set of thr Piano Quartets on vinyl!

Bring me Sanka or Tetley (Jon Lewis), Friday, 4 December 2009 16:03 (eleven years ago) link

So I have never heard this album but this orchestra is conducted by a good acquaintance/occasional boss and was just nominated for a Grammy so I am totally pimping it here:

http://www.hbdirect.com/album_detail.php?pid=1043361

Huckabee Jesus lifeline (HI DERE), Friday, 4 December 2009 16:08 (eleven years ago) link

BMOP has gotten nothing but rave reviews that I've seen (mostly in Fanfare mag).

'Wilde- a symphony for Baritone and Orchestra'. Sounds intriguing. I'll check the samples out on eMusic.

Bring me Sanka or Tetley (Jon Lewis), Friday, 4 December 2009 16:14 (eleven years ago) link

Just ordered this:

http://www.mdt.co.uk/public/pictures/products/standard/BISCD1767-68.jpg

I've been wanting to hear these forever without stooping to downloading but the individual discs were going for $20, but the whole set is only ~$30 from the UK. Can't wait.

C.T. Dalton (Daruton), Friday, 4 December 2009 20:40 (eleven years ago) link

Mm. Impressive. I have a couple of them stii on ol' Melodiya vinyl, I think.

t**t, Friday, 4 December 2009 20:52 (eleven years ago) link

Is that all-new recordings?

BIS is on eMusic and priced at a straight 1 credit per track so the set could be pretty affordable from them (albeit in non-physical format).

Bring me Sanka or Tetley (Jon Lewis), Friday, 4 December 2009 21:00 (eleven years ago) link

I think it's the same old recordings. Would be nice if they also contained the "filler" pieces from the original discs but I'm not getting my hopes up.

C.T. Dalton (Daruton), Friday, 4 December 2009 21:06 (eleven years ago) link

BIS' symphonic box sets are generally awesome. I recommend the shit out of their Holmboe- Complete Symphonies box.

Bring me Sanka or Tetley (Jon Lewis), Friday, 4 December 2009 21:14 (eleven years ago) link

I really want to hear that but would find it hard to justify spending $60 on a composer I'm not even sure I'll like (even though there's a very high probability that I will).

C.T. Dalton (Daruton), Friday, 4 December 2009 21:22 (eleven years ago) link

I take it you don't do purchased downloads? (eMusic is VBR 192kbps, Amazon MP3 is 256kbps).

That's how I buy lots of BIS releases these days.

Bring me Sanka or Tetley (Jon Lewis), Friday, 4 December 2009 21:30 (eleven years ago) link

Not really. I feel weird paying for downloads when I can just pirate a FLAC rip online.

C.T. Dalton (Daruton), Friday, 4 December 2009 22:34 (eleven years ago) link

Mainly I do it for Robert Von Bahr (BIS owner) cuz he is such an awesome dude and I want him to keep doing stuff through emusic.

Does anyone know anything about Ligeti's 3 Fantasies After Holderlin for choir? What time period do these come from?

Bring me Sanka or Tetley (Jon Lewis), Friday, 4 December 2009 22:46 (eleven years ago) link

listening to brahms' german requiem. dgg box with von karajan and the choir that premiered the requiem: the weiner singverein. lovely stuff but i'm not feeling all that requiem-ish right now. karajan has always been my go-to dude when it comes to brahms symphonies, but i feel like i need to branch out and listen to some other takes. karajan was just so...german. which is cool, don't get me wrong. but i want to hear someone open brahms up for me a little more. not be so rigid. (opera singer gundula janowitz on this requiem though, man, what a dream. so beautiful.) this box also includes variations on a theme by haydn, but i think i'll save it for another day.

cuz i'm curious about this album of piano stuff i have with pieces by people i've never heard before. charles griffes! dane rudhyar! ben weber! all very mod. the record is from the late 50's. and i actually have heard the pianist playing this stuff, william masselos.

scott seward, Sunday, 6 December 2009 17:59 (eleven years ago) link

I've heard of Rudhyar mentioned as one of the early American "ultramodernists" like Ruggles, Crawford-Seeger and Cowell. I'll definitely be interested hear your thoughts.

C.T. Dalton (Daruton), Sunday, 6 December 2009 19:38 (eleven years ago) link

This thread is fantastique.

Salvador Dali Parton (Turangalila), Sunday, 6 December 2009 19:49 (eleven years ago) link

Scott-- Try Charles Mackerras conducting the Scottish Chamber Orchestra in the Brahms symphonies. This was recorded in the digital age so it's not on vinyl, but recorded very well by Telarc and the performances are nimble, vivid and fresh.

Also there's a new Brahms 1st from Ivan Fischer and the Budapest Festival Orchestra on Channel Classics which is getting raves. Fischer and the Budapest are kind of the team to beat right now. Their recent Mahler recordings have been stupendous, as have their not as recent Bartok series.

Bring me Sanka or Tetley (Jon Lewis), Sunday, 6 December 2009 19:53 (eleven years ago) link

Guys why doesn't anyone here talk about Mieczysław Weinberg (Moisei Vainberg)? His 18th Symphony is seriously one of the most beautiful things ever. But he was so prolific! Any Weinberg fans here?

Salvador Dali Parton (Turangalila), Sunday, 6 December 2009 20:28 (eleven years ago) link

Never heard of him! Will investigate...

Monophonic Spree (Paul in Santa Cruz), Sunday, 6 December 2009 20:28 (eleven years ago) link

I have this:

http://img.amazon.ca/images/I/61U6a5x%2BagL._SS500_.jpg

I'll have to give it a listen once my Hindemith marathon is over. Thanks for reminding me. :)

C.T. Dalton (Daruton), Sunday, 6 December 2009 20:34 (eleven years ago) link

:D His piano quintet is amazing.

Salvador Dali Parton (Turangalila), Sunday, 6 December 2009 20:38 (eleven years ago) link

Also, what do we all think of Gloria Coates? GLISSANDI/CLUSTERS madness. The 5th String Quartet is still so unsettling and gorgeous.

Salvador Dali Parton (Turangalila), Sunday, 6 December 2009 20:44 (eleven years ago) link

"I've heard of Rudhyar mentioned as one of the early American "ultramodernists" like Ruggles, Crawford-Seeger and Cowell. I'll definitely be interested hear your thoughts."

very cool. and yes way ultramod. all the true hepcats must have dug him. cuz he was one of those mystical jungian ancient-non-western-music-loving deep thinkers. i want to hear more. and i need to listen to this piece again. it's called *Granites*. he wrote a book called *Art As Release Of Power*. he wrote more than one book. he wanted to transform society with his music. there is a very cool and far out short article written by rudhyar on the back of this album. he sounds stoned.

here's a piece called "yearning" from a larger work that should give you an idea of where he was coming from:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hmA_CMIQUJY

scott seward, Monday, 7 December 2009 03:08 (eleven years ago) link

and this site, yowza, see for yourself:

http://www.khaldea.com/rudhyar/

scott seward, Monday, 7 December 2009 03:12 (eleven years ago) link

you can read everything he wrote about music on that site and some of it is really interesting. i am definitely an ultramod sympathizer and support their fight against the stranglehold of the western note!

"Be it as it may, the spectacle of this group of French composers is a sad one for whomsoever loves the truly progressive life, and is trying to feel the great pulse of humanity as it vibrates toward a deeper and more intrinsically realization of the essence of a conscious, free, sincere and spontaneous Manhood and womanhood, toward universal compassion and international brotherhood. The music of Milhaud and of his friends is a denial of the dearest aspirations, of the most vibrant hopes, which a Scriabin, for instance, had roused. It "goes back" to Mozart and Mendelssohn — what more to say! It is cold, heartless, superficial, artificial, unmoving, chauvinistic. We must recognize that it is supremely clever, well made, well orchestrated; that it generates new and striking effects, that its technic is masterly. But it is dead, spiritually, ethically, emotionally."

scott seward, Monday, 7 December 2009 03:21 (eleven years ago) link

Charles Alkan (crushed by a falling coat rack)

The going story for a while IIRC was that he was crushed by a bookshelf as he reached for a volume of the Talmud, but this was later proven to be apocryphal - I don't think he was actually crushed at all.

But strange death aside, Alkan's totally fascinating and a fucking virtuoso. Contemporary and friend of tons of well-regarded composers, underappreciated until recently (and imo still underappreciated). Marc-Andre Hamelin's three albums of Alkan material are all Classic, but if you haven't heard anything of his before, the one to hear is Le Festin D'Esope (No. 12).

Gah. Five days and already so many amazing sounding recommendations to catch up on.

wrapped up, packed up, ribbon with a donk on it (Alex in Montreal), Tuesday, 8 December 2009 18:37 (eleven years ago) link

Cosign on Hamelin's Alkan discs. Each one's a gem. (My preference as a dyed-in-the-wool Dionysian is still with Liszt, but Alkan's knife-edge sangfroid makes for great listening).

Today and yesterday-- a couple of live radio broadcasts captured to good MP3 by a friend-- an old german radio one of Kubelik leading his Bavarian orchestra in Messiaen's colossal La Transfiguration de Notre-Seigneur Jesus Christ (which I think I like better than the commerical recording I have of the piece) and one from this year on Radio France with Nicholas Angelich and the Capucon brothers playing all three Brahms trios in one concert (huge, snorting romantic performances with lots of rubato, totally great).

Now bumping Villa-Lobos' Forest Of The Amazons on Delos Records. Should have mentioned this alongside the Choros the other day. Big raucous sentimental craziness with birds, rivers, natives, a soprano. I think this was born out of a film score?

Bring me Sanka or Tetley (Jon Lewis), Tuesday, 8 December 2009 19:01 (eleven years ago) link

Cannot stop listening to The Sparrow and the Gentle Dove by Purcell (Hyperion recording).

Good to see Brahms being mentioned a lot - his alto rhapsody (Ferrier I think, although I quite like the Klemperer as well) and his first symphony.

Constant Lambert's Prize Fight is quite a good alternative getting ready to go out music.

John Ireland's Mai Dun and The Legend are, as they were intended to be, the perfect accompaniment to my Arthur Machen kick a while ago - mixture of pastoral mysticism and ancient English militarism.

'virgin' should be 'wizard' (GamalielRatsey), Wednesday, 9 December 2009 13:48 (eleven years ago) link

I would think Delius would also go well with Machen...

Bring me Sanka or Tetley (Jon Lewis), Wednesday, 9 December 2009 16:23 (eleven years ago) link

digging Bruckner Symphonie No. 4, "Romantic"

which version should i hear? and what others?

andrew m., Wednesday, 9 December 2009 16:55 (eleven years ago) link

I don't have a million Bruckner 4s, but my favorite now is the Klemperer on EMI. Klemps and Bruckner a perfect match to my ears.

I'd recommend proceeding to the 5th, then the 9th, then the mighty 8th.

Bring me Sanka or Tetley (Jon Lewis), Wednesday, 9 December 2009 16:59 (eleven years ago) link

thanks jon. i've got two versions of 4, but can't remember either at the moment, but i don't think i've got Klemperer. will seek this and the others.

andrew m., Wednesday, 9 December 2009 17:07 (eleven years ago) link

BTW, lots of ppl also swear by the karl Bohm Bruckner 4 most recently reissued in the Decca Legends series. I haven't heard it though.

vadnais heights is cougartown (Jon Lewis), Wednesday, 9 December 2009 17:17 (eleven years ago) link

I would think Delius would also go well with Machen...

Definitely. Delius was buried in a churchyard near where I grew up in fact, although the only material effect this had on my musical taste was that every time I cycled or walked past the church and remembered Delius was buried there, I would break out into 'Delia's Gone' by Johnny Cash.

I will remedy this.

'virgin' should be 'wizard' (GamalielRatsey), Wednesday, 9 December 2009 17:21 (eleven years ago) link

For the darkling magical side of Delius try 'Song Of The High Hills' and 'North Country Sketches' imo.

vadnais heights is cougartown (Jon Lewis), Wednesday, 9 December 2009 17:28 (eleven years ago) link

"which version should i hear? and what others?"

if you want to make your head spin, listen to bruckner's massive 8th symphony and then put on some of his motets which are these brilliant miniature masterpieces of church music. so beautiful.

scott seward, Wednesday, 9 December 2009 18:24 (eleven years ago) link

I've never heard the Motets!

vadnais heights is cougartown (Jon Lewis), Wednesday, 9 December 2009 18:30 (eleven years ago) link

Oh shit, really?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K8no8t0saHI

wtf?!? just randomly started crying! (HI DERE), Wednesday, 9 December 2009 18:34 (eleven years ago) link

actually this a better boychoir rendition:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wWK4sF84M1I&feature=related

wtf?!? just randomly started crying! (HI DERE), Wednesday, 9 December 2009 18:35 (eleven years ago) link

listening to arturo benedetti michelangeli play haydn piano concertos in d & g (with zurich chamber orchestra). kinda jaw-dropping if you are into piano shredders. he didn't record a ton of stuff apparently. cuz he was such a prefectionist. thrilling really to hear.

here is him and some beethoven:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3z8VxIxZVOI

scott seward, Wednesday, 9 December 2009 18:52 (eleven years ago) link

definitely recommend the recording (on angel) if you like haydn or piano or great pianists or just great performances.

scott seward, Wednesday, 9 December 2009 18:54 (eleven years ago) link

i don't know what bruckner motet recordings to recommend on cd. there are probably a bunch. i have old vinyl recordings and can't think of any specific favorites.

scott seward, Wednesday, 9 December 2009 18:58 (eleven years ago) link

Yeah Michelangeli was the ultimate perfectionist piano hermit really. Listening to his studio Debussy (Images book i and ii and Children's Corner) feels almost hallucinatory, everything is so perfectly placed and shimmering.

It's funny re: the perfectionist thing, Michelangeli's most notorious recording, Ravel's Gaspard De La Nuit, is live-in-studio for radio and in not-great sound quality.

Pianists playing today who bring this kind of 'hallucinatory clarity' are Zimerman, Kocsis, and especially Ivan Moravec. Thankfully none of them are quite as restricted in their repertoire as ABM.

An interesting bit of trivia abt Arturo is that he was chronically obsessed with The Master And Margarita...

vadnais heights is cougartown (Jon Lewis), Wednesday, 9 December 2009 19:01 (eleven years ago) link

great thread, and thanks for all the good Bruckner recommendations

andrew m., Wednesday, 9 December 2009 19:24 (eleven years ago) link

This book looks very interesting (to me). Not in any local library yet. May blind-order.

Joseph Straus - Twelve-tone Music in America
http://www.cambridge.org/catalogue/catalogue.asp?isbn=9780521899550

Monophonic Spree (Paul in Santa Cruz), Wednesday, 9 December 2009 23:26 (eleven years ago) link

I'm experimenting with listening to classical music while doing other things (reading web forums, walking, etc.) When I first started getting into CM I would do the same but noticed eventually that I was retaining very little of what I heard, and started listening as an exclusive activity — but now I seem to be able to appreciate it (mostly tonal music, not anything hyper-complex).

Just wondering what percentage of everyone's listening is exclusive v. while doing other things, what music works for what, etc.

I'm listening to the Beethoven SQs (Alban Berg) and frankly wondering why I listen to anything else.

Stereo no aware (Daruton), Thursday, 10 December 2009 01:05 (eleven years ago) link

Hearing a Rubinstein recording from the '30s has, I think, made sense of Chopin's Scherzo No. 4 for me.

timellison, Thursday, 10 December 2009 01:51 (eleven years ago) link

the only photo of chopin. the year he died. has tim roth played him yet?

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/32/Chopin1849opt02.jpg

scott seward, Thursday, 10 December 2009 01:58 (eleven years ago) link

so much chopin i still need to hear. there's a lotta mazurkas out there! been listening to claudio arrau and maurizio pollini play chopin and they are supposed to be top-notch old-school interpreters. i've got some great rubinstein recordings too. speaking of top-notch old-school.

scott seward, Thursday, 10 December 2009 02:05 (eleven years ago) link

This is the album:

http://www.lala.com/#album/1009369266561368272/Artur_Rubinstein,_Frédéric_Chopin/CHOPIN:_Nocturnes_and_Scherzi_(Rubinstein)_(1936-1937)

8:14 version of Scherzo No. 2 as compared with a 9:40 interpretation on an early '70s or so LP I have by Philippe Entremont.

timellison, Thursday, 10 December 2009 02:23 (eleven years ago) link

Sorry again, my link got broken up.

timellison, Thursday, 10 December 2009 02:24 (eleven years ago) link

Rubinstein's 30s recordings are radically different to his mono LP and stereo LP recordings-- in the 30s he was a wildman with his Chopin, those Scherzi are like no others I've heard. His 30s polonaises are also straight fire from what I've listened to. By the end of the 78 era he had revised his approach to a much more reflective place.

I think my favorite modern recording of the 4 Scherzi is the Ivan Moravec one on Dorian Recordings. Moravec is pretty much the greatest living/still-playing Chopinist at this point. I wish he had a full set of the Mazurkas, but he has done 20 or so scattered across his several Chopin discs.

vadnais heights is cougartown (Jon Lewis), Thursday, 10 December 2009 18:26 (eleven years ago) link

I'm experimenting with listening to classical music while doing other things (reading web forums, walking, etc.) When I first started getting into CM I would do the same but noticed eventually that I was retaining very little of what I heard, and started listening as an exclusive activity — but now I seem to be able to appreciate it (mostly tonal music, not anything hyper-complex).

Just wondering what percentage of everyone's listening is exclusive v. while doing other things, what music works for what, etc.

...no one?

Stereo no aware (Daruton), Friday, 11 December 2009 07:20 (eleven years ago) link

Exclusively, or while walking (iPod), or while driving (if the dynamic range is narrow enough).

Monophonic Spree (Paul in Santa Cruz), Friday, 11 December 2009 08:06 (eleven years ago) link

le-awsh yan-nah-chek

Salvador Dali Parton (Turangalila), Saturday, 12 December 2009 19:23 (eleven years ago) link

Anyone into Baroque organ music? Listening to recordings of Frescobaldi's Book II, Twelve Toccatas, from 1627. Some are played on the harpsichord and some on the organ. A few of the organ pieces seem like they're right on the cusp before functional tonality took over. Contrapuntal texture is very thin and they seem to be very much about the progression of harmonies. They're really beautiful.

timellison, Sunday, 13 December 2009 19:32 (eleven years ago) link

Yan-nah-chek rules ofc. :3

Stereo no aware (Daruton), Sunday, 13 December 2009 20:31 (eleven years ago) link

Love Janacek. Especially in chamber music. Mad at myself for not making it to the Met production of From The House Of The Dead that just ended.

Friday night I was uncharacteristically early leaving work so I was able to make it to Academy Records before closing. Found two used Szymanowski things which have been on my want list for quite awhile: the complete Mazurkas for piano on the polish Dux label and the complete Songs on 4CDs from Channel Classics. Looking forward to digging into these today.

vadnais heights is cougartown (Jon Lewis), Monday, 14 December 2009 16:16 (eleven years ago) link

Classical record reviewers should still write like they did in 1956, y/n?

"Mozart: Concertos for Violin and Orchestra: No. 4, in D, K. 218; No.
5, in A ("Turkish"), K. 219

"Mischa Elman, violin; New Symphony Orchestra, Josef Krips, cond.
London LL 1271. 12-in.

"No one who can bring himself to listen to this record will deny Mr.
Elman's ownership of a few seraphim, whom he keeps in his violin. Not
to argue a cause already won, let it be admitted briefly that this
fiddler has more sweet unction in his strings than any other of our
times. All his records are anointed with it, particularly this one,
engineered to catch delicately every lambent hemi-demi-semi-quaver.

"The stylization suggests a sure grounding in Coleridge-Taylor. It
is the work of a free man, a little dazed. (Freedom sometimes cannot
be borne.) The pace is languid, inclined to swoon, the phrase
unshaped, as if stuck in molasses on the bow. In this independence of
spirit Concerto No. 5 is a hymn to melting butter, an apotheosis of
goo. This originality is not sustained during No. 4, which in many
places sounds like Mozart. In both the orchestra is tame, we may guess
from sheepishness. C. G. B."

Thulsa Doob (Jon Lewis), Wednesday, 16 December 2009 17:25 (eleven years ago) link

Concerto No. 5 is a hymn to melting butter, an apotheosis of
goo.
mmmm...

ogmor, Wednesday, 16 December 2009 18:45 (eleven years ago) link

"Just wondering what percentage of everyone's listening is exclusive v. while doing other things, what music works for what, etc."

i listen to music all day in my store, so that's a good time to listen to just about anything. but i like having the time to be at home on the couch reading liner-notes and really absorbing what i'm hearing. i make an effort at home to so some deep listening, because so much classical music is unfamiliar to me. and that includes things that i've heard more than once. i'm a simpleton and a rockhead, so it definitely benefits me to be attentive. as it is, i probably only absorb and retain about 5% of the liner-notes i read. and the music doesn't always stick either without repeated listening. (though, don't get me wrong, there is plenty of easy/immediate pleasure to a lot of the classical music i listen to.) so i re-read them. and re-listen. i think it's fun though. and rewarding. i am the opposite of an expert and instead of this scaring me, it instead encourages me to go in over my head. to listen to too much stuff from too many different eras and not worry too much about a coherent approach to my scattershot autodidactic education. it's kinda how i've always listened/read/learned anyway, so it's a little late now to change. i'm thinking in 30 or 40 years i'll have some grasp of western music and its history. then i'll tackle asia.

oh and i don't have an ipod or listen to music in the car much. the last time i had a walkman was 15 years ago.

scott seward, Wednesday, 16 December 2009 19:28 (eleven years ago) link

so i re-read them. and re-listen. i think it's fun though. and rewarding. i am the opposite of an expert and instead of this scaring me, it instead encourages me to go in over my head. to listen to too much stuff from too many different eras and not worry too much about a coherent approach to my scattershot autodidactic education.

OTM x 1000 this is my classical music listening career in a nutshell. (not so much with liner notes, but i read Fanfare magazine every issue and digest a few heavy composer biographies a year)

Thulsa Doob (Jon Lewis), Wednesday, 16 December 2009 20:14 (eleven years ago) link

it's not categorized precisely as classical, but right now i'm listening to sylvain chauveau's 'nuage' album and it's really working for me.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QZPG7ZwQru4

you are wrong I'm bone thugs in harmon (omar little), Wednesday, 16 December 2009 20:19 (eleven years ago) link

Big hit of the day for me is this Szymanowski songs collection. If you dig Debussy's songs or Scriabin's solo piano stuff, you should check out Szymanowksi's voice w/piano stuff. He's decadent, he's devilish, he's orientalist (Songs Of The Infatuated Muezzin and such).

Speaking of decadent/symbolist intoxication, went back to Charles Mackerras' recordings of Delius short pieces and was sound-drunk all over again.

Thulsa Doob (Jon Lewis), Wednesday, 16 December 2009 20:22 (eleven years ago) link

I'm enjoying a a performance of La Traviata with Maria Callas from the 50s. Also Mahler's 6th (Mariss Jansons) and 9th (Kettle). The Andante Moderato movement from the former is beyond delicious.

Freedom, Sunday, 20 December 2009 01:48 (eleven years ago) link

Anyone into Baroque organ music? Listening to recordings of Frescobaldi's Book II, Twelve Toccatas, from 1627. Some are played on the harpsichord and some on the organ. A few of the organ pieces seem like they're right on the cusp before functional tonality took over. Contrapuntal texture is very thin and they seem to be very much about the progression of harmonies. They're really beautiful

oh yeah i love baroque organ music, and i love hearing the variety of tones and sounds in dutch and belgian organs of the time. seems to me that 1627 is just before the great age of baroque organ composition (buxtehude was born in 1637) so that's interesting what you say about contrapuntal texture.

Henry Frog (Frogman Henry), Sunday, 20 December 2009 02:58 (eleven years ago) link

re Daruton's q. i just let it as i live it; music is an everpresent constant for me, and just exists alongside the busyness of whatever i have to do, and if that means i don't do deep listening as i would wish to, i don't mind; i find memory does its job here, and retains or recalls things at other times so i become acquainted with pieces in a conveniant way, and they thrill me whether they're in the air around me or in my head (can't listn on headphones, sadly). the length and structure of most classioal pieces mean they are best enjoyed/made for the concert hall, in one go, note after note from the beginning right to the end, and listening to them on record is a most unnatural way of experiencing them, but as i can't be there most of the time, i accept this and allow myself to listen to them piecemeal, skipping to movements, my mind on something else etc. my playlists have loads of things queued up and i often just stick them on shuffle and get a taste of several centuries in a couple of hours.
however if im able to listen to the full evening concerts on radio 3 i will. which reminds me of the george crumb concert from the other night that i must listen to.

Henry Frog (Frogman Henry), Sunday, 20 December 2009 03:09 (eleven years ago) link

anyone like brian fernyhough? really loving his etudes transcendantales atm

Henry Frog (Frogman Henry), Sunday, 20 December 2009 03:11 (eleven years ago) link

Yes I like Brian Ferneyhough, and I think Etudes Transcendantales is the pinnacle of his work.

Monophonic Spree (Paul in Santa Cruz), Sunday, 20 December 2009 03:48 (eleven years ago) link

Went to the Wigmore Hall the other day -
Dvorjak: Sonatina for Violin and Piano in G op.100;
Shostakovich: Piano Trio in E minor op.67;
Tchaikovsky: Piano Trio in A minor op.50.

Utterly fantastic - the dusky bohemian sentimentality of the Dvorjak, the funereal passion of the Shostakovich, with the ethereal opening and closing strokes of the violin and tumultuous and rippling piano sections. The Tchaikovsky was a curiosity; a sweet opening theme, followed by a series of variations (one short one was very memorable - a tinkling music box theme) and a final section that starts off with the gaudy vivacity that seems characteristic (the gaudiness of his emotions that is) and which I like so much, before yet more funereal solemnity - dying, weeping piano notes and violin & cello strokes, reminiscent slightly of the final movement of his amazing sixth symphony.

An evening well spent, and ended up in the pub afterwards, where there was a chap playing the piano, a delightful coda, one that a composer like Constant Lambert, who loved pub and popular music (not faux pub folk stuff like Warlock) would have appreciated.

'virgin' should be 'wizard' (GamalielRatsey), Sunday, 20 December 2009 13:12 (eleven years ago) link

I've been on a Shostakovich kick lately; his Bach-inspired cycle of 24 preludes and fugues is some of my favorite solo piano ever. the string quartets are great too, but a bit demanding/overwhelming for the kind of casual listening I tend to engage in.

I got gin but I'm not a ginger (bernard snowy), Sunday, 20 December 2009 16:50 (eleven years ago) link

that sounds like a great night gatalie, who was the trio?

i am reading 'music ho!' by lambert. it is a riot tbqh.

henri grenouille (Frogman Henry), Sunday, 20 December 2009 17:38 (eleven years ago) link

you mentioning dvorak reminds me of this bit:

The 'nineties themselves had no music, properly speaking, and the writers of that period were consequently driven to desperate similies when trying to add appropriate musical touches. Poor Wilde in his search for the 'curiously coloured scarlet music' that his soul desired could find nothing better than the piano pieces of Dvorak...

henri grenouille (Frogman Henry), Sunday, 20 December 2009 17:44 (eleven years ago) link

Frogman-- tell me more about this George Crumb broadcast concert--?

Thulsa Doob (Jon Lewis), Sunday, 20 December 2009 18:20 (eleven years ago) link

'tis here http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00p8hp7

Echoes of Time and the River; Little suite for Christmas AD 1979 for piano; Star Child

still havent listened to it, ive been maxing out on ferneyhough all day

henri grenouille (Frogman Henry), Sunday, 20 December 2009 18:36 (eleven years ago) link

Wow his orchestral pieces are very rare in performance. I'll have to listen to that!

Thulsa Doob (Jon Lewis), Sunday, 20 December 2009 18:43 (eleven years ago) link

Henry, do you know the music of Jason Eckhardt? I suspect you'll get a kick out of his stuff if you're into Ferneyhough.

Monophonic Spree (Paul in Santa Cruz), Monday, 21 December 2009 01:00 (eleven years ago) link

Frogman - It was the Razumovsky ensemble - not a permanent set of members I think, but a changing group of musicians who like chamber music.

Music Ho! is great, isn't it? A very good read.

'virgin' should be 'wizard' (GamalielRatsey), Monday, 21 December 2009 14:44 (eleven years ago) link

The 'nineties themselves had no music, properly speaking, and the writers of that period were consequently driven to desperate similies when trying to add appropriate musical touches. Poor Wilde in his search for the 'curiously coloured scarlet music' that his soul desired could find nothing better than the piano pieces of Dvorak...

The 90s were weird. A lot of stuff which would soon give Wilde all the colors he could possibly need was just bubbling under. All of Europe was still transfixed by Wagner, but young composers were finally appearing who were stubborn and prickly enough to take what they wanted from Wagner at the same time as rejecting him.

Debussy's 'Faune' appeared, where luxuriance and stasis and ambiguity finally becomes an end in itself, and Mahler's earliest symphonies (if Wagner took Beethovenian symphonism to the opera, Mahler took Wagnerian mega-symphonism back to the concert hall, adding a much needed dose of irony and humor).

Meanwhile Satie on the piano had already shown the way out the side-door of the Wagner dilemma. The sardonic and crepuscular piano epigrams of Liszt's late years (1870s to his death in the mid 80s) had already cast figures of Schoenberg and Scriabin, but nobody heard Liszt's late visions until long after Schoenberg et al had done their thing...

Thulsa Doob (Jon Lewis), Monday, 21 December 2009 15:57 (eleven years ago) link

hey I just want you kind thread regulars to know I bought a Sibelius symphony box set (Deutsche Grammaphon, Berlin Philharmonic, Karajan & Kamu) cause I lurk here. thanks for the informed discussion.

sleeve, Monday, 21 December 2009 23:21 (eleven years ago) link

That set should serve u pretty well as a starter. Do know that Karajan prioritizes sweep and atmosphere and a kind of impressionist pallet in these works and you can check out others later if you want hyper-detail or mythic grunt. I don't think there are any dud performances in that set.

.gif of the magpie (Jon Lewis), Monday, 21 December 2009 23:25 (eleven years ago) link

Some of you, I'm sure, know the Candide label LPs from the '70s. If you ever get a chance to hear the Giovanni and Andrea Gabrieli album they put out in 1973, it's really something.

timellison, Tuesday, 22 December 2009 01:33 (eleven years ago) link

"Karajan is the only man who really understands my music."
— Jean Sibelius

Salvador Dali Parton (Turangalila), Tuesday, 22 December 2009 02:03 (eleven years ago) link

Sibelius said things like that about Beecham too, and Robert Kajanus-- he was basically super psyched whenever someone recorded his music well and could be a bit of a quote whore (I seem to recall Messiaen was a bit like this as well)?

I wasn't denigrating Karajan's Sibelius in any way-- his take is v distinctive and strong; there's no one 'correct' angle on Sibelius.

.gif of the magpie (Jon Lewis), Tuesday, 22 December 2009 02:11 (eleven years ago) link

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2009/12/22/arts/music/22met1/articleInline.jpg

I can never resist a good James Levine photo.

.gif of the magpie (Jon Lewis), Tuesday, 22 December 2009 02:32 (eleven years ago) link

Whoa where's his traditional sweat-towel?

.gif of the magpie (Jon Lewis), Tuesday, 22 December 2009 02:33 (eleven years ago) link

haha yes re: Messiaen being a quote whore, too.

Salvador Dali Parton (Turangalila), Tuesday, 22 December 2009 03:04 (eleven years ago) link

Been neglecting this thread as of late, as I haven't really been left alone long enough to listen to anything with any degree of attention. :\

Lately I've been breaking my usual habit with CM and listening to the Mozart symphonies (Pinnock/English Consort), for the first time in fact! No. 40 is played to death but still beautiful, 41 is very impressive (esp. the final movement), but so far I've enjoyed No. 38 the most. The slow movement is especially gorgeous. I love the "shiny" timbre of the HIP ensemble.

You give me falun gong, four in the morning (Daruton), Saturday, 26 December 2009 21:38 (eleven years ago) link

Daruton, one of my favorite classical discs of the year was a Profil disc of Sawallisch and the Bavarian Radio SO performing symphonies 35 and 41, a live radio broadcast performance. These are not HIP performances, of course, but exciting high-energy modern orchestra renditions that somehow just sound totally right. Finally a recording of the 'Haffner' symphony that I can totally get with (I am a bit obsessed with #35).

.gif of the magpie (Jon Lewis), Saturday, 26 December 2009 23:11 (eleven years ago) link

I have a lot to say but I just thought I'd chime in that Villa-Lobos' "Etude 11" may be my favourite piece to play on guitar. The Ginastera Sonata for Guitar is essential, of course.

I'm studying the Mozart piano sonatas at the moment. (Analysing, not playing.)

Sundar, Sunday, 27 December 2009 00:47 (eleven years ago) link

Stream from my tumblr: http://themagiclantern.tumblr.com/post/286006568

Leoš Janáček - String Quartet No. 2, ‘Intimate Letters’ - II. Adagio, performed by the Talich Quartet

:D

Salvador Dali Parton (Turangalila), Sunday, 27 December 2009 23:46 (eleven years ago) link

lately i've been digging on toru takemitsu - why cant other modern composers make dissonance and otherwordly melodies that are actually pleasant to listen to?

messiahwannabe, Monday, 28 December 2009 05:18 (eleven years ago) link

I know what you mean, but... a lot of them have!

Salvador Dali Parton (Turangalila), Monday, 28 December 2009 12:23 (eleven years ago) link

Have been just blown away by my discovery of Prokofiev's 3rd Symphony (Muti/Philadelphia). I had avoided him before due to a bad experience with his piano concertos, but this is just amazing.

You give me falun gong, four in the morning (Daruton), Tuesday, 29 December 2009 03:49 (eleven years ago) link

xxp Late Feldman? Rautavaara? Ligeti? Messiaen?

You give me falun gong, four in the morning (Daruton), Tuesday, 29 December 2009 03:58 (eleven years ago) link

speaking of Rautavaara, I have a couple naxos discs (the one with Cantus Arcticus and the one with Angels and Visitations) that I bought a few years ago and never really got into, but I was listening to his Piano Concerto No. 1 the other day, and man does that thing cook! don't know how I never noticed it before.

I got gin but I'm not a ginger (bernard snowy), Tuesday, 29 December 2009 04:35 (eleven years ago) link

I know what you mean, but... a lot of them have!

i suspected as much, but i rarely come across any - suggestions for more pleasant dissonance then?

Late Feldman? Rautavaara? Ligeti? Messiaen?

tbh i've never even heard of these guys - i'm not a complete noob when it comes to classical but there are huge gaps in my knowledge to be sure...

messiahwannabe, Tuesday, 29 December 2009 08:19 (eleven years ago) link

haha, it's cool; I followed a pretty similar trajectory, actually. I first heard of Takemitsu thru a piece that Leo Brouwer (really good cuban guitar composer) dedicated to him, and then basically followed Amazon.com recommendations to find other 20th century stuff I dug.

btw, not to belabor the point, but seriously, this is great:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IjMtX1GLkTc

I got gin but I'm not a ginger (bernard snowy), Tuesday, 29 December 2009 13:08 (eleven years ago) link

Have been just blown away by my discovery of Prokofiev's 3rd Symphony (Muti/Philadelphia). I had avoided him before due to a bad experience with his piano concertos, but this is just amazing.

― You give me falun gong, four in the morning (Daruton), Tuesday, December 29, 2009 3:49 AM (10 hours ago) Bookmark

Prokofiev is easy: stay away from the early work. He went from being the Worst, most Unidiomatic composer (age 10-28, basically everything before the Classical Symphony) to being the poster child for idiomatic writing. His woodwind writing in Romeo & Juliet and Cinderella is so, so great.

Megadeth Panel (Ówen P.), Tuesday, 29 December 2009 14:29 (eleven years ago) link

Listening a lot to Britten's Turn of The Screw. I think it's the Britten/Pears version but I copied it to mp3 ages ago and lost track of some details so not 100% sure. In any case I prefer it to the Daniel Harding/Ian Bostridge version on Virgin, which I've been comparing it with. The kids' singing is more childlike in the Harding, thin and slightly insecure treble voices, which may be more authentic but I find them a bit irritating. Also Gergiev's cycle of Prokofiev symphonies, especially, by coincidence, the 3rd which is less familiar to me than 1,5 or 6. Quatuor Ebene's recordings of the Ravel/Debussy/Faure SQs - even if you think the first two of these in particular are overfamiliar it's worth checking out these revelatory performances.

frankiemachine, Tuesday, 29 December 2009 15:43 (eleven years ago) link

I was lucky enough to see Turn Of The Screw performed in Seattle ~15 years ago; so eerie and awesome. It was my first live opera. I don't have the Britten/Pears or the Harding/Bostridge but the one on Collins Records with Langridge and Bedford conducting.

Prokofiev's 3rd symphony is tremendous fire-breating modernism. I think it's my favorite thing he did for orchestra (though I also stan for Romeo, Cinderella, the 2nd symphony and the succulent fairy-tale Violin Concertos. Like daruton, I have not had good mileage from his piano concertos, BUT BUT BUT as a solo piano composer he is one of the century's finest.

i suspected as much, but i rarely come across any - suggestions for more pleasant dissonance then?

