List The Direct References of Stereolab

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Stereolab - Nurse With Wound - "A Wonderful Wooden Reason"
http://www.lyricstime.com/faust-meadow-meal-lyrics.html

Stereolab · Nurse With Wound - "Simple Headphone Mind"
Alcatraz - "Simple Headphone Mind" from "Vampire State Building", recorded at Faust's studio, 1971
http://www.progarchives.com/album.asp?id=10591

Milton Parker, Wednesday, 24 October 2007 21:35 (ten years ago) Permalink

Transient Random-Noise Bursts With Announcements: not one but three Perrey-Kingsley samples on one album, here are your royalties
http://www.amazon.com/Out-Sound-Complete-Vanguard-Recordings/dp/B000055ZE1

Milton Parker, Wednesday, 24 October 2007 21:35 (ten years ago) Permalink

Well, well, so you are an upright person, you love peace and quiet, law and order... you have worked over twenty years with the same company, your boss likes you, you have never been criticized, never any complaints... you play cards, you read the Neue Zürcher Zeitung, believe in God and belong to the shooting club... you're a lieutenant in the army!... about time you were bumped off! PENG!

http://stereolab.koly.com/exhibits/images/clifforig.gif

Milton Parker, Wednesday, 24 October 2007 21:35 (ten years ago) Permalink

http://www.badreputation.de/VU_murder_front.jpg

cutty, Wednesday, 24 October 2007 21:37 (ten years ago) Permalink

absolutely

Milton Parker, Wednesday, 24 October 2007 21:37 (ten years ago) Permalink

http://www.lyricsxp.com/lyrics/i/i_feel_the_air_of_another_planet_stereolab.html
"I feel the air of another planet" / "Ich fühle luft von anderem planeten", first line of the Stefan George poem 'Entrückung', set by Schoenberg to music in the last movement of his second string quartet, now regarded as the first fully atonal piece of classical music
http://www.everything2.com/index.pl?node_id=1426242

Milton Parker, Wednesday, 24 October 2007 21:37 (ten years ago) Permalink

Stereolab - Instant 0 In The Universe
http://www.discogs.com/release/192321
Bernard Parmegiani - 'Instant 0'
from 'La Création Du Monde'
http://www.discogs.com/release/173060

Milton Parker, Wednesday, 24 October 2007 21:38 (ten years ago) Permalink

I forget the 60's film poster that was used as the template for the cover of 'Sound Dust' -- I thought it was Polanski's "Cul De Sac" but can't find a direct match, I open the door

Milton Parker, Wednesday, 24 October 2007 21:38 (ten years ago) Permalink

Kybernetická babicka
"Cybernetic Grandmother" by Jirí Trnka, experimental animated Czech film, 1962
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0239543/
http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=3053080331721849771

Milton Parker, Wednesday, 24 October 2007 21:40 (ten years ago) Permalink

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean-Claude_Vannier

oscar, Wednesday, 24 October 2007 21:41 (ten years ago) Permalink

http://www.econ.duke.edu/Economists/Gifs/Marx.gif

jaymc, Wednesday, 24 October 2007 21:42 (ten years ago) Permalink

Huysmans Against Nature actually has McCarthy as an intermediate step ("Anti-Nature") --

Someone has done a Youtube video somewhere of musical lifts, a couple of which are a bit "umm a I-IV-V progression isn't really a steal," but most of which are pretty obviously what they were listening to / lifting from.

nabisco, Wednesday, 24 October 2007 21:43 (ten years ago) Permalink

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/COBRA_(avant-garde_movement)

oscar, Wednesday, 24 October 2007 21:45 (ten years ago) Permalink

"First of the Microbe Hunters" was a term originally applied to Anton van Leeuwenhoek.

jaymc, Wednesday, 24 October 2007 21:46 (ten years ago) Permalink

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stan_Brakhage

jaymc, Wednesday, 24 October 2007 21:49 (ten years ago) Permalink

Lyrics from Peng!33 = from opening chapter of Cent Anos de Solidad

nabisco, Wednesday, 24 October 2007 21:52 (ten years ago) Permalink

(I made that sound more highbrow than it actually is)

nabisco, Wednesday, 24 October 2007 21:52 (ten years ago) Permalink

esquivel, peter thomas sound orchestra, neu!

Mr. Hal Jam, Wednesday, 24 October 2007 21:58 (ten years ago) Permalink

P.S. Not just Perrey-Kingsley, but Perrey-Kingsley playing back to Brazil with "One Note Samba"

nabisco, Wednesday, 24 October 2007 22:01 (ten years ago) Permalink

http://www.danacountryman.com/jjp1/auto/Ondioline.jpg

The Ondioline was a vacuum tube-powered keyboard instrument, invented in 1941 [1] by the Frenchman Georges Jenny, and was a forerunner of today's synthesizers.

dan selzer, Wednesday, 24 October 2007 22:06 (ten years ago) Permalink

One of their songs namedrops about 40 different Blue Jam sketches, which is pretty awesome bizarre.