George Crumb and Kajia Saariaho. Both utterly uncompromising, both intensely beautiful in an almost palpable way.

.gif of the magpie (Jon Lewis), Tuesday, 29 December 2009 18:37 (eleven years ago) link

I can never resist a good James Levine photo.

― .gif of the magpie (Jon Lewis), Monday, December 21, 2009 9:32 PM


Me neither. He went missing from this thread Sticky-Uppy Hair
so I'm going to borrow your photo to replace him.

the embed's too big without you (James Redd and the Blecchs), Tuesday, 29 December 2009 19:22 (eleven years ago) link

Saw him in action a few times this year, most recently when he returned from his post-surgical convalescence to conduct Tales of Hoffmann. That was a lot of fun.

the embed's too big without you (James Redd and the Blecchs), Tuesday, 29 December 2009 19:23 (eleven years ago) link

messiahwannabe, you should check out Messiaen's "Quartet for the End of Time," Ligeti's Violin Concerto, Schnittke's Piano Quintet, Shostakovich's string quartets (all of them, really), String Quartet No. 4 by Peteris Vasks, Dutilleux's 'Ainsi la nuit' string quartet...

Salvador Dali Parton (Turangalila), Tuesday, 29 December 2009 20:10 (eleven years ago) link

The textures of "La création du monde" by Darius Milhaud are so gorgeous.

Salvador Dali Parton (Turangalila), Tuesday, 29 December 2009 20:13 (eleven years ago) link

@snowy, Thanks for posting the Rautavaara concerto; there's a composer I've always ignored & will now check out...

@messiahwannabe meanwhile, another noteworthy purveyor of "dissonance and otherwordly melodies that are actually pleasant to listen to" is Henri Dutilleux

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BEYsu6xXWWQ

Monophonic Spree (Paul in Santa Cruz), Tuesday, 29 December 2009 20:43 (eleven years ago) link

In addition to that quartet, favorites from Dutilleux include Tout un monde lointain (a cello concerto); L'arbre des songes (a violin concerto); Metaboles; and especially Timbres, espace, mouvement (go for the revision with the Interlude for cello ensemble)... I'm unfamiliar with the solo piano music.

Monophonic Spree (Paul in Santa Cruz), Tuesday, 29 December 2009 20:49 (eleven years ago) link

I gave Rautavaara's Angel of Light symphony a few listens last year and thought it sounded too much like movie music with "modern" sounds tacked on (glissandi, Ligeti-style "sound clouds", etc.). FWIW I find Takemitsu pretty boring also.

You give me falun gong, four in the morning (Daruton), Tuesday, 29 December 2009 22:36 (eleven years ago) link

Oops, apologies to Turangalila for totally missing his mention of Dutilleux a few posts before mine! Glad I'm not the only fan here...

Monophonic Spree (Paul in Santa Cruz), Tuesday, 29 December 2009 22:53 (eleven years ago) link

I love my disc with the 2nd Symphony and Shadows of Time, but haven't explored anything else yet.

You give me falun gong, four in the morning (Daruton), Tuesday, 29 December 2009 23:23 (eleven years ago) link

Been listening to some Haydn string quartets. Really liked a couple of the slow movements (one being the second movement from the Quartet in G, Op. 77, No. 1).

timellison, Wednesday, 30 December 2009 00:43 (eleven years ago) link

listening to mozart. the four flute quartets. all very lovely and spritely and all that. i could go for some haydn right about now. mozart and haydn used to jam together. they had a jam band.

scott seward, Friday, 1 January 2010 23:26 (eleven years ago) link

what are the best classical mags w/r/t quality and trustworthy recommendations?

A™ machine (sic) (omar little), Friday, 1 January 2010 23:37 (eleven years ago) link

For me it's been Smetana - Ma Vlast and Grieg - Sigurd Jorsalfar.

argosgold (AndyTheScot), Friday, 1 January 2010 23:39 (eleven years ago) link

now playing: william byrd - music for voice and viols (i could listen to this all day long.)

scott seward, Friday, 1 January 2010 23:51 (eleven years ago) link

it's opera time. listening to rossini's il turco in italia. dramma buffo in two acts. sounds great. maria callas in the house.

scott seward, Saturday, 2 January 2010 00:13 (eleven years ago) link

Woah! I just learned that Charles Wuorinen is composing an opera based on "Brokeback Mountain". The composer's own website confirms that Proulx herself is contributing the libretto.

(the parser is warning me of a BBcode error, but I can't see anything wrong, so clicking "Submit")

Monophonic Spree (Paul in Santa Cruz), Saturday, 2 January 2010 02:53 (eleven years ago) link

no yeah no yeah no what r we typing 4 no no no by no

self-hating unfunny topical reference (Noodle Vague), Saturday, 2 January 2010 03:02 (eleven years ago) link

Been (somewhat grudgingly) admitting to myself lately that Fauré's chamber music (not including solo piano, I can't completely take that stuff yet) is Really Rather Good, e.g. piano quartets.

anatol_merklich, Sunday, 3 January 2010 00:53 (eleven years ago) link

And have dvded a couple of "minor operas" for quiztraining purposes as well, lots of fun! Händel's Tamerlano and Rossini's Comte d'Ory, to name a couple. The DVD of the former (T. Pinnock) has the coolest "subtitling" feature I've ever seen in an opera DVD, transparent overlay of the score at all times!

It's almost like an aural equivalent of those Klee paintings that are just regular grids of colors with varying hues and brightnesses.

Loving this comment abt late Webern.

Also loving thread!

anatol_merklich, Sunday, 3 January 2010 01:34 (eleven years ago) link

Fauré's late chamber music is fucking genius! Seek ye the 2nd violin sonata, the string quartet (one of my favorite pieces ever, period) and the two piano quintets (the quartets are weak in comparison imo). Some of the most magical and pleasantly unpredictable music I know.

Sailor Tuxedo Moon Mask (Daruton), Sunday, 3 January 2010 01:38 (eleven years ago) link

listening to Bruckner's 7th symphony (on naxos) a lot. My first Bruckner. I got the 8th too but it hasn't clicked with me.

abanana, Sunday, 3 January 2010 02:00 (eleven years ago) link

Mozart's String Quartet No. 19, K. 465 (the last of the "Haydn Quartets") is incredible.

timellison, Monday, 4 January 2010 01:07 (eleven years ago) link

I second Daruton's Faure SQ & Piano Quintet reccs. Gorgeous music.

Salvador Dali Parton (Turangalila), Monday, 4 January 2010 01:09 (eleven years ago) link

That arpeggiated intro in the 1st piano quintet is :O

Salvador Dali Parton (Turangalila), Monday, 4 January 2010 01:10 (eleven years ago) link

can anyone give me a yes/no on a Beethoven symphony box with George Szell/Cleveland Symphony? Columbia/RCA pressing I think.

sleeve, Tuesday, 5 January 2010 00:56 (eleven years ago) link

xxxxxpost to Omar Little-- the only classical mag I spend money on every time is Fanfare. It's bi-monthly and very thick. Layout is totally basic and zine-like. It's invaluable for its massive review section, which takes up about 80% of every issue-- the articles at the front are relatively lightweight. But the reviewers are not kept on any leash at all in terms of tone, style or review length, and they range from brilliant to douchebag. You can subscribe to just the online version for a little less than a print subscription, and that includes the online archive of the last 10 years of reviews.

sleeve-- I blow hot and cold on Szell in classical-era music. He can sometimes be too tight-assed whipcrack in Beethoven and Mozart. The further you get into Romantic, late-romantic and early modern stuff, the better Szell's recordings are. He's amazing in Schumann and Strauss and Mahler, for instance. But if the price on that box is not too high then buy it.

SPEAKING OF MAHLER I just listened to a download of a captured radio broadcast of Mahler's 1st with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orch led by their new conductor Manfred Honeck. HOLY SHIT this is a crushingly powerful, shit-hot performance of this piece. Do a little googling for Honeck Mahler R@p1dsh@re and you'll find the DL link for this. It will blow you away. An audiophile Japanese CD is available of the same concert, and the broadcast version was so good I just went on Amazon and spent 30 bucks on that.

Coincidentally, I see Honeck/Pittsburgh will be playing this symphony in NYC soon-- I'll probably have to go.

.gif of the magpie (Jon Lewis), Wednesday, 6 January 2010 00:42 (eleven years ago) link

Listening to the Boulez Conducts Stravinsky box set. I've heard some of these performances before but it really adds to the impact getting all of the Boulez performances together in one box. Wonderful stuff.

frankiemachine, Monday, 11 January 2010 09:29 (eleven years ago) link

It's a box of all his Sony stravinsky or all his DG?

Jams Burke Presents The Day The Universe Chikked (Jon Lewis), Monday, 11 January 2010 16:33 (eleven years ago) link

It's the DG stuff. Amazon UK link here.

http://tinyurl.com/yb8suyn

frankiemachine, Monday, 11 January 2010 17:37 (eleven years ago) link

can anyone give me a yes/no on a Beethoven symphony box with George Szell/Cleveland Symphony? Columbia/RCA pressing I think.

I would go for this btw

Lee Dorrian Gray (J0hn D.), Monday, 11 January 2010 17:43 (eleven years ago) link

I meanwhile am listening to this a lot and it is one of the most remarkable performances and recordings - just unbelievable. I got it blind offa emusic, didn't know anything about it except new Bach concert on Telmarc, sounds cool, turns out Dinnerstein is kind of a from-nowhere superstar about whom some commentators are suspicious because of the backstory that's getting pushed ("she produces her own records!") but seriously what an incredible ear for Bach she has.

Lee Dorrian Gray (J0hn D.), Monday, 11 January 2010 17:48 (eleven years ago) link

Shostakovich Piano Trio No 2 - Beaux Arts Trio. Very beautiful. Bartok String Quartets - Vermeer Quartet. I have to be in the right mood, otherwise they're too intense. I also need a new version because I'm creeped out by the audible breathing on the Vermeer's recording. The music is already eerily unsettling and then you get some guy breathing in your ear.

frankiemachine, Wednesday, 13 January 2010 14:36 (eleven years ago) link

ah! i would hate that.

scott seward, Wednesday, 13 January 2010 14:51 (eleven years ago) link

heh. i find that can sometimes add something to the music...especially on viol music, as that kind of feels like breathing to me anyway. actually a lot of seventeenth century chamber music reminds me of breathing.

henri grenouille (Frogman Henry), Wednesday, 13 January 2010 14:59 (eleven years ago) link

second timellison's love for the mozart 'haydn' quartets. they are truly incredible. dissonance qt ftw possibly.

currently digging: ligeti's piano violin and horn concertos by boulez and ensemble intercontemporain. undoubtedly the best ligeti i've heard so far (i've ha some trouble appreciating elements of the chamber music i've heard so far, packed with interest though it is, and i'm afraid i found the elektronische Komposition's difficult to enjoy).
Beethoven's late piano sonatas by Schnabel....good god. does it get more exciting than this?
Manchicourt's Missa and Motets...I've liked Manichicourt's horn music before so thought I'd try this. Overriding purpleness of texture...

henri grenouille (Frogman Henry), Wednesday, 13 January 2010 15:09 (eleven years ago) link

I've got this MHS label box of Boccherini symphonies. Realized how much I liked it the last time I was listening to it, but just heard Symphony No. 5 on the radio - really great.

timellison, Saturday, 16 January 2010 19:06 (eleven years ago) link

Handel's Op. 3 Concerti Grossi. Five of the six are fairly early pieces from the 1710s. Don't have a recording of the Op. 6 set (written in 1739).

timellison, Tuesday, 26 January 2010 02:57 (eleven years ago) link

Listening to Igumnov's mesmerising recordings of Tchaikovsky's Seasons. YouTube here.

Going to see the Takács quartet play some Beethoven late string quartets tonight, including I think (I hope) the wonderful A Minor (15).

'virgin' should be 'wizard' (GamalielRatsey), Tuesday, 26 January 2010 12:39 (eleven years ago) link

^ ha, i'll be there!

henri grenouille (Frogman Henry), Tuesday, 26 January 2010 12:39 (eleven years ago) link

and yes it is op.132, no 15. other two works are two from the 0p.18 set

henri grenouille (Frogman Henry), Tuesday, 26 January 2010 12:41 (eleven years ago) link

Scelsi, Radulescu, Saariaho, Dumitrescu, James Tenney... and Feldman. always Feldman.

zoom, Tuesday, 26 January 2010 16:58 (eleven years ago) link

Bein' digged currently, by me, a Toru Takemitsu CD, Quotation of Dream.
Compos's from 1985-1993. Deutsche Grammophon. London Sinfonietta, Oliver Knussen. & Paul Crossley, Peter Serkin, pianos.

t**t, Tuesday, 26 January 2010 17:50 (eleven years ago) link

Takács Beethoven was good - although strongly feel that a concert hall is too big for chamber music, also their interpretation seemed a little glib at times I guess, cd've done with a bit more Sturm und Drang for me, tho I'm an ignorant peasant.

Henri, how was it for you?

'virgin' should be 'wizard' (GamalielRatsey), Wednesday, 27 January 2010 12:06 (eleven years ago) link

Quotation of Dream is gamazing. another great one is I Can Hear the Water Dreaming (or something like that)

zoom, Wednesday, 27 January 2010 16:29 (eleven years ago) link

now playing: Messiaen - Petites Liturgies De La Presence Divine

loving it. i'm a fan. onde martenot! love olivier's all caps liner notes too. BIRD SONG HELPED HIM TO RESIST EVIL.

i've been enjoying some kickass Vivaldi lately! again, i'm a fan. i have this album...it's at home. but man does it rule. can't remember now what all is on it. i'll report back.

scott seward, Wednesday, 27 January 2010 23:18 (eleven years ago) link

can i have some classical recommendations? i wanna listen to some, but i have no clue what to listen to

subversive time travel (FACK), Wednesday, 27 January 2010 23:19 (eleven years ago) link

listen to some bach. any old bach. bach was the shit.

scott seward, Wednesday, 27 January 2010 23:41 (eleven years ago) link

listen to bach's cello suites. no, really, any bach. just find some.

scott seward, Wednesday, 27 January 2010 23:42 (eleven years ago) link

xxpost OMG scott Trois Petites... is one of my favorite pieces *ever* :D

Salvador Dali Parton (Turangalila), Wednesday, 27 January 2010 23:45 (eleven years ago) link

I've been digging Mieczysław Weinberg's string quartets and chamber music in general. Hugely overlooked composer tbh.

Salvador Dali Parton (Turangalila), Wednesday, 27 January 2010 23:46 (eleven years ago) link

are any of you Hildegard von Bingen fans?

Salvador Dali Parton (Turangalila), Wednesday, 27 January 2010 23:49 (eleven years ago) link

i dig her. i had a GREAT cd that i found at a thrift store and i was playing it in my store and someone wanted to buy it. so i sold it. but i miss it. hard to find on vinyl.

scott seward, Wednesday, 27 January 2010 23:53 (eleven years ago) link

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=irxG-GCV5Es

Salvador Dali Parton (Turangalila), Thursday, 28 January 2010 02:03 (eleven years ago) link

Can I join in the "Trois Petites Liturgies" group hug? I love how, in Messiaen's world, birdsong is a percussion idiom.

Enoki Doki (Paul in Santa Cruz), Thursday, 28 January 2010 04:04 (eleven years ago) link

Listening to a bootleg of Mieczyslaw Weinberg's recently premiered (!!!) Requiem. I've always found his vocal writing so piercing & shamelessly beautiful. Here's someone who knew how to orchestrate.

Criminally underperformed/recorded, this guy.

Salvador Dali Parton (Turangalila), Sunday, 31 January 2010 21:14 (eleven years ago) link

>"Trois Petites Liturgies"

the fucking BEST

dropped the 6/8 third movement into an uptempo 4/4 dance set once. a few seconds of confusion, but once the chorus kicked in everyone kept dancing

Milton Parker, Sunday, 31 January 2010 21:25 (eleven years ago) link

Martha Argerich|Nelson Freire- "Salzburg" (Brahms, Schubert et al played live with absolute sweetness, synchronization and poise)

Now, Sunday, 31 January 2010 21:29 (eleven years ago) link

xp haha Milton that's amazing, you are my hero

Salvador Dali Parton (Turangalila), Sunday, 31 January 2010 21:30 (eleven years ago) link

Haven't been around lately but have been continuing my traversal of the Sony Stravinsky box set. Loving the Violin Concerto and the Basle Concerto.

Also starting a four-disc set of music by André Jolivet. The second Cello Concerto is really impressive.

vittorio de sickofitall (Daruton), Tuesday, 2 February 2010 18:20 (eleven years ago) link

I've been listening to Jolivet's orchestral Cinq Danses Rituelles a lot lately. Awesome.

Salvador Dali Parton (Turangalila), Tuesday, 2 February 2010 19:12 (eleven years ago) link

André Jolivet : Cinq danses rituelles
directeur d'orchestre:
Jolivet, André
interprète:
Orchestre National de l'ORTF ; Navarra, André

Salvador Dali Parton (Turangalila), Tuesday, 2 February 2010 19:16 (eleven years ago) link

if a renaissance neophyte rly likes the tomas de victoria requiem then where else should they look?

nakhchivan, Wednesday, 3 February 2010 15:30 (eleven years ago) link

Allegri's "Miserere", "Missa Susanne un jour" by Orlande de Lassus, "Spem in Alium" by Thomas Tallis

Salvador Dali Parton (Turangalila), Wednesday, 3 February 2010 16:30 (eleven years ago) link

silvestrov - requiem for larissa

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31XWmTZIVLL._SL500_AA240_.jpg

('_') (omar little), Monday, 8 February 2010 04:29 (eleven years ago) link

Don't think I've seen this thread before (must read later), there is a really good concert on tonight at King's Place (near Kings's cross):

Date: Monday 8 February
Time: 20:00
Venue: Hall Two
Price: £9.50

Part of Out Hear at Kings Place

Curated by ELISION

Peter Veale oboe
Richard Haynes clarinet in B-flat, bass clarinet
Tristram Williams piccolo trumpet, trumpet, flügelhorn
Benjamin Marks alto and tenor trombones
Daryl Buckley electric guitar
Richard Barrett live electronics
Séverine Ballon violoncello

Timothy McCormack disfix (2008)
For clarinets, piccolo trumpet/flugelhorn, trombone

Klaus K Hubler Cercar (1983)
For solo trombone

Liza Lim Invisibility (2009)
For solo violoncello

Richard Barrett Aurora (2010)
For flugelhorn and trombone

Roger Redgate Tehom (2009)
For bass clarinet, violoncello and trombone

Evan Johnson Apostrophe 2 (pressing down on my sternum) (2009)
for quarter-tone flugelhorn and alto tromboner-

James Dillon Crossing Over (1978)
For Bb clarinet

Richard Barrett Codex X1
For oboe, clarinet, trumpet, trombone, electric guitar, cello and live electronics

xyzzzz__, Monday, 8 February 2010 12:44 (eleven years ago) link

just got a huge stack of 70's/80's New World Records vinyl. looking forward to digging in. 20th century americana up the wazoo. gonna start with William Parker (baritone) (with piano and string quartet) doing the vocal works of Ernest Bacon, Robert Evett, Charles Tomlinson Griffes, Lee Hoiby, John Jacob Niles, and Ned Rorem.

scott seward, Monday, 8 February 2010 15:42 (eleven years ago) link

Wish I could go to that Elision concert! *jealous*

Enoki Doki (Paul in Santa Cruz), Monday, 8 February 2010 16:17 (eleven years ago) link

now playing: Frank Lewin - Innocence and Experience (a cycle of songs from poems by william blake)

soprano and chamber ensemble. don't think i've ever heard any Lewin before. or i don't remember hearing any.

(the other side of this record is music for the new family of violins. you know, those violins made by carleen hutchins.)

(oh and i like this blake thing. seems properly blakeian.)

scott seward, Monday, 8 February 2010 20:20 (eleven years ago) link

been constantly playing khachaturian's adgio from gayane (as heard in 2001). so damn beautiful. i could listen to this every hour for the rest of my life

guammls (QE II), Tuesday, 9 February 2010 00:00 (eleven years ago) link

Have kind of burned out on the Stravinsky box set for the time being, so decided to switch it up:

http://g-ecx.images-amazon.com/images/G/01/ciu/10/f3/7f4592c008a0ae53b0cda010.L.jpg

Brilliant music that seems to spring from the symphonic tradition that goes from Beethoven to Sibelius and Nielsen. It's complex, emotional, classicist, and has an inexorable logic overriding all the musical material.

Gesualdo Rivera (Daruton), Friday, 19 February 2010 16:29 (eleven years ago) link

arvo part - Music for Unaccompanied Choir (amazing)

('_') (omar little), Wednesday, 24 February 2010 21:45 (eleven years ago) link

andriessen/california ear unit - zilver

abanana, Wednesday, 24 February 2010 22:07 (eleven years ago) link

Brahms - Violin Concerto (Itzhak Perlman/Barenboim)
Webern - Complete String Trios and Quartets (Arditti String Quartet)

o. nate, Wednesday, 24 February 2010 22:11 (eleven years ago) link

You should all be ashamed of yourselves.

I cannot emphasize this man's greatness enough

Turangalila, Tuesday, 2 March 2010 02:58 (eleven years ago) link

@subversive time travel (FACK) re:can i have some classical recommendations? i wanna listen to some, but i have no clue what to listen to:

classical 101, first weeks listening assignments:

http://www.amazon.com/Pachelbels-Canon-Favorites-Johann-Pachelbel/dp/B0000025TV/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1267516347&sr=1-2
http://www.amazon.com/Lute-Suites-1-Essential-Classics/dp/B000069JK1/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1267516388&sr=1-6
http://www.amazon.com/Mozart-Requiem-Augér-Bartoli-Wiener/dp/B0000041ZS/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1267516502&sr=1-1
http://www.amazon.com/Holst-Planets-Gustav/dp/B0000041S7/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1267516550&sr=1-1
http://www.amazon.com/Puccini-Pavarotti-Harwood-Karajan-Highlights/dp/B0000041TR/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1267516644&sr=1-4

@helpful "dissonant but pleasant" suggestions: thanks, searching now for several of those atm

@everyone: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luigi_Boccherini i've been digging onto a collected works comp a cd or 2 at a time and it's all good; this guy's not especially innovative but his works are v easy on the ears

messiahwannabe, Tuesday, 2 March 2010 08:05 (eleven years ago) link

rock and roll, stick it to the record companies moment circa 1761:

"In 1761 Boccherini went to Madrid, where he was employed by Infante Luis Antonio of Spain, younger brother of King Charles III. There he flourished under royal patronage, until one day when the King expressed his disapproval at a passage in a new trio, and ordered Boccherini to change it. The composer, no doubt irritated with this intrusion into his art, doubled the passage instead, leading to his immediate dismissal"

messiahwannabe, Tuesday, 2 March 2010 08:08 (eleven years ago) link

How is Sibelius' 4th so impossibly beautiful?

Turangalila, Tuesday, 2 March 2010 19:34 (eleven years ago) link

Tonight, I am obsessed with Hans Krasá's "children's opera" 'Brundibar'. It's so lovely.

Turangalila, Tuesday, 9 March 2010 07:26 (eleven years ago) link

Never even heard of the guy, ty! Will investigate.

anatol_merklich, Friday, 12 March 2010 23:12 (eleven years ago) link

Is he 20th century Czech?

Edward Gibbon & Ruskin' Man (Jon Lewis), Friday, 12 March 2010 23:25 (eleven years ago) link

btw one thing I'd really like (that I have no idea whether exists) is a service/rssfeed/infocentral/whatevs that informs on premiere ie first-time recordings of "classical" works.

Of course, I want info on new works properly CD-recorded first and foremost, but also interwar archivism, (1/2/3)-viennese-school revisionism, minor scores showing up in attics, diggings-ups in Renaissance music, or whatever. It is a bit silly, but I loves the importance/triviality stuff that comes with first recordings. :-D

anatol_merklich, Friday, 12 March 2010 23:27 (eleven years ago) link

xpost re: Sibelius' 4th--

Because even though it is obsessively based on tritones and whole tone melodies it isn't all 'ooooh scary kids!' about it? It's like music from a world where tritones and whole tone scales are simply right and natural.

So many moments in the 4th when I just have to stop whatever I'm doing and close my eyes. And what a fucking ending.

Edward Gibbon & Ruskin' Man (Jon Lewis), Friday, 12 March 2010 23:29 (eleven years ago) link

anatol that would be really cool. Fanfare should add a tag to that effect in their online review archive. Maybe I'll write to them suggesting it.

Then again, sometimes it can be so hard for a writer to say for sure something hasn't been recorded before. There were a shit-ton of weird indie classical labels already in the 1950s...

Edward Gibbon & Ruskin' Man (Jon Lewis), Friday, 12 March 2010 23:31 (eleven years ago) link

Good point about not really knowing, but "first on CD" should be close to verifiable, possible and doable. And if someone turns up and says "hey no we actually released this on CD in 1989 you are not first ner ner", then is anyone the worse off? No.

My wishes about this was really about newly-written works; thing is (sorry to drag anyone into my own obsessions) I have deep deep worries abt the academization of the classical ("classical") tradition; new major ("major") works of eg poetry appear in academic press, to be read by academics in exactly same positions at other institutions... I wouldn't like the COUGH COUGH ivory tower model to carry the day or something. Am very conflicted, cannot deny the might of Boulez or Stockhausen or Berio or those guys, but I feel like clearing the air in my head and just sometimes... listen to music without having a 16-ton weight of Tradition or Non-Tradition (aka fucking Ideology) above my head.

Heheh, I've had a few glasses, as you will notice. Want want want info on new stuff.

anatol_merklich, Friday, 12 March 2010 23:55 (eleven years ago) link

New works written in the last decade which do not require 16 ton weight:

Kalevi Aho, last few symphonies on BIS label, especially the most recent disc titled 'Rituals'.

Kajia Saariaho, Graal-Theatre for violin and ensemble (multiple recordings available already)(or anything else by Saariaho!)

Per Norgard, 6th symphony on Danacord label.

These are certainly contemporary composers, with all that implies, BUT you can approach their works purely instinctively.

All of the above are from Scandinavia/the Baltic-- that wasn't on purpose--!

Edward Gibbon & Ruskin' Man (Jon Lewis), Saturday, 13 March 2010 00:14 (eleven years ago) link

does anyone here like milton babbitt's 'transfigured notes'

nakhchivan, Saturday, 13 March 2010 00:19 (eleven years ago) link

Hurrah mr Gibbon Man! Will try. Have pre-softened spot for Saariaho already; Nørgård & Aho I know by name only so far.

anatol_merklich, Saturday, 13 March 2010 00:36 (eleven years ago) link

Is he 20th century Czech?

Jewish origin but yes, lived/died in Prague. The opera was... "written first in 1938 and revised
in the Nazi transit camp Terezín (or Theresienstadt in German),
for children’s choir with ten solo vocal roles and a chamber ensemble of strings, percussion, piano, and guitar." You can hear Akt 1, scene 1here.

Re: Sibelius 4th

Because even though it is obsessively based on tritones and whole tone melodies it isn't all 'ooooh scary kids!' about it? It's like music from a world where tritones and whole tone scales are simply right and natural.

Yesssssssssss. It's so magical.

-

Anyhow, speaking of Terezín, I'm kind of obsessed with Sylvie Bodorova's Terezin Ghetto Requiem for Baritone and String Quartet.

Turangalila, Saturday, 13 March 2010 03:22 (eleven years ago) link

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y5TjPMb9Ovk&feature=related

Turangalila, Saturday, 13 March 2010 07:10 (eleven years ago) link

does anyone here like milton babbitt's 'transfigured notes'
*raises hand*

(but not as much as the solo and chamber pieces, generally)

Facepalm. With a hammer. (Paul in Santa Cruz), Saturday, 13 March 2010 16:16 (eleven years ago) link

it's most unlike anything else of his i know and more obviously alluring than his earlier fundie serialism stuff, some of which makes early stockhausen sound like saint saens

nakhchivan, Saturday, 13 March 2010 16:35 (eleven years ago) link

Maybe. The only commercial recording is so full of wrong notes, it's hard to say for sure...

Facepalm. With a hammer. (Paul in Santa Cruz), Saturday, 13 March 2010 16:36 (eleven years ago) link

they had to find chamber players because orchestral players found it too taxing iirc? can't imagine it will be improved upon any time soon so who knows

any other recommendations within that american serialist sort of vein?

nakhchivan, Saturday, 13 March 2010 16:44 (eleven years ago) link

xfigured notes history: commissioned by the Philadelphia Orchestra, but rejected by them as "unplayable." Gunther Schuller collects a group of freelance string players, schedules 12 rehearsals and two performances, all at his own expense. The recording is pieced together from the best bits of the two live performances. It is possibly the most accurate recording of any orchestral work by Babbitt, although the bar is low. Schuller's liner notes are rather touching actually:

... there was little chance that the resultant performances would be technically letter-perfect... Herewith then, GM Recordings presents the results of [this] "valiant effort", less-than-perfect though they may be. (A little honesty in liner notes is, I think, not a bad idea! Everything can't be "the greatest".) The performance of the Babbitt is, at least, very 'representative' of the work, in mood and character, and in all its polyphonic, rhythmic/metric and structrual splendor. To boot, it has the drama and excitement of a live performance -- coughs and a creaking podium and all.

I should give the piece another chance, hadn't thought about it in years. If the lyrical, subliminally Romantic side of Babbitt appeals to you most, I would also recommend his chamber pieces Groupwise and Consortini.

I've said more here and here (focusing on Carter)

Facepalm. With a hammer. (Paul in Santa Cruz), Saturday, 13 March 2010 17:30 (eleven years ago) link

My how I love low-register reeds!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LYQYT2F_gwY

Facepalm. With a hammer. (Paul in Santa Cruz), Sunday, 14 March 2010 00:21 (eleven years ago) link

I'll look for "Transfigured Notes". "Soli e Duettini" for flute and guitar is an almost surprisingly lyrical Babbitt piece. I also really like "For Brass". A lot of intensity to that.

Sundar, Sunday, 14 March 2010 02:17 (eleven years ago) link

Oh, obviously, "Philomel" is my favourite!

I'm listening to "Transfigured Notes" now though (on Youtube!: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ATtsF8Hr9gU&feature=PlayList&p=73890135EECBD3F1&index=0&playnext=1) and it is almost shocking that this is the same composer.

Sundar, Sunday, 14 March 2010 02:21 (eleven years ago) link

Listened now to David Starobin's performance of "Sheer Pluck", which is kind of exhilarating to a geek like me.

Sundar, Sunday, 14 March 2010 02:59 (eleven years ago) link

man, i kinda overdosed the last couple of weeks on the big stash of New World Records albums that came into the store. all from the 70's and 80's. like, a zillion american composers i'd never heard. i should have taken notes. some stuff was good, but there was a lot of not very memorable stuff.

i'm going ancient this week. waaaaaay ancient.

scott seward, Sunday, 14 March 2010 03:24 (eleven years ago) link

Wish I could go to that Elision concert! *jealous*

― Enoki Doki (Paul in Santa Cruz), Monday, February 8, 2010 Bookmark

There is another one at King's Place tomorrow night - a timely revival.

This is late but I'll say here that last month's was welcome for the Lim and Hubler pieces alone. It was a mixed affair though. The Barrett was exasperating, the more I see combinations for instruments and electronics the more I feel these are incompatible. I Know there is plenty out there that does work. The Evan Johnson was the best of the ones I hadn't heard before.

This Friday there is a lunchtime recital by Ian Pace - Brahms and Lachenmann.

xyzzzz__, Sunday, 14 March 2010 10:12 (eleven years ago) link

scored big at the thrift store today. everything either mint or near mint. been listening all day.

handel - 12 concerti grossi op.6 - english chamber orchestra/raymond leppard (philips)

jan dismas zelenka - lamentationes jeremiae prophetae - ars redivia/milan munclinger (nonesuch)

heinrich schutz - cantiones sacrae vol. 2 - gachinger kantorei/helmuth rilling (mhs)

dietrich buxtehude - four solo cantatas - bach collegium/helmuth rilling (nonesuch)

schubert - symphony no.7 in e major - radio symphonie orchester berlin/gabriel chmura (schwann/musica mundi)

sibelius - the tempest - royal liverpool philharmonic orchestra/sir.charles groves (emi)

telemann - 3 concerti (trumpet/oboe/recorder) - the telemann society/richard schulze (vox)

telemann - suites d'orchestre (don quichotte/l'mperiale/l'espiegle/la bouffonne) - orchestre de chambre de rouen/albert beaucamp (philips)

telemann - three cantatas (der schulmeister/die landlust/von geliebten augen) - collegium aureum (basf/harmonia mundi)

bach/telemann - actus tragicus/trauerkantate - collegium aureum (basf/harmonia mundi)

telemann - musique de table/tafelmusik - austrian tonkuenstler orchestra/dietfried bernet (mhs)

michel corrette - concertos comiques - antiqua musica/jacques roussel (philips)

mouret/lully - ceremonial music from the court of louis XIV (mhs)

jean-baptiste lully - ballet d'alcidiane et polexandre (excerpts) (mhs)

jean-baptiste lully - te deum (mhs)

frottole - works by mantovano, cara, bartolomeo, tromboncino, pesenti, milanese, and fogliano (candide)

william byrd - madrigals, motets, anthems and keyboard music (mhs)

edward elgar - symphony no.2 in e flat (enigma)

carl maria von weber - der freischutz (basf)

handel - violinsonaten (da camera magna)

baroque flute music - roswitha staege (flute) (odeon)

gavinies/leclair - 18th century french violin concertos (philips)

elgar/williams - enigma variations/fantasia (capitol)

jean gilles - gilles requiem (mhs)

bellini, molique, moscheles, reitz - oboe and flute works played by holliger/nicolet (philips)

vivaldi - five concerti (mhs)

vivaldi - four concerti (mhs)

schumann - compete works for piano vol.1 (mhs)

fanfare - philip jones brass ensemble (argo)

beethoven - incidental music to goethe's egmont (mhs)

16th century court and village dances (cbs)

palestrina - masses and motets (odyssey)

joannes ockeghem - requiem (hnh)

hotteterre - musique de joye (amphion)

jean gilles - requiem (westminster)

schutz - musikalische exequien (vanguard)

jean-noel hamal - in exitu israel (mhs)

andre campra - requiem mass (mhs)

monteverdi - vespers of the blessed virgin mary (vanguard)

carl nielsen - saul & david (unicorn)

joachim/godard - concertos (candide)

wilhelm stenhammar - symphony no.1 in f (bis)

josef foerster - symphony no.4 in c minor (nonesuch)

max reger - string trios (basf)

respighi - trittico botticelliano (argo)

marschner - der vampyr (voce)

glinka - you know, stuff by glinka (vox)

novak/suk - string quartets (crossroads)

nielsen - symphony no.5/saga-drom (nonesuch)

ippolitov-ivanov/glazunov - more stuff (mhs)

babbitt/bavicchi - old stuff (cri)

dvorak/vorisek - czech stuff (philips)

heinrich marschner - hans heiling (melodram)

rachmaninoff - symphony no.1 (philips)

scott seward, Monday, 15 March 2010 21:19 (eleven years ago) link

sibelius - the tempest - royal liverpool philharmonic orchestra/sir.charles groves (emi)
I have four or five recordings of this, but not this one. Some of my favorite music by Sibelius, and one of the very last things he wrote. Little swatches of mysterious essence.
schumann - compete works for piano vol.1 (mhs)
Who is this, Jorg Demus? You can find some great performances on these old MHS cheapies.
joannes ockeghem - requiem (hnh)
This should fulfill your 'ancient' agenda. Such strange music. Recommend weed.
monteverdi - vespers of the blessed virgin mary (vanguard)
We were just talking about this on another thread!
nielsen - symphony no.5/saga-drom (nonesuch)
Scott you will love Nielsen's 5th. Unless this is a shitty performance. But even then you'll be able to tell you SHOULD love it.

Chatbot LeFonque (Jon Lewis), Monday, 15 March 2010 21:28 (eleven years ago) link

"wilhelm stenhammar - symphony no.1 in f (bis)"

this is wonderful! never even heard of him.

scott seward, Monday, 15 March 2010 21:43 (eleven years ago) link

Stenhammar had one of the best composer names, that's for sure. I've always feared that if I listened to him he wouldn't live up to that name.

Chatbot LeFonque (Jon Lewis), Monday, 15 March 2010 22:14 (eleven years ago) link

Such strange music. Recommend weed.

haha OTM

Turangalila, Monday, 15 March 2010 22:15 (eleven years ago) link

Let us know what the Reger string trios are like, Scott, when you get a chance to listen.

Olivier Messiaen Control (Paul in Santa Cruz), Tuesday, 16 March 2010 04:04 (eleven years ago) link

haha awesome nick, P

Turangalila, Tuesday, 16 March 2010 04:10 (eleven years ago) link

:-)

Olivier Messiaen Control (Paul in Santa Cruz), Tuesday, 16 March 2010 04:12 (eleven years ago) link

was listening to the short german opera der freischutz - the marksman - and enjoying the overture a lot. i know nothing of carl maria von weber and it makes me think i should look out for some of his orchestral work. there can't be much as it seems he died at the age of 40 (1786-1826). anyway, if you are looking for something REALLY german, this might be for you. break out the schnapps.

scott seward, Tuesday, 16 March 2010 12:19 (eleven years ago) link

"Such strange music. Recommend weed."

i have some records of ancient spanish music that are truly stonerific. i'll have to dig around for titles. hypnotic vocal stuff that 4AD should have reissued when they were at their mock-baroque height.

scott seward, Tuesday, 16 March 2010 12:22 (eleven years ago) link

oh man this french candide pressing of a joachim violin concerto sounds amazing. it would make an analog lover out of anyone. maybe even geir since it is the concerto "a la hongroise". aaron rosand on violin.

scott seward, Tuesday, 16 March 2010 12:56 (eleven years ago) link

Weber didn't do much substantial orchestral stuff outside of his operas. The overtures from his operas stand on their own pretty well though (Freischutz overture = awesome, Oberon and Euryanthe ones also great, can't remember the others). Maybe look out for a Weber Overtures collection. I should do the same!

As a point of trivia, Der Freischutz and Tom Waits- The Black Rider are derived from the same source material.

Also Liszt made a solo piano fantasy out of Der Freischutz which is super fun.

Chatbot LeFonque (Jon Lewis), Tuesday, 16 March 2010 15:04 (eleven years ago) link

it's a nice day and i have my door open and i'm blasting the mozarabic antiphonary of silos onto main street. nothing says hip happening record store like 7th century spanish monk music!

scott seward, Tuesday, 16 March 2010 17:04 (eleven years ago) link

Tell them its the new Om record.

Chatbot LeFonque (Jon Lewis), Tuesday, 16 March 2010 17:10 (eleven years ago) link

sometimes its all in the pickin'. put on american string quartet doing dvorak string quartets and...blehhhh. just sounded bleh. by the book bleh.

so now i'm playing lenny bernstein doing ives symphony no.2 instead. so not bleh.

scott seward, Tuesday, 16 March 2010 21:38 (eleven years ago) link

I've been listening a lot to Janacek's The Cunning Little Vixen to familiarise myself with it before going to see it in a couple of weeks. Rather slight and quirky but very beautiful in places. Lots of other stuff but the piece that's made the biggest impact has been Berg's Violin Concerto, which I know well from listening repeatedly a few years back but hadn't heard for ages. I caught myself wondering if it isn't the most beautiful modernist work in any genre. Not a very meaningful question, and if push came to shove I'd probably still rate it below a few Stravinsky pieces at least, but it really is astonishingly lovely.

frankiemachine, Monday, 22 March 2010 12:41 (eleven years ago) link

One of the best things about 'modernist' music is that all your ideas of beauty tend to fall apart until you don't know what's beautiful (or not) anymore...so a Beethoven piece could much uglier than certain pieces by Webern.

xyzzzz__, Tuesday, 23 March 2010 10:40 (eleven years ago) link

The 8th Volume of Bridge Records' Music of Elliott Carter is pretty spectacular -- 2 CDs featuring music written since 2002, when the composer turned 94 years old. Several major works (a compact Horn Concerto, a Clarinet Quintet, an Ezra Pound setting, cycles on poems of Ashbery and Zukofsky), several charming shorter works for soloists or small groups, and two remarkable, coloristic orchestral works (Sound Fields for strings, Wind Rose for winds) that, in their stillness and single-mindedness, are like nothing else he's ever written. Highly recommended.

Olivier Messiaen Control (Paul in Santa Cruz), Wednesday, 24 March 2010 23:37 (eleven years ago) link

"One of the best things about 'modernist' music is that all your ideas of beauty tend to fall apart until you don't know what's beautiful (or not) anymore...so a Beethoven piece could much uglier than certain pieces by Webern."

I don't really know any Webern but I wouldn't need to like him much to prefer him to Beethoven, at least the orchestral Beethoven. I have a blind (deaf?) spot with Beethoven's orchestral music. I go to concerts with Beethoven on the programme and arrive/leave at the interval so I don't have to sit through the bloody Seventh symphony or whatever again. The only other piece of music I feel like this about is Sibelius's Violin Concerto, but I like Sibelius's symphonies a lot so that's quite different.

I can't explain this. I dislike stuff that sounds heavily Beethovianto me as well (esp Brahms). It might have to do with over exposure when young, but other stuff I heard a lot of when younger
(Mozart, Tchaikovsky, Mahler) I can still enjoy in the right frame of mind.

frankiemachine, Saturday, 27 March 2010 18:19 (eleven years ago) link

i think beethoven is a poor choice as a signifier for 'stereotypically beuatiful classical music' because most of his music does sound 'ugly', certainly ungainly and awkward and often grotesque and i think he meant for it to be that way. a better composer to use for that kind of comparison would be, idk, richard strauss, puccini, elgar, rachmaninov. perhaps you could go further back to mendelssohn and schubert.

henri grenouille (Frogman Henry), Saturday, 27 March 2010 18:37 (eleven years ago) link

I suspect my problems with Beethoven have to do with his appropriation of sonata form as a vehicle for something intended to represent or at least be an analogue for serious thought. Music as philosophy. Of course some of that is already there in Mozart or Haydn, but there's always enough lightness to counter any sense that the music is taking itself too seriously. In Beethoven the result too often sounds to me tediously sententious or religiose, and a somehow predictable orchestral palette doesn't help: his influence then becomes pervasive though the Germanic tradition, argumentative structures that I personally find claustrophobic and alienating, and doesn't start to break down until Wagner.

I appreciate that in purely musical terms much of what he was doing was incredibly imaginative, brave and new and that he was a genius by any fair definition of the term. You have to admire that, but it doesn't seem to be enough to make most of his music a pleasurable listen for me.

frankiemachine, Sunday, 28 March 2010 14:46 (eleven years ago) link

not even the string quartets? are pleasurable? to you? ever? wait, did you say you you don't like brahms? :(

scott seward, Sunday, 28 March 2010 18:49 (eleven years ago) link

Thank you for reminding me to listen to Brahms' first symphony. Alto Rhapsody for hangover, first symphony for bein slightly pissed. That 'I send you a thousand greetings!' bit early in the fourth movement gives you a useful surge that stops you sinking into gloomy lethargy. Sure this is why Brahms composed it.

porn mirth pig (GamalielRatsey), Sunday, 28 March 2010 18:55 (eleven years ago) link

I'm not sure about the string quartets. My listening history is a bit untypical because I heard a lot of predominantly very mainstream classical music as a youngster, then for many years listened to it hardly at all, then 3 or 4 years ago started to re-immerse myself in it by which time predictably enough my taste had changed quite a lot. I found I was bored by Beethoven despite liking him a lot when younger. I'm not being a "critic" - Beethoven's reputation isn't going to be affected by my idiosyncratic taste - just trying to make sense of a personal response.

A couple of years ago I went to a Wigmore Hall concert where the programme included a quartet each by Shostakovich and Prokofiev (the attractions for me) and one of Beethoven's late ones. I was very unexpectedly blown away by the Beethoven. That's the main reason I say that it's his orchestral music I don't get along with. There seems to be a glimmer of something to follow up with the SQs but I've never gotten round to it, just on the basis you can't listen to everything.

I've never much liked Brahms. I've heard well played/conducted live performances of the 3rd symphony and 1st piano concerto in the past year or so without having my prejudices in any way dented. To me it sounds like Beethoven with extra romantic stodge. For personal history reasons I do quite like the Double Concerto.

frankiemachine, Monday, 29 March 2010 14:19 (eleven years ago) link

"think beethoven is a poor choice as a signifier for 'stereotypically beuatiful classical music' because most of his music does sound 'ugly', certainly ungainly and awkward and often grotesque"

Yes you're right...Beethoven and Bach are probably held as quite beautiful by people though...maybe I was thinking of a Geir-esque listener when I said it.

I saw a performance of Brahms alongside Helmut Lachenmann a couple of weeks ago (both piano works) - the connection didn't quite strike me but I'll be listening on.

xyzzzz__, Monday, 29 March 2010 15:33 (eleven years ago) link

Man, I do not agree that Strauss works any better as a signifier for 'stereotypically pretty classical music'.

Sundar, Monday, 29 March 2010 15:46 (eleven years ago) link

Hahaha OTM unless we're talking about Der Rosenkavalier or something-- but even that is so gnarly that 'ah beauty' can hardly be the takeaway.

Frankiemachine, I commend you as the first non-fan of LvB I have encountered who does not turn it into an aggressive and challops-y stance. In fact your articulation of your unenthusiasm is v interesting to me.

I agree that LvB was not about any kind of common ideal of beauty. His music is so often redolent of contradictions, struggle, surprise, and sardonic humor that the scenes of straight-up beauty feel like just another part of the grammar. Eventually he comes to a kind of uncontextualizable beauty which is unlike any foregoing concept of beauty and seems to have been stolen from the sky somewhere (the last 3 piano sonatas, the lyrical episode in the latter part of the Diabelli Variations, the late quartets). I agree that his symphonies inspire much less awe than the sonatas and chamber music-- I love his symphonies and concertos deeply but they do spring far more from the conventions of the time.

I find it endlessly fascinating the diverse ways the generation after him came to grips with the Beethoven Problem (basically 'what the fuck to do next?). Schumann's solution is the most interesting and exciting to me in that it is at once the most subversive and reverent. I'm talking here about what Schumann is up to in his solo piano music and lieder, not his symphonies (which are v addictive and quirky but not ahem Great Works).

Re: Brahms, I have felt for a long time that the heart of what we was about is in the chamber music.

Bonnie Prince Stabby (Jon Lewis), Monday, 29 March 2010 16:08 (eleven years ago) link

Re: Brahms, I have felt for a long time that the heart of what he was about is in the chamber music.

My sentiments exactly.

Olivier Messiaen Control (Paul in Santa Cruz), Monday, 29 March 2010 16:24 (eleven years ago) link

as a kid, one of the first things i ever fell in love with was brahms 4th symphony. its a warhorse, a chestnut, and beloved by old ladies, but i still love hearing it. its as catchy as pop music and i got no problem with the whole beauty thing. brahms did beauty up right! but one thing that i've learned is he was not one thing and one thing only. he still surprises me. i love the chamber stuff too. and the piano pieces. man, there is much richness and goodness there.

scott seward, Monday, 29 March 2010 16:34 (eleven years ago) link

There's a particular review writer for Fanfare who has insisted repeatedly and at length that the 4th is a march to death, a depiction of utter annihilation and disaster. I haven't heard this in it myself, but I haven't spent that much time with the 4th-- still preoccupied with the 1st with its proto-mahlerian feel in the first movement...

Bonnie Prince Stabby (Jon Lewis), Monday, 29 March 2010 16:56 (eleven years ago) link

i was hooked on the double concerto for awhile. kept playing it for weeks.

hey, now i'm playing vivaldi concertos. maybe i am an old lady...

scott seward, Monday, 29 March 2010 17:03 (eleven years ago) link

Right this moment, I'm listening to some contemporary Serbian music linked to from Kyle Gann's blog and I am enjoying it enough to want to point it out (I'm on the first file linked to from this post): http://www.artsjournal.com/postclassic/2010/04/every_29_years_saturn.html

That photo of Gann and the Serbian composers at dinner together makes me want to be civilized (if it's not too late).

_Rudipherous_, Saturday, 3 April 2010 09:17 (eleven years ago) link

Messiaen's ‘Louange à l’Éternité de Jésus’ from Quatuor pour la fin du temps arranged for choir ensemble (!!!!)

performed & arranged by Hans-Christoph Rademann & Dresdner Kammerchor

Turangalila, Saturday, 3 April 2010 10:41 (eleven years ago) link

Must give that one a listen later.

Really enjoying In Moto Propio for Woodwinds and what sounds like a bunch of processed cat-squealing vocals: a powerful and at the same time humorous contrast.

Picked up his Orchestra ages back. Will give it a listen later.

xyzzzz__, Saturday, 3 April 2010 18:20 (eleven years ago) link

that's rly good xp

nakhchivan, Saturday, 3 April 2010 19:20 (eleven years ago) link

two weeks pass...

http://www.sequenza21.com/Turabgalila_Symph.jpg

:O

Turangalila, Monday, 19 April 2010 10:25 (eleven years ago) link

Since the above Beethoven discussion I've been to the Wigmore Hall to hear the Auryn Quartet play Beethoven SQs 7 and 15. I loved these especially 15 (although I had the advantage of recognising most of it from some forgotten past listening, while I only knew the opening theme from the 7th). Definitely something to follow up. It seemed to confirm it's only Beethoven's orchestral music I find tedious, although presumably the structural principles are fairly closely linked. I've never played classical music but I used to play in a jazz quartet (drums/bass/piano/sax) and although SQ playing is obviously massively different there are some similarities in the way the players interact that makes SQ playing easier for me to identify with than orchestral. I thought the Auryn's were superb, authoritative, elegant, precise, clear - but I'm no great connoisseur - I noticed that the following night's performance (more Beethoven) was lukewarmly reviewed in The Times.

I've been listening a lot to the Shostakovich Cello Concertos, Britten's Death in Venice, Strauss's Don Quixote, various other stuff. The Shostakovich I know well, the others are new to me.

frankiemachine, Monday, 19 April 2010 11:51 (eleven years ago) link

La création du monde, Op. 81a by Darius Milhaud

Beautiful.

Turangalila, Monday, 19 April 2010 13:01 (eleven years ago) link

That performance of Turangalila I have, but have not yet given it due attention. However, Antoni Wit and the PNRSO are a hidden treasure-- their series of complete Lutoslawski orchestral works on Naxos is one of the best things that label has ever done.

I Smell Xasthur Williams (Jon Lewis), Monday, 19 April 2010 15:16 (eleven years ago) link

Yes!

I strongly urge you to listen to this version of Turangalila which imo is, if not the best, way up there. I think I prefer this over the Myung-Whun Chung version!

Turangalila, Monday, 19 April 2010 15:22 (eleven years ago) link

I've been listening mainly to more "standard" material as my CD collection has been 1000+ miles away from Chicago in Florida -- though not for long, I'm now in Florida and about to drive back with a jeepful of my crap, mostly books and CDs.

Right now on the listening agenda:

Brahms/Beethoven - Violin Concertos
Mendelssohn - Symphony No. 4
Prokofiev - Alexander Nevsky/Scythian Suite
Janáček - Katya Kabanova
Mussorgsky - Sunless/The Nursery/Songs and Dances of Death
Beethoven - Op. 2 Piano Sonatas

Gesualdo Rivera (Daruton), Monday, 19 April 2010 20:52 (eleven years ago) link

Love LvB Op. 2. He was already fucking incredible.

I Smell Xasthur Williams (Jon Lewis), Monday, 19 April 2010 20:56 (eleven years ago) link

LOL @ your nickname

Is this a reference to Xasthur going 'lite' aka John Williamsy? lol

Turangalila, Monday, 19 April 2010 21:30 (eleven years ago) link

Naw, it's a reference to Mark 'My Cousin My Gastroenterologist' Leyner's first novel, 'I Smell Esther Williams'. But I like your parsing of it.

I Smell Xasthur Williams (Jon Lewis), Monday, 19 April 2010 21:32 (eleven years ago) link

trying to investigate grieg's piano music having been reminded of his folksy genius on this recital by thomas ades

http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2000/dec00/ades.htm

there's quite a lot of it

nakhchivan, Tuesday, 20 April 2010 16:04 (eleven years ago) link

There is indeed a lot of piano music by Grieg. Uneven stuff, but the best of it is great. In addition to Ades' picks, I recommend the Op. 54 set, which includes the well-known Notturno and the extraordinary Glockengeläute.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=24shW29Hv_A
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CtSbLHjW_8o

Olivier Messiaen Control (Paul in Santa Cruz), Tuesday, 20 April 2010 16:26 (eleven years ago) link

For starters, I would recommend the Lyric Pieces from Op. 43 and 54 (I think i'm remembering those numbers correctly) and the Slatter Op. 72. Leif Ove Andsnes is excellent in this rep. Or, there's a huge complete series played by Eva Knardahl on the BIS label. The individual volumes are cheap on amazon mp3, and Knardahl is even better than Andsnes.

I Smell Xasthur Williams (Jon Lewis), Tuesday, 20 April 2010 16:27 (eleven years ago) link

Anybody got a recommendation for a recording of Shostakovich's Symphony No. 10?

Born In A Test Tube, Raised In A Cage (unperson), Tuesday, 20 April 2010 16:33 (eleven years ago) link

My two favorites: Mravinsky/Leningrad SO on the Erato label. I think Erato may have been folded into Warner but this is still easy to find. Paavo Berglund/Bournemouth SO on EMI.

I'm willing to bet Mark Wigglesworth on BIS is also excellent.

I Smell Xasthur Williams (Jon Lewis), Tuesday, 20 April 2010 16:36 (eleven years ago) link

If you're thinking of the Shostakovich 10 and don't already have most of the symphonies it may be worth bearing in mind that there are some very decent complete cycles out there for around the price of a couple of standard price cds.

frankiemachine, Wednesday, 21 April 2010 11:57 (eleven years ago) link

thanks for the grieg recommendations

karajan's shostakovich #10 is good iirc, nice lugubrious string sounds.....

nakhchivan, Wednesday, 21 April 2010 19:18 (eleven years ago) link

Yeah Karajan is good too. Plenty of tension. IIRC you want the 'Karajan Gold' edition (he recorded it twice).

I Smell Xasthur Williams (Jon Lewis), Wednesday, 21 April 2010 19:28 (eleven years ago) link

Jean-Efflam Bavouzet's recordings of Debussy's préludes & 'Estampes' sounding so magical today.

Also, Alla Pavlova's Symphony No. 3 is a thing of beauty.

Turangalila, Sunday, 25 April 2010 00:11 (eleven years ago) link

LOL couldn't disagree more with this review

The Symphony no.3, composed six years later, might have been by a different composer. It's written in a kind of pastiche nineteenth-century style, complete with faux-Spanish exotic syncopations, melody and harmony (falling tetrachords, augmented seconds). Some traces remain of the earlier technique - for example, both symphonies feature passacaglia, but where no.1 uses it subtly and sparingly, allowing it to hover latent in the background, no.3 does it to death.

Turangalila, Sunday, 25 April 2010 00:16 (eleven years ago) link

Though I do agree that Symphony No. 1 is amazing.

Turangalila, Sunday, 25 April 2010 01:32 (eleven years ago) link

three weeks pass...

Gmeeoorh for organ by Xenakis is sensational

silence is a rhythm too (Turangalila), Sunday, 16 May 2010 01:59 (eleven years ago) link

Some really powerful and surprising music there. Thanks! I always found Xenakis' acoustic music more appealing than his electronic music. Do you know who the organist is?

On a softer note, today I was really enjoying "Sunday Song Set" performed by David Starobin (guitar) and Patrick Mason (baritone). It's an arrangement (by Michael Starobin) of selections from Sondheim's Sunday in the Park with George. (I haven't seen the musical.) Energetic, striking, and attractive with great intricate guitaristic orchestration and dazzling playing.

Sundar, Sunday, 16 May 2010 02:50 (eleven years ago) link

Christoph Maria Moosmann, sir.

silence is a rhythm too (Turangalila), Sunday, 16 May 2010 02:58 (eleven years ago) link

Thanks!

Sundar, Sunday, 16 May 2010 03:03 (eleven years ago) link

That organ piece made me want to put on "Metastasis" - the first Xenakis I ever heard, actually. The guy could get seriously intense.

(Also, I see now that the organist's name is on the linked page. Sorry about that.)

Sundar, Sunday, 16 May 2010 03:30 (eleven years ago) link

It's ok. Are you familiar with Jonchaies?

silence is a rhythm too (Turangalila), Sunday, 16 May 2010 03:31 (eleven years ago) link

For 109 (!) musicians. The strings are so amazing.

silence is a rhythm too (Turangalila), Sunday, 16 May 2010 03:36 (eleven years ago) link

The best moments in his music are where there's just gigantic blocks of sound and you can't really tell what's going on internally.

silence is a rhythm too (Turangalila), Sunday, 16 May 2010 03:39 (eleven years ago) link

No. I'll look for that one. Agreed re blocks of sound. "Xas" was important to me too.

Sundar, Sunday, 16 May 2010 03:41 (eleven years ago) link

Turanga, that's amazing! Is that from Mode Records' Xenakis series?

Felix Frankfurter, Man Of Justice (Jon Lewis), Monday, 17 May 2010 16:53 (eleven years ago) link

Glad you liked! That 'Jonchaies' is from this release, conducted by Arturo Tamayo. Probably my favorite recording I've heard of that piece so far.

silence is a rhythm too (Turangalila), Monday, 17 May 2010 21:43 (eleven years ago) link

Lately I have been obsessed with Håkon Austbø's recording of Janáček's 'In the mists' - <3

I like the Firkusny recordings all right but this is on another level imo.

silence is a rhythm too (Turangalila), Monday, 17 May 2010 23:07 (eleven years ago) link

I'm listening to Andrew Staniland tonight. Nice stuff.

Sundar, Tuesday, 18 May 2010 00:38 (eleven years ago) link

Austbo is a very talented dude and has recorded even more rep than most ppl know (he has stuff only on Scandinavian labels like a complete Debussy series)

Is In The Mists the set that includes 'The Barn Owl Has Not Flown Away!'?

Felix Frankfurter, Man Of Justice (Jon Lewis), Tuesday, 18 May 2010 02:01 (eleven years ago) link

No, that would be 'On An Overgrown Path' which is also beautiful.

Austbø's 'Vingt regards' is actually my favorite btw.

silence is a rhythm too (Turangalila), Tuesday, 18 May 2010 02:04 (eleven years ago) link

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/517D6SRSg7L.jpg

nakhchivan, Friday, 21 May 2010 17:26 (eleven years ago) link

never heard this but i like the cover

nakhchivan, Friday, 21 May 2010 17:26 (eleven years ago) link

Slight resemblance to trolololo guy!

(mash-up idea?)

Is it far? Is it far? Is it far? (Jon Lewis), Friday, 21 May 2010 17:29 (eleven years ago) link

alfie schnittke feat eduard khil, 'a soviet artist's response to just criticsm: the musical'

nakhchivan, Friday, 21 May 2010 17:32 (eleven years ago) link

i'm not sure how it wd work tbh

nakhchivan, Friday, 21 May 2010 17:40 (eleven years ago) link

Use trolololo tune the same way Schnittke uses 19th century pastoral tune in last movement of that piano quintet. 'I am so happy to be going back to limbo'

Is it far? Is it far? Is it far? (Jon Lewis), Friday, 21 May 2010 17:41 (eleven years ago) link

Schnittke and son:

http://img3.photographersdirect.com/img/262/wm/pd649560.jpg

y kant immanuel rite (Daruton), Friday, 21 May 2010 17:43 (eleven years ago) link

haha why am I not surprised that the kid's all gothy?

silence is a rhythm too (Turangalila), Saturday, 22 May 2010 17:05 (eleven years ago) link

i have a weakness for janacek's piano music.

henri grenouille (Frogman Henry), Saturday, 22 May 2010 17:12 (eleven years ago) link

That's because it's gorgeous. :)

silence is a rhythm too (Turangalila), Saturday, 22 May 2010 18:29 (eleven years ago) link

three weeks pass...

Bought the Brilliant Classics boxed set of Alfred Brendel's early recordings some months ago. Been listening to his Mozart Piano Concerto No. 22: very impressive.

Webern conducts Berg (Call the Cops), Monday, 14 June 2010 18:45 (eleven years ago) link

WcB, is that a box of his Vanguard recordings or his Vox recordings?

I'm not that well versed in his Vanguard period but his first cycle of Beethoven sonatas on Vox is dynamite. There are a few sonatas in there which he didn't surpass in his later cycles (I'm thinking in particular of the Waldstein, Les Adieux and Hammerklavier).

I'm a huge fan of Brendel and have spent time on the classical newsgroup defending his ass. Ppl who are are highly wedded to the notion that great pianism = a 'singing tone' often abhor Brendel with a passion.

Loathsome Dov (Jon Lewis), Wednesday, 16 June 2010 15:39 (eleven years ago) link

Actually, as I understand it, the box contains both his Vanguard and Vox recordings. His entire first Beethoven cycle is in there, anyway - haven't gotten to it yet (besides a couple of runs through the Hammerklavier) but definitely looking forward...

Webern conducts Berg (Call the Cops), Friday, 18 June 2010 05:34 (eleven years ago) link

two weeks pass...

Listening lately:

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51Vr%2BhdiwXL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

Very good post-70s-thaw Babbitt (both pieces are from the 80s). It'd be wrong to say that Babbitt has ever "mellowed out" but relatively speaking (compared to the pieces from the 50s and 60s) that's how it seems. There's more lingering over chord associations and attention paid to homophonic texture than the spiky counterpoint of the earlier pieces. The PC has a wonderfully dramatic scope and some winks at tonality (at one section the soloist and orchestra play tutti an almost Beethovenian chord) and beautiful orchestral textures (B. really is a great orchestrator), and The Head of the Bed has a great dreamlike clarity of textual image and instrumental interplay.

The Bitter Tears of Petula Clark (corey), Saturday, 3 July 2010 17:35 (eleven years ago) link

Chamber Music Albuquerque took out an ad a year or two back with the caption: "You go with him to the ball game. He should go with you to chamber music." I thought that was pretty awful on at least two levels: (1) the idea of making it into some guilt-trip chore (2) the kind of weird gender assumptions (are younger females--and it's a young female portrayed in the photo--really more interested in chamber music than young men?). And maybe she goes with him to the baseball game because she likes it. Is it fair to expect him to do something he doesn't like in return?

_Rudipherous_, Monday, 5 July 2010 22:54 (eleven years ago) link

Women only listen to music for illicit reasons in my experience.

Ciudad Warez (corey), Monday, 5 July 2010 22:58 (eleven years ago) link

jk

Ciudad Warez (corey), Monday, 5 July 2010 22:58 (eleven years ago) link

Listening to the Tzadik disc with Wuorinen's Time's Encomium, New York Notes, etc — my first listen to this composer. Very impressive.

Ciudad Warez (corey), Tuesday, 6 July 2010 02:14 (eleven years ago) link

Yeah that disc, esp New York notes is great iirc

xyzzzz__, Wednesday, 7 July 2010 21:29 (eleven years ago) link

two weeks pass...
two weeks pass...

This is what I am currently digging:

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51GOTbbxFSL._SS500_.jpg

Have so far listened to the first disc with Syms. 1 and 6. The 1st I know pretty well but this is a nice, rather slowly-paced take — the 6th is new to me, but what a great slab of concrete and steel this symphony is! Apparently it was written at the height of the Soviet crackdown on artists, and he got into deep shit. The crushingly loud and dissonant chord at the end of the final movement is an awesome (in the original sense) moment.

I am about to be digging this:

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41HR4ZMH59L._SL500_AA300_.jpg

Janet Privacy Control (corey), Sunday, 8 August 2010 00:43 (eleven years ago) link

i am currently digging:

the aeolian quartet playing haydn

the emerson quartet playing webern

j., Sunday, 8 August 2010 00:51 (eleven years ago) link

currently:

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41BE3JD2VFL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

beautiful. essentially the precise sort of classical music i enjoy.

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41nhIGhw4UL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

a particularly moving work, i think. even the title is moving in its directness!

('_') (omar little), Saturday, 21 August 2010 22:13 (eleven years ago) link

Do love the Lamentations of Jeremiah. Remember a particularly intense moment listening to the Ierusalem section while walking through London, thinking about its frequent mystical reconfigurations as the New Jerusalem.

At the moment really enjoying John Ireland's 'London Pieces' for the piano. Two of them anyway - Chelsea Reach, appropriately Londonish (a bit like French impressionism crossed with music hall) and very attractively melancholy, and Month's Mind. The other two, particularly Ragamuffin, I find slightly mawkish, but that's a risk you run with John Ireland.

Spotify link here.

Hide the prickforks (GamalielRatsey), Sunday, 22 August 2010 12:00 (eleven years ago) link

lauridsen - lux aeterna

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nhfrG_AsbxQ

('_') (omar little), Thursday, 26 August 2010 14:15 (eleven years ago) link

I've been listening to the DG disc of Arvo Pärt's Fratres, Tabula Rasa and the 3rd Sym but I'm finding it a little dull. Does his music warrant exploring more?

mein voight-kampff (corey), Friday, 27 August 2010 12:38 (eleven years ago) link

http://images.emusic.com/music/images/album/279/111/560/11156011/300x300.jpg

Love the Schnittke - my first discovery of him.

Ground Zero Mostel (Hurting 2), Friday, 27 August 2010 14:53 (eleven years ago) link

I've been listening to the DG disc of Arvo Pärt's Fratres, Tabula Rasa and the 3rd Sym but I'm finding it a little dull. Does his music warrant exploring more?

I don't have that one but I do have the ECM disc of Fratres and Tabula Rasa and I have to say it's my favourite of all Part's works that I've heard.

margana (anagram), Friday, 27 August 2010 14:58 (eleven years ago) link

Oh okay. I dunno, it's probably the music and not so much the performance. However, I'm listening to this right now and it's hitting the sweet spot:

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41s6xTR7WAL._SS500_.jpg

Also listening to this week:

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61iAA2BtVEL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

glutinous maximus (corey), Monday, 30 August 2010 14:55 (eleven years ago) link

The gamelan-like fugal passage after the initial stabs in Jonchaies is some of the most gorgeous music I've heard, srsly.

glutinous maximus (corey), Monday, 30 August 2010 14:57 (eleven years ago) link

it seems like you would maybe prefer part's choral works. i would suggest checking out de profundis w/the theater of voices and berliner messe/magnificat/summa w/the elora festival orchestra.

('_') (omar little), Tuesday, 31 August 2010 16:06 (eleven years ago) link

Cool, will do, thanks.

I'm also investigating his early work that predates the tonal stuff. I have a feeling it might give me a better understanding of how he arrived at (what I assume to be) his mature style. For me it seems a bit inscrutable and I feel like there must be something "there" underneath the glassy surface.

Lardo Calrissian (corey), Tuesday, 31 August 2010 16:11 (eleven years ago) link

dear london-based currently digging classical dudes: the Rodolfus Choir are doing a concert of polyphonic music at St Dunstan's-in-the-West on Thursday and it sounds amazing. tbh I would go for Spem in Alium alone but there's Pärt and Tavener and Palestrina as well! pretty pumped tbh.

czyczyczyczy comparative (c sharp major), Tuesday, 31 August 2010 22:19 (eleven years ago) link

I'd go but I'd fall asleep (due to tiredness, not through breaching any boredom threshold by attending, that is)

xyzzzz__, Wednesday, 1 September 2010 18:22 (eleven years ago) link

oh shit I would be ALL OVER that concert

the Allegri piece alone is worth it

feel free to answer my Korn Kuestion (HI DERE), Wednesday, 1 September 2010 18:23 (eleven years ago) link

Yep, I'm seriously thinking of going if there are any tickets left. Might have to work late tomorrow tho so I'm having to hold off for the mo.

GamalielRatsey, Wednesday, 1 September 2010 18:27 (eleven years ago) link

I've sung the Tallis, Allegri and Lauridsen pieces (I've been the baritone in the quartet for the Allegri quartet every time I've done it ^_^)

feel free to answer my Korn Kuestion (HI DERE), Wednesday, 1 September 2010 19:18 (eleven years ago) link

Today I am listening to this disc of music by Tristan Murail:

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51nfU2OBp4L._SS500_.jpg

So far my favorite is "Attracteurs étranges" for solo cello. Incredibly colorful.

I guess you might say it was a "duck blur"! (corey), Sunday, 12 September 2010 15:19 (eleven years ago) link

Not new to me, but I just want to bring this to everyone's attention because I was just listening to it:

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51bBAviOEvL._SS500_.jpg

The short (6 minute) piece "Interlude" is just a gem — an extremely atmospheric weave of hazy consonance like the "Farben" movement from Schoenberg's 5 Pieces for Orch. Chain II and Partita are both unabashedly virtuosic, the harmony Funeral Music (might be his most famous piece) is amazingly dense and contrapuntally complex, and the 4th symphony (his masterpiece imo) is wonderfully dark and tightly argued. This is a top ten disc for me.

I guess you might say it was a "duck blur"! (corey), Monday, 13 September 2010 01:23 (eleven years ago) link

Continuing my trip through the Xenakis orch. works — about to give this a first listen:

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61Fmfbqw0EL._SS500_.jpg

Set the Controls for the Heart of the Baby Head Sun (corey), Tuesday, 14 September 2010 22:49 (eleven years ago) link

xenakis' shaar is great

i don't think i've heard any of those

need to revisit the orch clasics like metastasis/pithoprakta (sp?)

Chinedu "Edu" Obasi Ogbuke (nakhchivan), Tuesday, 14 September 2010 22:55 (eleven years ago) link

Shaar is great. Jonchaies is still probably my favorite piece by him — just an elemental power. So far on first listening Synaphaï is the standout piece. Kyania is kind of boring and rhythmically square, like some of late Xenakis I've heard.

Set the Controls for the Heart of the Baby Head Sun (corey), Wednesday, 15 September 2010 02:31 (eleven years ago) link

So beautiful. I've listened to this disc close to a dozen times and yet for some reason still have not explored his other organ works. There are just so many of them, I don't know where to start — though maybe I should just assume (probably correctly) that they're all good.

Set the Controls for the Heart of the Baby Head Sun (corey), Wednesday, 15 September 2010 02:39 (eleven years ago) link

I just made a command decision that I need to explore Shostakovich and Prokofiev. Where to start? I prefer dense, dark, and dramatic.

Nate Carson, Wednesday, 15 September 2010 07:26 (eleven years ago) link

there's a rly nice xenakis piece for organ, gmeeoorh

shostakovich....well those adjectives will fit a lot of his work, espcially symphonic

#7 and #10 especially but i like the last (#15) which is quite strange and parodic and grim

Chinedu "Edu" Obasi Ogbuke (nakhchivan), Wednesday, 15 September 2010 11:01 (eleven years ago) link

I strongly recommend Shostakovich's 8th string quartet.

EveningStar (Sund4r), Wednesday, 15 September 2010 17:32 (eleven years ago) link

Also the second piano trio.

Gorecki or Go Home (Paul in Santa Cruz), Wednesday, 15 September 2010 21:29 (eleven years ago) link

But enough about Shostakovich. I'm a much bigger fan of Prokofiev and would recommend the following in particular:

Third, Fifth, and Sixth Symphonies
Romeo and Juliet
Second piano concerto
Second violin concerto <-- good place to start

Piano Sonatas: Nos. 3, 6, 7, 8, 9

Less "dense, dark, and dramatic," but equally great:

First Symphony ("Classical")
Lt. Kije
Flute and piano sonata (there's a later version for violin and piano)

Gorecki or Go Home (Paul in Santa Cruz), Wednesday, 15 September 2010 21:44 (eleven years ago) link

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2fVoUQScW5s

Gorecki or Go Home (Paul in Santa Cruz), Wednesday, 15 September 2010 21:46 (eleven years ago) link

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Knqsx6_Ku1Q

Gorecki or Go Home (Paul in Santa Cruz), Wednesday, 15 September 2010 21:48 (eleven years ago) link

And a much younger Gilels playing the same work

Gorecki or Go Home (Paul in Santa Cruz), Wednesday, 15 September 2010 21:50 (eleven years ago) link

I don't know much Prokofiev so I couldn't say much other than echoing the recommendations of the others — as for Shostakovich, I'd recommend his Piano Quintet and the String Quartets (all of them from 3 on. I'd start with the trilogy of 7, 8 and 9).

Esa-Pekka picked a pack of pickled peppers (corey), Wednesday, 15 September 2010 23:19 (eleven years ago) link

Thanks for the recommendations guys! :)

Nate Carson, Thursday, 16 September 2010 01:59 (eleven years ago) link

Be sure to post here once you've listened to them. :)

Now playing on LP: Handel Recorder Sonatas, Op. 1 (Gustav Leonhardt, August Wenzinger, Hans-Martin Linde)

Esa-Pekka picked a pack of pickled peppers (corey), Thursday, 16 September 2010 02:40 (eleven years ago) link

I used to work in that building!

Gorecki or Go Home (Paul in Santa Cruz), Saturday, 18 September 2010 01:34 (eleven years ago) link

Where is it?

pope ur ban II (corey), Saturday, 18 September 2010 01:34 (eleven years ago) link

It's the Renzo Piano tower at IRCAM (Paris).

Gorecki or Go Home (Paul in Santa Cruz), Saturday, 18 September 2010 01:35 (eleven years ago) link

(And I only worked there for about six months way back in 2001.)