Just got offed, Wednesday, 24 October 2007 22:09 (ten years ago) Permalink

looking up these links was occasionally very frustrating -- five years ago it was easy to google the direct reference, but at this point you've got to go through about sixty pages worth of stereolab lyrics pages / retail sites / review pages / playlists playlists playlists. the difference between acknowledging an influence and eclipsing the source by borrowing the title for your own successful project is growing.

the fact that the referents are baldly sitting there doesn't necessarily mean anyone thinks to look (and why would they, it's a pop band). it's not as if there's a place for endless trainspotting in most reviews but sometimes I wonder if this band has ever offered a single intuitive or non-pilfered moment or if the whole point is wholesale representation / recombination, in which case you'd expect the referents to be mentioned a little more often than they are

Milton Parker, Wednesday, 24 October 2007 22:14 (ten years ago) Permalink

http://popsike.com/pix/20060911/190030441794.jpg

scott seward, Wednesday, 24 October 2007 22:16 (ten years ago) Permalink

ok a bit of overstatement there but the depth of their borrowing sometimes leaves me a bit stunned

xpost ok if we're just going to begin posting covers of albums

http://ochtendeditie.radio6.nl/files/2007/04/tusoa.jpg

Milton Parker, Wednesday, 24 October 2007 22:17 (ten years ago) Permalink

Which song is that Louis? Or is it easily Googlable?

DJ Mencap, Wednesday, 24 October 2007 22:20 (ten years ago) Permalink

http://popsike.com/pix/20060129/4828460304.jpg

scott seward, Wednesday, 24 October 2007 22:25 (ten years ago) Permalink

sorry, i'm lazy.

scott seward, Wednesday, 24 October 2007 22:25 (ten years ago) Permalink

Nothing To Do With Me
(aka Moonflies (aka Chris Morris))

(as seen on This is the thread where you talk about Chris Morris - genius, and the finest satirist of modern times )

Just got offed, Wednesday, 24 October 2007 22:27 (ten years ago) Permalink

Does one of those links go to Gil Scott-Heron?

James Redd and the Blecchs, Wednesday, 24 October 2007 22:45 (ten years ago) Permalink

i'm not a huge stereolab fan, but this list is mindboggling. good work, guys.

ian, Wednesday, 24 October 2007 22:53 (ten years ago) Permalink

Here's an obscure one - the title of "Animal Or Vegetable (A Wonderful Wooden Reason)" which was on the Crumbduck EP, is a line from a Faust song (at least the bit in brackets is).

everything, Wednesday, 24 October 2007 22:55 (ten years ago) Permalink

Should also mention the later McCarthy releases which offer a neat segueway into the first Stereolab record. (eg: "The Home Secretary Briefs the Forces of Law and Order").

everything, Wednesday, 24 October 2007 22:58 (ten years ago) Permalink

http://www.uh.edu/engines/switchedonbach.jpg

dmr, Wednesday, 24 October 2007 23:07 (ten years ago) Permalink

Does one of those links go to Gil Scott-Heron?

You're talking about the bass line to "Metronomic Underground," I take it?

jaymc, Wednesday, 24 October 2007 23:13 (ten years ago) Permalink

Song on Aluminum Tunes:

http://www.reel.com/Content/Reelimages/hollconf/1013_getcarter.jpg

jaymc, Wednesday, 24 October 2007 23:18 (ten years ago) Permalink

Pack Yr Romantic Mind from Transient Random-Noise Bursts With Announcements begins with a sample from "Pop Orbite", a song on Chico Magnetic Band's album.

oscar, Wednesday, 24 October 2007 23:32 (ten years ago) Permalink

Obvious one, they recorded a split record with her.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brigitte_Fontaine
http://www.discogs.com/release/256204

oscar, Wednesday, 24 October 2007 23:34 (ten years ago) Permalink

I always thought Speedy Car had a bit of the Soft Machine about them.

But if you want to talk United States of America, it's Broadcast on their first album that really rips that.

dan selzer, Wednesday, 24 October 2007 23:35 (ten years ago) Permalink

On Dots and Loops.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stan_Brakhage

oscar, Wednesday, 24 October 2007 23:36 (ten years ago) Permalink

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/On_the_Road_Again_(Canned_Heat)

oscar, Wednesday, 24 October 2007 23:39 (ten years ago) Permalink

But if you want to talk United States of America, it's Broadcast on their first album that really rips that.

I agree, I'd prefer to keep this to direct references / uncredited samples / lyrical lifts rather than vaguer incorporated influences or else I'd just be Sylvie Vartaning it up over here

first track on Refried Ectoplasm, 'Harmonium', where the 70's DJ spools up a tape which promptly breaks and falls off the reel is lifted from an aircheck of Negativland's 'Over the Edge Vol 4 - Dick Vaughan'

Milton Parker, Wednesday, 24 October 2007 23:44 (ten years ago) Permalink

http://www.indiatomorrow.net/health/images/lemonade.jpg

- le

Autumn Almanac, Wednesday, 24 October 2007 23:49 (ten years ago) Permalink

great work, Milton!

sleeve, Thursday, 25 October 2007 00:00 (ten years ago) Permalink

This
http://www.yellowmelodies.com/e-zine/numero5/portadas/Stereol7.jpg

is supposed to be based on the comic series Pravda la Survireuse by Guy Peellaert.
http://www.bedetheque.com/thb_couv/pravda.jpg

Elvis Telecom, Thursday, 25 October 2007 00:00 (ten years ago) Permalink

Yes, this is a nice thread. Milton rocks.

nabisco, do they really reference _À Rebours_? That's one of my favorite books ever.