Gorecki or Go Home (Paul in Santa Cruz), Saturday, 18 September 2010 01:36 (eleven years ago) link

That's really cool though. I really hope to visit IRCAM one day.

pope ur ban II (corey), Saturday, 18 September 2010 02:34 (eleven years ago) link

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41qB4N9j12L._SS500_.jpg

Revisiting this set, my first complete Sib. I'm listening to the disc with syms. 5-7.

pope ur ban II (corey), Sunday, 19 September 2010 01:21 (eleven years ago) link

This is the best music ever btw.

pope ur ban II (corey), Sunday, 19 September 2010 01:21 (eleven years ago) link

Buxtehude, baby.

o. nate, Sunday, 19 September 2010 03:23 (eleven years ago) link

Cool, I don't know much by him other than a few organ pieces that are in the Gustav Leonhardt box set. What do you recommend?

pope ur ban II (corey), Sunday, 19 September 2010 04:36 (eleven years ago) link

Listening:

http://g-ecx.images-amazon.com/images/G/01/ciu/16/ba/33519833e7a0ab8c18713110.L.jpg

LvB - Große fuge
Conlon Nancarrow - String Quartet No. 3
Ruth Crawford-Seeger - String Quartet
Roger Reynolds - Coconico... A Shattered Landscape
Iannis Xenakis - Tetras

pope ur ban II (corey), Monday, 20 September 2010 01:23 (eleven years ago) link

that's a great cd, my fav version of grosse fuge, xenakis and c-s pieces excellent

Chinedu "Edu" Obasi Ogbuke (nakhchivan), Monday, 20 September 2010 01:26 (eleven years ago) link

Yes, and the Nancarrow is a lot of fun and the Reynolds piece was a surprise, I'd never heard him until now.

pope ur ban II (corey), Monday, 20 September 2010 12:50 (eleven years ago) link

Tonight saw Cliff Colnot conduct the Civic Orchestra in Sibelius's 4th and the 2nd suite from Ravel's Daphnis and Chloé. Orchestra sounded good but the tempi in the Sib were... weird, but the Ravel went off without a hitch.

pope ur ban II (corey), Tuesday, 21 September 2010 04:33 (ten years ago) link

I don't even know if William Brittelle's new Television Landscape is even "classical," apart from the fact that the whole thing is notated, but I don't know where else to mention it on ILM. It's really fantastic.

jaymc, Tuesday, 21 September 2010 05:19 (ten years ago) link

I listened to a bit, would probably say it's pop, but pop in the vein of Van Dyke Parks with really good arrangements. The vocals are a little off-putting.

pope ur ban II (corey), Wednesday, 22 September 2010 04:28 (ten years ago) link

Went to my first recital in an age last night. Highlight was a piece for violin and piano, played by Tim Parkinson and Angharad Davies.

From the pre-performance intro Tim gave you can conclude that, if it was composed in the 1850s people would have dismissed simply as out of tune, but because of the baggage that history accumulates over time something like this, executed with a straight face, could work. I actually like the violin passages at the end where it was reaching certain frequencies where it sounded so out of tune. The old notes but not in this way.

When a young group gets together for their first gig its their naivety and perhaps their ignorance (and that you know of this) but also enthusiasm that makes anyone listening invest emotions to make up for any gaps in tech. But here you know they are aware of history and that they have a technique. Usually I'd dismiss but there was almost a serious attempt to codify naivety. Except that its the lack of investment on part of your ear that is felt the most.

I guess I wanted to feel cheated, somehow.

Also heard a performance of Earle Brown's December 1952 (piano/saxophone). Made much more of an impression than any recording.

xyzzzz__, Wednesday, 22 September 2010 10:25 (ten years ago) link

Neat, I went to a similar concert on Sunday held in a loft and put on by a few local musicians — the guy who put it together is a composer/pianist. He played some short piano pieces by a Uruguayan composer whose name I can't remember, a piece by French composer Allain Gaussin (of whom I'd not heard before then) and Feldman's Piano Piece 1956 A. After that a trio played improvisational electroacoustic music with electric guitar, amplified flute and a home-built instrument that had various objects amplified like metal springs, a pewter chalice, hair combs and small pieces of metal that made a sound like a thumb piano. After that a quartet of clarinet, flute, piano and modular synthesizer played some improvisational music with a more structured character.

pope ur ban II (corey), Wednesday, 22 September 2010 14:07 (ten years ago) link

Listening this week:

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41i5lJ%2B1guL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

meatball subs (corey), Thursday, 23 September 2010 01:29 (ten years ago) link

NP:

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51pPp3YFGAL._SS500_.jpg

corey, Saturday, 25 September 2010 01:02 (ten years ago) link

Martha Argerich playing Bach's Partita no. 2 in C minor and English Suite no. 2 in A minor... beautiful and very brilliant

jeevves, Saturday, 25 September 2010 02:55 (ten years ago) link

Re: the Nono I posted above — remarkable stuff. The early Due Esspressioni seems to be an extension of Webern's muted dynamics and constantly shifting instrumental color. There are some really unique instrument doublings in the latter half of the piece.

A Carolo Scarpa is surprisingly Scelsi-like, gravitating around a single tone and alternating stretches of silence with exclamations from the orchestra (with a hefty percussion battery).

Post-Praeludium is scored for tuba and live electronics, but is surprisingly delicate and quite beautiful really. The actions of the player come back as echoes and eventually the lines pile up, weave across and interact with each other. Very ghostly.

"fragmente-stille" is famous. I've heard the Arditti recording but it's been probably four years, so I couldn't compare, but I remember the piece as being extremely static and dull — so funny how our perceptions change. There is so much drama in this piece and I find it excitingly varied and engaging. Need to hear the other recordings.

lady gagaku (corey), Monday, 27 September 2010 05:10 (ten years ago) link

Or see fragmente-stille live. Saw the Arditti play that with one of Schoenberg's quartet and it works really well!

xyzzzz__, Monday, 27 September 2010 20:32 (ten years ago) link

I hope that I'll be able to in my lifetime! Where did you see the Ardittis?

lady gagaku (corey), Monday, 27 September 2010 22:18 (ten years ago) link

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51r65Ld7cfL._SS500_.jpg

Scando-tonal syms from a composer that died too young (only 64). Neither are incredibly groundbreaking but both are very personal and unique. The 3rd is surprisingly bleak. He eventually wrote a total of 8 syms and 11 string quartets (which I especially want to hear).

corey, Wednesday, 29 September 2010 13:35 (ten years ago) link

Corey - At the QEH in London.

xyzzzz__, Wednesday, 29 September 2010 20:06 (ten years ago) link

Listening to this week:

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51NR6KVZfcL._SS500_.jpg

The Ligeti (from his bizarre-yet-accessible late style) I know and love, but I'm new to the Nørgård pieces. I'm a huge Nørgård fan and think he's one of the greatest composers living today.

third-strongest mole (corey), Sunday, 3 October 2010 18:03 (ten years ago) link

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Knqsx6_Ku1Q

― Gorecki or Go Home (Paul in Santa Cruz), Wednesday, September 15, 2010 4:48 PM (2 weeks ago) Bookmark Suggest Ban Permalink

I'm foolishly attempting to learn this one. It's probably going to be an all-year affair, and I usually seem to tackle Prokofiev, get halfway through and give up. So we'll see.

Eric H., Tuesday, 5 October 2010 03:14 (ten years ago) link

I was a fairly serious pianist when much younger, and I worked on Prokofiev 3, but getting halfway and giving up was my speciality, too. But it's a great piece, even though the energetic and lyrical sides seem stitched together awkwardly at a few points. I hope you stick with it! What else are you playing?

ti, I drink with jam and lewis (Paul in Santa Cruz), Tuesday, 5 October 2010 04:58 (ten years ago) link

Agree about the stitching together aspect, tho it seems that's true of a lot of the Prokofiev I like.

As of right now, this is the only P piece I've managed to make it all the way through (and not, obv, up to speed):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=chmSTEIcZ_w

Eric H., Tuesday, 5 October 2010 12:55 (ten years ago) link

If you play a recital I want to be there! Lotus Land is the only Cyril Scott piece I know, thanks to this anthology:

http://assets.sheetmusicplus.com/product/Look-Inside/covers/3603869.jpg

(Which has a much plainer cover design in the edition I own.)

ti, I drink with jam and lewis (Paul in Santa Cruz), Tuesday, 5 October 2010 18:19 (ten years ago) link

Oy, that I could ever get enough pieces in recital condition at the same time! (What else is in that anthology?)

Eric H., Tuesday, 5 October 2010 19:17 (ten years ago) link

http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/An-Anthology-Of-Piano-Music-Vol-4-The-Twentieth-Century/3603869

Click on the "Song [sic] List" tab, then click "see all..."

ti, I drink with jam and lewis (Paul in Santa Cruz), Tuesday, 5 October 2010 19:27 (ten years ago) link

It's been so long since I've played Kabalevsky.

Eric H., Tuesday, 5 October 2010 19:29 (ten years ago) link

This was one of the first songs I remember playing that I remember also liking playing:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ub872y6IS_g

I guess I have been partial to the Russians from day one.

Eric H., Tuesday, 5 October 2010 19:40 (ten years ago) link

So cuet! His feet don't even reach the pedals. I never played that one but I did play the Sonatina in the Anthology I mentioned above.

ti, I drink with jam and lewis (Paul in Santa Cruz), Wednesday, 6 October 2010 00:49 (ten years ago) link

Listening to later today:

http://home.swipnet.se/sonoloco2/Rec/Stockhausen/IR05.jpg

delicious demonym (corey), Wednesday, 6 October 2010 22:16 (ten years ago) link

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Do1NJL4SIwE

Eric H., Friday, 8 October 2010 04:48 (ten years ago) link

Musical-score videos of obscure repertoire on Youtube are my favorite thing ever!

ti, I drink with jam and lewis (Paul in Santa Cruz), Friday, 8 October 2010 05:56 (ten years ago) link

Serious LOLs -- the Kapustin Etude at ca. 0:20 is EXACTLY the theme song of The Price is Right.

ti, I drink with jam and lewis (Paul in Santa Cruz), Friday, 8 October 2010 06:00 (ten years ago) link

Haha, a YouTube comment says the same thing. I hear it in the melody, but only fleetingly. (Talk about obscure, this guy's stuff isn't even available to buy in the U.S.)

Eric H., Friday, 8 October 2010 11:20 (ten years ago) link

http://automaticheartbreak.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/12/SomeoneWillTakeCare-Cover.jpg

is this disc classical? it's interesting, it feels classical in some ways, and it's on the new amsterdam label (a classical label iirc).

horrible cover, btw.

Daniel, Esq., Sunday, 10 October 2010 02:54 (ten years ago) link

I think so — I've been following his Twitter for a while. He usually has interesting things to say about queer rights and music. That is a really bad cover though.

delicious demonym (corey), Sunday, 10 October 2010 03:15 (ten years ago) link

Oh, that's a nice discovery for me. Not a million miles away from Owen Pallett's Heartland. (But leaning a bit towards Bang-on-a-Can.)

ti, I drink with jam and lewis (Paul in Santa Cruz), Sunday, 10 October 2010 04:13 (ten years ago) link

Maybe it's poor form to post this, but it's the main reason I haven't been listening to more of other people's music lately. I guess I'm "currently digging" it; at any rate I'm relieved to have finally finished it after two months of pretty intensive work.

MIDI mockup of a new composition for solo piano

I hope maybe some of the folks who hang out in this thread and who enjoy stuff like Carter, Babbitt, Wolpe, Rakowski, and Imbrie will enjoy my work as well.

Waldstein Sinatra (Paul in Santa Cruz), Tuesday, 12 October 2010 11:33 (ten years ago) link

Not bad form at all. I'm very interested to hear it. I'll have to listen later when I can give it my full attention.

Last night at Northwestern I heard Ensemble Alternance perform new music by Mark André, Raphaël Cendo, Gérard Pesson and Phillipe Leroux, all of whom save André are completely to me. I'll be writing a review and will post it once it's up.

groovy-otter.gif (corey), Tuesday, 12 October 2010 13:19 (ten years ago) link

completely *new* to me, that is.

groovy-otter.gif (corey), Tuesday, 12 October 2010 13:19 (ten years ago) link

I've always had problems getting soundcloud files to play for me, but when I find a computer/browser that makes it work for me, I'll definitely give it a good listen!

Eric H., Wednesday, 13 October 2010 02:59 (ten years ago) link

Oh, I didn't realize Soundcloud could be problematic. I wonder if there's a better choice. Bandcamp? (I'm not keen on the Myspace model.)

Waldstein Sinatra (Paul in Santa Cruz), Wednesday, 13 October 2010 04:23 (ten years ago) link

http://home.swipnet.se/sonoloco2/Rec/Stockhausen/IR02.jpg

I'm on a Stockhausen kick.

nico muesli (corey), Sunday, 17 October 2010 13:46 (ten years ago) link

I got a mailing from ArkivMusic about a bunch of Danish composers, and I'm always curious about composers from outside the usual big-name places (which I think of as Germany, France, England, Austria, and Russia), so I trucked on over to eMusic and got a two-symphony album by Asger Hamerik - his Symphony No. 5 was fine if not spectacular but the No. 6, "Symphonie spirituelle," this is lovely stuff - kind of like less bombastic Elgar maybe? (nb disregard if you hate Elgar, it's not really "Elgarian," just in terms of its mood it reminds me a little.)

btw it looks like another year will pass without me being home long enough to actually properly learn how to play piano again. kind of bummed. I was a decent child pianist, stopped playing in my first act of "you can't tell me what to do"ism, and as a result my left hand is now pretty much only good for chords (and my right isn't much to write home about dynamically). every year I think about finding a teacher but I am in and out of town so much that I never seem to get around to it, and one of my desires is to actually be able to play some of the classical music I love on an instrument instead of just listening.

my first act of "you can't tell me what to do"ism = not learning the piano, ever, despite fervent protestations from various people (i think i was the only kid in my class who didn't play any instruments)

terrible idea

entrylev leviev (nakhchivan), Sunday, 17 October 2010 20:11 (ten years ago) link

yeah people are always sort of confused when they find out how much I'm into music but that I can't sightread/play any instrument whatsoever

nico muesli (corey), Sunday, 17 October 2010 20:14 (ten years ago) link

I should just let it go but am going to give this thread one bump in case I can interest anyone in checking out the piano pieces I posted here.

https://sites.google.com/site/pnauert/elegy-2-preview.jpg

Waldstein Sinatra (Paul in Santa Cruz), Tuesday, 19 October 2010 23:47 (ten years ago) link

yeah i listened to episodes... last week, which i liked

certainly reminded me of a less anguished wolpe and perhaps a bit of carter's piano music

nakhchivan, Wednesday, 20 October 2010 10:29 (ten years ago) link

This is beautiful Paul, thank you.

corey, Wednesday, 20 October 2010 13:54 (ten years ago) link

Thanks for listening and commenting guys! Wish me luck persuading a pianist to play this stuff.

Corey, I'd be interest to see your Ensemble Alternance review if it's online somewhere.

Waldstein Sinatra (Paul in Santa Cruz), Wednesday, 20 October 2010 19:10 (ten years ago) link

Certainly like to hear that piece of yours in a recital, Paul.

Maybe you'd have better luck in Europe? :-)

xyzzzz__, Wednesday, 20 October 2010 19:49 (ten years ago) link

xp you can find it here

corey, Wednesday, 20 October 2010 20:01 (ten years ago) link

That's a clear and nicely detailed review -- and good for musicweb allowing a generous word count. I know a couple of the composers by name (André, Leroux) but I've heard little or none of their music. (Turns out it's fairly well represented on recordings, so I can explore a bit. The Pesson seems like a good place to start.)

Waldstein Sinatra (Paul in Santa Cruz), Thursday, 21 October 2010 02:23 (ten years ago) link

Thanks! I've been meaning to write a review of the concert I saw last week but I've been feeling fairly negative about it and haven't been motivated.

corey, Thursday, 21 October 2010 03:29 (ten years ago) link

Bach's Orgelbüchlein right now. Put it on because feeling a bit too impatient and scatterbrained to pay attention to an extended work (average subwork length abt 2 minutes here), but am ending up sitting it out, it seems. :D

anatol_merklich, Saturday, 23 October 2010 17:51 (ten years ago) link

Exploring the music of Claudio Spies, Chilean-born American composer who was a professor at Princeton for several decades.
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61ngI1NY4uL._SS500_.jpg
I suppose Spies music epitomizes "academic twelve-tone" practice, but there's nothing routine or formulaic about it. He has a knack for lean textures, angular but expressive lines, and memorable recurring sonorities, all of which harken back to Stravinsky's late 12-tone music.

Waldstein Sinatra (Paul in Santa Cruz), Saturday, 23 October 2010 19:04 (ten years ago) link

oops huge picture

Waldstein Sinatra (Paul in Santa Cruz), Saturday, 23 October 2010 19:05 (ten years ago) link

Not too big a picture. Actually "academic twelve-tone" is something that I sorta wanna explore a bit more but names are sorta buried under all the negativity.

Yesterday I saw a chamber recital as part of the Helmut Lachenmann w/e at the South Bank.

1st half: 1st/2nd string quartets played by Arditti who do the usual heroic job they do. 1st is the radical-in-inverted-commas stuff, 2nd had more NOTES and tremolos than the skeletal sounds, that sounded more like exploring the gap between different perceptions of music and a more obvious commentary on the tradition. Tougher and almost certainly shouldn't be programmed together.

Intermission was an interview and then the 2nd half with a few solos then a newly written duo for piano and soprano (first time he was written for voices since his opera). Totally great to hear what you can't on record (and w/Lachenmann's comment in mind). I never quite noticed how fond he is of almost child-like sounds, but there it is on the piano piece (which deconstructs a melody) how much his music is framed by silence (not in the same manner as Feldman but he is deeply attuned to gaps in between sounds), how at times there is a thin line between a mere transference of discoveries to something more substantial (passages from the cello and violin pieces sounded thin to me).

The final piece was really good. I think his writing for the piano does have bite. And with voices he has definitely learned from Kagel.

I liked Lachenmann as a personality. Listen through the thick accent and certain phrases come out. 'Philharmonic thinking' was a good one and it'll be much tougher to use 'interesting music' to describe anything ever again.

xyzzzz__, Sunday, 24 October 2010 17:45 (ten years ago) link

I'm always jealous hearing about how much new music is presented in London. Rare to hear an individual piece by Lachenmann in/around San Francisco, so a whole weekend of concerts seems extraordinary. I heard James Avery play a set of piano pieces many years ago and can absolutely see the "child-like" quality in that music. And I know a few things from recordings, like the string quartet "Gran Torso" (which I guess is the "first quartet" that the Ardittis did at your concert).

Sometimes I think Lachenmann is spoiled for me by all the poor imitations his students churn out. Not that a lot of names are popping into my head, just that I've heard several tedious pieces by students referencing his notions of deconstruction and anti-music.

Waldstein Sinatra (Paul in Santa Cruz), Sunday, 24 October 2010 18:27 (ten years ago) link

Nice work Paul these are economical and well written for the instrument
There are lots of new music opportunities in North America, but more often than not they've come about by comrades-in-arms from certain institutions getting together and composing, promoting and performing works themselves, see ACME, Bang on a Can in New York, Esprit in Toronto, etc. etc. etc.

The Bartered Bride (Ówen P.), Sunday, 24 October 2010 21:12 (ten years ago) link

Thanks Owen! Yeah, that's usually how performances have worked for me as well. For a variety of reasons I undertook several composition projects this past year without having performers on board in advance. Something will work out, though.

Waldstein Sinatra (Paul in Santa Cruz), Monday, 25 October 2010 00:26 (ten years ago) link

http://www.classicsonline.com/catalogue/product.aspx?pid=690395

Badura-Skoda, Schubert piano sonatas 14 & 20 on the fortepiano: a revelation.

Paul, sure, maybe its more than you're getting. Otoh I think many British composers haven't had a w/e of concerts. Don't think Ferneyhough could ever get the same treatment, myself. Or even some other continental composers I'd love to hear (Mathias Spahlinger).

Sometimes I think Lachenmann is spoiled for me by all the poor imitations his students churn out. Not that a lot of names are popping into my head, just that I've heard several tedious pieces by students referencing his notions of deconstruction and anti-music.

Heard of Pierluigi Billone, who seems to reference a lot of his ideas and really don't think he adds much. But I haven't heard many of them. From the talk I could really see that the energy which Lachenmann brings to his ideas and ideology can easily seduce a student to go down a bad path.

Whereas a few of Ferneyhough's students have more than something going for 'em, I think. Really like Franklin Cox and James Erber. Not much luck with Claus-Steffen Mahnkopf.

xyzzzz__, Monday, 25 October 2010 17:55 (ten years ago) link

btw, picked up the first Wire magazine in ages and it has an interview w/ Irish Composer-performance artist Jennifer Walshe (she's on the cover!)

xyzzzz__, Monday, 25 October 2010 17:57 (ten years ago) link

Don't think Ferneyhough could ever get the same treatment, myself.

My jealousy continues unabated...

Waldstein Sinatra (Paul in Santa Cruz), Monday, 25 October 2010 18:07 (ten years ago) link

haha omg!

Maybe you should give yrself a holiday, Paul :-)

xyzzzz__, Monday, 25 October 2010 18:14 (ten years ago) link

No kidding!

Waldstein Sinatra (Paul in Santa Cruz), Monday, 25 October 2010 18:21 (ten years ago) link

is there anyone following 2010 releases who'd care to suggest a few?

j., Monday, 25 October 2010 19:54 (ten years ago) link

Releases of new music? New performances/recordings of older music? (Both?)

Waldstein Sinatra (Paul in Santa Cruz), Tuesday, 26 October 2010 03:07 (ten years ago) link

you know, whatever. anything with '2010' written in tiny print somewhere on the physical packaging.

j., Tuesday, 26 October 2010 03:33 (ten years ago) link

Morton Feldman - Trio performed by Aki Takahashi, Rohan de Saram, Marc Sabat, on Mode.
Steve Reich - Double Sextet and 2x5 on Nonesuch.
Marc Andre Hamelin - Etudes on Hyperion.
Music of Elliott Carter, Vol. 8 (16 Compositions 2002-2009) on Bridge.
Chaya Czernowin - Maim, on Mode.
Olivier Messiaen - Visions De L'Amen performed by Sarah Rothenberg and Marilyn Nonken, on Bridge.

Waldstein Sinatra (Paul in Santa Cruz), Tuesday, 26 October 2010 07:04 (ten years ago) link

Briefly:

The Feldman is pretty much what you'd expect from a late-ish work (1980 I believe). It spans 2 CDs and is a slow and patient journey through a lot of intriguing sonorities and patterns.

The Reich is also pretty much what you'd expect -- I like the energy of both works but I have doubts. Working with long notes seems to have been a focal idea in the Double Sextet, but it gives the textures an opaque quality that I find tiring, or maybe the performance is sluggish or too careful, I haven't heard others to compare. The BOAC performance of 2x5 is excellent, very tight, but I'm not sure the electric guitars blend convincingly with the rest of the ensemble.

The Hamelin compositions aren't terribly profound, but the level of keyboard virtuosity is mind boggling.

The Carter has a snapshot from the composer's 100th (!) birthday celebrations for cover art. The Horn Concerto, the Clarinet Quintet, and the Zukofsky songs (with clarinet) are standouts, as is the string orchestra piece Sound Field, which sands off all the sharp edges from Carter's usual material to reveal a world of slowly evolving sonorities (which actually reminds me of the climactic chorale in the Brass Quintet). This double-CD also offers a series of Carter's strangest pieces, which he calls "retracings," and which are basically individual instrumental parts liberated from larger ensemble contexts -- the one for trumpet, for example, comes from A Symphony of Three Orchestras. It's the idea, really that's a bit strange; the result is a series of fairly unassuming but effective solo pieces.

The Czernowin pieces assemble the most fascinating sounds -- from delicate to thundering -- but also manage to feel solid and architectural.

The Messiaen is a beautifully nuanced performance of a classic piece.

Waldstein Sinatra (Paul in Santa Cruz), Tuesday, 26 October 2010 08:06 (ten years ago) link

thanks, paul!

i guess i have kind of a block with the reich. i have never been attracted enough by any of his other music in that style to listen to anything but '18 musicians' over and over. when i put on the new one i just think, 'you're doing it all wrong!'. but '18' is maybe a top ten, top five all time record for me, so.

i didn't know carter had set zukofsky, that's very appealing.

j., Tuesday, 26 October 2010 08:28 (ten years ago) link

Tharaud doing the Chopin Waltzes on Harmonia Mundi - I am pretty much a massive Hamonia Mundi cheerleader and the breadth of their focus is partly why; I get a fair amount of early music from them, but also great Mozart, Beethoven quartets, they're reliable like DG used to (seem to) be. Tharaud is good, he's somewhat - studied? which to my mind seems the trend in playing Chopin for the last while, to tread warily around romantic ideas of emoting/"feeling" - which - I don't know, on the one hand, I'm always sympathetic to classical voices that say "no, this isn't pop music, it's not about 'self-expression'" but on the other hand I just moved over from Tharaud to some Rubenstein and while that's a little unfair you just immediately hear that lift in spirit, that dedication - I like Tharaud's touch, it's gorgeous, but I think Chopin needs a player who is in some way in love with Chopin.

still, curious to look into Tharaud doing the complete piano works of Ravel - people, including me, need to listen to more Ravel

Jupiter Symphony by Mozart

jeevves, Tuesday, 26 October 2010 15:48 (ten years ago) link

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZG1wx2_tY_8

Herbert Howells was THE SHIT

The majestic sounds of Skin Up (HI DERE), Wednesday, 27 October 2010 15:59 (ten years ago) link

damn that is awesome

That has been, if not my favorite choral piece, one of my top 3 favorites since I first sang it in 1992. It was written for JFK's memorial service.

The majestic sounds of Skin Up (HI DERE), Wednesday, 27 October 2010 16:45 (ten years ago) link

Asger Hamerik, Symphony No. 6. Listened to No. 5 earlier and wasn't particularly taken with it but No. 6 is kind of the business!

honkin' on joey kramer (underrated aerosmith bootlegs I have owned), Tuesday, 2 November 2010 14:55 (ten years ago) link

This woman's vibrato gave me the giggles

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fCdcg9W3lRw

PEAVEY Ó))) (Ówen P.), Friday, 5 November 2010 19:27 (ten years ago) link

holy hell

DJP, Friday, 5 November 2010 19:30 (ten years ago) link

beethoven sonata 20 yeaaaaaaaaaaahh

HOOS tremendo...steen ridically (BIG HOOS aka the steendriver), Monday, 8 November 2010 01:12 (ten years ago) link

one month passes...

James Dillon complete Nine rivers cycle.

xyzzzz__, Sunday, 12 December 2010 09:37 (ten years ago) link

<3 liszt

salvia divanorum (nakhchivan), Monday, 13 December 2010 01:26 (ten years ago) link

in a certain frame of mind there's nothing like liszt (with apols to chopin, alkan, godowsky etc)

salvia divanorum (nakhchivan), Monday, 13 December 2010 01:29 (ten years ago) link

or argerich for that matter (with apols to pollini, richter, aimard etc)

salvia divanorum (nakhchivan), Monday, 13 December 2010 01:40 (ten years ago) link

two weeks pass...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tRG5gEGgGJE

1. climax at 7:20 kills me
2. FLEXATONE!

benanas foster (Eric H.), Tuesday, 28 December 2010 06:48 (ten years ago) link

i like that khatchaturian....not too familiar with him apart from some of his (faux?) ethnic caucasian pieces and that lugbrious ballet excerpted in '2001'

don't they say he didn't read music til he was 19 or something

Nedrag "Neđa" Mijatović (nakhchivan), Thursday, 30 December 2010 23:19 (ten years ago) link

eight months pass...

I seem to be going through a violin phase at the moment, currently listening to the Violin concerto by Ades.

What other recent violin pieces should I listen to?

jellybean (back again) (Jill), Monday, 19 September 2011 22:56 (ten years ago) link

one year passes...

The gamelan-like fugal passage after the initial stabs in Jonchaies is some of the most gorgeous music I've heard, srsly.

― glutinous maximus (corey), Monday, 30 August 2010 14:57 (2 years ago)

just searched to see if i had said this

things that are jokes pretty much (Nilmar Honorato da Silva), Friday, 28 December 2012 06:51 (eight years ago) link

idk how but i ended up on a youtube of this then the router cut out some way into the thudding central section, possibly for the best cuz this isn't falling asleep at 7am tinny laptop music

then it linked to this

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mnc6c_Tn0NM

idk why, but it is nice

things that are jokes pretty much (Nilmar Honorato da Silva), Friday, 28 December 2012 07:02 (eight years ago) link

I miss Turanga

Q-Tip—blessed Q-Tip! (Jon Lewis), Friday, 28 December 2012 16:23 (eight years ago) link

Nice to see this thread bumped and be reminded of old thoughts and a couple dozen posts i missed altogether. I would have been right there hollering paeans to Trois Petites Liturgies.

Clouds and I talked about Prokofiev symphonies on the other classical thread a while ago. I recently took advantage of an ArkivMusic sale and finally ordered this:

http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/album.jsp?album_id=555034

...ridiculously cheap box of all of Erich Leinsdorf's Boston Prokofiev recordings. I think this is now my recommendation for a one-stop intro to the symphonies. It includes all my favorites (2,3,5,6), sound is vintage analog, performances are great. And did I mention cheap as fuck?

Q-Tip—blessed Q-Tip! (Jon Lewis), Friday, 28 December 2012 16:28 (eight years ago) link

been listening to prokofiev's symphonies. i dig. i think i have all those leinsdorf records too. been playing russian pressings lately. man, i've been listening to so much music. could never list it all here. right this minute i'm playing Bruno Labate! i know, who? (1883-1968) music for oboe and piano. in the mood for oboe. i have several hundred classical records in the back room of my store and i want to hear a lot of them. stuff i've never played/heard. was just playing some 16th and 17th century keyboard music. i mean it IS friday.

also: still can't get into bruckner symphonies. i think it's me. not him. i try once a year.

scott seward, Friday, 28 December 2012 16:38 (eight years ago) link

skot throw on a soviet LP of prokofiev 2 or 3 for the metalheads! Such heavy stuff!

It's okay abt Bruckner. As you said on another thread once 'I can't love everything'. It's cool that you keep trying with Anton though. I certainly have my composers like that.

Q-Tip—blessed Q-Tip! (Jon Lewis), Friday, 28 December 2012 16:43 (eight years ago) link

stuff i'm taking home and adding to my collection cuz i like them:

prokofiev - sonatas nos. 1 and 2 for violin and piano (artur balsam - old mercury living presence stereo pressing.)

frank glazer american piano music record (shapero, copland, gottschalk, dello joio, gershwin)

elliott carter string quartets nos.1 & 2 (composer's quartet)

brahms double concerto (oistrakh/fournier) (i'm becoming a brahms completist. ha! will take all brahms home. love him so. in 3 and half years here i don't think i've sold one brahms record) (playing this now actually. great recording. on angel.)

arthur tollefson plays the piano music of virgil thomson (complete etudes. i'm a sucker for a 58 second piano piece.)

Ettore De Carolis - Ciociaria - A Land Of Ancient Silences (one of my finds of the year. and why i will always love the musical heritage society. they put out so much stuff that NOBODY would have put out in the states. Italian folk stuff. children chanting. hurdy-gurdy. guitar. harmonium. mandolin. lutes. trombones. evocations of ancestral rituals. this record has it all.)

early sonatas for the pianoforte (eugene list. more italians. and a couple of germans. 18th century stuff.)

horowitz - the studio recordings - new york 1985 (dg digital)

brahms - symphony no.3 (mehta and the new york phil. nice cbs digital recording.)

scott seward, Friday, 28 December 2012 17:28 (eight years ago) link

Gonna look for that Coiociaria thing!

Q-Tip—blessed Q-Tip! (Jon Lewis), Friday, 28 December 2012 17:33 (eight years ago) link

James Dillon's Nine Rivers cycle was given its premiere in Glasgow 2010. I heard a radio broadcast at the time but was too exhausted by life. Now I'm chasing it down and giving it another listen. I've heard parts of it over the years (see James Dillon thread

If anyone wants it the FLAC files from the broadcast with interview w/Dillon it all begins here w/commentary. Click on 'Newer' at the bottom of the page to go onto the next part.

xyzzzz__, Saturday, 29 December 2012 01:03 (eight years ago) link

i couldn't get into bruckner apart from the 8th and 7th syms but he just clicked for me one day and now i can't do without

nevaeh for evaeh (clouds), Saturday, 29 December 2012 02:04 (eight years ago) link

someone once told me to listen to him the same way you'd listen to bach, i think that was it

nevaeh for evaeh (clouds), Saturday, 29 December 2012 02:05 (eight years ago) link

should we continue to update this thread or start a new one in '13?

nevaeh for evaeh (clouds), Saturday, 29 December 2012 02:09 (eight years ago) link

probably start a new one I guess?

re: recent ground covered here - I love Prokofiev's piano music a lot; have probably mentioned it on this thread already but this disc is just terrific. Freddy Kempf is my kinda pianistBruckner I love to pieces, I'm really interested in Celibidache's Bruckner cycle - I didn't buy it at Tower in NYC (RIP) on a tour in '98 because those were lean times and buying a whole symphonic cycle was beyond my means, but I did get his 6th later on which I'm listening to right now - it's tremendous imo. Celibidache on Bruckner: "For me, the fact of Bruckner's existence is God's greatest gift." Now that's a guy whose Bruckner I wanna hear

too many encores (underrated aerosmith bootlegs I have owned), Saturday, 29 December 2012 13:41 (eight years ago) link

Thread isn't dated, and we are also seeing the first and last 50 posts. Go w/whatever.

re: Dillon: making my way through, heard the interviews and I'll note it as 'interesting' the way such a high-modernist is interested in the occult "but not in an Alesiter Crowley way god forbid" and uses it as a strand in this work. That and classical conceptions of science in the age of quantum mechanics.

I love the complexity of line and shape, and also the fact that it isn't gigantic - different sets of small of ensembles to percussion and bits of electronics that aren't immediately obvious. But bcz of the themes and James' love of rock (before Webern got in the way, natch) marks this as what I think prog rock would sound like if those guys had any wild classical technique crossed w/a mode of rock indiscipline. But their sources were Wagner and other 19th century, from what I can tell.

xyzzzz__, Saturday, 29 December 2012 13:51 (eight years ago) link

also taking home a vox box of haydn string quartets. heavenly. and such nice recordings.

i will keep trying with bruckner. sometimes it taakes me a while.

scott seward, Saturday, 29 December 2012 14:00 (eight years ago) link

It's funny how when this thread is bumped it gets so much more action than the 'Rolling Classical' thread. Something abt the title idk?

I have had Nine Rivers on my hard drive for about a year, keep waiting for the 'right time'. But I should prob just start in with it chunk by chunk.

~farben~ (Jon Lewis), Saturday, 29 December 2012 16:14 (eight years ago) link

listening to bruckner's 4th right now just to show i'm a nice guy.

scott seward, Saturday, 29 December 2012 16:15 (eight years ago) link

^^ enjoyed hearing that in "bronson" a while back — 7th is probably better if y're still not convinced

xp it could the tentative tone that invites ppl who might feel intimidated otherwise

i am listening to k.a. hartmann's 1st sym which is a blazing piece of modernism that fits in nicely w/ prokofiev and roussel's 3rd syms

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eRe-G-wxg24

the memoirs of gaydrian (clouds), Saturday, 29 December 2012 18:00 (eight years ago) link

yeah, it did nothing for me. then i put on dvorak and mahler symphonies and everything is okay again...

scott seward, Saturday, 29 December 2012 18:04 (eight years ago) link

you like mahler but you can't get down w/bruckner? idgi tbh

too many encores (underrated aerosmith bootlegs I have owned), Saturday, 29 December 2012 18:54 (eight years ago) link

there's no telling with people.

scott seward, Saturday, 29 December 2012 18:59 (eight years ago) link

mahler gives me more to hold on to. i'm very fragile. i need a helping hand every now and then.

scott seward, Saturday, 29 December 2012 19:01 (eight years ago) link

makes sense to me. they are often mentioned side by side and I get why, but they use the same basic building blocks for vastly different purposes. Mahler, like Debussy, is all about the state of interruption, unwanted polymorphism, the perverse flow of mind. Bruckner comes from the baroque concept of huge unbroken blocks of one specific affect. I actually think that based on just the feelings I get from their music Bruckner and Dvorak are closer kin.

~farben~ (Jon Lewis), Saturday, 29 December 2012 19:03 (eight years ago) link

love dvorak. who knows what my problem is. i'm listening to more haydn right now. cuz i'm your grandma. though i was thinking of putting this on and i don't know if your grandma would like it. so loud.

http://www.audiophileusa.com/covers400water/20645.jpg

scott seward, Saturday, 29 December 2012 19:22 (eight years ago) link

which dvorák do u recommend jon

the memoirs of gaydrian (clouds), Saturday, 29 December 2012 19:35 (eight years ago) link

I think all the symphonies from 5 onward are amazing. See if you can listen to #9 without prejudice, I know that's hard with warhorses but it deserves it. They are very sensitive to their interpreters-- you gotta have a performance with the right balance of creaminess and sting. Sticking to the Supraphon label is not a bad idea.

And the four late tone poems based on macabre czech fairy tales (The Noon Witch, The Golden Spinning Wheel, The Water Goblin and... the other one...)