Turangalila, Thursday, 25 October 2007 00:04 (ten years ago) Permalink

Here are the YouTube dissections of musical origins I was talking about. Apart from a couple things that seem too basic to see as steals (e.g., the Canned Heat), they're mostly pretty clear lifts or pastiches, without too many stretches -- and a couple disappointing "oh man, I can't believe you lifted the melody" parts. Mostly it's rhythmic grooves and feels they're snipping from things and using as a basis for their own stuff.

http://youtube.com/watch?v=IrFdR7I_kjM
http://youtube.com/watch?v=s9N1uwNEraM
http://youtube.com/watch?v=E9iiJy0jWSg
http://youtube.com/watch?v=LNAO-vqa6R0

Artists mentioned: Faust, Piero Piccioni, Canned Heat, Gal Costa, Krzystzof Komeda, Kraftwerk, Jean-Michel Jarre, Sun Ra, Snapper, Wanderlea, Laurie Anderson, the Association, the Archies, Serge Gainsbourg, Neu!, Silver Apples, Steve Reich, and Plastic Ono Band (as source of "Emperor Tomato Ketchup" bass line -- this was the only one that kinda surprised me!)

nabisco, Thursday, 25 October 2007 00:09 (ten years ago) Permalink

xpost turangalila I'm not 100% sure. 'against nature' is the title in translation and a direct reference would have used the original french. the lyrics do seem to me like a commentary or response to the book, I linked them upthread

Milton Parker, Thursday, 25 October 2007 00:26 (ten years ago) Permalink

if it is a reference it's admittedly not a very direct one (though I'm sure they've read it) -- with those lines about 'war', probably something else made the song's orbit as well

I actually liked this translation better, but I went for the pop edition to underscore the reference

Milton Parker, Thursday, 25 October 2007 00:31 (ten years ago) Permalink

You're talking about the bass line to "Metronomic Underground," I take it?
Yup, that's what I'm talking about, jaymc.

James Redd and the Blecchs, Thursday, 25 October 2007 00:53 (ten years ago) Permalink

Milton I can't believe you didn't post this -

http://files.myopera.com/E.%20Driver/albums/35120/JohnCage.jpg

Stormy Davis, Thursday, 25 October 2007 01:58 (ten years ago) Permalink

xxpost Milton

Hmm... yes. "Living fantasy of the immortal"

thanks!

I've actually only read it in Spanish. Going to buy this version you recommend!

Turangalila, Thursday, 25 October 2007 02:01 (ten years ago) Permalink

Gastr del Sol opened for Stereolab at the Metro in Chicago back in the mid-90s, and a couple weeks before the show I bumped into David Grubbs at the Hyde Park Kinko's on 57th St. He showed me the gig flyer he was printing up which read "Stereolab - 'John Cage Bubblegum' / Gastr del Sol - 'Steve Reich n Roll'"

Stormy Davis, Thursday, 25 October 2007 02:03 (ten years ago) Permalink

I didn't actually go that show tho. Dumb! I never saw Stereolab.

Stormy Davis, Thursday, 25 October 2007 02:04 (ten years ago) Permalink

I HAVE THAT FIRST RECORD!

jaxon, Thursday, 25 October 2007 02:21 (ten years ago) Permalink

it's been so long, but they ripped the bassline for a song directly from a yoko ono tune from her first or second solo album

jaxon, Thursday, 25 October 2007 02:22 (ten years ago) Permalink

http://www.zenker.se/Books/the_stars_my_destination.jpg

dad a, Thursday, 25 October 2007 04:17 (ten years ago) Permalink

http://www.see.com.au/blog/archives/Darren%20002.jpg

Mark Rich@rdson, Thursday, 25 October 2007 04:26 (ten years ago) Permalink

Prokofiev's Symphonie Diabolique:
http://website.lineone.net/~dmitrismirnov/image020.jpg

dad a, Thursday, 25 October 2007 04:32 (ten years ago) Permalink

http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/I/51It1cvE6cL._SS500_.jpg

dad a, Thursday, 25 October 2007 05:27 (ten years ago) Permalink

if it is a reference it's admittedly not a very direct one (though I'm sure they've read it) -- with those lines about 'war', probably something else made the song's orbit as well

Well after the lines about war, they've got:
This is the future of an illusion
Aggressive culture of despotism
Living fantasy of the immortal
The reality of an animal

Of course the first line is: http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/715CHD055PL._BO2,204,203,200_PIlitb-dp-500-arrow,TopRight,45,-64_OU01_AA240_SH20_.gif
I wonder if the next three lines are from three other fin-de-siecle sources.

These Robust Cookies, Thursday, 25 October 2007 06:27 (ten years ago) Permalink

One of their tracks is based on "Disco Rough" by Mathématiques Modernes.

Raw Patrick, Thursday, 25 October 2007 09:20 (ten years ago) Permalink

Can't think of anything less obvious right now (I thought I was a genius for spotting the 100 Years of Solitude thing once and then googled it and nabisco had already written about it on Pitchfork, thus I lose), but "Enivrez-Vous!" from Peng! takes its lyrics from a Baudelaire prose-poem.

I'd always wondered about some of these! Thanks.

a passing spacecadet, Thursday, 25 October 2007 10:27 (ten years ago) Permalink

Maybe someone knows what that French Disco line really is: Bubble Withdrawal?

Mark G, Thursday, 25 October 2007 10:33 (ten years ago) Permalink

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucia_Pamela

zeus, Thursday, 25 October 2007 11:21 (ten years ago) Permalink

I have her CD somewhere, it is bats!