~farben~ (Jon Lewis), Saturday, 29 December 2012 19:50 (eight years ago) link

Does the download link for Dillon's Viridas on this page work?
http://5-against-4.blogspot.co.uk/2011/10/james-dillon-nine-rivers-world-premiere_31.html

I got #1 and 2 before it no problem. Quite possibly I am doing something dumb.

▶ Play all samples (Paul in Santa Cruz), Saturday, 29 December 2012 20:02 (eight years ago) link

Max Richter's recomposition of The Four Seasons from this year is all Minimalist Baroque pastiche (ala early Nyman), deriving most of its entertainment from playing with expectations. Not difficult listening by any means, and I expect it'll be ubiquitous in documentary soundtracks for some while.

The whole piece is presently on YouTube (here's a playlist), and here's a pleasant video sampler.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0MYmjJjMnb8

Pauper Management Improved (Sanpaku), Saturday, 29 December 2012 20:19 (eight years ago) link

Nevermind re: the Dillon download, it worked this time (even though I did everything the same as before?)

▶ Play all samples (Paul in Santa Cruz), Saturday, 29 December 2012 21:02 (eight years ago) link

damn file sharing services what are we payin' em for?! >:[

~farben~ (Jon Lewis), Saturday, 29 December 2012 21:15 (eight years ago) link

i've gone back to s1sk for my classical needs but even that's not good enough

the memoirs of gaydrian (clouds), Saturday, 29 December 2012 23:02 (eight years ago) link

there was a w h a t . cd freeleech a few days ago which i managed to miss completely

things that are jokes pretty much (Nilmar Honorato da Silva), Saturday, 29 December 2012 23:03 (eight years ago) link

re: Dvorak I rep hard for Rusalka. Just lovely.

too many encores (underrated aerosmith bootlegs I have owned), Saturday, 29 December 2012 23:06 (eight years ago) link

I have pretty much the same thing with Bruckner. Apparently Brian Eno has been banging his head against that wall his whole life too, so we're in good comapny.

Terabytes of FLACS of screaming (Call the Cops), Sunday, 30 December 2012 07:06 (eight years ago) link

Yes, comapny.

Terabytes of FLACS of screaming (Call the Cops), Sunday, 30 December 2012 07:06 (eight years ago) link

to me the Bruckner to start with is Te Deum. I get pretty caught up in both his bio & his piety though, there's almost a celebrity/idol/tragic figure aspect to him. he's a little creepy! but anyway yeah - I think the religious/spiritual/personal-struggle aspect of Bruckner is a big part of why I'm drawn to him. Which is why again Celibidache is really worth checking out, I think his Bruckner is really romantic.

man I'm gonna listen to some more of that right now

too many encores (underrated aerosmith bootlegs I have owned), Sunday, 30 December 2012 14:02 (eight years ago) link

Bachfest on WKCR right now and very nice it is too. Heard a few cantatas plus Segovia playing Partita no. 2. this morn at 4am.

Terabytes of FLACS of screaming (Call the Cops), Sunday, 30 December 2012 15:24 (eight years ago) link

Yep. I turned that on by accident yesterday afternoon. Within the Bachfest was also a celebration of Pablo Casals birthday.

Albee Thousand (James Redd and the Blecchs), Sunday, 30 December 2012 15:30 (eight years ago) link

"Baroque and Roll: Townshend on Purcell

The Who guitarist and songwriter Pete Townshend talks about the band's career and reveals the influence on his songwriting of Baroque composer Henry Purcell.

When Pete was a struggling 20-year-old musician he was turned on to Purcell by his manager, Kit Lambert. It was Kit's recommendation of Purcell's Gordian Knot Untied that struck the loudest chord with Pete, awakening him to a lineage in English music that seemed strangely familiar. Immersing himself in the music, he soon set about writing The Who's first album.

Pete reveals how he drew on Purcell's dramatic genius for his most intriguing compositions. From his first mini-rock opera to his masterpiece, Tommy, and from his enduring Lifehouse project through to his current musical endeavour, there has always been a Purcellian presence.

Broadcast on BBC Radio 4 on Tuesday, 27th October 2009."

Terabytes of FLACS of screaming (Call the Cops), Sunday, 30 December 2012 15:35 (eight years ago) link

I don't know if it works outside of Denmark, but the public radio station records a lot of classical concerts and puts them on their website. Some of it is quite interesting:

The New Nørgård-symphony. No 8

Frederik B, Monday, 31 December 2012 14:18 (eight years ago) link

looking forward to hearing the nørgård

the memoirs of gaydrian (clouds), Monday, 31 December 2012 15:53 (eight years ago) link

V. exciting!

EveningStar (Sund4r), Monday, 31 December 2012 16:26 (eight years ago) link

yeah psyched for the Norgard too. Hope I get a chance to listen with all the family around the place.

~farben~ (Jon Lewis), Monday, 31 December 2012 16:36 (eight years ago) link

happy new year from the previn household!

https://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash4/734972_10151987355982137_1524864941_n.jpg

scott seward, Monday, 31 December 2012 17:08 (eight years ago) link

I like a lot of Previn/LSO/EMI recordings from the 70s. They still have that sound I love so much in the 60s decca Monteux/LSO sides.

~farben~ (Jon Lewis), Monday, 31 December 2012 17:15 (eight years ago) link

also 60s/70s classical sleeves get me emotionally so bad

too many encores (underrated aerosmith bootlegs I have owned), Monday, 31 December 2012 19:07 (eight years ago) link

full disclosure, after staring too long at the Ansermet Le Sacre du Printemps sleeve, I went wilding in Central Park.

~farben~ (Jon Lewis), Monday, 31 December 2012 19:08 (eight years ago) link

Chaya Czernowin - this disc paints a ruinious landscape at times. Sahaf is the highlight, in part due to its set-up for - among other other things - guitar and sax. You often think she is not only making use of vast skyscraper- type 'scapes but blowing it out further into the universe for thousands of light years. Its only now that this becomes visible.

Another day, another Finnissy: Kagami-Gishi for flute and harp makes use of his time spent studying gagaku music. Reading an article on him and his interests in folk culture are vast: aboriginal music, Sicilian and Eastern European folk and so on, but he always stamps his own personality on whatever he is interested in. You could say 'Finnissy music' but I feel like I want to find out more and listen to the sources. So there.

Ferneyhough - La Terre Est un Homme. This is a radio recording from a concert that took place about two years ago. Everyone re-discovered this neglected orchestral piece. I can sorta see it...

xyzzzz__, Tuesday, 1 January 2013 13:02 (eight years ago) link

Bernd Alois Zimmermann - Orchestral sketches. Implies bitzy and all, but they are substantial.

Heinz Holliger - Pneuma.

How are people doing w/Dillon? Not worrying at all about how it fits, a piece here and there...Introitus is a cracker.

xyzzzz__, Tuesday, 1 January 2013 13:10 (eight years ago) link

Have been hitting these hard this past few days:

http://www.thomasmusic.net.au/images/products/HMC90181820.jpg

https://d3mfbaa198drag.cloudfront.net/assets/products/346222/large/346222.jpg

Plus I watched Tony Palmer's great 'O Thou Transcendent' - a portrait of Ralph Vaughan Williams featuring some sterling performances and a great deal of background info previously unknown to me.

Terabytes of FLACS of screaming (Call the Cops), Tuesday, 1 January 2013 13:45 (eight years ago) link

Starting 2013 listening to Mahler's Symphony No. 6. I bought the 2009 box of Leonard Bernstein-conducted Mahler symphonies a while back, and put one in whenever I've got an hour-plus to kill (which isn't often).

誤訳侮辱, Tuesday, 1 January 2013 15:52 (eight years ago) link

I've decided to start the new year with as much Conlon Nancarrow as I can listen to at one time. The first cut on NHK’Koyxeи's Dance Classics Vol.1 had hints of Conlon Nancarrow, which is what started the gears in motion that led to this. I decided it might be a good time to listen through all his player piano music.

_Rudipherous_, Tuesday, 1 January 2013 15:59 (eight years ago) link

Have started what may turn into a full-chronology Alban Berg listening project (he being one of those composers with manageable output), with opp. 1-3 under my belt so far. Still struggling a bit to get much sense out of the songs, but the piano sonata op. 1 and string quartet op. 3 are really unfolding for me after some concentrated listening. If anyone has recommendations for specific recordings of these things, or for any of what lies in the future (Altenberg-Lieder, 4 clarinet/piano pieces, 3 orchestral pieces, Wozzeck, chamber concerto, Lyric Suite, Lulu (+suite), violin concerto), I'd love to hear them!

anatol_merklich, Tuesday, 1 January 2013 17:23 (eight years ago) link

(for the operas, DVD suggestions are of course particularly welcome!)

anatol_merklich, Tuesday, 1 January 2013 17:26 (eight years ago) link

pollini in the piano sonata iirc

i think james levine is good in the orchestral music

things that are jokes pretty much (Nilmar Honorato da Silva), Tuesday, 1 January 2013 17:29 (eight years ago) link

that is a really good idea by the way

who else has a relatively small oeuvre, if not of webern or varese level concision

things that are jokes pretty much (Nilmar Honorato da Silva), Tuesday, 1 January 2013 17:30 (eight years ago) link

debussy, ravel

the memoirs of gaydrian (clouds), Tuesday, 1 January 2013 17:33 (eight years ago) link

debussy is smallish, i think i am probaby familiar with 80% already

is there anyone from prior to the late 19th century?

things that are jokes pretty much (Nilmar Honorato da Silva), Tuesday, 1 January 2013 17:35 (eight years ago) link

ugh wikipedia has an 'impressionist music' infobox covering ravel debussy and satie

things that are jokes pretty much (Nilmar Honorato da Silva), Tuesday, 1 January 2013 17:41 (eight years ago) link

Not properly prior to the late 19th century I guess, but Borodin?

anatol_merklich, Tuesday, 1 January 2013 17:43 (eight years ago) link

Jean Barraque (20th century) also has a v small oeuvre.

xyzzzz__, Tuesday, 1 January 2013 17:46 (eight years ago) link

Yeah, Ravel has a pretty miniscule but potent oeuruever.

Zero Dark 33⅓: The Final Insult (Eric H.), Tuesday, 1 January 2013 17:46 (eight years ago) link

Sounds dirty.

_Rudipherous_, Tuesday, 1 January 2013 17:48 (eight years ago) link

Sorry, a sexual interpretation of that phrase is just very amusing to me for some reason. More immature for 2013.

_Rudipherous_, Tuesday, 1 January 2013 17:50 (eight years ago) link

My first draft called Ravel's "whole" "small and tight."

Zero Dark 33⅓: The Final Insult (Eric H.), Tuesday, 1 January 2013 17:51 (eight years ago) link

there's a lurid anecdote involving jean barraqué and a stiletto heel which google, for better or worse, is refusing to reveal

things that are jokes pretty much (Nilmar Honorato da Silva), Tuesday, 1 January 2013 17:53 (eight years ago) link

stuff i've been playing and enjoying at the store:

debussy - string quartet in g minor/ravel - string quartet in f major - drolc quartet (dg)

prokofieff - lieutenant kije suite/scythian suite - chicago/abbado (dg) (appreciating warhorses that might show up in a beef or cotton commercial important in my opinion. hearing new things in old chestnuts. plus, this recording is awesome.)

brahms - piano quartet no.2 in a major/mahler - piano quartet movement - domus (virgin classics digital) (big fan of the 80's virgin classic metal mastered stuff on vinyl. they sound amazing.)

dvorak - complete piano trios - suk trio (supraphon)

francois joseph fetis - first symphony (for organ and orchestra) - orchestre symphonique de la rtbf (koch schwann) (never heard fetis before this - mid 19th century dude - and i have no idea what the orchestre symphonique de la rtbf is but again (with the euro-pressings) i love koch schwann vinyl from the 80's and will check out anything on the label and this is pleasant stuff.)

neilsen - symphony no.5/sibelius - symphony no.5 - knodrashin - concertgebouw orchestra (philips) (2 great tastes that go great together!)

brahms - piano quartet in g minor - gilels and dudes from the amadeus quartet (dg) (one of my faves. pieces and recordings.)

piano music of poulenc - gabriel tacchino (angel)

mozart - six quintets for string quartet and viola - budapest string quartet + one more dude (columbia) (i never listen to mozart but i'm feeling string-y these days and i can't remember if i've ever played this box set.)

piano concertos of muzio clementi and giovanni paisiello - felicja blumental/torino symphony orch (auditorium) (late 60's recording on small geeky u.k. label distributed in the states by the legendary record hunter store in nyc.)

scott seward, Tuesday, 1 January 2013 17:54 (eight years ago) link

(appreciating warhorses that might show up in a beef or cotton commercial important in my opinion. hearing new things in old chestnuts. plus, this recording is awesome.)

OTM. I have become a sort of defender of warhorses. Most of them are warhorses for a reason, and in most cases the overexposed/culturally saturated bit is no more than a couple of minutes long. Listen to the rest of Also Sprach Zarathustra! It's really fun!

~farben~ (Jon Lewis), Tuesday, 1 January 2013 18:10 (eight years ago) link

neilsen - symphony no.5/sibelius - symphony no.5 - knodrashin - concertgebouw orchestra (philips)

Had NO idea this recording existed! That sounds potentially awesome.

~farben~ (Jon Lewis), Tuesday, 1 January 2013 18:12 (eight years ago) link

also full circleness-- I was urging you to hear the Suk Trio Brahms set years back in the enfance of this thread! So good and meaty.

~farben~ (Jon Lewis), Tuesday, 1 January 2013 18:12 (eight years ago) link

scott: rtbf = Radio Télévision Belge Francophone

anatol_merklich, Tuesday, 1 January 2013 18:13 (eight years ago) link

have become a big fan of the suk trio. and josef suk! the commposer that is. lucked into a trove of supraphon vinyl a couple of years back.

scott seward, Tuesday, 1 January 2013 18:17 (eight years ago) link

listening to robert erickson right now. night music/the idea of order at key west/pacific sirens. dismissed tons of academic-type CRI albums years ago cuz they weren't weird enough or didn't include vietnam-era tape hijinx or something (being punk rock or whatever) and then i go back and listen to one and i'm totally in love. and this actually does have cool tape stuff on Pacific Sirens. and weird vocalizing and all kinds of great sounds. he taught subotnick and oliveros when they were just wee little things and he definitely knew what was up.

anyway, this album has become a fave of mine. and i love the small room ambience of Night Music. don't know if any modern chillwavers have discovered Pacific Sirens but they should check it out.

scott seward, Tuesday, 1 January 2013 18:27 (eight years ago) link

xpost Suk's 'A Summer Tale' symphony tone poem thing rocks my world. The 'blind musicians' and 'phantoms' movements are so moving to me.

~farben~ (Jon Lewis), Tuesday, 1 January 2013 18:29 (eight years ago) link

in case people have never heard it. set adrift on memory bliss:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omuA2ghnrIY

scott seward, Tuesday, 1 January 2013 18:37 (eight years ago) link

Re catalogues of manageable sizes: The official work list of Fartein Valen (early Norwegian atonalist) clocks in at about 6 hours, according to a playlist published on Spotify (although a few works seem unrecorded). (The "official" criterion is important here; wikipedia says he also wrote about 25000 (!!) piano etudes, which have obviously not been recorded.)

anatol_merklich, Tuesday, 1 January 2013 19:10 (eight years ago) link

Lili Boulanger has a tiny catalogue, much of it very beautiful. I've been meaning to recommend her music here. I own two great CDs on the Timpani label:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Melodies-BOULANGER/dp/B000Y1BR7U/

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Works-Choir-Orchestra-BOULANGER/dp/B00113EZVK/

The second in particular cuts straight to the heart.

Terabytes of FLACS of screaming (Call the Cops), Tuesday, 1 January 2013 23:26 (eight years ago) link

oh yeah

jean cras too. his biography is a fun read: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean_Cras

the memoirs of gaydrian (clouds), Tuesday, 1 January 2013 23:39 (eight years ago) link

i really dig this dutch guy. 20th century. didn't write a TON of stuff. i like everything i've heard. pretty sure everything he did could fit on 4 CDs or so.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nTHz_nA5-qA

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NC4CTyBwzp4

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uhx7mLcWdJY

scott seward, Tuesday, 1 January 2013 23:50 (eight years ago) link

I have been savoring Jean Cras' Polypheme opera lately. He's really got the succulent stuff I go for.

~farben~ (Jon Lewis), Wednesday, 2 January 2013 00:54 (eight years ago) link

Gonna check out his orchestral songs after Polypheme.

~farben~ (Jon Lewis), Wednesday, 2 January 2013 00:55 (eight years ago) link

19th century composers tended to produce voluminously. For a compact body of work in high Romanticism I would nominate Berlioz, actually. The works themselves are large but there are only a few.

~farben~ (Jon Lewis), Wednesday, 2 January 2013 00:57 (eight years ago) link

Alkan too, perhaps.

~farben~ (Jon Lewis), Wednesday, 2 January 2013 00:58 (eight years ago) link

The works themselves are large but there are only a few.

*cough*wagner*cough* ;)

Thanks for Berg recoms, ttajpm!

anatol_merklich, Wednesday, 2 January 2013 06:52 (eight years ago) link

Re: Brahms trios, say this recording?

http://ec2.images-amazon.com/images/I/71ZDyilc3xL._AA1103_.jpg

Terabytes of FLACS of screaming (Call the Cops), Wednesday, 2 January 2013 07:55 (eight years ago) link

Not sure! They may have done them more than once. The one I have is analog, a 2cd set which does include the Horn Trio.

~farben~ (Jon Lewis), Wednesday, 2 January 2013 15:47 (eight years ago) link

All I could find in the library was the Borodin Trio's set on Chandos, so that will have to do for now!

Terabytes of FLACS of screaming (Call the Cops), Wednesday, 2 January 2013 16:31 (eight years ago) link

can somebody who knows Feldman better than I do tell me whether I should get this? The stuff I have of his I love a lot, but it looks as though there's a lot to know about him

too many encores (underrated aerosmith bootlegs I have owned), Wednesday, 2 January 2013 16:58 (eight years ago) link

If you like the 90 min stuff (esp. Crippled Symmetry, there is an affinity between both works in my mind) and feel like you could listen to this for even hours then yes I would get Philip Guston.

Have the California EAR Unit rec, if that matters.

xyzzzz__, Wednesday, 2 January 2013 17:39 (eight years ago) link

I have Feldman's String Quartet No. 2 (six hours) and have only listened to it once, but I really like having it.

誤訳侮辱, Wednesday, 2 January 2013 17:45 (eight years ago) link

SQ no. 2 is unlike Feldman's other 'late' music iirc, the last couple of hours are very different, more into repetition..

xyzzzz__, Wednesday, 2 January 2013 17:49 (eight years ago) link

I haven't dared For Philip Guston yet. My Feldman faves fall into the 30 to 70 minute range, it seems.

~farben~ (Jon Lewis), Wednesday, 2 January 2013 17:53 (eight years ago) link

My Feldman faves fall into the 30 to 70 minute range, it seems.

Definitely the case with me. I love the Piano & String Quartet (I have the '90s recording w/Kronos and Aki Takahashi), For John Cage (which splits between two CDs but is only about 82 minutes), and For Bunita Marcus (which I saw performed live once).

誤訳侮辱, Wednesday, 2 January 2013 17:56 (eight years ago) link

Definitely get this at any rate: http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/album.jsp?album_id=804552

Terabytes of FLACS of screaming (Call the Cops), Wednesday, 2 January 2013 18:12 (eight years ago) link

Guston is probably my favourite Feldman piece at the moment. of course it's a listening commitment, but over the course of a quiet evening it inhabits the space and resolves itself into some of MF's most beautiful, transcendent music.

soma dude (Noodle Vague), Wednesday, 2 January 2013 18:26 (eight years ago) link

For me, a piece like that is aspirational in a way - I'd buy the CD/box set dreaming that one day I'd have the kind of uncluttered existence where I could devote five hours to a single piece of music.

誤訳侮辱, Wednesday, 2 January 2013 18:33 (eight years ago) link

"uncluttered", "lazy", it's all good :)

soma dude (Noodle Vague), Wednesday, 2 January 2013 18:38 (eight years ago) link

listening to a nice 1953 pressing of bruckner's great mass no.3. dig it. maybe christ-y is the way to go for me and old bruckner. and 60 year old records.

scott seward, Thursday, 3 January 2013 16:35 (eight years ago) link

That's an interesting era, already recording to tape and releasing LPs but no stereo yet.

~farben~ (Jon Lewis), Thursday, 3 January 2013 16:37 (eight years ago) link

Some of the big names did their best work in that in between time. Thomas Beecham for example.

~farben~ (Jon Lewis), Thursday, 3 January 2013 16:37 (eight years ago) link

yeah i got no problem with mono. this is the vienna state philharmonia conducted by ferdinand grossman. which doesn't mean much to me. great recording though.

scott seward, Thursday, 3 January 2013 16:42 (eight years ago) link

sounds like a pseudonym for a pickup orchestra. There were lots of them back then. The Vienna [something] [something]

~farben~ (Jon Lewis), Thursday, 3 January 2013 16:44 (eight years ago) link

i'd much rather hear a newer recording of bruckner, but the dynamic range makes home listening difficult w/out headphones

silver pozole (clouds), Thursday, 3 January 2013 16:49 (eight years ago) link

For Bruckner's sound world I prefer the height of analog: 60s or 70s. Like the recording of #6 by Horst Stein on Decca.

~farben~ (Jon Lewis), Thursday, 3 January 2013 16:53 (eight years ago) link

on the opposite end of the recording spectrum, yesterday i was listening to angel digital vinyl of muti and philadelphia doing scriabin symphony no.1. soooooo creamy. and dreamy. and kinda perfect. state of the art if you will. in 1986 anyway.

scott seward, Thursday, 3 January 2013 17:23 (eight years ago) link

Creamy is the word for the Philadelphia, especially under Ormandy. Most recently I was getting drunk on their recording of Shostakovich #15. Haven't heard that many of the Muti/Philly era I must admit.

~farben~ (Jon Lewis), Thursday, 3 January 2013 17:26 (eight years ago) link

that's a mixed metaphor I guess. You don't get drunk on cream.

~farben~ (Jon Lewis), Thursday, 3 January 2013 17:27 (eight years ago) link

muti/philly was what hooked me on prokofiev's 3rd sym

silver pozole (clouds), Thursday, 3 January 2013 17:28 (eight years ago) link

One of the best Schubert piano performances I've ever heard is 5 bucks in Arkiv's January clearance sale:

http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/album.jsp?album_id=167461

~farben~ (Jon Lewis), Thursday, 3 January 2013 17:32 (eight years ago) link

So I haven't been paying close attention to the news for a month or so and it has come to my attention just now on another thread that Charles Rosen has died.

The Romantic Generation is one of the best books I've ever read, fiction or non-fiction, on any topic, and one of those rare books that really affected who I am at least w/r/t all my thoughts about art and artistic effort.

Gonna cue up Schumann's Davidsbundlertanze, one of many keystones I owe Rosen for.

RIP.

~farben~ (Jon Lewis), Friday, 4 January 2013 19:34 (eight years ago) link

He cancelled a gig and lecture here last year. Great writer - he's all over the original Boulez Webern box, an obscure but noteworthy point I didn't see in any of the obituaries.

OG requiem head (Call the Cops), Friday, 4 January 2013 20:50 (eight years ago) link

He was the first to record the Debussy Etudes, beating even Gieseking and Loriod to the punch. I really hope it finally gets released on CD as a tribute. It's supposed to me an amazing performance.

~farben~ (Jon Lewis), Friday, 4 January 2013 20:53 (eight years ago) link

RIP.

Loving this piece on Carter

No central beat can be; heard: the rhythms therefore do not cross, but proceed independently.

Looks at this - what a semi-colon!

xyzzzz__, Friday, 4 January 2013 21:28 (eight years ago) link

I meant to post this earlier today but got sidetracked by finding out about Rosen. It's a little Spotify playlist of the most recent things to slay me:

http://open.spotify.com/user/1213493496/playlist/62g39Ncy2VfBZkylN1tV61

1. Ernst Toch's vocal/chamber cycle The Chinese Flute. I love to wallow in modernist orientalism. I can't help it! I know it's wrong. This is so up my alley. If you love Das Lied von der Erde and Pierrot Lunaire you should give this a whirl. The recording available on Spotify is a historical mono one. Mine is the ravishing new digital recording on the cpo label.

2. Shostakovich 15th symphony, Ormandy conducting the Philadelphia Orch. Somehow the rich, creamy soulful Ormandy/Philly sound works incredibly well for the russian modernists. Their Prokofiev 5 is awesome and this recording of DSCH's last and most enigmatic symphony is even better. I don't know that much about Schnittke but it seems like DSCH 15 must have been a huge influence on him, with its impossible-to-fathom quotations and bitter, bitter tone of irony mixed with childish fantasy.

3. the music for chorus and orchestra of Maurice Ohana. Yet another 20th century francophone who gets me moondrunk on sheer instrumental color. A reissue series just came out of his orchestral and orchestral/vocal and chamber/vocal stuff. He's a little reminiscent of Messiaen but not derivatively so. The piece which got me super excited is a choral orchestral cycle called 'Office des Oracles' which is not on Spotify, but I found a similar piece.

4. Benjamin Frankel's fierce, beautiful serialism-tinged film score for the early Hammer Horror classic Curse of the Werewolf. I was reminded in various places of Schoenberg, Britten and Janacek. Take my word that those are three rare influences to encounter in film music. This is my first encounter with Frankel's music. It's a digital recording of a suite from the score which came out on Naxos.

5. Alfred Brendel's live broadcast performance of Beethoven's Diabelli Variations. This was released in a special series a few years ago around when he retired. It's the fourth Brendel Diabelli to come out on CD. He says it's his best one. It certainly can go head to head with, and is very complementary to, his Philips studio version, which was already one of my very favorites of this work. I am a tireless defender of Brendel's Beethoven, and believe me there's a lot of hate out there for it on the interwebs. His Beethoven has been up and down, but when he's on he's incomparable IMO. Anyway, the 2CD album this comes from is on clearance at Arkiv right now for like 8 bucks!

6. Who the hell is Edith Canat de Chizy? She's a living composer, she's French, I stumbled across these pieces completely by chance, and here way with an orchestra floors me.

~farben~ (Jon Lewis), Friday, 4 January 2013 22:48 (eight years ago) link

Dutilleux's piano music is great, I've discovered... Mean to listen to the orchestral works now in a much-recommended Chandos boxed set (Tortelier).

OG requiem head (Call the Cops), Sunday, 6 January 2013 21:58 (eight years ago) link

I have a new favorite cycle of Schumann symphonies, and it's Phillipe Herreweghe's Harmonia Mundi cycle. If owned it a few years, gave it a couple listens, but somehow this month on revisiting it, has unfolded itself to reveal sheer glory. The four deeply strange Schumann syms are pieces I've listened to exhaustively over the years; I've probably owned twenty different recordings of them. They are so full of sonic events, and so inscrutable in company with the rest of the 19th century heavies (as are his piano fragment cycles, but you can't engage the symphonies through the same prism as the piano cycles AT ALL. They are a different species of sphinx).

~farben~ (Jon Lewis), Thursday, 10 January 2013 16:57 (eight years ago) link

found a gem in one of my two dollar bins at the store:

hidden sparks - maryvonne le dize-richard (violin) and jean-claude henriot (piano) on New World Records from 1986. stuff by elliott carter, tod machover, john melby, and ralph shapey. don't know any of those dudes except for carter. though its possible i have something by melby on an old crystal records lp. (and the melby thing on here is awesome piece for violin and computer-synthesized tape)

anyway, this has been in the two dollar bin forever and its going home with me now.

scott seward, Thursday, 10 January 2013 17:20 (eight years ago) link

A few bits from Elliott Carter (Double Concerto), following that article by Rosen.

Hans-Joachim Hespos - a composer who was most active in the 70s and 80s, paints savage landscapes (note I said paint not splashes)...akin to Finnissy or Barrett or Emsley, many years later.

Listening to a few pieces for solo oboe too: Ausgangspunkte by Roger Redgate, Holliger's Studie. Looking for more to compile. xp

xyzzzz__, Thursday, 10 January 2013 17:23 (eight years ago) link

currently digging this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hrmb9iifnwg

Solange Knowles is my hero (DJP), Thursday, 10 January 2013 17:41 (eight years ago) link

Also a few works by Mark Osborn who died in his early 30s leaving about a dozen or so cracking compositions I can listen to an awful lot at times. He developed a sensibility like few others (he was a colleague of Czernowin's, who I talked about above) that is hard to describe right now.

Spahlinger - El Sonido Silencioso. Great choral piece from the mid-70s, post-Chilean coup.

xyzzzz__, Thursday, 10 January 2013 17:56 (eight years ago) link

xpost was scared that was gonna be amanda palmer for a sec

~farben~ (Jon Lewis), Thursday, 10 January 2013 17:59 (eight years ago) link

oh come the fuck on

Solange Knowles is my hero (DJP), Thursday, 10 January 2013 17:59 (eight years ago) link

(kidding)

~farben~ (Jon Lewis), Thursday, 10 January 2013 18:09 (eight years ago) link

btw Dan have you ever sung in/listened to Ives' Psalms? Had my first hearing of some of them yesterday and really, really dug them.

~farben~ (Jon Lewis), Thursday, 10 January 2013 18:10 (eight years ago) link

I've done Psalm 67 multiple times, which is also one of my favorite pieces ever

Solange Knowles is my hero (DJP), Thursday, 10 January 2013 18:16 (eight years ago) link

Luigi Nono - Un Volto, E del Mare, for voice and electronics: what marks it out is that he does such a convincing impersonation of a Renaissance Master (of his contemporaries, maybe only Bussotti wrote better for voice).

xyzzzz__, Friday, 11 January 2013 19:20 (eight years ago) link

Had a wonderful time with Ginastera's 'Panambi' on the recent Naxos disc with Gisele Ben-Dor and the LSO. I have to tell you that I have an almost inexhaustible weakness for large orchestra folk-modernist Rite of Spring ripoffs where 'pagan russia' is replaced with 'pagan <whatever the mother culture of the composer is.' I turned this one up to 10 and did some serious basking in it.

As mentioned on the alex ross thread, I'm burning through Taruskin's late 20th c book and while I got v little mileage out of most of the Babbitt Taruskin talks about, I am v glad to make the acquaintance of his 'Philomel' for soprano and electronics (it's on Spotify fyi).

Haenssler album of Ives' complete Psalms is now on my to-buy list.

the dyspeptic Hirax (Jon Lewis), Friday, 11 January 2013 20:07 (eight years ago) link

for babbitt i like: 1st piano cto, relata i, correspondences, vision and prayer and the sqs 2-6 (esp 6)

ð_ð (clouds), Friday, 11 January 2013 21:17 (eight years ago) link

have you heard Philomel?

the dyspeptic Hirax (Jon Lewis), Friday, 11 January 2013 21:31 (eight years ago) link

huh, my first thought was "of course i have" cuz it's usually the only babbitt anyone knows, but i don't think i actually have!

ð_ð (clouds), Friday, 11 January 2013 23:51 (eight years ago) link

Also a few works by Mark Osborn who died in his early 30s leaving about a dozen or so cracking compositions I can listen to an awful lot at times. He developed a sensibility like few others (he was a colleague of Czernowin's, who I talked about above) that is hard to describe right now.

Oy, I knew Mark and did not know he had passed away. He and I were undergrads at the same time and had composition class with Brian Ferneyhough. :)

Anyway, nice guy - I'm so sorry to hear about this. Chaya Czernowin was possibly already a doctoral student at this time.

timellison, Saturday, 12 January 2013 02:28 (eight years ago) link

re: Osborn. Looking at dates the compositions are listed from the mid-90s to 2001, really felt like there was a particular voice there, inventive writing for ensemble that was immediate -- whether harsh and engaging or both (why can't it both? he managed it effortlessly) whereas Czernowin is someone I'm only getting to grips w/now.

Babbitt - try A Solo Requiem for soprano and two pianos, its the one I stopped at.

Listening to Isang Yun - again, a particular voice I want to listen to. First heard his Glisees in this classic album, and Piri (Heinz Holliger on duty) absolutely slays these elongated lines (there are relations to Korean music I've yet to explore) juxtaposed with fast flurries, placed as an afterthought you'd think.

The studies for flute I'm making my way through now, the chamber works have these odd combinations so its all to be explored in a lot more depth although I can't be arsed with 5xsymphonies he wrote in the 80s. We'll see.

xyzzzz__, Sunday, 13 January 2013 23:47 (eight years ago) link

Were you trained in New Complexity, Tim?

EveningStar (Sund4r), Monday, 14 January 2013 00:52 (eight years ago) link

Ha, no. Mark was a little further advanced than I was and may have been more so. Ferneyhough's first assignment for me was "Create a composition that consists of the numbers one through nine." Those were the only instructions.

timellison, Monday, 14 January 2013 02:49 (eight years ago) link

And I'm sure Mark's compositions are brilliant. He was the real deal.

timellison, Monday, 14 January 2013 03:38 (eight years ago) link

Klaus Hubler - listening to Grave e Sfenato. "wotta fackin' piece!", as they say round these parts.

Think I have enough for an "Oboe from Mars" style compilation now..

xyzzzz__, Monday, 14 January 2013 12:08 (eight years ago) link

Nono's Ricorda Cosa Ti Hanno Fatto In Auschwitz for Solo tape is really increadible...from listening and not reading about it I'd say its a non-treatment of the subject, which is possibly the right approach.

In the same way the Spahlinger is a non-treatment of what happened in Chile - its not exactly a choral piece; more fragments of such, its atomized to snatches of song and scream. The way people are shut out.

Was trying to make my way through Britten's War Requiem but uncle Benjy is so emblematic (in my head) of everything that is wrong with the way the arts and music is talked about in this country...I can tell from the first min or so its going to be heavy going.

xyzzzz__, Monday, 14 January 2013 12:45 (eight years ago) link

Nono's Ricorda Cosa Ti Hanno Fatto In Auschwitz for Solo tape is really increadible

Indeed it is

Designated Striver (Tom D.), Monday, 14 January 2013 13:06 (eight years ago) link

Will give the Nono a first listen later today. God bless YouTube!

Re: that "Oboe from Mars" compilation, don't miss Claus-Steffan Mahnkopf's Solitude-Nocturne!

il caresse sa dingding (Paul in Santa Cruz), Monday, 14 January 2013 20:26 (eight years ago) link

I've yet to hear a piece by Mahnkopf that I really like - will give that a go.

Surprised you've never heard that Nono piece, Paul!

xyzzzz__, Monday, 14 January 2013 20:42 (eight years ago) link

anyone have any recs for "difficult" classical music? it's always been a kind of slurry undifferentiated background music genre for me and i think the way for me to get around that is to seek out examples that are deliberately antagonistic. I don't know how successful a strategy this will be because I have the same problem with metal.

Philip Nunez, Monday, 14 January 2013 20:47 (eight years ago) link

lachenmann - string quartets

#YOLO magic orchestra (clouds), Monday, 14 January 2013 20:53 (eight years ago) link

finnissy - english country-tunes

#YOLO magic orchestra (clouds), Monday, 14 January 2013 20:54 (eight years ago) link

Philip - don't think of this stuff as "deliberately antagonistic" (or to flip a coin, things that might be "beautiful"). I don't think there is much intention for any composer worth listening to be that (Lachenmann, as an example, would interrogate the idea of an idealised beauty that is bandied about but he wouldn't set out to make something deliberately ugly as its a reactianory move).

The first classical things I listened to Webern and Steve Reich and I never had those ideas. Then again I had few ideas about anything, so I appreciate its harder.

Can you go to any contemporary recitals? xp

xyzzzz__, Monday, 14 January 2013 21:04 (eight years ago) link

And if you can't see English Country Tunes playing in yur town soon there is footage of Michael Finnissy playing it in 1984 on youtube (only 25 mins or so, about half of it)

xyzzzz__, Monday, 14 January 2013 21:12 (eight years ago) link

Philip--

Elliott Carter - Double Concerto

the dyspeptic Hirax (Jon Lewis), Monday, 14 January 2013 21:19 (eight years ago) link

thanks for the recs! I didn't really know where to go from nancarrow(sp?) or nico muhly.

Philip Nunez, Monday, 14 January 2013 21:29 (eight years ago) link

Also, Xenakis - Jonchaies

the dyspeptic Hirax (Jon Lewis), Monday, 14 January 2013 21:39 (eight years ago) link

phil: i would just explore influences, regions, time periods. frinstance if you like nancarrow's player piano music you should explore ligeti's etudes, &c

#YOLO magic orchestra (clouds), Monday, 14 January 2013 21:52 (eight years ago) link

Eonta is my go to Xenakis these days.

Philip - v few classical mixed composer sets that work as albums but Trio Surplus worked up some inspiration. Quite unexpectedly varied yet within a tight spectrum, whether Liza Lim mining talking to the dead or Xenakis as having an almost lightly easternised vibe on Dmaathen, which actually is not his best on its own but works with the rest of the record.

Best of all is A Book of Maps by Ian Willcock.

xyzzzz__, Tuesday, 15 January 2013 10:24 (eight years ago) link

I attended the recording of this BBC Symphony orchestra performance of some John Zorn works on Saturday - http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b01ppw1t. Some of it, the first piece in particular, was absolutely stupendous. Wasn't so keen on the works that had soloists however. They weren't bad by any means but the pieces seemed to work best when the orchestra was working as a whole, without a focal point.

neilasimpson, Tuesday, 15 January 2013 13:42 (eight years ago) link

phil: i would just explore influences, regions, time periods. frinstance if you like nancarrow's player piano music you should explore ligeti's etudes, &c

― #YOLO magic orchestra (clouds), Monday, January 14, 2013 4:52 PM (Yesterday) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

This is p much how I learned classical music. Aside from the above method of branching out, you can also make good discoveries by following performers. As in, I loved this recording of Jan DeGaetani singing composer X, maybe I'll check out this record of Jan DeGaetani singing composer Y.

the dyspeptic Hirax (Jon Lewis), Tuesday, 15 January 2013 15:50 (eight years ago) link

Surprised you've never heard that Nono piece, Paul!

I don't have an easy time appreciating his tape pieces. Something about them. Maybe his tendency to collage together a lot of unmanipulated instrumental and vocal sounds, and that omnipresent muddy reverberation. Just not drawn to that sound world the way I am to Davidovsky's, say, or to the "Acousmatic" school's (if I may lump them together)…

il caresse sa dingding (Paul in Santa Cruz), Tuesday, 15 January 2013 20:32 (eight years ago) link

The only Nono in my collection is the ~20 minute extract from Prometeo on an Abbado/Berlin PO Prometheus-themed disc.

the dyspeptic Hirax (Jon Lewis), Tuesday, 15 January 2013 20:41 (eight years ago) link

Maybe his tendency to collage together a lot of unmanipulated instrumental and vocal sounds, and that omnipresent muddy reverberation.

Ah ok that piece won't persuade you as I really like a lot of those things. My favourite is Non consumiamo Marx, a collage of sounds from Paris '68.

xyzzzz__, Tuesday, 15 January 2013 22:10 (eight years ago) link

Found this piece which mentions Non... here:

On March 6, 1970, at the close of the Second International Free Composers Tribune in Prague, the final composer to be represented at the conference, Luigi Nono, spoke for more than 10 minutes before a large audience of mostly Czech musicians, vigorously criticizing my score for the short film “Pour,” which preceded his presentation. Although the protocol of the tribune permitted each composer only 10 minutes to speak about his or her own music, Nono took those 10 minutes to speak about mine, concluding with a scathing condemnation of my use of vernacular music.

Nono then went on for another 10 minutes about the making of his own work, especially pointing out the theoretically correct choice of the pre-recorded sounds he had employed. He then played a tape of his composition “Non Consumiamo Marx.” When the piece was over there were three people left in the hall at the Janacek Composers’ Club at 3 Besedni Street: Luigi Nono, Mr. Okurka (the technician who operated the tape recorder and sound system) and me.

xyzzzz__, Tuesday, 15 January 2013 22:15 (eight years ago) link

The choral works I connect with far more readily …

il caresse sa dingding (Paul in Santa Cruz), Tuesday, 15 January 2013 22:25 (eight years ago) link

Love Sara Dolce Tacere myself. I think a concert w/Renaissance works and choral pieces by Nono and Bussotti would be a must for me.

xyzzzz__, Tuesday, 15 January 2013 22:35 (eight years ago) link

(I must say I connect with most Nono I've heard, although I need a refresher on some of the works form the 50s so thx Nilmar)

xyzzzz__, Tuesday, 15 January 2013 22:36 (eight years ago) link

i don't know nono that well, promoteo, hay que caminar, the string quartets

liebeslied is on one of the wien modern albums that abbado recorded late 80s / early 90s, some pristine live recordings of ligeti, boulez, kurtag etc

things that are jokes pretty much (Nilmar Honorato da Silva), Tuesday, 15 January 2013 22:40 (eight years ago) link

Another good Nono piece is "A floresta é jovem e cheja de vida"

Designated Striver (Tom D.), Wednesday, 16 January 2013 13:54 (eight years ago) link

Gonna start making my way through Newman's sonatas. They strike me as no other, like updates on older classical sources yet not as physical, also played by Finnissy.

Here is a cut from the CD on MODE

xyzzzz__, Thursday, 17 January 2013 11:19 (eight years ago) link

not as physical like yer modernists I mean

xyzzzz__, Thursday, 17 January 2013 11:34 (eight years ago) link

Really enjoying Julius Eastman - Unjust Malaise (it's on Spotify). Great piece here on new music box:

http://www.newmusicbox.org/articles/In-Search-of-Julius-Eastman/

Crackle Box, Thursday, 17 January 2013 13:33 (eight years ago) link

That set was the biggest surprise - Julius had a real Cage-ian do it yourself ethos from his compositions, a very indepedently minded spirit to his music.

xyzzzz__, Thursday, 17 January 2013 14:14 (eight years ago) link

Hello classical music enthusiasts.

Question: If I am totally fixated on David Munrow's version of Lamento Di Tristano, but don't particularly love the other versions that I've heard, what is it that I'm liking? The only thing I can think of is that the beginning sounds ridiculously similar to Willow's Song (before the faster dance portion), and I like his story and that seems to put a stamp of YES on everything. Musically I can only guess it's the spareness and drone? I am just trying to figure out how to find more, but I don't even know what I'm searching for. It's not the songs, but the way he arranges them, I guess. Maybe I would like some weird old Sino-Russian music or something?

I would put this on the Early Music thread but I feel like this one is ok for weird questions.

this customer is a jerk (La Lechera), Thursday, 17 January 2013 15:09 (eight years ago) link

That's him doing the Baaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaannnnnnnnnnnnnnnggggggggggggggggggg bit on Dinosaur L 'Go Bang' too! And yeah 'very independently minded' gets right to it. Love that story about him performing a Cage piece and his interpretation involved stripping a male model and it totally pissing Cage off.

Crackle Box, Thursday, 17 January 2013 15:10 (eight years ago) link

Note -- It's partially the songs, but I don't love all of them like I love that particular one.

this customer is a jerk (La Lechera), Thursday, 17 January 2013 15:13 (eight years ago) link

got some nice vinyl for myself the other day:

poulenc - stabat mater (angel)

music for a great cathedral - the choir of st. paul's cathedral (guild)

haydn - theresa mass (argo)

ravel - chansons medecasses/sites auriculaires frontispice/sonata for violin & cello (nonesuch)

brahms - symphony no. 2 - boult/baker/london phil (angel) (couldn't remember if i had this or not)

america sings 1920-1950 (vox box) (barber, carter, cowell, foss, ives, piston, etc, etc.)

america sings volume v - american choral music after 1950 (vox box) (bergsma, carter, bruckman, harrison, etc, etc.)

josquin desprez - marian motets (archiv)

bach - motet: jesus, priceless treasure and sacred part-songs - choir of king's college, cambridge (argo)

monteverdi & gesualdo - motets & madrigals - monteverdi choir (argo)

britten - part songs - elizabethan singers (argo)

bach cantatas - elly ameling (philips)

hugo wolf - lieder/schumann - frauenlibe und leben - helen watts/geoffrey parsons (l'oiseau lyre)

brahms - the young brahms: early songs - fischer-dieskau/moore (angel)

scott seward, Thursday, 17 January 2013 15:29 (eight years ago) link

anyway, my kind of stuff. and i am such a sucker for those argo and l'oiseau lyre pressings. and guild! never see them around these parts. can you get old guild pressings in the dollar bins in the u.k.?

scott seward, Thursday, 17 January 2013 15:31 (eight years ago) link

I haven't heard the Munrow version, I have a version played by some hardcore authenticity obsessed people. The opening theme is played on something that sounds like a hammered dulcimer. This gives off a similar vibe to me:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U2zRuYWl4aU

May be way off though, dunno! x-posts

Crackle Box, Thursday, 17 January 2013 15:40 (eight years ago) link

Really enjoying Julius Eastman - Unjust Malaise

'Gay Guerilla' on that set is one of my favourite pieces of music ever - would love to see it performed, one day

Ward Fowler, Thursday, 17 January 2013 15:44 (eight years ago) link

lechera, u'd probably enjoy the clemencic consorts recording of gabrieli's canzonas and sonatas:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X9eL2akC6r0

#YOLO magic orchestra (clouds), Thursday, 17 January 2013 15:46 (eight years ago) link

Wow that Harry Partsch song sounds like awesome dream sequence music. Hm, I have heard that guy's name but never looked into it. Is this representative? Sorry for all the questions. I am trying to figure out what I am currently digging re: classical.

I'll c/p your recommendation for later, clouds. Thank you.

this customer is a jerk (La Lechera), Thursday, 17 January 2013 15:54 (eight years ago) link

america sings 1920-1950 (vox box) (barber, carter, cowell, foss, ives, piston, etc, etc.)

america sings volume v - american choral music after 1950 (vox box) (bergsma, carter, bruckman, harrison, etc, etc.)

WANT

Crackle Box, Thursday, 17 January 2013 16:02 (eight years ago) link

LL I think u would dig the Partch CD titled 'Historic Speech-Music Recordings' as an intro to his world.

Welcome to the classical thread where no one but me and scott ever wanna talk about old fart pre-WWII stuff!

consistency is the owlbear of small minds (Jon Lewis), Thursday, 17 January 2013 16:08 (eight years ago) link

*crosses arms*

#YOLO magic orchestra (clouds), Thursday, 17 January 2013 16:10 (eight years ago) link

Gonna have to do some ear research on the Munrow/Tristano question. But I just scared up something rly interesting; it sounds like there is a Henze composition that Munrow fans need to hear (let me know if this Google Books link works or not):

http://books.google.com/books?id=uxB39t7O3FcC&pg=PA56&lpg=PA56&dq=david+munrow+lamento+di+tristano&source=bl&ots=9dG-FrHyWW&sig=zdr9M4-OoEvbNDb02DIbajU8Nlc&hl=en&sa=X&ei=qiD4UJ-VGuqy0QHQp4GYCQ&ved=0CF4Q6AEwBw#v=onepage&q=david%20munrow%20lamento%20di%20tristano&f=false

consistency is the owlbear of small minds (Jon Lewis), Thursday, 17 January 2013 16:13 (eight years ago) link

AND CLOUDS

xpost

consistency is the owlbear of small minds (Jon Lewis), Thursday, 17 January 2013 16:13 (eight years ago) link

That album title is deliciously boring. I love it, will investigate.
I had already counted clouds among my allies ;)

this customer is a jerk (La Lechera), Thursday, 17 January 2013 16:14 (eight years ago) link

also I am all for including early music in cm discussions. Especially with how much we talk about post-war stuff itt and how much the post-war avant garde was thinking about early music in their own work.

consistency is the owlbear of small minds (Jon Lewis), Thursday, 17 January 2013 16:14 (eight years ago) link

yeah it is a hella dry title but it includes works that quote hobo inscriptions from the railings of train stations and transcribed cries of san fran newsboys!

consistency is the owlbear of small minds (Jon Lewis), Thursday, 17 January 2013 16:15 (eight years ago) link

this is magical cd which includes a nice version of the partch piece:

http://www.allmusic.com/album/just-west-coast-mw0001407432

any bach experts here? i have a bach question on the sandy bull thread...

Crackle Box, Thursday, 17 January 2013 16:32 (eight years ago) link

Thanks for asking, bc now I looked at that thread and I never knew abt Sandy Bull before now! If that album is on spotify I can prob ID the bach pc for you...

consistency is the owlbear of small minds (Jon Lewis), Thursday, 17 January 2013 16:40 (eight years ago) link

What? Trade you a Harry Partch for a Sandy Bull. He's great!
I'll be back when I have something more to report about what I am currently digging. Thank you thread!

this customer is a jerk (La Lechera), Thursday, 17 January 2013 16:53 (eight years ago) link

Really enjoying Julius Eastman - Unjust Malaise (it's on Spotify). Great piece here on new music box:

http://www.newmusicbox.org/articles/In-Search-of-Julius-Eastman/

― Crackle Box, Thursday, 17 January 2013 Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

Sad article, have a quite a few compositions of perfs from many composers that were transferred from tape to mp3s which should be getting a wider issue (not to mention a clearer recording in some cases), with good liner notes so as to perhaps encourage more enthusiasm and performance and understanding.

So much is tied up in older cassettes where you need to contact the people performing, or excellent performances that are tied up in publishing hell.

xyzzzz__, Thursday, 17 January 2013 17:42 (eight years ago) link

Welcome to the classical thread where no one but me and scott ever wanna talk about old fart pre-WWII stuff!

Getting organized here, give me a minute :-)

Scoobie Dufay (Paul in Santa Cruz), Thursday, 17 January 2013 20:39 (eight years ago) link

awesome dn there!

consistency is the owlbear of small minds (Jon Lewis), Thursday, 17 January 2013 21:08 (eight years ago) link

Was hoping someone would listen to the Newman I posted earlier and tell me what other old fart 19th century stuff it sounds like?

When I started posting here I thought we'd discuss classical music from other eras, hoping to make new links too.

xyzzzz__, Thursday, 17 January 2013 22:13 (eight years ago) link

you know you can always talk about whatever you want. everyone wins.

scott seward, Thursday, 17 January 2013 22:20 (eight years ago) link

i feel really clueless about more recent stuff. so its always nice to hear about that. my problem is i don't really ever download/stream/etc. i listen to CDs and vinyl and CDs of recent music is hard to come by for me. though i do listen to stuff on youtube.

scott seward, Thursday, 17 January 2013 22:22 (eight years ago) link

i was so excited when i found a bunch of schnittke CDs at the library book sale last summer! i never ever see them anywhere and that goes double for any vinyl of his stuff. listened to it for months.

scott seward, Thursday, 17 January 2013 22:24 (eight years ago) link

So I am obsessed at the moment with Bach's organ chorale prelude BWV 659, and particularly with Busoni's solo-piano transcription of the same.

The recording a very elderly Horowitz made in his living room, for the documentary, "The Last Romantic" , I find almost unbearably moving.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2PzGf-_zKuM

(This YT comment fits nicely with the poignancy of the music:

"..it was very beautiful, very beautiful..."
Horrowitz: " But I didn't compose it.... "
In this line he shows his sadness. His dream was to become a composer afterall. I bet he is composing in the life after ;)

Like many of the chorale preludes, this one consists of a freely imitative texture over which phrases of the chorale tune are presented (in this case with an unusual degree of liberty and elaboration). Here is the chorale tune itself, in a harmonization by Bach.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uAiFO4S9G_g

For more information about this tune, including a transcription and English translation of Martin Luther's text, see: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Texts/Chorale016-Eng3.htm

My other favorite performances of Bach-Busoni BWV 659:

Perahia - more momentum
Paul Jacobs - evokes sound of organ

Here's a nice performance of Bach BWV 659 by organist Hans-Andre Stamm:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R6piOhwgopg

And if you still haven't had your fill of this music, check out the superb musician Stefan Hussong playing a transcription for accordian!

Scoobie Dufay (Paul in Santa Cruz), Thursday, 17 January 2013 22:28 (eight years ago) link

xyzzzz, I missed when you said the Newman was on Spotify. Listening to his First Sonata now. First mvmt is a dead ringer style-wise for late (last 7 or 8 Piano Sonatas) Schubert. Almost sounds like it could be a po-mo collage of bits from the late schubert!

2nd mvmt puts me in mind more of prokofiev's sonata style, especially his 2nd through 4th sonatas. Also Bartok's early set of Bagatelles.

3 mvmt - harder to pin down similarities. More brittle and strange, made of isolated gestures, than the first 2 mvmts. Oh gosh now the pianist is singing! I like the effect.

consistency is the owlbear of small minds (Jon Lewis), Thursday, 17 January 2013 22:32 (eight years ago) link

Newman's 4th sonata is bleary, wrong-note Bach, sounding plausibly Bach for a while but then repeatedly wandering outside the lines.

Will listen to the other 2 sonatas on this album tomorrow.

consistency is the owlbear of small minds (Jon Lewis), Thursday, 17 January 2013 23:11 (eight years ago) link

Paul - wonderful post. That Horowitz youtube stopped me on my tracks - will have to check the rest later.

Thx Jon, also.

xyzzzz__, Friday, 18 January 2013 08:49 (eight years ago) link

Horowitz is such a weird pianist. People make out like Gould was an eccentric interpreter but Horowitz' style was just SO palpably bizarre, it's wild that he became the public name for 'greatest pianist on earth'. Even the sound of his instrument was weird. NB I actually LIKE him a lot in things like Kreisleriana and Scarlatti sonatas and Scriabin.

consistency is the owlbear of small minds (Jon Lewis), Friday, 18 January 2013 16:01 (eight years ago) link

+1 on the latter two.

I don't know if I'm projecting but on the Meysles brothers films of him I get the vivid impression of a gay man culturally straitjacketed with a really dominating diva wife (Toscanini's daughter?) to boot. I can't escape the poignancy of this, to a certain extent anyway, when listening to the few records of his I have.

OG requiem head (Call the Cops), Friday, 18 January 2013 18:34 (eight years ago) link

To my understanding, you are not projecting re: that situation.

consistency is the owlbear of small minds (Jon Lewis), Friday, 18 January 2013 19:03 (eight years ago) link

That's consistent with what I've heard from people who knew him slightly. Not that they had juicy rumors of marital infidelity or anything like that. The trapped part as much as the gay part. It is an interesting meaning to map onto some of his performances.

And yes, an eccentric interpreter who achieved the highest level of mainstream appeal. His earlier recordings have a kind of nervous energy, his later ones seemingly placid but with a nervous undercurrent capable of exploding into the foreground. The violence of that final cadence in bwv 659! But I can't call him eccentric without adding that he is unfailingly sincere.

Scoobie Dufay (Paul in Santa Cruz), Friday, 18 January 2013 19:38 (eight years ago) link

placid at times, it would be better to say

Scoobie Dufay (Paul in Santa Cruz), Friday, 18 January 2013 19:45 (eight years ago) link

His performance of Liszt's Scherzo und Marsch (Sony) is... well, if it doesn't sell you on Liszt's 'demonic' side, nothing ever will.

consistency is the owlbear of small minds (Jon Lewis), Friday, 18 January 2013 19:48 (eight years ago) link

i bought so many classical records this week. i don't know what i'm thinking...i don't sell that many classical records. can't resist i guess.

scott seward, Friday, 18 January 2013 21:00 (eight years ago) link

if you need selling on liszt then fuck you

things that are jokes pretty much (Nilmar Honorato da Silva), Friday, 18 January 2013 23:53 (eight years ago) link

To be clear, I am a Liszt partisan from way back. But vh's scherzo really shows you the demon in the demon.

Whose st Francis is that, nilmar?

consistency is the owlbear of small minds (Jon Lewis), Saturday, 19 January 2013 00:40 (eight years ago) link

hamelin

things that are jokes pretty much (Nilmar Honorato da Silva), Saturday, 19 January 2013 00:42 (eight years ago) link

i think i have seen him play that

ive been using up my wh4+.cd tokens on old liszt cds, i think i have all of hamelin's recordings

also something called 'the composer pianists' in which our quebecois hero plays loads of silly music by people called sorabji, which i don't think i will listen to again

things that are jokes pretty much (Nilmar Honorato da Silva), Saturday, 19 January 2013 00:44 (eight years ago) link

i was disappointed in sorabji

hypnotiQ tanqueray (clouds), Saturday, 19 January 2013 00:46 (eight years ago) link

i read a biographical article about him years ago which was more interesting than any of his music i have heard

things that are jokes pretty much (Nilmar Honorato da Silva), Saturday, 19 January 2013 00:48 (eight years ago) link

better read than heard from, agreed

consistency is the owlbear of small minds (Jon Lewis), Saturday, 19 January 2013 00:52 (eight years ago) link

I have a broadcast of Hamelin playing his own set of 12 etudes, I need to bust that out again. Was not in the mood on first audition.

consistency is the owlbear of small minds (Jon Lewis), Saturday, 19 January 2013 00:55 (eight years ago) link

yeah i think that could be quietly shelved

things that are jokes pretty much (Nilmar Honorato da Silva), Saturday, 19 January 2013 00:58 (eight years ago) link

I wish Hamelin would record Liszt's penultimate version of the Transcendental Etudes. There's yet to be a credible rendition of those (Leslie Howard did them, Janice Weber did them, Ogdon did one or two, that's all there's been).

consistency is the owlbear of small minds (Jon Lewis), Saturday, 19 January 2013 01:05 (eight years ago) link

ha i was just thinking i should listen to those again

they aren't among my favourite liszt

the guardian reviewer speculated that hamelin hasn't recorded all that much because hyperion have the whole howard collection

things that are jokes pretty much (Nilmar Honorato da Silva), Saturday, 19 January 2013 01:14 (eight years ago) link

jon what is your favourite alkan and how do you rate him in the grand victorian scheme of things?

things that are jokes pretty much (Nilmar Honorato da Silva), Saturday, 19 January 2013 01:37 (eight years ago) link

http://ak.buy.com/PI/0/500/60097986.jpg

im increasingly convinced the 80s was the apogee of classical album cover design

things that are jokes pretty much (Nilmar Honorato da Silva), Saturday, 19 January 2013 02:05 (eight years ago) link

The English pianist Ian Pace describes Sorabji's music as that of "a massive ego thoroughly unaware of its crushing banality."[190] The music critic Andrew Clements calls Sorabji "just another 20th-century English eccentric ... whose talent never matched [his] musical ambition."[191] The music journalist Max Harrison, in his review of Rapoport's book Sorabji: A Critical Celebration, heavily criticised Sorabji's compositions, piano playing, criticism and personal conduct and implied that "nobody cared except a few close friends".[192]

things that are jokes pretty much (Nilmar Honorato da Silva), Saturday, 19 January 2013 02:34 (eight years ago) link

Alkan: I have only scratched the surface but he is definitely brilliant. I know the solo Concerto (in Hamelin's earlier recording) and I have the Hyperion discs of the Sonata and the Symphony waiting to be attended to.

consistency is the owlbear of small minds (Jon Lewis), Saturday, 19 January 2013 03:04 (eight years ago) link

That quote by Ian comes from this classic thread on Sorabji (first time I heard his name when I posted there).

R3 shut it down, before the cuts - no reason given that I know of at the time - but it could be er difficult to manage at times.

I have to say I always wanted to hear Opus Clavicembalisticum alongside Finnissy's History of Photography in Sound for an experiment.

xyzzzz__, Saturday, 19 January 2013 12:46 (eight years ago) link

that clements quote is quite apposite generallky i think -- 'eccentricity' as a curse of english culture, the repressively tolerated selfconscious 'weirdness' of prog or whatever vs disaffection for the sincerely strange and uncompromising

things that are jokes pretty much (Nilmar Honorato da Silva), Saturday, 19 January 2013 12:58 (eight years ago) link

Clemets says this is "modelled on Busoni's Fantasia Contrappuntistica". Since we've been talking about Busoni and Bach I'll give it a go.

This is really good piece on Sorabji by Max Harrison.

Withdrawing your music from performance for 40 years says it all.

xyzzzz__, Saturday, 19 January 2013 13:36 (eight years ago) link

For Fantasia Contrappuntistica, you want the two-piano version in the recording by Paul Jacobs and Richard Goode, which was finally issued on CD recently. I never saw the point of the Fantasia till i heard this recording. Like Liszt, Busoni seems to be very much at the mercy of his interpreters.

consistency is the owlbear of small minds (Jon Lewis), Saturday, 19 January 2013 15:21 (eight years ago) link

Will definitely check out the Jacobs/Goode Fantasia Contrappuntistica. The piece hasn't clicked for me the few times I've heard it. (Once? Twice?)

& a belated thanks for the display name props, took me a while to figure out what "dn" meant! (I know, a standard ILX abbreviation…)

Scoobie Dufay (Paul in Santa Cruz), Saturday, 19 January 2013 19:42 (eight years ago) link

We've been listening to the Brandenburg Concertos at work recently. Man, instead of giving the kids drugs for ADHD, they should have them listen to some Bach.

nicky lo-fi, Saturday, 19 January 2013 19:53 (eight years ago) link

bach is tops. i gave this woman i know a box set of solo bach violin partitas for free today cuz she asked me if i ever had any and she really wanted one. i looked in back and i had three box sets. spread the bach love, that's my motto.

scott seward, Saturday, 19 January 2013 20:45 (eight years ago) link

listening to an excellent telefunken box right now of dvorak stuff. vaclav neumann and tschechische philharmonie doing various dances and suites and wood dove stuff. sounds awesome.

scott seward, Saturday, 19 January 2013 20:46 (eight years ago) link

actually sold classical records today! to a chinese kid who goes to deerfield academy. he comes in every once in a while. and i sold a couple of other things to the woman i mentioned. they both bought string stuff. the woman plays the viola. i don't know what the kid plays. always encouraging when people buy my classical seeing as how i buy way more than i can ever sell.

scott seward, Saturday, 19 January 2013 20:49 (eight years ago) link

99% of the people who come in here who buy rock and jazz and folk or whatever would never ever buy a classical record. not even for a dollar. almost zero crossover. unless its like an electronic record or stockhausen or satie. non-classical people will buy satie and occasionally a glenn gould record.

seriously thinking of including a free classical record with every purchase.

scott seward, Saturday, 19 January 2013 20:52 (eight years ago) link

seriously thinking of including a free classical record with every purchase.

No doubt generating a mixture of smiles, puzzled looks, and maybe even a few future classical sales. Can't assess from a business angle but I love the idea in principle.

Scoobie Dufay (Paul in Santa Cruz), Saturday, 19 January 2013 21:34 (eight years ago) link

think i might just put a box near me of clean dollar/two dollar stuff and just tell people they can take one for free when they buy something. no pressure.

scott seward, Saturday, 19 January 2013 21:43 (eight years ago) link

I have some of those Neumann Czech Phil recordings. Such a great sound and great feel. Scott if you ever notice Czech Phil records conducted by karel sejna, listen to them! I have his Dvorak 5 and Beethoven 6 and they're both magical.

consistency is the owlbear of small minds (Jon Lewis), Saturday, 19 January 2013 22:39 (eight years ago) link

Marius constant! Dee-doo dee-doo dee-doo dee-doo

consistency is the owlbear of small minds (Jon Lewis), Saturday, 19 January 2013 22:48 (eight years ago) link

(Do you like my rendition of the twilight zone theme ?)

consistency is the owlbear of small minds (Jon Lewis), Saturday, 19 January 2013 22:49 (eight years ago) link

how much of your classical is vinyl scott

classical vinyl collectors are quite a rarity id guess

possibly still some old people who never got out of the habit

things that are jokes pretty much (Nilmar Honorato da Silva), Saturday, 19 January 2013 22:51 (eight years ago) link

i bought three classical records just like a week ago! i am trying to figure out what i like, and that is taking some time, but i would be elated to get a free classical record with my purchase.

update on my situation:

1) i realized that harry partch recordings aren't easy to find (go ahead and laugh, it won't hurt me because i can't hear you)
2) i got HP collection Vol 2 from emusic
3) it was ok but not nearly as interesting as the youtube posted above

not really back at square one, but i guess i'll just keep listening to the things i have until i get sick of them. as it is, i listen to the same song like 3x before i feel like i really get it. i've had this on repeat in my car since i got it:

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_gGRVVjXfK-U/TDtIe-8KKmI/AAAAAAAAAv0/WtuKOHxIhzU/s1600/Early+Music+Consort+.01.jpg

ALSO
the store i used to work at had a special "classical room", which no other store in the area had, and it was a wonderful haven of peace from the rest of the store and had comfortable chairs. it was clearly a place for people who knew how to live.

this customer is a jerk (La Lechera), Saturday, 19 January 2013 23:00 (eight years ago) link

omg that is huge i am so sorry
wow

this customer is a jerk (La Lechera), Saturday, 19 January 2013 23:01 (eight years ago) link

i listen to classical all the time at home now

it's nice

surm, Saturday, 19 January 2013 23:03 (eight years ago) link

my store is pretty much just used records. one shelf of CDs. i guy i know came in and bought a 3 dollar record and i told him he could pick out a 2 dollar classical album for free and he was very happy to look through the boxes. he took some ravel.

scott seward, Saturday, 19 January 2013 23:09 (eight years ago) link

i think it goes without saying that i would enjoy visiting your store but
i would enjoy visiting your store

rather

this customer is a jerk (La Lechera), Saturday, 19 January 2013 23:11 (eight years ago) link

i sold about 300 dollars worth of records today. 40 dollars of that was classical. i'll take it! most people don't even bother. i like to put out nice stuff for cheap. i would love to expand even more. and have the best vinyl classical section in the state of massachusetts.

scott seward, Saturday, 19 January 2013 23:15 (eight years ago) link

that posted accidentally because my mouse was freaking out and i tried to clean it
but fortunately i meant that wholeheartedly

40/300 doesn't sound too bad -- is 300 normal for a saturday?

this customer is a jerk (La Lechera), Saturday, 19 January 2013 23:16 (eight years ago) link

i spent my entire day listing elvis 45s on ebay and listening to amazing classical records. it's a living.

scott seward, Saturday, 19 January 2013 23:17 (eight years ago) link

300 is a good saturday for me. plus i sold odds and ends. books, some comics, some CDs. it was a slow week though.

scott seward, Saturday, 19 January 2013 23:18 (eight years ago) link

January is slowsville, says my friend who runs the comics shop down the street. He takes his vacations in January.

consistency is the owlbear of small minds (Jon Lewis), Saturday, 19 January 2013 23:29 (eight years ago) link

i actually do okay right after christmas. kids home from school. people are bored. last january i did really well. its really just this past week that was the pits.

scott seward, Saturday, 19 January 2013 23:46 (eight years ago) link

Is Wim Mertens 'Classical'? Recently got his Struggle for Pleasure album and it's very enjoyable. Find myself putting it on again after it finishes and putting it on when I can't think of anything particular to play.

brotherlovesdub, Sunday, 20 January 2013 00:10 (eight years ago) link

my partner loooooves that album

hypnotiQ tanqueray (clouds), Sunday, 20 January 2013 00:19 (eight years ago) link

The only mertens I know is the sdtrk to belly of an architect ...

consistency is the owlbear of small minds (Jon Lewis), Sunday, 20 January 2013 00:46 (eight years ago) link

i love the stuff i have of his on windham hill. whisper me is great. such underheard records. you can buy them on vinyl for nothing. i think of him more in the harold budd type of arena? whatever that is. modern newage ambient classical whatever music.

scott seward, Sunday, 20 January 2013 03:23 (eight years ago) link

i would totally buy any of his Les Disques Du Crépuscule releases from the 80's and 90's but physical copies are harder to find. the windham hill pressings are ubiqutous. and they are comps of the les disques material.

scott seward, Sunday, 20 January 2013 03:28 (eight years ago) link

Outsider music tonight in London. Tenney, Nancarrow among others.

Won't be there.

Liking Invisibility for Solo cello by Liza Lim quite a bit. I was at that concert, and it felt like I was witnessing the birth of something that would be in the repertoir for a long time to come. First time that has happened.

Really hit me because I had a CD of hers - works from the 90s - that hadn't made much of an impression but it seems like only now she is writing great music. So Wild Winged One for Solo Trumpet has these clownish flurries of humour that get your attention straight away, but there is an argument in which they are subsumed into, grains of which only return now and then. I haven't heard many compositions for solo trumpet, its hard to get away from its legacy in jazz but she certainly manages to give it a distinct character.

xyzzzz__, Sunday, 20 January 2013 11:47 (eight years ago) link

I just got back from seeing the Cecilia String Quartet and pianist Georgy Tchaidze at the university. The one contemporary work the quartet played, Another Little Piece of My Heart by Kelly-Marie Murphy, is really really great, despite the dumb title. You can watch one movement here: http://youtu.be/39Fla-lTbNw

They also did Franck's Piano Quintet, which was staggering. And Tchaidze played some Mendelssohn. I admit to taking a nap during Variations serieuses.:P

EveningStar (Sund4r), Sunday, 20 January 2013 22:50 (eight years ago) link

Variations sneuzes

consistency is the owlbear of small minds (Jon Lewis), Sunday, 20 January 2013 23:03 (eight years ago) link

Wonder what Canadian composers Cecilia will be recording - get onto it Sund4r :)

xyzzzz__, Sunday, 20 January 2013 23:17 (eight years ago) link

Yeah, that Franck piece rules.

timellison, Sunday, 20 January 2013 23:33 (eight years ago) link

Yun's Study for Flute is A+++

Liza Lim's Mother Tongue I'm undecided on this - great vocal lines and all but some of the brassy lines don't agree w/me, a bit one-dimensional at times. Will re-listen

xyzzzz__, Tuesday, 22 January 2013 13:05 (eight years ago) link

how about this! i was just listening to john renbourn's lady and the unicorn and was like WHAT IS THIS SONG because it sounded so familiar
it was lamento di tristano played super duper fast!!

i never look at the song titles on this record but now i know
pleasant surprise, the end

this customer is a jerk (La Lechera), Wednesday, 23 January 2013 00:45 (eight years ago) link

i forgot about my ear-research project i was supposed to do on that ('why does LL like Munrow Lamento di Tristano more than other versions? What makes this Tristano diff than other Tristanos?')

here is no telephone (Jon Lewis), Wednesday, 23 January 2013 18:33 (eight years ago) link

it's ok, you have other things to do -- i'm patient! i think it has something to do with (1) spare instrumentation (2) drone and (3) pace, but beyond that i have no idea.

this customer is a jerk (La Lechera), Wednesday, 23 January 2013 18:35 (eight years ago) link

I've hunted a work for larger ensemble by Newman (The State Paintings with the anti-abstract), he has this...naivety about him, very English experimental school, i.e. post-Obscure records variety, yet what keeps you from dismissing it as solely is that is by how well learnt it is. Lives and revels in that paradox.

Elliott Carter re-discovery gathers pace - rocking away the duo for violin and piano from '75. The violin is incredibly gestural and violent, the piano is a almost ambient observer by comparison. Until it joins in the fun later, that is.

xyzzzz__, Thursday, 24 January 2013 16:14 (eight years ago) link

anyone recognize the artist of this painting?

http://static.qobuz.com/images/jaquettes/3760/3760127221029_600.jpg

ramblin' evil mushroom (clouds), Saturday, 26 January 2013 22:46 (eight years ago) link

It's a detail from Johann Friedrich Overbeck's "Maria und Elisabeth mit dem Jesus- und Johannesknaben".
http://www.arthistoryarchive.com/arthistory/romanticism/Friedrich-Overbeck.html

Øystein, Saturday, 26 January 2013 23:47 (eight years ago) link

wow! i was expecting it to be some northern renaissance painter from the 15th/16th century. thanks :D

ramblin' evil mushroom (clouds), Sunday, 27 January 2013 00:24 (eight years ago) link

probably a fun cd (idk much ornstein apart from "suicide in an airplane"), but ugh that cover

ramblin' evil mushroom (clouds), Sunday, 27 January 2013 23:05 (eight years ago) link

Well people really did call them that tbf

John Bradshaw-Leather (Jon Lewis), Monday, 28 January 2013 00:02 (eight years ago) link

that is solidly in the upper quartile of steffen scheiermacher covers judging by a cursory gis

Why they hide the bodice under décolletage? (Nilmar Honorato da Silva), Monday, 28 January 2013 00:21 (eight years ago) link

Re: that "Oboe from Mars" compilation, don't miss Claus-Steffan Mahnkopf's Solitude-Nocturne!

― il caresse sa dingding (Paul in Santa Cruz), Monday, 14 January 2013 Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

Love this! Def on the comp!

xyzzzz__, Monday, 28 January 2013 11:08 (eight years ago) link

So wanna go to this tonight. *sigh*

xyzzzz__, Monday, 28 January 2013 14:10 (eight years ago) link

http://open.spotify.com/track/7mc9iLnsOGsKyTHs6ICpNT

can anyone id that bach piece?

Crackle Box, Monday, 28 January 2013 14:36 (eight years ago) link

Happy birthday to Delius!

OG requiem head (Call the Cops), Tuesday, 29 January 2013 19:40 (eight years ago) link

cool — i will listen to "paris" for the occasion

ramblin' evil mushroom (clouds), Tuesday, 29 January 2013 19:44 (eight years ago) link

I always wanna reach for Song of the High Hills or Appalachia

hibernaculum (Jon Lewis), Tuesday, 29 January 2013 19:57 (eight years ago) link

Jon: as a big Sibelius fan, what do you think of Rozhdestvensky?

OG requiem head (Call the Cops), Tuesday, 5 February 2013 10:02 (eight years ago) link

I have not heard any of Rozhdy's Sibelius cycle. I understand it's kind of a controversial one. Rozhdy is quite versatile in my experience - I have him in Prokofiev, Delius and Vaughan Williams and he's great in all three.

there were chinchillas, these weird little rat animals, in cages (Jon Lewis), Tuesday, 5 February 2013 18:43 (eight years ago) link

I'm really curious to hear his cycle, which is supposed to be very distinctive indeed - booking it out of the library tomorrow.