Mark G, Thursday, 25 October 2007 11:23 (ten years ago) Permalink

a lot of that youtube series of comparisons are a little on the vague side, but they're fun

I would not have compared 'Emperor Tomato Ketchup' to 'Why?' by the Plastic Ono Band, I'd have used "Les Histoires D'A" by Les Rita Mitsouko

Stereolab guilty: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ML9PWVm0wEQ

Milton Parker, Thursday, 25 October 2007 23:20 (ten years ago) Permalink

& I will post these anyway

Sylvie Vartan - Cette lettre-là (1965)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dOlx2MxC6eQ

Sylvie Vartan - Par amour par pitié (1966)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r3uL8M0svSQ

Sylvie Vartan - Irresistiblement
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kZCbwg6VmnI

Milton Parker, Thursday, 25 October 2007 23:21 (ten years ago) Permalink

Pack Yr. Romantic Mind:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bataille

Bill in Chicago, Thursday, 25 October 2007 23:42 (ten years ago) Permalink

http://www.bigoven.com/uploads/margarine.jpg

Autumn Almanac, Friday, 26 October 2007 03:15 (ten years ago) Permalink

that was feeble, sorry

Autumn Almanac, Friday, 26 October 2007 03:16 (ten years ago) Permalink

brilliant thread, that Jirí Trnka film is mindblowing. good work!

has anyone mentioned family fodder yet?, as a general influence and specifically savoire faire and it's uncanny resemblance to (i think) wow and flutter. was it milton who mentioned upstairs somewhere that sterolab steals seem a bit disingenuous? i dunno if i could go along with that, their references generally seem pretty overt, if obscure. i think it's pretty key to the appeal of stereolab that you just know everything is pilfered.

cw, Friday, 26 October 2007 11:51 (ten years ago) Permalink

Yet nothing sounds quite like Stereolab. Sort of like a robot made of all sorts.

Autumn Almanac, Friday, 26 October 2007 11:59 (ten years ago) Permalink

holy shit this thread. overwhelming amount of info. more pls!

CharlieNo4, Friday, 26 October 2007 12:22 (ten years ago) Permalink

What Charlie No4 said above.

thanks, people

Daniel Giraffe, Friday, 26 October 2007 12:51 (ten years ago) Permalink

"All good things to come.."

Mark G, Friday, 26 October 2007 12:57 (ten years ago) Permalink

MBV,Spacemen 3, Astrud Gilberto, Nico, Francoise Hardy.

Zeno, Friday, 26 October 2007 13:12 (ten years ago) Permalink

"Pause" samples the "Swedish Rhapsody" numbers station transmission.
(Numbers stations transmission consist of transient noise bursts with announcements.)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EVqaoxxsN7Q
More info:
http://www.simonmason.karoo.net/page30.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Numbers_station

dad a, Friday, 26 October 2007 14:03 (ten years ago) Permalink

Wouldn't it be quicker to just list the things that aren't a direct influence on Stereolab?

Like uh........ummmmm........

PhilK, Friday, 26 October 2007 14:07 (ten years ago) Permalink

Corn Flakes

Autumn Almanac, Friday, 26 October 2007 23:52 (ten years ago) Permalink

You obviously haven't heard the obscure 1996 comp-only track "Kellogg Oberheim Fondle"

Ned Raggett, Saturday, 27 October 2007 00:01 (ten years ago) Permalink

Does it count that they play this record sometimes before they go on mean it's a reference, or just a somewhat similar sound?

http://perso.orange.fr/vivonzeureux/Images/familysavoir1.jpg

Soundslike, Saturday, 27 October 2007 00:32 (ten years ago) Permalink

i'm not on board with a lot of these, but ...
http://youtube.com/watch?v=IrFdR7I_kjM
http://youtube.com/watch?v=s9N1uwNEraM
http://youtube.com/watch?v=E9iiJy0jWSg
http://youtube.com/watch?v=LNAO-vqa6R0

-- jaxon, Saturday, 27 October 2007 10:23 (53 minutes ago) Bookmark Link

Some of those are either acknowledged influences (Gane has said Flower Call Nowhere is based on Fearless Vampire Killers, which is obvious when you hear the AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAH ... AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAH ... AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAH ... AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAH bit) or incredibly tenuous links. Quite a few are disturbingly close though.

Autumn Almanac, Saturday, 27 October 2007 01:19 (ten years ago) Permalink

http://www.seafriends.org.nz/photolib/shows/snapper.jpg

keythkeyth, Saturday, 27 October 2007 01:46 (ten years ago) Permalink

And from an NZ domain too.

Ned Raggett, Saturday, 27 October 2007 01:47 (ten years ago) Permalink

You poopheadz, I posted those just upthread!

The really tenuous ones are the things that seem common to a million songs, too common to count as a "steal" even if they're directly referencing the original -- the Canned Heat one is pretty free-floating in the whole world of music at this point, and the Archies one is like, umm, pretty common rhythm guitar sound.

nabisco, Saturday, 27 October 2007 22:30 (ten years ago) Permalink

now i see snapper, sorry.

keythkeyth, Saturday, 27 October 2007 23:58 (ten years ago) Permalink

astrud gilberto - "summer sweet"

listen to the verses and tell me that the organ sound and chord changes aren't like a total mid-era Stereolab sound.

Steve Shasta, Sunday, 28 October 2007 01:38 (ten years ago) Permalink

Jon, amazingly comprehensive -- nice work. I will admit I had no idea of the extent to which their music was referential.

Should we start a thread about the 'Lab aesthetic -- ie, what the point of all this is? Because for me, the mind has always been engaged by the sum total of their work -- in particular, the (frankly unprecedented) vigilance of their postmodernism. But the heart, which has to judge Stereolab records on their musical merits, is altogether less convinced.

Naive Teen Idol, Sunday, 28 October 2007 15:10 (ten years ago) Permalink

The whole thing started collapsing under its own weight when they started collaborating with fellow derivative bricoleurs, the High Llamas.

James Redd and the Blecchs, Sunday, 28 October 2007 22:49 (ten years ago) Permalink

The Lightning Seeds: "Pure"

Mark G, Monday, 29 October 2007 16:31 (ten years ago) Permalink

Pack Yr Romantic Mind from Transient Random-Noise Bursts With Announcements begins with a sample from "Pop Orbite", a song on Chico Magnetic Band's album.

-- oscar, Wednesday, October 24, 2007 11:32 PM (6 days ago) Bookmark Link

actually "Pop Orbite" is sampling the same fragment of that Perrey / Kingsley tune "One Note Samba -- Spanish Flea". thanks for getting me to check out that Chico Magnetic Band album though, it's nuts

The Groop Played "Midnight Cowboy" Music

>Should we start a thread about the 'Lab aesthetic -- ie, what the point of all this is?

I think we all know what the point is, I like their tunes. If they're sometimes a little too wallpapery, the wallpaper suits me -- if I'm going to tune out to something lovely, it's reassuring that when I tune back in I realize the lyrics are about Bataille or Marx instead of guns or money or something poisonous). I like that they leave a trail of crumbs leading to the inspirations, I'm just surprised more people don't investigate them when it's such a blatant aspect of their whole project

Milton Parker, Tuesday, 30 October 2007 19:37 (ten years ago) Permalink

Can I just point out that the arrangement of Perrey & Kingsley's One Note Samba/Spanish Flea medley is surely based on the Sergio Mendez medley of the same two songs which was released the previous year. All the changes take place at identical points in the songs, the tempo is almost identical also. It's like they used it as a template. I realize that this has nothing to do with Stereolab though I'm sure they must have at some point betrayed a Sergio Mendez influence.

everything, Tuesday, 30 October 2007 22:25 (ten years ago) Permalink

This thread is why I've never liked Stereolab and have never tried very hard to

Tom D., Wednesday, 31 October 2007 17:15 (ten years ago) Permalink

I think we all know what the point is, I like their tunes. If they're sometimes a little too wallpapery, the wallpaper suits me -- if I'm going to tune out to something lovely, it's reassuring that when I tune back in I realize the lyrics are about Bataille or Marx instead of guns or money or something poisonous). I like that they leave a trail of crumbs leading to the inspirations, I'm just surprised more people don't investigate them when it's such a blatant aspect of their whole project

See, Jon, I actually wasn't be snide about asking what the "point" of them is -- reading this thread, for the first time I began to think that maybe I was missing something about Stereolab's referentiality. I honestly used to think, "These guys are the lowest form of hero worship" -- Neu, Serge Gainsbourg, etc. It never seemed to rise above the materials they were pilfering.

But what you've laid out above is much, MUCH more obsessive than that -- more than I ever realized and definitely more than mere hero worship. It's almost as if Stereolab intentionally went into this thinking that they were going to be analog plunderphonics, creating their work exclusively out of the songs and aesthetics of others' to the exclusion of any original material whatsoever.

And I think that's absolutely fascinating -- a word I never would have associated with Stereolab in my life.

Naive Teen Idol, Wednesday, 31 October 2007 17:32 (ten years ago) Permalink

Primal Scream for hipsters

Tom D., Wednesday, 31 October 2007 17:34 (ten years ago) Permalink

Because Primal Scream are for the masses, maaaaan

nabisco, Wednesday, 31 October 2007 17:48 (ten years ago) Permalink

The idea that they're somehow insane plunderers is getting WAY overblown on this thread, for a lot of reasons:

(a) the stuff up at the top of the thread consists of the same kind of iconographic / non-musical references most every band takes up in the service of creating an image/aesthetic

(b) the number of direct musical borrowings may not be as high as this thread makes it seem, considering that this band has released approximately 18,000,000 songs

(c) the only reason those borrowings get tagged as somehow significant is precisely because they were borrowing from sources that were (at the time) somewhat arcane -- a rock band that borrows just as much from obvious sources like the Kinks or Clash or Gang of Four or whatever is not considered to be plundering, mostly because they're interpreted as following in a common tradition, and not trying to get credit for those sources; it's not necessarily a safe bet that anything different is going on with Stereolab

(d) it's somewhat off to act as if these borrowings were somehow discrete: one of the best things about their middle period was the way a lot of their influences just went bubbling around in an amalgam that could seem to be referencing, say, K Komeda and Neu! and Jobim and Francoise Hardy in equal parts and at the same time

nabisco, Wednesday, 31 October 2007 17:54 (ten years ago) Permalink

Exactly. It's worth pointing out for example that their song "The Free Design" doesn't actually sound like the Free Design, "Into Outer Space With Lucia Pamela" sounds completely unlike Lucia Pamela's album of that name etc etc.

everything, Wednesday, 31 October 2007 18:09 (ten years ago) Permalink

BUT the coda for the song "The Free Design" is an intact borrowing of the intro to ABBA's "Dancing Queen"

the point that it all comes out sounding like Stereolab has already been made on this thread, I think they certainly have their own distinctive voice. but it's a strange voice with hundreds of carefully chosen historical voices shoehorned into it. nabisco's point C is also key, the things they reference were obscure during their own time and still obscure by the time Stereolab brought them up again -- making a preferable alternate history = having a voice

Milton Parker, Wednesday, 31 October 2007 18:33 (ten years ago) Permalink

is there a specific origin for the phrase "space age bachelor pad music" or is that just a record collector catch-all term for "Martin Denny and Esquivel records"?