OG requiem head (Call the Cops), Tuesday, 5 February 2013 21:30 (eight years ago) link

a stroll thru some of my classical bins.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YQpq4T-cGjM

scott seward, Thursday, 7 February 2013 19:07 (eight years ago) link

That made me happy!

If i was there hangin' out right now I would bug you to throw on the Britten - Spring Symphony and then Boulez - Le Marteau! And WTF is the Nude Paper Sermon?!

try a little crowleymass (Jon Lewis), Thursday, 7 February 2013 19:33 (eight years ago) link

"http://open.spotify.com/track/7mc9iLnsOGsKyTHs6ICpNT

can anyone id that bach piece?"

I'm having trouble tracking this down. There's a famous Bourree from the Lute Suite in e minor but that's not it. I wouldn't be surprised if this was a transcription/derivation.

skip, Thursday, 7 February 2013 19:41 (eight years ago) link

Favorite Chopin Etudes? Perahia is my go-to for having the best combination of virtuosity and musicality. I am listening to the Lang Lang set on Spotify and it's surprisingly good for all the shit he gets from connoisseurs. On the positive - the guy can clearly play and it's cool to hear all the notes. However I don't want to hear EVERY note pounded out precisely at the expense of the melody. 25/6 and 25/11 are player-piano robotic in sections.

skip, Thursday, 7 February 2013 19:49 (eight years ago) link

There has never been a particular one that worked all the way through the whole cycle for me. At various times I've favored Ashkenazy, abbey Simon, and Perahia. The BBC live excerpts by Richter are astonishing. Maybe too astonishing.

try a little crowleymass (Jon Lewis), Thursday, 7 February 2013 20:15 (eight years ago) link

schubert d.958 and 959 (kempff)

groundhog-enorme-toute-grosse-253x300.jpg (clouds), Thursday, 7 February 2013 23:47 (eight years ago) link

D958 is my favorite Schubert sonata right now. Andsnes!!!

try a little crowleymass (Jon Lewis), Friday, 8 February 2013 00:52 (eight years ago) link

all three of the last sonatas are otherworldy

groundhog-enorme-toute-grosse-253x300.jpg (clouds), Friday, 8 February 2013 15:33 (eight years ago) link

I consider D894 to be absolutely amazing too. Man, there's just nothing like late Schubert. I saw the trio D929 performed live last year and was almost indecently intense to experience in public.

try a little crowleymass (Jon Lewis), Friday, 8 February 2013 15:39 (eight years ago) link

"http://open.spotify.com/track/7mc9iLnsOGsKyTHs6ICpNT

can anyone id that bach piece?"

I'm having trouble tracking this down. There's a famous Bourree from the Lute Suite in e minor but that's not it. I wouldn't be surprised if this was a transcription/derivation.

------------------------------------------------------------

Yeah, this is the weird thing, I've got the lute suites book and my sight reading isn't quite what it used to be, but I'm quite sure it's not in there. It doesn't sound like it could be related either.

(If you can play the famous E minor one, play it triplets like a 6/8 feel and listen to what happens to the bass part, it does incredible things, I found a Buckethead video once where he seems to have discovered the same thing)

Crackle Box, Friday, 8 February 2013 15:57 (eight years ago) link

Just got back from seeing Penny Johnson playing Bach: French Suite #2, Prelude and Fugue in F# from WTC2, Contrapunctus 9 from Art of the Fugue, Partita #4 in D. Sounded great!

EveningStar (Sund4r), Sunday, 10 February 2013 23:27 (eight years ago) link

Favorite Chopin Etudes?

Pollini or Uchida imo

available for sporting events (underrated aerosmith bootlegs I have owned), Monday, 11 February 2013 03:27 (eight years ago) link

I saw Angela Hewitt play French Suites 5 & 6, Debussy's Pour le Piano, and Ravel's Tombeau de Couperin. She is not the most virtuosic pianist out there but her control and sensitivity are astonishing.

skip, Monday, 11 February 2013 16:04 (eight years ago) link

Warner Music Group announced they are buying the Parlophone Group - including EMI Classics and Virgin Classics. Good news IMO since Warner does not put sonic watermarks on their digital offerings.

try a little crowleymass (Jon Lewis), Monday, 11 February 2013 17:31 (eight years ago) link

got great CDs at the thrift store this morning:

havergal brian - symphony no. 1 "gothic" (marco polo) (slovak philharmonic. which is pretty gothic.)

sensemaya - the unknown silvestre revueltas (1899-1940) (dorian recordings)

schoenberg - verklarte nacht/kammersymphonien (DG) (orpheus chamber orchestra)

korngold - between two worlds (london)

janacek - concertino/violin sonata (london) (musiktage mondsee ensemble)

peter blanchette - style brise - the broken style (angelic alternative) (killer tunes - bach, handel, dowland, etc - for 11-string archguitar)

johann adolf hasse - salve regina (archiv)

scott seward, Wednesday, 13 February 2013 17:37 (eight years ago) link

Revueltas? Not unknown over here, that guy is super cool

flamboyant goon tie included, Wednesday, 13 February 2013 17:43 (eight years ago) link

its all stuff that had never been recorded until this cd.

scott seward, Wednesday, 13 February 2013 17:50 (eight years ago) link

Ooh, interesting. I just did a google search to learn about it. (The 2nd google result for "revueltas" is a recipe for pupusas on the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute.)

flamboyant goon tie included, Wednesday, 13 February 2013 17:58 (eight years ago) link

It also means "scrambled" (re: eggs) iirc!

and that sounds like a gong-concert (La Lechera), Wednesday, 13 February 2013 17:59 (eight years ago) link

The janacek concertino is one of my favorite pieces of chamber music.

try a little crowleymass (Jon Lewis), Wednesday, 13 February 2013 18:08 (eight years ago) link

Anybody see the first part of The Sound and the Fury on BBC Four last night?

wronger than 100 geir posts (MacDara), Wednesday, 13 February 2013 18:19 (eight years ago) link

So it is becoming more and more indisputable that my ears cannot handle high fidelity stereo recordings of solo piano anymore. I.e. the repertoire which has been my listening bread and butter ever since classical music became a huge thing for me in 1995.

I should note that almost all of my listening opportunities are at my job and while walking/taking the subway, so I am a creature of headphones by necessity.

And I have had garden variety constant ringing of the ears for ages and ages, but in the last year or two it's become clear that solo piano recordings make my ringing a lot worse. To avoid it I have to lower the volume to the point where I can't hear hardly any of the tone color which makes it pointless to listen in the first place.

This may be a subconscious reason why my listening has veered so strongly toward orchestral music and chamber music in recent years. It's funny, I can handle a cello + piano chamber recording or a lieder recording.

You know what also works? Mono-era piano solo piano recordings. And to some extent, modern hi-fi recordings of historical instruments (fortepianos etc). I threw Yves Nat's, Wilhelm Kempff's and Schnabel's mono Beethoven cycles on my ipod and one could ask for much worse a situation than to get one's Beethoven from these fuckers.

try a little crowleymass (Jon Lewis), Thursday, 14 February 2013 18:30 (eight years ago) link

Sorry to hear about your ringing-ears trouble, Jon. Solo-piano music is central to my own music listening, and giving up some or all of it would not be easy.

If you've still got chamber music and orchestra music, and modern recordings of historical keyboards, and historical recordings of modern pianos, then the good news is that you've got a world of stuff you can listen to without aggravating the ringing.

I don't see how the mono/stereo distinction itself would matter for ear-ringing, so I wonder if the advantage you're getting with mono-era recordings is a rolled-off frequency response. Have you tried messing with the EQ settings built into older iPods (http://support.apple.com/kb/TA26537), or with an equalizer app for newer iPods (https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/equalizer-pro/id505170168?mt=8 -- NB I've never used this)?

Also, have you talked with your doctor about the whole ringing problem? I'm just thinking it could be worth learning about ways to ensure it doesn't get worse…

Scoobie Dufay (Paul in Santa Cruz), Thursday, 14 February 2013 20:07 (eight years ago) link

I think the difference is in the attack of piano notes - it's not mono v stereo per se obv, but that recordings of the 50s and before don't capture as much of that massive brick of high frequency information when the hammer strikes the string. It's definitely the note attack that gives me problems.

So that with a hi fi recording of a fortepiano, the instrument itself does not produce as much high frequency attack as a steinway. I almost wonder if I would also do well listening to recordings of modern Bosendorfer pianos which iirc have more of a 'ping' attack and less of a 'klang' attack.

Problem with using EQ is that the wonderful colors in the decay/long tail of the piano note seem to suffer too much.

I have had ringing forever and I don't usually notice it, and am almost never stressed out by it, so I hesitate to look into it as a health issue because 1) the ringing itself is notoriously untreatable and 2) so much of the ravages of tinnitus seems to come from the psychological stress of it, and I seem to naturally not focus on the ring; I would hate to learn to foreground it more in the course of paying attn to it as a health problem and then be unable to defocus on it, if that makes sense.

try a little crowleymass (Jon Lewis), Thursday, 14 February 2013 20:34 (eight years ago) link

It does make sense and is probably a healthy way of thinking about the whole issue, as long as you're using common sense about things like loud headphone listening that could do you harm. Anyway not really meaning to lecture you about this.

Scoobie Dufay (Paul in Santa Cruz), Thursday, 14 February 2013 21:00 (eight years ago) link

That's...interesting. I was listening to a piano recording a few days ago, felt something, maybe I'm a bit paranoid about my listening at times.

Anyway, onto Rabelais

xyzzzz__, Friday, 15 February 2013 20:11 (eight years ago) link

Just the cover I'm digging (the real soundtrack is Boulez/Cleveland La mer from DG's Debussy Edition).

http://http://images.amazon.com/images/G/01/richmedia/images/cover.gif

OG requiem head (Call the Cops), Saturday, 16 February 2013 18:36 (eight years ago) link

Bah check it out yourselves: http://images.amazon.com/images/G/01/richmedia/images/cover.gif

OG requiem head (Call the Cops), Saturday, 16 February 2013 18:37 (eight years ago) link

Triple fail so this better work: http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51X3sdwEv7L._SL500_AA280_.jpg

OG requiem head (Call the Cops), Saturday, 16 February 2013 18:37 (eight years ago) link

^ worth a click

flamboyant goon tie included, Saturday, 16 February 2013 18:50 (eight years ago) link

Sorry about that horrorshow but yes, I believe it is.

OG requiem head (Call the Cops), Saturday, 16 February 2013 18:51 (eight years ago) link

Curretly working through my medieval obsessions w/ars subtilis from Italy. Its a captivating yet aimless desert, you usually find an oasis if you walk around long enough.

The stuff from France isn't as long or "ambient" sounding as this from what I can tell.

Whereas The Island of St. Hylarion CD its a lot more song like and gorgeous.

xyzzzz__, Saturday, 16 February 2013 20:25 (eight years ago) link

this is a really good disc for music from that era:

http://www.amazon.com/Homage-To-Johannes-Ciconia-1370-1412/dp/B000000R38

crimson hexagon sonned (clouds), Saturday, 16 February 2013 20:37 (eight years ago) link

Yeah, was just looking at that.

Hitting Ensemble PAN p/hard at the moment.

xyzzzz__, Saturday, 16 February 2013 20:41 (eight years ago) link

this is really good too:

http://www.amazon.com/Codex-Chantilly/dp/B0011BAV06

incredibly strange and fascinating music

crimson hexagon sonned (clouds), Saturday, 16 February 2013 20:43 (eight years ago) link

Yeah I first heard about it from a bunch of modernist composition friendly folk at another board I used to frequent.

xyzzzz__, Saturday, 16 February 2013 20:56 (eight years ago) link

Smokin'

think jon recommended this uphthread or elsewhere.

xyzzzz__, Saturday, 16 February 2013 22:14 (eight years ago) link

what else sounds like the first couple of minutes of zadok the priest?

Nilmar Honorato da Silva, Wednesday, 27 February 2013 01:15 (eight years ago) link

sorry to hear about your hearing troubles jl. it's interesting to me - when the ringing started for me, and I lost my mind and felt for quite some time that I would never be able to function again, it was piano music that saved me - specifically playing it. hope you do not have further stress about this!

I am on a Franck kick right now when I'm not listening to opera. Tonight I listened to the first disc of this while making dinner. I <3 Anna Netrebko I know some people don't but I do.

available for sporting events (underrated aerosmith bootlegs I have owned), Wednesday, 27 February 2013 02:02 (eight years ago) link

big fan of, big crush on netrebko

balls, Wednesday, 27 February 2013 02:04 (eight years ago) link

yeah I'm crushed out too I can't lie. there's a recital disc with Barenboim that's just awesome as is this shot of the set being presented live

available for sporting events (underrated aerosmith bootlegs I have owned), Wednesday, 27 February 2013 13:18 (eight years ago) link

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful

You may not know......but Luigi Nono is one of the best kept musical secrets of the 1900's! He was not only one of the most innovative and creative Italian composers, but unlike most of his colleagues or peers, he enjoyed a personal and artistic relationship with Claudio Abbado and Maurizio Pollini, two authentic musical giants. This recording is conducted by Abbado, in splendid form, and played by, arguably, the best orchestra in the world (Berliner Philharmoniker). The set also includes a Kindertotenleider of rare beauty, here in the soprano version. The booklet explains that this recording is devoted to victims of absurd and avoidable wars, which perfectly matches the text of Nono's "Il canto sospeso". If you like something bit more challenging than Gorecki, and also like atonal beauty, this disc is for you! The Nono foundation in Venice has a very pleasant web site where you can learn about his music. For those who were around at the time the Nono piece was writtenm(50's), this is a serious trip to perhaps more complex yet happy times. Highly recommended.

Nilmar Honorato da Silva, Wednesday, 27 February 2013 15:24 (eight years ago) link

i just asked this on facebook, i'll ask it here too:

every once in a while - VERY rarely though - customers who buy rock or jazz or r&b at my store will buy a classical record and its almost always a record by the same composer. can you guess who it is?

scott seward, Wednesday, 27 February 2013 15:57 (eight years ago) link

mahler? or nono, probably mahler

Nilmar Honorato da Silva, Wednesday, 27 February 2013 16:00 (eight years ago) link

stravinsky

þjóðaratkvæðagreiðsla (clouds), Wednesday, 27 February 2013 16:01 (eight years ago) link

i'll let you know if you hit it. definitely the number one *what do people who don't buy classical buy when they buy classical* in my store over the last 4 years. and to make it easier its not glass or riley cuz like i said on facebook i almost consider them pop cuz they are as easy to sell as kate bush and tom waits records.

scott seward, Wednesday, 27 February 2013 16:02 (eight years ago) link

Wagner?

skip, Wednesday, 27 February 2013 16:04 (eight years ago) link

Vivaldi's Four Seasons

skip, Wednesday, 27 February 2013 16:05 (eight years ago) link

górecki

þjóðaratkvæðagreiðsla (clouds), Wednesday, 27 February 2013 16:06 (eight years ago) link

last guess - Debussy

skip, Wednesday, 27 February 2013 16:06 (eight years ago) link

stockhausen

cb, Wednesday, 27 February 2013 16:13 (eight years ago) link

i should also say that number two on the list of classical that people who don't buy classical buy would be anything by glenn gould.

scott seward, Wednesday, 27 February 2013 16:17 (eight years ago) link

Rhapsody in Blue

skip, Wednesday, 27 February 2013 16:20 (eight years ago) link

Carmina Burana?

Zero Dark 33⅓: The Final Insult (Eric H.), Wednesday, 27 February 2013 16:25 (eight years ago) link

John Adams?

tochter tochter, please (Noodle Vague), Wednesday, 27 February 2013 16:26 (eight years ago) link

Gilbert and Sullivan?

tochter tochter, please (Noodle Vague), Wednesday, 27 February 2013 16:27 (eight years ago) link

Bach

tochter tochter, please (Noodle Vague), Wednesday, 27 February 2013 16:29 (eight years ago) link

haha! oh man if i could unload some gilbert & sullivan box-sets i would be a happy guy.

scott seward, Wednesday, 27 February 2013 16:29 (eight years ago) link

i wish it were bach too. i got so much great bach.

scott seward, Wednesday, 27 February 2013 16:30 (eight years ago) link

i assumed Sideshow Bob was representative

tochter tochter, please (Noodle Vague), Wednesday, 27 February 2013 16:30 (eight years ago) link

it's andré boucourechliev isn't it?

þjóðaratkvæðagreiðsla (clouds), Wednesday, 27 February 2013 16:32 (eight years ago) link

What's Lang Lang's latest? Are the Three Tenors still selling well?

Zero Dark 33⅓: The Final Insult (Eric H.), Wednesday, 27 February 2013 16:32 (eight years ago) link

scott said composer tho

Cage

tochter tochter, please (Noodle Vague), Wednesday, 27 February 2013 16:33 (eight years ago) link

Sousa

tochter tochter, please (Noodle Vague), Wednesday, 27 February 2013 16:34 (eight years ago) link

Got confused when he said second place was Glenn Gould.

Zero Dark 33⅓: The Final Insult (Eric H.), Wednesday, 27 February 2013 16:34 (eight years ago) link

John Williams

tochter tochter, please (Noodle Vague), Wednesday, 27 February 2013 16:35 (eight years ago) link

I mean, someone has to guess Beethoven or Mozart, right?

Zero Dark 33⅓: The Final Insult (Eric H.), Wednesday, 27 February 2013 16:36 (eight years ago) link

i can't work out if the answer is gonna be surprisingly kitsch or surprisingly modernist

tochter tochter, please (Noodle Vague), Wednesday, 27 February 2013 16:38 (eight years ago) link

it's satie

þjóðaratkvæðagreiðsla (clouds), Wednesday, 27 February 2013 16:39 (eight years ago) link

That would've been one of my guesses after flipping through my book of wedding piano music.

Zero Dark 33⅓: The Final Insult (Eric H.), Wednesday, 27 February 2013 16:41 (eight years ago) link

Rachmaninoff or Chopin

acid in the style of tenpole tudor (NickB), Wednesday, 27 February 2013 16:42 (eight years ago) link

"it's satie"

bingo! winner by a mile.

scott seward, Wednesday, 27 February 2013 16:43 (eight years ago) link

Hah, and I'm sure they all only listen to that one thing, too.

Zero Dark 33⅓: The Final Insult (Eric H.), Wednesday, 27 February 2013 16:45 (eight years ago) link

there's a couple that people recognise i think

tochter tochter, please (Noodle Vague), Wednesday, 27 February 2013 16:47 (eight years ago) link

Bizarre.

skip, Wednesday, 27 February 2013 16:49 (eight years ago) link

Hah, and I'm sure they all only listen to that one thing, too.

― Zero Dark 33⅓: The Final Insult (Eric H.), Wednesday, February 27, 2013 8:45 AM (4 minutes ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

bet they probably don't listen to it at all

Gunoka Cuntles (Matt P), Wednesday, 27 February 2013 16:51 (eight years ago) link

satie and glenn gould, shit i'm that customer

Gunoka Cuntles (Matt P), Wednesday, 27 February 2013 16:52 (eight years ago) link

"Well, it's not meat but I suppose I better buy some for appearances."

Zero Dark 33⅓: The Final Insult (Eric H.), Wednesday, 27 February 2013 16:52 (eight years ago) link

i think as a precursor of ambient music and huge film/TV earworm people might be able to handle listening to the rugged stylings of "Trois Gymnopedes"

tochter tochter, please (Noodle Vague), Wednesday, 27 February 2013 16:53 (eight years ago) link

OH GOD WHAT IS THIS SHIT TURN IT OFF I THOUGHT IT WOULD ROCK MORE

tochter tochter, please (Noodle Vague), Wednesday, 27 February 2013 16:53 (eight years ago) link

guys

IF IT FLOATES, WE KNOAWE IT'S A HIPSTERE

Gunoka Cuntles (Matt P), Wednesday, 27 February 2013 16:54 (eight years ago) link

*wonders if xenakis is #3*

Gunoka Cuntles (Matt P), Wednesday, 27 February 2013 16:55 (eight years ago) link

annnd i'm sorry for running in on that note, i love this thread but i never have anything to contribute. *sidesteps off*

Gunoka Cuntles (Matt P), Wednesday, 27 February 2013 16:56 (eight years ago) link

Ha, I always thought of Satie as 'classical music for people who don't listen to classical music'.

EveningStar (Sund4r), Wednesday, 27 February 2013 17:36 (eight years ago) link

satiesque is one of the worst reviewer-speak for "tinkly major key piano music" but none of the assholes writing "satiesque" music would've written something as weird as the "3 sonneries de la rose-croix"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RlOGPcD2A9g

þjóðaratkvæðagreiðsla (clouds), Wednesday, 27 February 2013 18:05 (eight years ago) link

one of the worst reviewer-speak buzzwords* rather

þjóðaratkvæðagreiðsla (clouds), Wednesday, 27 February 2013 18:05 (eight years ago) link

hating on people for wanting to hear some classical music they enjoyed in a movie is kinda the worst caricature of the classical music listener - I don't listen to lots of Satie but c'mon y'all drop the snob act, it's a bad look

available for sporting events (underrated aerosmith bootlegs I have owned), Wednesday, 27 February 2013 18:40 (eight years ago) link

i like when someone buys ANY classical. i ain't no snob. still think i should give out a free classical album with every purchase. but i don't even know if people would take them for free! i mean i sell classical but 99.9% goes to classical people. i'm always amazed by the lack of crossover. despite being a rockhead i ALWAYS bought classical records at thrift stores and elsewhere. for decades. and apparently this is really not that common. it really is a rarefied audience. in this case meaning the audience is rare to find. which isn't the meaning of rarefied at all.

scott seward, Wednesday, 27 February 2013 18:51 (eight years ago) link

Who was being snobby about Satie?? I like Satie fine. My comment wasn't a putdown.

EveningStar (Sund4r), Wednesday, 27 February 2013 19:05 (eight years ago) link

yeah i don't think anybody here said otherwise?

tochter tochter, please (Noodle Vague), Wednesday, 27 February 2013 19:11 (eight years ago) link

I admit I intended my wedding piano music book to be a little bit snobbish.

Zero Dark 33⅓: The Final Insult (Eric H.), Wednesday, 27 February 2013 19:13 (eight years ago) link

i sell classical but 99.9% goes to classical people. i'm always amazed by the lack of crossover. despite being a rockhead i ALWAYS bought classical records at thrift stores and elsewhere. for decades. and apparently this is really not that common.

To generalize: much classical music, especially common practice repertoire, would seem to work pretty differently from pop/rock and emphasizes a different mode of listening from that used for music with relatively flat dynamics, a steady rhythm section, repeated cyclic chord progressions, and riff/motive-based melody. (Sure, CPP music works with motives but often does so in a different way, emphasizing e.g. transformation and development.) Many pop/rock listeners might not be in the habit of listening for the large-scale formal issues and developmental processes we find in CPP music? Satie's big 'hits', on the other hand, do work pretty similarly to how pop works!

EveningStar (Sund4r), Wednesday, 27 February 2013 22:08 (eight years ago) link

Jazz is much closer to pop/rock in many ways.

EveningStar (Sund4r), Wednesday, 27 February 2013 22:09 (eight years ago) link

classical might share an intimidation factor with jazz. like, where do you start? i have definitely had people ask me to recommend some jazz to them cuz they had no idea what was good/what they would like/etc. which is hard! a lot of people start with miles davis and never go on from there. i don't know what i would give people in the way of classical. to start with. maybe bach is the way to go. or come to think of it just some nice piano music! some debussy maybe. then i'd tell them that miles davis was a big debussy fan and sell them some miles davis.

scott seward, Wednesday, 27 February 2013 22:23 (eight years ago) link

And then you can sell them some Gil Evans, and then you can tell them how Gil was a big Delius fan, and then you can sell them some Delius!

multi instru mentat list (Jon Lewis), Wednesday, 27 February 2013 23:44 (eight years ago) link

Today is Kalevala Day so please listen to Kullervo or Pohjola's Daughter or something!

Call the Cops, Thursday, 28 February 2013 09:15 (eight years ago) link

As if you people needed to be told!

Call the Cops, Thursday, 28 February 2013 09:16 (eight years ago) link

I did need to be told! I'll be spinning Sibelius' 4 Legends (the Horst stein recording) and Amorphis' Silent Waters!

multi instru mentat list (Jon Lewis), Thursday, 28 February 2013 15:14 (eight years ago) link

Good choices. You can stare at stuff like this at the same time: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/17/Gallen_Kallela_The_Aino_Triptych.jpg

Call the Cops, Thursday, 28 February 2013 17:29 (eight years ago) link

I adore Gallen-Kallela. Someday I'ma make it over there and get me an eyeful of him first-hand.

multi instru mentat list (Jon Lewis), Friday, 1 March 2013 17:24 (eight years ago) link

Anybody see the first part of The Sound and the Fury on BBC Four last night?

― wronger than 100 geir posts (MacDara), Wednesday, 13 February 2013

yeah. this is a three part three hour bbc series on 20th century classical music. if unlike me you're in the UK you can still watch the whole thing online, though ep 1 has only three days left.

the full perfomances on the red button were nice
http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/p01531w2/The_Sound_and_the_Fury_in_Concert_Cage_Feldman_Reich_Monk_Part_and_Benjamin/

don't call it a cloud rap i've been high for years (zvookster), Saturday, 2 March 2013 22:29 (eight years ago) link

Listening to late Stravinsky. Getting near the end of Stephen Walsh's hefty biography and listening along to the late serial stuff I've not knowingly heard before. Threni (or most of it) is much more engaging than I was anticipating and Movements for Piano and Orchestra sounds just as Webernian as its reputation suggests. I believe I can dig these.

Nag! Nag! Nag!, Saturday, 2 March 2013 23:30 (eight years ago) link

Listening to Crime and Dissonance

xyzzzz__, Sunday, 3 March 2013 11:25 (eight years ago) link

believe in the webernianisms

Gunoka Cuntles (Matt P), Sunday, 3 March 2013 11:31 (eight years ago) link

Only thing I believe in these days..

xyzzzz__, Sunday, 3 March 2013 11:48 (eight years ago) link

"Il Buio" always sticks with me

approx. david bowie (flamboyant goon tie included), Sunday, 3 March 2013 13:38 (eight years ago) link

Ricreazione Divertia is my favourite atm.

xyzzzz__, Sunday, 3 March 2013 14:08 (eight years ago) link

I want to argue that Band of Susans was the best that NY minimalism ever got, by quite a distance (even if Young composed the works he is know for in NY, he is an LA kinda guy).

xyzzzz__, Saturday, 9 March 2013 12:29 (eight years ago) link

http://thestar.blogs.com/.a/6a00d8341bf8f353ef0120a8ebc725970b-320pi

j., Tuesday, 12 March 2013 07:38 (eight years ago) link

so Elgar's first symphony is pretty awesome, huh

glumdalclitch, Tuesday, 12 March 2013 08:48 (eight years ago) link

Yes it is. The 2nd even better IMO. My faves are the 2nd, the Cello Concerto and the Falstaff symphonic poem.

multi instru mentat list (Jon Lewis), Tuesday, 12 March 2013 14:21 (eight years ago) link

I only know the Cello Concerto and it is indeed awesome.

Sorta related: I finished reading Britten's Children, about Benjamin Britten's relationships with adolescent boys, and about how he uses children and child singers in his works. Really interesting, and a bit hard to take at points... As a former boy singer myself, I have sung so much of his stuff, which probably increased my interest.

Frederik B, Tuesday, 12 March 2013 14:58 (eight years ago) link

I want to argue that Band of Susans was the best that NY minimalism ever got, by quite a distance (even if Young composed the works he is know for in NY, he is an LA kinda guy).

NOOOO...

But, really, Band of Susans over Steve Reich??

And, come on, that's totally cheating re Young.

EveningStar (Sund4r), Tuesday, 12 March 2013 15:11 (eight years ago) link

Absolutely: there was no way he could ever have found enough La Montes for a band of them.

Call the Cops, Tuesday, 12 March 2013 16:23 (eight years ago) link

Ha.

EveningStar (Sund4r), Tuesday, 12 March 2013 17:13 (eight years ago) link

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vqODySSxYpc

Favorite performance of this. Holy shit.

Can't click at work, whose is it?

a church not made with ham (Jon Lewis), Friday, 15 March 2013 18:37 (eight years ago) link

Hollywood Quartet's.

Oh yeah, cosign on that. Have it on CD.

a church not made with ham (Jon Lewis), Friday, 15 March 2013 19:31 (eight years ago) link

I want to argue that Band of Susans was the best that NY minimalism ever got, by quite a distance (even if Young composed the works he is know for in NY, he is an LA kinda guy).

NOOOO...

But, really, Band of Susans over Steve Reich??

And, come on, that's totally cheating re Young.

― EveningStar (Sund4r), Tuesday, 12 March 2013 Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

haha ok fair enough on Young but Reich and Glass' model of minimalism was to develop their own groups, v post-rock era type stuff...and I think its a bit sluggish. Really you have to tackle this from another angle, as a rock group playing with ampage and volume, using that to develop minimalist songs off that, and it totally works. I love the 2nd CD of Wired for Sound without the vocals (even if those were great if a bit without character, which they acknowledge by compiling a whole CDs worth of instrumentals)

otoh there was a dave q post comparing them to OASIS and actually I can kinda see it just richness of sound-wise. There is a weird correspondance I'd rather leave unexamined bcz I like it so much.

xyzzzz__, Friday, 15 March 2013 19:40 (eight years ago) link

Susan Stenger plays Cage this week

xyzzzz__, Saturday, 16 March 2013 10:57 (eight years ago) link

Anyone have a spare ticket? :)

xyzzzz__, Saturday, 16 March 2013 10:59 (eight years ago) link

I think Band of Susans was junk tbqh.

EveningStar (Sund4r), Saturday, 16 March 2013 11:32 (eight years ago) link

By all rights, I should like them: 80s noise/drone guitar rock with a post-minimal pedigree (Chatham proteges no less), pop hooks in the classic Amerindie style. Somehow, nothing seems to come together right on the records, though: The cheesy 80s production with giant gated drums might work if this were spare new wave/postpunk but it seems to work so strongly against what they were going for. The rhythm section is plodding and uninspired, just a constant predictable backbeat. I find Poss's voice completely unappealing. The guitars drone but never quite seem to deliver much in terms of rich textures or innovative sounds. They never seem to really nail a pop hook like REM or Husker Du or, say, the Mary Chain or MBV could. ("Hard Light" comes closest.)

― EveningStar (Sund4r), Wednesday, 12 September 2012 00:18 (6 months ago) Bookmark

EveningStar (Sund4r), Saturday, 16 March 2013 11:33 (eight years ago) link

The way I read minimalism is as something restrictive albeit slowly unfolding and that's how I'm reading things like 'predictable backbeat'. I play 5/6 songs in a row, they have hooks yet are without much character. Agree Poss' voice is an acquired taste but somehow that works with the icey-dirge they get into a lot of the time

As for sounds and textures: take out new wave/postpunk and it is spare set of variations on a sound palette, going on a song-by-song basis. What do you think they were going for? I find it quite addicitve the louder I'm playing it. They are not as rich as what MBV were doing on Loveless but physically the sound is as attractive. They must've been amazing live.

Du's Recurring Dreams is a late 60s psych re-thread; Guitar Trio is an actual (even if accidental) update of sorts, felt truly of its time and years before the stuff SY were doing on Goodbye 20th Century.

xyzzzz__, Saturday, 16 March 2013 12:03 (eight years ago) link

I mean they were odd, heavy concentration of a partic guitar sound above everything else, so the rhythm section is never doing as much work, but how much better is it on some of those MBV/JAMC records?

xyzzzz__, Saturday, 16 March 2013 12:14 (eight years ago) link

digging this:

charles villiers stanford

http://open.spotify.com/track/3TY1Z5poA1sv4BmFihWHIU

Crackle Box, Saturday, 16 March 2013 13:24 (eight years ago) link

i've listened to helmet's meantime album way more than any band of susans album i ever owned. and i would like to thank rhys chatham for that album too. that album kinda ruined big black for me. cuz it was like listening to big black but the sound was way big in a metal way and helmet's drummer made me want to write a fan letter to a drummer.

scott seward, Saturday, 16 March 2013 14:27 (eight years ago) link

i know i'm always embarrassing him on here, but seeing ilx's own tarfumes the escape goat play drums on guitar trio was one of the highlights of the last, like, five years for me. MASSIVE.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WJhR7L2iZrg

scott seward, Saturday, 16 March 2013 14:47 (eight years ago) link

Moeran's Rhapsody No. 3 in F-sharp major for piano and orchestra has been a fav recently too, makes every commute an adventure!

http://open.spotify.com/track/50zWyAbkO2CYANakU5fRJW

The single note at the end of the Stanford piece kills me:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tJcad_kowuI

Crackle Box, Saturday, 16 March 2013 14:51 (eight years ago) link

Wow, you're right about that version of Verklarte Nacht!

I mentioned JAMC and MBV as examples of bands that were more successful at coming up with pop hooks, not great rhythm sections (although I'll rank "You Made Me Realise" over most BoS for rhythm). Reich and Glass actually both did innovative and really engrossing things with rhythm imo. I do rate Guitar Trio but I give Chatham the credit for that one.

EveningStar (Sund4r), Saturday, 16 March 2013 16:17 (eight years ago) link

Sorry mis-read you.

Oh yeah I give Chatham the credit but I mean the thing about covering a mdoern classical composer was a thing that seemed to be forgotten or not much of a thing, so I given them a bit of credit for closing Worda and the Flesh with that.

I'm hearing enough hooks with Band of Susans, not as many as JAMC and MBV but they are perhaps less interested in that. Thought I'd be bored with their instrumentals but no. Gotta say I only listen to Word and the Flesh and Wired for Sound comp, haven't got round to the others.

i've listened to helmet's meantime album way more than any band of susans album i ever owned.

*listens to a few tracks on youtube* I've heard Limp Bizkit you know ;-)

xyzzzz__, Saturday, 16 March 2013 16:29 (eight years ago) link

"In the meantime" (no pun intended) Boulez's structures off this CD on hat art is slaying me.

xyzzzz__, Saturday, 16 March 2013 16:33 (eight years ago) link

that album is way better than any nu-metal and doesn't sound anything like limp bizkit and page of helmet was in band of susans and played with branca which is why i brought them up.

scott seward, Saturday, 16 March 2013 16:34 (eight years ago) link

I know he was in Band of Susans.

Helmet's sound does seem incorporated to a lot of nu-metal. I mean that's what it was reminding me off which is why I bought Limp Bizkit up even if it was a bit of a low blow.

xyzzzz__, Saturday, 16 March 2013 16:38 (eight years ago) link

earlier helmet is less slick but i think meantime is the perfection of something or other. nu-metal obviously inspired by lots of good stuff. and some bad stuff. i mean that helmet album is really the only math rock i need when it comes to the 90's. though i do own two albums by the sea and cake.

scott seward, Saturday, 16 March 2013 16:42 (eight years ago) link

OMG NO DON CABALLERO WHAT IS THIS?!

xyzzzz__, Saturday, 16 March 2013 16:44 (eight years ago) link

its the only helmet album i feel the need to own. but i love it. in a way that i never loved BOS. and production and vocals on BOS records probably did have something to do with that. songwriting not a strong suit of a lot of post-whatever guitar bands. or good vocals. which i can live with usually. i dunno i'm sure if i went back and listened to band of susans i would find things to like. their records sell for a dollar here and i would pick one up if i saw one. i think i did a year or so ago but i didn't play it.

scott seward, Saturday, 16 March 2013 16:50 (eight years ago) link

yeah was never a don cab fan. i liked trans am though. hated the fucking champs. tortoise bored the hell out of me.

scott seward, Saturday, 16 March 2013 16:51 (eight years ago) link

but this is the classical thread sorry everyone!

scott seward, Saturday, 16 March 2013 16:53 (eight years ago) link

It is! Loving Savall and Hesperion XX's Brandenburgs right now.

Call the Cops, Saturday, 16 March 2013 17:23 (eight years ago) link

Oh sorry - it's Le Concert Des Nations.

Call the Cops, Saturday, 16 March 2013 17:24 (eight years ago) link

Reckon we should bring anything we feel its classical-related to this thread, btw.

Anyone in London going to the London Ear festival next weekend. Cello recital looks good, btw.

xyzzzz__, Saturday, 16 March 2013 18:09 (eight years ago) link

Hello, just popped by to say that Boulez's Structures are his most austere and successful work and worth listening to and studying.

I recommend listening to "The Unanswered Question" and following that up with a simultaneous listen of Mozart Clarinet Quartet and Boulez Structure for Piano 1a

time turns all men into pies (flamboyant goon tie included), Saturday, 16 March 2013 18:49 (eight years ago) link

Huh, you rate those over Le Marteau? I should listen again.

I recommend listening to "The Unanswered Question" and following that up with a simultaneous listen of Mozart Clarinet Quartet and Boulez Structure for Piano 1a

Ha!