I googled for it but all I found was the Esquivel record under that name, which was a collection that came out after the Stereolab EP had already used the phrase ...

dmr, Wednesday, 31 October 2007 18:49 (ten years ago) Permalink

http://www.chaoskitty.com/sabpm/sapvol1.html

It should be pointed out that the phrase "Space Age Pop" wasn't in vogue when this music was created. That term arose during the mid-1980s, when cultural trashpickers--underground cartoonists and free-form DJs--were scavenging through thrift store bins and used record shops, paying 50 cents an armload for the stuff--because nobody else wanted it. Moreover, the vinyl archaeologists who bought those castoff relics developed a new (or in some cases renewed) appreciation for the quirky signals etched in the grooves. The producer credits Los Angeles artist Byron Werner with coining the phrase "Space Age Bachelor Pad Music"--later shortened to Space Age Pop by the producer.

Milton Parker, Wednesday, 31 October 2007 18:59 (ten years ago) Permalink

So [ban me], are you saying I should just go back to being bored by them again?

Because I can!

Naive Teen Idol, Wednesday, 31 October 2007 19:13 (ten years ago) Permalink

(what did N-i-t-s-u-h's name get replaced by "[ban me]" in my post?)

Naive Teen Idol, Wednesday, 31 October 2007 19:14 (ten years ago) Permalink

cause you're always going around using people's real names

An Incomplete Catalog of Space Age Bachelor Pad Music

Danny and Dena Guglielmi's 'Adventure in Sound' & Elsa Popping's 'Delirium in Hi-Fi' are standouts. The latter's particularly French, a 1959 pop record made with concrète techniques.

Milton Parker, Wednesday, 31 October 2007 19:18 (ten years ago) Permalink

Since when is that verboten? Everyone's emails used to be on here WITH their names!

Naive Teen Idol, Wednesday, 31 October 2007 19:19 (ten years ago) Permalink

happier times

remember rivers, becky?

Milton Parker, Wednesday, 31 October 2007 19:29 (ten years ago) Permalink

I have the Elsa Popping record. it's pretty good but the descriptions of the songs on the back of the sleeve made it sound like it was going to be really really good.

dmr, Wednesday, 31 October 2007 19:33 (ten years ago) Permalink

I think that record's really really really good. side one's especially demented.

& the Boris Vian involvement is a huge connect-the-dots perk

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4b5Cs0AlsZM
http://wapedia.mobi/en/Boris_Vian

Milton Parker, Wednesday, 31 October 2007 19:38 (ten years ago) Permalink

"Froth on the Daydream" is an excellent book

zappi, Thursday, 1 November 2007 13:15 (ten years ago) Permalink

Ok, Nabisco:

(a) the stuff up at the top of the thread consists of the same kind of iconographic / non-musical references most every band takes up in the service of creating an image/aesthetic

Yes...and no. Not every band does it by any means -- these guys worked extra hard at creating that image/aesthetic.

(b) the number of direct musical borrowings may not be as high as this thread makes it seem, considering that this band has released approximately 18,000,000 songs

Ha, agreed but...now I'm just guessing, but I bet it is.

(c) the only reason those borrowings get tagged as somehow significant is precisely because they were borrowing from sources that were (at the time) somewhat arcane -- a rock band that borrows just as much from obvious sources like the Kinks or Clash or Gang of Four or whatever is not considered to be plundering, mostly because they're interpreted as following in a common tradition, and not trying to get credit for those sources; it's not necessarily a safe bet that anything different is going on with Stereolab

The first difference with the Kinks, Clash and Gang of Four is that you wouldn't notice those sources as much anyway. With Stereolab, you do -- even if you don't get the references, as I was mentioning earlier in the thread, there isn't a moment in their catalogue (as I know it anyway) that at its most opaque doesn't sound at least like an homage to someone or something. Beyond that, though, is there ANYTHING they're done that doesn't hark back to some other source, be it a song title, lyric, instrumentation, artwork, melody, etc.? Again, this isn't something I really thought much about before -- but I'm asking seriously...

(d) it's somewhat off to act as if these borrowings were somehow discrete: one of the best things about their middle period was the way a lot of their influences just went bubbling around in an amalgam that could seem to be referencing, say, K Komeda and Neu! and Jobim and Francoise Hardy in equal parts and at the same time

This is a point I actually agree with, in large part. But I would chalk that up to the maturation process more than anything.

"Insane plunderers"? I dunno -- pop's been around too long to argue anything exists in a vacuum. But Stereolab very consciously seem to not even bother trying.

Naive Teen Idol, Thursday, 1 November 2007 14:23 (ten years ago) Permalink

BUT the coda for the song "The Free Design" is an intact borrowing of the intro to ABBA's "Dancing Queen"

Haha, I never noticed this! Probably because I wasn't really familiar with ABBA when Cobra and Phases Group came out.

jaymc, Thursday, 1 November 2007 14:39 (ten years ago) Permalink

Those YouTube clips are great; I think the Komeda/Sun Ra/Ono comparisons are the most striking - the rest are a bit of a stretch.

Of course, now I must go out and buy every Goraguer/Komeda soundtrack I can find.

Michael Jones, Thursday, 1 November 2007 15:01 (ten years ago) Permalink

Komeda did Rosemary's Baby, I believe.

jaymc, Thursday, 1 November 2007 15:01 (ten years ago) Permalink

BUT the coda for the song "The Free Design" is an intact borrowing of the intro to ABBA's "Dancing Queen"

Holy shit, so it does! That's why it's bothered me for so many years.

Hey and now Dancing Queen's always going to remind me of The Free Design.

Autumn Almanac, Friday, 2 November 2007 01:37 (ten years ago) Permalink

I think they got that part via "Oliver's Army."

James Redd and the Blecchs, Friday, 2 November 2007 04:33 (ten years ago) Permalink

j/k

James Redd and the Blecchs, Friday, 2 November 2007 04:34 (ten years ago) Permalink

Oliver and his army
Will work on a project
To make the people happy
And further production

Autumn Almanac, Friday, 2 November 2007 04:41 (ten years ago) Permalink

NTI -- there was an ILE thread where people were having fun posting my real name a lot, so the Lou E. Jagga code got applied. This will be awesome if I become famous and successful and there are threads like "Nobel Prize awarded to BAN ME."

It's funny how it seems like you agree with me about the mechanics of point (c), but still see it as a problem! I think the thing I'm trying to get at there is that it's not necessarily a matter of varying levels of "creativity" -- the way Stereolab will approach a task like "sounding like Neu!" does not seem to me to be particularly less creative than the way some standard-ass rock band might approach "sounding like the Clash." And Milton's point about having an alternate history of basic references is kind of key here. I think I wrote somewhere (review of Oscillons?) that there was a later-90s point where any given Stereolab track seemed like a thought experiment in imagining different pop worlds: one song where pop's main influences were Hardy / Denny / Faust, another where pop's main influences were Can / Jarre / Gilberto, and so on infinitely. This made for interesting stuff, I think.

I am totally cool with you just plain being bored with it; I just tend not to agree with the idea that it's some kind of shameless mix-and-match "easy" plundering, largely because they've tended to do the mixing and matching in a really sophisticated and hard-working way.

nabisco, Friday, 2 November 2007 18:30 (ten years ago) Permalink

Wait, wait, wait -- I think you misread what I meant. I'm not saying they're boring -- I'm saying I may have missed how fascinating they are! I may have missed the extent to which they were essentially coding everything they did in, yes, another language quite apart from what we think of when we think of "pop." And yes, I'm saying that's actually a helluva lot more fascinating than, yeah, "Now let's juxtapose Neu! and Bridget Bardot."

I still find the depth of their plundering to be kind of remarkable -- it's certainly far more sophisticated than I'd thought when I listened to them during the mid-90s. I mean, Magma notwithstanding, there aren't too many acts who've essentially created their own language.

So, getting back to my earlier point, I guess that's the aesthetic then -- "Stereolab's Bizarro Pop Canon."

Naive Teen Idol, Friday, 2 November 2007 19:12 (ten years ago) Permalink

Yeah, that's definitely a good part of the appeal! If you listen through the EP tracks on Oscillons, you get more of a sense of how they were working that angle -- a lot of their sidework tracks seemed like fun-experiment answers to questions, some of which actually may be as simple as "what if Bardot fronted Faust?" and the like. Did someone mention upthread how their on-stage set-lists would contain working titles that were just the sources -- songs referred to as, say, "Sun Ra Cage" or "Can samba" or whatever? The main one that always sticks out in my memory had the working title "Heavenly Van Halen," which is the kind of interesting pop-imagination experiment I can totally go for. (Was that the one that wound up being called "Pinball?")

nabisco, Friday, 2 November 2007 19:37 (ten years ago) Permalink

BUT the coda for the song "The Free Design" is an intact borrowing of the intro to ABBA's "Dancing Queen"

Wow, I must say -- I just dl'd Cobra Phase and listened to this w/o actually hearing it, until I played it back. It's pretty clearly intentional but buried beyond belief.

Incidentally, I'm only 3 songs into it, but Cobra Phase seems pretty packed with the Dave Brubeck "Take Five" grooves.

Naive Teen Idol, Saturday, 3 November 2007 19:43 (ten years ago) Permalink

Some further insights via Simon Reynolds' interview w/ them in 1996:

"I'm not into the kitsch element," Gane says. "I'm more into the futuristic side, the way orchestral big band music was crossed in the '60s with early electronic music – stuff that was originally done for cynical, commercial reasons often resulted in some very strange combinations and juxtapositions of sounds."

Naive Teen Idol, Saturday, 3 November 2007 19:51 (ten years ago) Permalink

Listened to "The Free Design" yesterday, off "Oscillons"...

Yep.

Mark G, Thursday, 8 November 2007 14:54 (ten years ago) Permalink

Here's parts V and VI from that dude who did the youtube dissections that nabisco and others linked to upthread.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KZkpyzXVOFk

http://youtube.com/watch?v=ZAxxMQwzL0Y

Personally, I think nearly all of these are OTM. Only the Cybele's Reverie one was too much of a stretch for me.

Jeff W, Thursday, 8 November 2007 19:38 (ten years ago) Permalink

>-- dad a, Thursday, 8 November 2007 14:42 (5 hours ago) Link

thank you! I searched and searched but couldn't find it

I'd forgotten the degree to which they really just used that Polanski poster as clip art

Milton Parker, Thursday, 8 November 2007 20:26 (ten years ago) Permalink

yeah that's amazing

I already knew the majority of musical stuff in this thread but the visual ones like the Polanski poster and the Peng! cartoon are great

dmr, Thursday, 8 November 2007 20:37 (ten years ago) Permalink

Milton, you were so comprehensive I had to read the thread twice to make sure I hadn't overlooked it! For extra credit here's Komeda's Polanski soundtrack:

http://www.soundtrackcorner.de/images/cul_de_sac_HRKCD8137.jpg

dad a, Thursday, 8 November 2007 21:09 (ten years ago) Permalink

It sez something about Stereolab that pt six of that vid has two equally plausible origins of Metronomic Underground (and that's before anyone Kraut rock is considered too.)