EveningStar (Sund4r), Saturday, 16 March 2013 18:52 (eight years ago) link

IMHO those Structures are as clear a representation of mathematical purity as the finest Mozart and hearing those two pieces simultaneously is a more successful representation of the philosophical idea that Ives sought to create intuitively

time turns all men into pies (flamboyant goon tie included), Saturday, 16 March 2013 18:58 (eight years ago) link

I love those Structures *so much* and as a student went one step further and used Boulez' matrices to create MIDI clusters of varying densities to further get closer to serial perfection-- *checks hard drive*-- sadly long gone.

time turns all men into pies (flamboyant goon tie included), Saturday, 16 March 2013 19:02 (eight years ago) link

:(

EveningStar (Sund4r), Saturday, 16 March 2013 19:21 (eight years ago) link

Hello, just popped by to say that Boulez's Structures are his most austere and successful work and worth listening to and studying./

They aren't talked about as much as the sonatas are they? It is said iirc that Boulez relaxed a bit and all I'm thinking is why would you want to relax from this?!

xyzzzz__, Sunday, 17 March 2013 09:57 (eight years ago) link

^work in progress

xyzzzz__, Sunday, 24 March 2013 09:23 (eight years ago) link

I love it!! Yeah I can see why Boulez would want to relax, composing in that style is some heavy number crunching

flamboyant goon tie included, Sunday, 24 March 2013 15:58 (eight years ago) link

After coming across an excellent overview of Kagel's works from the 80s and 90s I thought I'd devote to hunt some more down as I've had real problems with anything he's written after the mid-70s.

The Trio for Violin, Cello and Piano (85 - 92) is really tough, like his work based on Bach's life I am hearing a distorted quotation but because my understanding of what he is quoting doesn't work at the depth Kagel put into it large sections and their meanings may only become intelligible to people who are really in the know. But then what if I was to do the work? Someone is always shut out. I need to re-hear that one, see if I can get something else (or more) out of it.

"Rrrrrrr...." is p/good though. There is always that cathedral like association but the riffs come across as a circus act and their arrangement points to a computerized treatment at times.

xyzzzz__, Friday, 29 March 2013 15:21 (eight years ago) link

I am absolutely delighted to note that a CD devoted to Kurtag's excruciatingly beautiful piano duo Bach transcriptions has been released. The performers are the Yin-Yang Piano Duo. It has 17 of the transcriptions interspersed with Bartok piano duo works. It's on Spotify, go wallow and prosper.

Jeff "Skink" Baxter (Jon Lewis), Friday, 29 March 2013 15:30 (eight years ago) link

In other news, since I can now only listen to mono-era piano recordings if I want to avoid aggravating my tinnitus, I have been hunting high and low for mono era Schubert Sonata performances. This was pretty rare repertoire in that era. Especially when it comes to my favorite, the Sonata D 894. Does anyone itt happen to have an old Dante CD of Gieseking playing that sonata?

Jeff "Skink" Baxter (Jon Lewis), Friday, 29 March 2013 15:32 (eight years ago) link

Since it's Good Friday, I've just heard Passio by Arvo Pärt. The ending gets me every time.

Frederik B, Friday, 29 March 2013 21:10 (eight years ago) link

Do you know current favourite micropolyphonic composer Ezra Sims?

hxxp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oP6-sFdYsQs

a source of "vegelate" (flamboyant goon tie included), Monday, 1 April 2013 13:42 (eight years ago) link

I didn't but that sounds good. Thanks for the tip.

EveningStar (Sund4r), Monday, 1 April 2013 14:48 (eight years ago) link

I got a haul of CRI records I'm gonna work through, pick the hits

a source of "vegelate" (flamboyant goon tie included), Monday, 1 April 2013 15:03 (eight years ago) link

Ives Plays Ives! Viola In My Life! All Harrison and Partch! Gay American Composers series!

Call the Cops, Monday, 1 April 2013 19:56 (eight years ago) link

Listening to:

Brian Ferneyhough - Transit. Real cracker from the 70s golden age of nu-complexity.
Chris Dench - enonce and afterimages. Two amazing pieces for ensemble, the former has these shiny solos that creep up from the murk. Feels like an exploration, a real adventure.

Going to:

Kagel and Ives at the Forge

Ferneyhough and Dillon and Bartok and Friends on the 27th (yay for amazing free gigs)

Reading:

The Jakob Ullmann cover story in the Wire (first issue I bought in at least a year). Nothing too relevatory, but love A Catalogue of Sounds - a mix of backstory of a composer in East Germany fighting to get his music heard at all (fighting allegations he was a collaborator post-Berlin wall), but what he is actually doing is totally in line w/ Wandelweiser types. A thing that goes unmentioned. There were questions of, you know, if you want to use bits of sounds to structure the noises you hear outside then the implication is that you won't need the music anymore surely?

And this crazy interview w/James Dillon

xyzzzz__, Saturday, 6 April 2013 10:48 (eight years ago) link

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uUJtc0lJMoo

Nilmar Honorato da Silva, Thursday, 11 April 2013 03:27 (eight years ago) link

saw the emersons play janacek's 2nd sq, lyric suite and verklärte nacht tonight — great program!

pea hen (clouds), Thursday, 11 April 2013 03:59 (eight years ago) link

that does sound rather excellent

Nilmar Honorato da Silva, Thursday, 11 April 2013 19:18 (eight years ago) link

unfortunately i wasn't in the right frame of mind to enjoy it properly but it was definitely worthwhile

pea hen (clouds), Thursday, 11 April 2013 19:45 (eight years ago) link

RIP Sir Colin Davis =(

Call the Cops, Monday, 15 April 2013 06:52 (eight years ago) link

indeed, one of the best interpreters of berlioz in recording history

clouds, Monday, 15 April 2013 13:03 (eight years ago) link

oh wow. Huge presence, RIP indeed.

not feeling those lighters (underrated aerosmith bootlegs I have owned), Monday, 15 April 2013 13:13 (eight years ago) link

Classic for his old Philips traversals of Sibelius and Berlioz alone. I got to see him twice in all-Sibelius programs in the 00s and will always remember the power he conjured up.

brad palsy (Jon Lewis), Monday, 15 April 2013 13:54 (eight years ago) link

carl nielsen

Nilmar Honorato da Silva, Tuesday, 16 April 2013 16:44 (eight years ago) link

i remember listening to the helios overture on radio 3 during a period of insomnia in early 2008 and now i feel inclined to listen to it for the first time since then

are there any advocates here? thinking c0rey because he loves those nordic composers

jon, i suspect, given his proclivities

Nilmar Honorato da Silva, Tuesday, 16 April 2013 16:46 (eight years ago) link

nielsen is fantastic. he probably gets short shrift bc his music is not as "difficult" as the more modernist of his contemporaries or as easy to enjoy as the more grandiose symphonists, but his music, esp the syms have the feeling of an extremely logical construction. his later music gets quite strange -- sparser, clipped, just within the bounds of tonality.

clouds, Tuesday, 16 April 2013 19:33 (eight years ago) link

Symphonies 4 and 5 are as good as any music I know. The Aladdin suite has some amazing stuff in it, like the movement where he has multiple village bands playing at once (before he could have known what Ives was up to). The 6th symphony is deeply warped. Nielsen rocked.

brad palsy (Jon Lewis), Wednesday, 17 April 2013 00:10 (eight years ago) link

So, no discussion of Caroline Shaw's "Passacaglia", which won the Pulitzer a few days ago?: http://www.npr.org/blogs/deceptivecadence/2013/04/15/177348405/caroline-shaw-30-wins-pulitzer-for-music

I'm listening to the Roomful of Teeth recording available for streaming via Naxos Music Library. It sounds excellent, much better than that Youtube. This is a very nice piece, rich in timbral and textural variation, concisely and attractively structured, and something that I can actually put on often.

EveningStar (Sund4r), Thursday, 18 April 2013 18:55 (eight years ago) link

Wow, just noticed she beat out Aaron Jay Kernis and Wadada Leo Smith!

EveningStar (Sund4r), Thursday, 18 April 2013 18:57 (eight years ago) link

I've got to admit, though, I never really know what the criteria are for things like this. This piece is, as I said, very pleasant and listenable and well-crafted, but it's not necessarily exceptionally innovative or hugely ambitious. I haven't listened to the runners-up.

EveningStar (Sund4r), Friday, 19 April 2013 16:43 (eight years ago) link

you've pretty much described all american contemporary classical music that gets any kind of acclaim

love's secret borad (clouds), Friday, 19 April 2013 16:50 (eight years ago) link

Really digging

Trying to find the rest now - that track is amazing.

xyzzzz__, Friday, 19 April 2013 21:17 (eight years ago) link

Liking this album by Nadia Sirota a lot. American viola player overdubbing herself, covering Nico Muhly, Missy Mazzolli, and others...

@GracieLoPan #fyi (Display Name (this cannot be changed):), Friday, 19 April 2013 21:35 (eight years ago) link

This week I'm finally getting a breakthrough into the Baroque, courtesy of avant-garde oboist Heinz Holliger: his set of Zelenka's Tri Sonatas on ECM ae amazing. Its all witty with plenty of dances and extravagancies, without being in any overbearing. Not sure how he manages this, and I won't start to ask questions now.

xyzzzz__, Friday, 26 April 2013 21:59 (eight years ago) link

Trio Sonatas

xyzzzz__, Friday, 26 April 2013 22:01 (eight years ago) link

My trouble with classical is that it's not only the individual works, it's the player(s)/orchestra and the conductor that have such a huge bearing. Take the example of something like Beethoven's 9th; that piece may have hundreds of iterations available with an equally wide palette of flavors -- so, how can one sift through it all to find those few examples that really do it for you?

I have a small collection of Columbia Masterworks and Angel imprints that i enjoy, and have so far trusted that those guys back in the 50s and 60s did the necessary homework to make sure these pieces were given their due due justice, yet, i have no idea. I'm still on the lookout for guidance in this realm as i don't have the time or the money to explore the field with an equal amount of zeal that i've tapped to explore, roughly, all other musical forms.

Example. I may have heard 50 different iterations of Toccata and Fugue, but not a single one so resonates as a version i found from a "local" early 60s version played by some no-name geezer in his hometown church.

bodacious ignoramus, Friday, 26 April 2013 22:26 (eight years ago) link

Really reaching a breakthrough on Baroque music. If I look at things from a contemp music lense everything becomes clear. Like it could be anything, so now I'm looking at the discog of Musica Antiqua koln and really feeling the Leclair Chamber Music recording.

But of course the key is 'Koln' => the city of Stockhausen and Kagel.

xyzzzz__, Saturday, 27 April 2013 08:03 (eight years ago) link

So last Thrus I went to Camden's Forge venue, watched Mark Knoop and EXAUDI's Juliet Fraser perform songs by Ives and Kagel, Shlomowitz and Laurence Crane. Just loved the combination of Ives' awkward romanticisms and Kagel's uninhibited joy in clowning around. A combination that simply worked and a good link between the early and later years of the 20th century. Juliet had not only to sing but act (with both body and voice), speak, and later on w/Shlomowitz, to read straight and fast.

Crane's piece was the one oddity: he started out in the 80s and I'm getting the sense there was a vogue then for writing playful pieces (this one has the winning countries of the Tour de France) as lyrics; pieces that rode against complexity perhaps. But the lyrics were sorta nothingy, an I prefer Kraftwerk's music.

Saw Mark Knoop and Ian Pace playing w/two percussionists (Nicholas Reed and Tenley Martin) at Goldsmiths last night, putting on an exciting programme, although I'm not sure the Nebulae in my mind has cleared yet to see what James Dillon was up to. I think its the (from the programme note) "nebulous character" that acted as a bit of a crutch, you couldn't see the "simple expansion and contraction" of the material at times, whereas in Ferneyhough's Sonata clarity was achieved, the two pianists really doing a great job in making sure the "cells" did their work on the audience. All those precise physicalities at ends of sections...the job of any performer is to make these structures clear and they do so. Shlomowitz Hi-Hat and me was a brilliant, witty performance piece, and all credit for programming this in as it wasn't as physical an experience, it reminded me of Hugh Metcalfe doing percussion and poetry at the Klinker over the years. Zaldua's Brumaires (apart from the Bartok the only other work in the programme to make use of the full line-up) was the weaker piece in the whole programme. I'm not sure we needed as many starts and stops, too many metallic explosions w/out seeing the joins: you could perhaps see this was a 'progression' on Ferneyhough and Dillon (and Bartok!) but I'm not sure how exactly this is meant to operate as commentary on Marx's text, in the end leaves an impression of a piece that is anxious to be seen as 'progression' whereas Shlomowitz there was no commentary (no programme note on it apart from who it was written for), he's really trying to work at something else (as was the case with the songs of his that were played at the Forge), and all the better for it, without lapsing into gimmickry. Possibly unfair to compare both but I do so as they wrote the younger pieces on the programme.

xyzzzz__, Sunday, 28 April 2013 16:30 (eight years ago) link

Hey classical heads, I have a bit of a question to you. I was listening to Mendelssohn's Liebe ohne Worte, and noticed that the tune titled Frühlingsliede ("Spring Song") sounded very familiar. I'm sure it's been used a lot in TV and movies, but Wikipedia doesn't list any examples. IMDb says it's in a bunch of Warner Brothers cartoons, but I'm sure there other examples as well. Can you recall any?

Tuomas, Monday, 29 April 2013 10:06 (eight years ago) link

Sorry for the typos, it's "Liede ohne Worte", and "Frühlingslied".

Tuomas, Monday, 29 April 2013 10:11 (eight years ago) link

that is such an excellent question because it has been used so much that it's impossible to think of even one example, it feels like. like it's "morning scene" default music, but is there a specific place it actually got that rep? hmm

not feeling those lighters (underrated aerosmith bootlegs I have owned), Monday, 29 April 2013 12:42 (eight years ago) link

Yeah, I guess it's so widely used I've just picked it up without consciously acknowledging where I heard it. It's interesting though, with most "stock classical tunes used in movies/TV", I can name at least one example of their usage, like "Morning Mood" in The Simpsons, "Ride of the Valkyries" in Apocalypse Now, "Carmina Burana" in Jackass The Movie, etc, but with this one I can't think of a single one.

Tuomas, Monday, 29 April 2013 12:50 (eight years ago) link

yeah i'd guess that originated w/ carl stalling, i'm not even sure i've seen it anywhere outside of warner bros cartoons (and if i did they were definitely referencing warner bros cartoons) but i can imagine once they'd done that gag it was a useful well to go back to. obligatory - http://www.nbc.com/saturday-night-live/video/looney-tunes-classics/n10049/

balls, Monday, 29 April 2013 12:58 (eight years ago) link

Can't watch that video in Finland, what's it about?

Tuomas, Monday, 29 April 2013 13:09 (eight years ago) link

Pretty sure I've heard the Mendelssohn as "morning" music in a Buster Keaton short (The Scarecrow?) Music in silent films is highly variable, and often just a bunch of classical things performed solo and strung together haphazardly, which is perhaps why IMDB wouldn't list it for something like that at least.

liam fennell, Monday, 29 April 2013 13:21 (eight years ago) link

Enjoying

http://www.deutschegrammophon.com/imgs/s300x300/4791180.jpg

Allen (etaeoe), Monday, 29 April 2013 22:33 (eight years ago) link

RIP Janos Starker. Probably not enough interest on ILM to start an entire thread, but I am currently digging the hell out of this:

http://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcS-3WsEMvX4usO_iqfc149ba4wC2sz5pn3UzuZ1_inqIX74qpX_Iw

huun huurt 2 (Hurting 2), Tuesday, 30 April 2013 01:27 (eight years ago) link

i take it all back about band of susans. Love Agenda is killing me at the moment. my apologies.

scott seward, Wednesday, 1 May 2013 19:32 (eight years ago) link

RIP Janos Starker. Probably not enough interest on ILM to start an entire thread, but I am currently digging the hell out of this:

Didn't know who he was before somebody posted about him on the general RIP thread but really enjoyed the various stories I have read about him so now randomly listening around in his catalog.

Blue Yodel No. 9 Dream (James Redd and the Blecchs), Wednesday, 1 May 2013 19:45 (eight years ago) link

i take it all back about band of susans. Love Agenda is killing me at the moment. my apologies.

― scott seward, Wednesday, 1 May 2013 Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

Apols accepted :)

xyzzzz__, Wednesday, 1 May 2013 21:09 (eight years ago) link

is coptic light supremely ~unheimlich~ or is it just because i am reading wiki pages about rare & lurid & lethal fungal diseases

treeship journey to aja (Nilmar Honorato da Silva), Thursday, 2 May 2013 23:28 (eight years ago) link

it is not chill by any means

clouds, Thursday, 2 May 2013 23:34 (eight years ago) link

it becomes unnerving with duration even though it's fairly short for feldman

biber's passacaglia for unacommpanied violin is wonderful

treeship journey to aja (Nilmar Honorato da Silva), Friday, 3 May 2013 00:14 (eight years ago) link

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9M9BvpikuAk

Nilmar Honorato da Silva, Saturday, 4 May 2013 01:18 (eight years ago) link

For the first time really in my life, I've been diving headlong into Romantic-era symphonic music the past few weeks. I played tuba quite seriously for eight years when I was a student, so these aren't completely uncharted waters for me. But I'm in a much different place now, and I think my ability to appreciate these works has deepened considerably.

Mahler's 9th has been a particular obsession. I recall being floored by a performance of it by the Virginia All-State Orchestra (a bunch of high school kids!) when I was in the All-Virginia Band back in 1998, and rediscovering it has re-lit fires in my brain. This is all classical fan 101 stuff I realize, but just hearing how different conductor/orchestra combinations can bring out such different emotional, structural, textural, etc., nuances from the piece is astonishing. The one I keep coming back to is Carlo Maria Giulini's recording with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra in 1977; there's something meditative and ethereal about it. In fact, I adore all the Giulini I've found--Bruckner's 9th, Brahms's 4th, and Beethoven's 7th.

I've also been digesting Mahler 9's from Otto Klemperer/New Philharmonia, Bruno Walter/Vienna (1938 version), and Georg Solti/London. This stuff sounds incredible on LP (maybe just because my cartridge cost twice what my CD player did!), and it's kind of amazing how much classical is out there on vinyl for the taking--and not for very much money. This is such a rich and involving piece that every performance--even if it's not my personal favorite--brings out things that others don't.

I'm rambling, but man does digging into these long, involving, deep works ever remind one of the finitude and scarcity of free time. I feel like I could pick four or five symphonies I really love and spend years and years just digesting all the different renditions. But then I'd miss out on so much! It's all so anxiety-inducing. Anyhow, in addition to Mahler's 9th (and 3rd, 5th, and 6th), I've also been loving Bruckner's 8th and 9th, Sibelius's 4th, Brahms's 1st and 4th (how had I never listened to Brahms before?!)... And I'm trying to figure out who to dive into next.

Clarke B., Thursday, 9 May 2013 14:35 (eight years ago) link

Such a great feeling - have been on a similar roll since the end of last year, albeit with different emphases. Enjoy!

Call the Cops, Thursday, 9 May 2013 18:17 (eight years ago) link

try the nielsen syms clarke, partic 4 and 5

clouds, Thursday, 9 May 2013 20:16 (eight years ago) link

Bought a Musical Heritage Society album of Purcell overtures on cassette at a thrift store today to listen to in the car.

timellison, Friday, 10 May 2013 00:14 (eight years ago) link

Played Khachaturian's "Violin Concerto in Dm" a coupla weeks ago.

Sir Lord Baltimora (Myonga Vön Bontee), Friday, 10 May 2013 06:10 (eight years ago) link

Atembogen and Five pieces for Organ and tape are frieghteningly good.

Available here off this double set: http://www.schott-music.com/shop/resources/598610.jpg

xyzzzz__, Saturday, 11 May 2013 20:12 (eight years ago) link

Great youtube clip of Heinz playing Mozart's Concerto for Oboe, must've been the hottest ticket in town...assuming he doesn't play anymore.

xyzzzz__, Saturday, 11 May 2013 20:14 (eight years ago) link

Clouds, thanks... I found a David Zinman/Rotterdam Orchestra recording of Nielsen's 5th on LP yesterday, and will spin it today.

Clarke B., Monday, 13 May 2013 13:43 (eight years ago) link

Derp, that was my Janacek Sinfonietta I was thinking of; I mean Horenstein/New Philharmonia on the Nielsen.

Clarke B., Monday, 13 May 2013 13:51 (eight years ago) link

There's really nothing like Mahler, is there? I mean, his has to be some of the strangest music ever composed. I find myself constantly asking, "How did he take it THERE from where it was? How did he think to overlay those instruments, those rhythms? What is this texture he's created? What is the emotional content of this? Is he joking with this?" The music moves and breathes and pulsates as if one single organism rather than a bunch of interlocking parts driving toward a resolution, but not in that drift-minimalism way I'm so used to. I cannot get my head all the way around it, but I love it.

Clarke B., Monday, 13 May 2013 14:09 (eight years ago) link

Very interested to get into Mahler.

I feel like I could pick four or five symphonies I really love and spend years and years just digesting all the different renditions.

I couldn't do that (my ear wouldn't be that discerning) but there are certain pieces I could just spend lifetimes on. They provide immersion like little else.

Am on a good run:

Alban Berg - Pieces for Clarinet and Piano together w/ several pieces by Bernd-Alois Zimmermann (Canto di Speranza, Cello Concerto, Metamorphose, Presence, Sonata for solo viola and Tempus Loquendi (flutes)). Both stand perfectly alongise one another: they are hyper-expressive and both undercut with bits of music not from classical (jazz, 'film music', cabaret). This invites BAD WRITING as people will talk how postmodernist it all is.

Kevin Volans White Man Sleeps, Mbira, She Who Sleeps, Leaping Dance.. Really like this, it sounds careful about what its inferring (years earlier than Paul Simon's Graceland if you're looking for an example within pop) but it doesn't let that care strangle the potential for expression and expansion. A great fusion.

Andriessen - Die Staat and Workers Union. Love the ending of the latter, could be Neil Young...he's so much better than Glass or Reich, really my idea of minimalism, its full of politics.

xyzzzz__, Monday, 13 May 2013 20:09 (eight years ago) link

Oh man, if you're into Berg you should definitely check out Mahler's 9th and 10th. As you can see from the above, I'm deeply enamored of the 9th, especially the outside movements. He's really pushing against the limits of tonality, but not at all in a dry or forced manner--it's just gorgeous, flowing, and unpredictable but uncannily right-feeling. Need to investigate Andriessen myself.

Clarke B., Monday, 13 May 2013 21:01 (eight years ago) link

#9 is as good as late romanticism gets, there's a late karajan digital recording i like a lot

I'm tempted to say it's as good as symphonic writing gets, period! I haven't heard a Karajan version of it yet--I should. I have mixed feelings about Karajan, but I think the Bruckner of his I've heard is unstoppable. I just got a used CD of Eliahu Inbal and the Frankfurt Radio Symphony Orchestra doing M9, and it's really, really good--a somewhat emotionally restrained reading, but the tempos are perfect and the production sound is just incredible.

Clarke B., Monday, 13 May 2013 21:20 (eight years ago) link

XXXXXXXXXXXXP = Saw a performance of Death Speaks at the weekend w/ Nico Muhly and Nadia Sirota, was ace.

MaresNest, Monday, 13 May 2013 22:10 (eight years ago) link

MareNest - were you at the Barbican thing?

I'm still mulling on the Philip Glass études from last night. Overall of the three concerts I saw over the weekend, it was a bit hit and miss. Some of the good bits were very good, but then there was some really dull bits too.

Jill, Monday, 13 May 2013 22:25 (eight years ago) link

Yea, I went to the Friday and Sunday evening sessions. I agree about the etudes, I dug the couple of more complex and splattery ones, I was getting Einstein/Train vibes from one especially. Did you go to the Friday gig? The Prestini Opera was baaaaad.

MaresNest, Monday, 13 May 2013 22:36 (eight years ago) link

Yeah, it didn't really make much sense at all (although I discovered afterwards that the opera in its full form is double the length, so maybe some of the key story bits got cut out).though that wasn't as bad as sitting through Villagers and Glen Hansard the next night.

The two things I've got out the weekend though are:
1) I really want to see So Percussion perform in a non-seated venue
2) Timo Andres (tempted to see him at the Wigmore Hall tomorrow night)

Jill, Monday, 13 May 2013 22:54 (eight years ago) link

Berg's Wozzeck at the ENO, anyone seen it?

xyzzzz__, Tuesday, 14 May 2013 20:31 (eight years ago) link

XP - Timo Andres was a machine, incredible to watch, Muhly is good, but you can tell he's at the limit of this capabilities (no surprise as he's a composer, not a concert pianist) but Timo almost had a big neon sign above him with COULD PLAY BOULEZ' SECOND SONATA AT TEN YRS OLD

MaresNest, Thursday, 16 May 2013 16:02 (eight years ago) link

Anyone into Finnissy? I was listening to "Ulpirra" today and it kind of made me feel like a kid discovering new music again.

EveningStar (Sund4r), Sunday, 19 May 2013 01:08 (eight years ago) link

Admittedly, it could be because my listening was saturated with the Sonic Youth discography for the past week and a half or so.

EveningStar (Sund4r), Sunday, 19 May 2013 01:09 (eight years ago) link

Sund4r - this is awesome news. Finnissy is just one of my very favourite composers. Plenty of things said (possibly by me) upthread. Certainly you should hear his piano music (English Countr Tunes is the obvious place), and then get onto Red Earth.

I'm listening to a few bits and pieces from John Cage (

xyzzzz__, Sunday, 19 May 2013 10:12 (eight years ago) link

Oops pressed too early: The City Wears a Slouch Hat. Its a quaint little piece.

Then I also feel like I'm really getting into Elliott Carter for the first time, even though I've been listening to a piece or two now and again for a few years, but this feels a bit more sustained. Mostly works from the 80s. I like the little duo combinations. I can't get used to the English operatic voice so In Thunder isn't something I'll be returning too.

Wonder how much he was listening to Franco Donatoni (or vice-versa). Triple Duo sounds p/good in that sense.

d/l more works by Bruno Maderna and Charles Ives too.

xyzzzz__, Sunday, 19 May 2013 10:26 (eight years ago) link

Wow, I just listened to Finnissy's 3 Preludes and am now listening to Kierkegaards (perf Laurence Crane). This is not what I expected! Somehow I'd thought he was a new complexity guy but this stuff sounds more like accessible post-minimal post-Satie mood music. It's definitely nice though!

EveningStar (Sund4r), Sunday, 19 May 2013 14:21 (eight years ago) link

Ha, OK, I just started the Youtube of English Country Tunes that you linked upthread: this is more what I expected.

EveningStar (Sund4r), Sunday, 19 May 2013 14:22 (eight years ago) link

OK, I'm a moron. The first recording I was listening to was of Finnissy PLAYING pieces by Laurence Crane. It's still early!

EveningStar (Sund4r), Sunday, 19 May 2013 14:47 (eight years ago) link

On This Church now. This seems like the most accessible 'New Complexity' music I've ever heard, lyrical even. I can't say I understand yet how it's all put together but it mostly sounds great.

EveningStar (Sund4r), Sunday, 19 May 2013 15:27 (eight years ago) link

Ah, I see Ben Watson made a Britten comparison. I thought of Britten as well.

EveningStar (Sund4r), Sunday, 19 May 2013 15:42 (eight years ago) link

'New Complexity' is a snappy term for dense, physical, muscular music. but it doesn't describe everything the composers associated with it get up to, and that especially goes for Finnissy who has a wide range of tastes, both as a pianist and composer.

xyzzzz__, Monday, 20 May 2013 20:51 (eight years ago) link

Got this as a birthday present a couple weeks ago on the heels of my first ring cycle attendance. It immediately became one of my favorite piano recordings ever.

http://www.dynaudio.com/records/int/releases_files/cover.jpg

sonderpop, Wednesday, 22 May 2013 11:04 (eight years ago) link

Ach Henri was great.

flamboyant goon mayor denuded (flamboyant goon tie included), Wednesday, 22 May 2013 14:40 (eight years ago) link

Went through abt a dozen CRI records yesterday and realized I don't like Lou Harrison but I do like Irving Fine
So far, no dazzling standouts. It's been cool to listen to crates of new-to-me-and-OK 20th c stuff tho

flamboyant goon mayor denuded (flamboyant goon tie included), Wednesday, 22 May 2013 14:48 (eight years ago) link

i wish i liked lou harrison more. i like the idea of his music more than the actual offerings.

clouds, Wednesday, 22 May 2013 17:49 (eight years ago) link

Yes I am never moved to seek more.

At the moment I am quite deeply into Ives: no4/Holidays/a CD worth of songs. And Finnissy is a bit like a latter day Ives, both of whom transform their own folk musics with the exception that Finnissy loves folk musics of every corner of the globe and he's far mroe subtle whereas Charles inserts quotation marks.

Vinko Globokar: Echange and Res - As - Eex - Ins - Pirer, both for trombone solo are quite something. His ensemble works aren't as interesting but I need to know more. His opera had Diamanda Galas in the lead role.

Rediscovering Xenakis' chamber works: Dmaathen, Charisma...Anaktoria has an outstanding ending. So punishing and good!

Berio: some of the sequenzas, esp the one for Recorder, Cello and Voice are p/great. As are the folk songs. I've been stuck into Coro for too long (not exactly a bad thing, it is still possibly his best)

Lachenmann's Accanto, where he drops a tape of Mozart in the middle of fierce concrete instrumentale. Very much like Kagel and Nono...the music that was can never be again. Its not about a notion of march of progress; this isn't necessarily better, but a "we can't repeat" msg is at work. The str trio; Dal Niente for Clarinet.

Berg's Lyric Suite is, in some ways, a counterpart to Accanto.

Birtwistle - Messiaen(ic) screams all round, in Triumph of Time its all delayed and er, well, timed.

xyzzzz__, Saturday, 25 May 2013 10:34 (eight years ago) link

A change of pace w/Les Barricades Mysterieuses by Couperin in the v well regarded recordings by Blandine Verdet.

xyzzzz__, Saturday, 25 May 2013 15:11 (eight years ago) link

the 'hexameron' youtube account is so great, full of slightly marginal but wonderful piano repertoire

I just started getting into the composer Örjan Sandred, a Swedish guy who now teaches at University of Manitoba. The album Cracks and Corrosion, which you can stream on Naxos Online, is pretty satisfying imo. "Cracks and Corrosion no. 2", for classical guitar with live electronics, was the initial draw and is still my favourite: some excellent processing, gets pretty intense at times. But the whole album is a good mix, with acoustic pieces opening and closing (piano + clarinet + string trio; flute and harp). In between, you also have "Amanzule Voices" for cello with live electronics, and "The Third Perspective", which is entirely computer-created but based on his analysis of cello sounds.

Some programme notes:
http://sandred.com/texts/amanzule-progr-note.pdf
http://sandred.com/texts/3rdpersp-progr-note.pdf
http://sandred.com/texts/Cracks-and-Corrosion-II.pdf

He actually offers software and Max patch downloads at his website too!

EveningStar (Sund4r), Sunday, 26 May 2013 22:42 (eight years ago) link

Also getting back into Ben Thigpen, an electronic/EA composer to whom I was exposed a great deal when I was at Buffalo. It's not the same without octatonic surround sound but there are some good samples/excerpts here:
http://thigpen.free.fr/pages/music/paths.html

EveningStar (Sund4r), Sunday, 26 May 2013 22:43 (eight years ago) link

I'm never sure whether electronic music counts as 'classical', unless it's scored.

EveningStar (Sund4r), Sunday, 26 May 2013 22:44 (eight years ago) link

How much interest would there be in a ballot poll of either string quartets or chamber music?

EveningStar (Sund4r), Monday, 27 May 2013 03:54 (eight years ago) link

SQs would suit my habits of late.

Call the Cops, Monday, 27 May 2013 09:17 (eight years ago) link

Both would be good.

xyzzzz__, Monday, 27 May 2013 09:22 (eight years ago) link

Actually we should amalgamate into one poll for chamber music that includes str quartets.

xyzzzz__, Monday, 27 May 2013 09:32 (eight years ago) link

I was just thinking yesterday that ILM has never had a proper classical music ballot poll. Since I'm a diletantte when it comes to classical, I'd love to see this happen, so I can get recommendations. But I think the poll should include all of it, not just chamber music... Possibly it could have two different votes, one of chamber music and one for orchestral works? Kinda like the earlier polls have had different votes for singles and albums.

Tuomas, Monday, 27 May 2013 11:00 (eight years ago) link

I can't, unfortunately, lend a hand to try and organise due to lack of time but its interesting to try and shape what it would look like. From what I've seen of how these are conducted can we have a top 50 countdown, seems weird to have stuff with a couple of votes in the poll.

xyzzzz__, Monday, 27 May 2013 11:19 (eight years ago) link

Also don't think there is much point in an orchestral poll -- most of us know its 'classics'. Bit yawnsome, google.com job.

Then again I always had to work some enthusiasm for it: always been my feeling that, few orchestral-sized works aside, the seismic shifts etecetera have been in chamber/solo music repertoir. This is certainly true in the last 40 years. Mid-sized ensembles have done better and I wonder if that would be included as chamber or orchestral? If there are two polls, that becomes a question.

xyzzzz__, Monday, 27 May 2013 11:47 (eight years ago) link

Well, it becomes a question even if there's just one poll; what size would the ensemble have to be so it's not "chamber" anymore?

Also don't think there is much point in an orchestral poll -- most of us know its 'classics'. Bit yawnsome, google.com job.

If we were to follow this logic, there wouldn't be any genre polls, since we all know well-known classics are gonna place high in any of them... But I think these polls can still be exciting, and those like me, who aren't well versed in genre in question, they can be a great way to get into new stuff, even if it isn't new to someone else.

Tuomas, Monday, 27 May 2013 12:20 (eight years ago) link

Personally over 20 and it isn't chamber anymore. I'll go to a classical board I am a member of and ask actually.

As oposed to electronic/dance, the canon for orchestral music is an incredible bore. I've got a sinking feeling about it..

xyzzzz__, Monday, 27 May 2013 12:51 (eight years ago) link

"Chamber music" is already a far broader category than "disco" or "heavy rock albums of the 1980s". If I'm running the poll, I'm not going to poll "all classical music", i.e. every genre of Western art music (solo, chamber, orchestral, choral, opera, electroacoustic, ...) from the Medieval era to the present day. Other people are welcome to do that if they want to, obv. It makes more sense to me to focus on one genre, as long as there is enough interest. The somewhat vague definition of "chamber music" does make me consider just doing "string quartets" instead.

xpost

EveningStar (Sund4r), Monday, 27 May 2013 12:54 (eight years ago) link

Agree that coming up with a def to apply to a poll would be difficult, esp when it seems a lot of work when there might be only a dozen people voting.

re: quatets there is a big enough volume, shame it only became a thing in the last, what, 250 years? Chamber would mean Ars Subtilier songs and Zelenka's trio sonatas in the menu.

xyzzzz__, Monday, 27 May 2013 13:15 (eight years ago) link

"Only the last 250 years"!

I don't think I'd include any vocal music in a chamber music poll, certainly not Medieval songs. If we went that way, I'd probably keep it to instrumental music for 2-10 instruments.

EveningStar (Sund4r), Monday, 27 May 2013 13:28 (eight years ago) link

Wasn't it Haydn that got str quartets going...so that's 300 years or so...

Reading wiki now though: "The origins of the string quartet can be traced back to the Baroque trio sonata, in which two solo instruments performed with a continuo section consisting of a bass instrument (such as the cello) and keyboard."

So this would include Zelenka.

Ars Subtilier had instruments with a singer or two. Small set-up, less than 10.

xyzzzz__, Monday, 27 May 2013 13:35 (eight years ago) link

As oposed to electronic/dance, the canon for orchestral music is an incredible bore. I've got a sinking feeling about it..

Agreed, but in what way does this mean orchestral music is a bore? IDG u sometimes.

2 huxtables and a sousaphone (Jon Lewis), Monday, 27 May 2013 13:35 (eight years ago) link

Str quartet poll would be awesome, but it would be rightn natural if it could include quintets as well. Because Mozart k515, schubert d956 and the two Brahms are so fkin killer.

2 huxtables and a sousaphone (Jon Lewis), Monday, 27 May 2013 13:37 (eight years ago) link

I wasn't commenting on the accuracy of the "250 years" comment. I just thought it was funny to say "only the last 250 years" when the entire history of rock and roll is about 60 years old (and we poll very specific subgenres of it all the time).

EveningStar (Sund4r), Monday, 27 May 2013 13:40 (eight years ago) link

haha ok sorry I read a question mark which wasn't there.

I would include Finnissy's String Trio if we widened it on the string front. Or Aroura (for 12 str) by Xenakis (which is much btr than his str quartet imo)

xyzzzz__, Monday, 27 May 2013 13:48 (eight years ago) link

so er, what's IDG :-)

Its not a big mystery. I often feel there is more exploratory work carried out in smaller ensembles/chamber, and a lot more of what an instrument can do is explored when its written for solos only as well.

I was listening to Xenakis' Persephassa earlier today and you look at the variety of sound and action (and this given that you're not getting the full 'surround sound' that you would in a hall, from a recording)...and think how orchestral composers completely ignored percussion, makes you furious really. A lot of it is one big show.

But as I said in some earlier post Xenakis' whole conception of sound-as-mass really suited the orchestra.

xyzzzz__, Monday, 27 May 2013 13:59 (eight years ago) link<