Raw Patrick, Thursday, 8 November 2007 21:58 (ten years ago) Permalink

the "Symbolic Logic of Now!" rip of Archie Shepp's "Akai" and the "Margarine Melodie" rip of Ron Grainger's "Theme from Omega Man" sound like insane plundering to me, Nabisco

better Philip Glass tracks to illustrate "Kybernetická babicka": "Music In Twelve Parts, Part 11" or some of the choral pieces from "North Star"

ok they're referencing 'The Omega Man', 10,000 points to anyone who can find a "Demon Seed" or "Phase IV" reference

Milton Parker, Friday, 9 November 2007 00:03 (ten years ago) Permalink

and putting "symbolic logic of now" and scrolling past about 15 mail order hits, you get a fragment of an online book called "PERFORMANCE ANTHOLOGY" about California Performance art in the 70's and a reference to a piece by video artist Joel Glassman

http://books.google.com/books?id=lu7KPDCfcXMC&pg=PA520&lpg=PA520&dq=%22symbolic+logic+of+now%22&source=web&ots=M6h1noVnPN&sig=LXv4xzXCgcPI_0AhFnnvddU8HvU#PPP1,M1

anyone saying that they may not be borrowing _that much_ only makes me think that person isn't even bothering to notice their project, these are not just songs, but clues

Milton Parker, Friday, 9 November 2007 00:25 (ten years ago) Permalink

oh and I just found two Cluster samples on Fab-Four Suture, if anyone has the packaging perhaps they can tell me if they even credited or paid. they obviously go on listening tears to specific artists while recording single albums.

'Excursions Into Oh, A-oh' samples a loop of 'Prothese' from Grosses Wasser
'Widow Weirdo' samples a loop of 'Caramel' from Zuckerzeit

Milton Parker, Friday, 9 November 2007 00:38 (ten years ago) Permalink

No mention of Cluster samples in the FFS (FFS!) artwork, such that it is (single card insert, CD back cover, that's it).

Michael Jones, Friday, 9 November 2007 00:57 (ten years ago) Permalink

not to be self-righteous about uncleared sampling or anything

the loops themselves are more winking ornamental shoutouts than integral elements

Milton Parker, Friday, 9 November 2007 01:13 (ten years ago) Permalink

10,000 points to anyone who can find a "Demon Seed" or "Phase IV" reference

Add N to X got there first on Demon Seed:
http://www.discogs.com/release/325990

...but Andy Ramsey from Stereolab does play on this track!

(/lab geek. I deserve my 10,000 points for that one!)

Jeff W, Friday, 9 November 2007 16:09 (ten years ago) Permalink

Golly, I'm drunk

Moodles, Saturday, 10 November 2007 05:15 (ten years ago) Permalink

The Incredible Shrinking He-Man

Autumn Almanac, Saturday, 10 November 2007 11:51 (ten years ago) Permalink

two months pass...

Was just listening to Steve Hillage's "It's all too much", the refrain of which bears striking resemblance to "I'm going out of my way" from Transient Random Noise Bursts, right down to the overdriven organ.

Sparkle Motion, Monday, 21 January 2008 06:16 (nine years ago) Permalink

According to this interview the title of Sound Dust comes from the liner notes to a Messiaen record. Which one?

dad a, Monday, 28 January 2008 22:48 (nine years ago) Permalink

not sure, it'd be appropriate for any of them. tim mentions the Turangalila here. a lot of Sound-Dust strikes me as Komeda production & arrangements of Messiaen chord sequences). One of my favorite Stereolab moments ever is that shifting filtered sequence at the end of "Gus The Mynah-Bird", which reminds me of "Vingt Regards".

Messiaen POV / POX

Parts 7 & 8 of the 'Stereolab Origins' series, part 8 includes a bit of the Turangalila

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bV78kmTqH3k

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yn7vfuC-waE

Milton Parker, Monday, 28 January 2008 23:49 (nine years ago) Permalink

Maybe he's talking about this? Pupils of Messaien, A Capella Works by Messaien, Stockhausen & Xenakis - one of the Stockhausen pieces, Agnus Dei, describes the Lamb of God by saying, "its step makes the sound of rainfall on the dust."

dad a, Tuesday, 29 January 2008 03:27 (nine years ago) Permalink

Anyone heard the Monade record? I like it but it's basically just Cobra and Phases Group without the fiddlier bits.

Dimension 5ive, Tuesday, 29 January 2008 03:34 (nine years ago) Permalink

seven months pass...

the other day I found a copy of the "Stereolab" edition of Tchaikovsky's Symphony #6 Pathetique on Vanguard - the 'Lab nicked the cover design for the sleeve of "Space Age Bachelor Pad Music". Wish I could post a scan, can't find an image online...

Shakey Mo Collier, Thursday, 11 September 2008 17:42 (nine years ago) Permalink

seven months pass...

http://www.discogs.com/Stereolab-Explosante-Fixe/release/1469221

http://www.amazon.com/Boulez-Explosante-fixe-Ensemble-Intercontemporain/dp/B0007404HI

the Stereolab Origins series on Youtube is up to episode 13. It's so much fun, you try to guess which track is about to be cut to, providing a vague match, but I'm out of my depth by this point (though man, it's clear I really need to hunt down every last Don Cherry album I can find)

Milton Parker, Monday, 20 April 2009 19:11 (eight years ago) Permalink

4) The alternate set list name for "Blips" is "Emil". Surprised?

Nooo

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/519FURrEsmL._SL500_AA240_.jpg

Milton Parker, Monday, 20 April 2009 19:19 (eight years ago) Permalink

ha ha WOW the first one on part IX, biggest laugh yet

Milton Parker, Monday, 20 April 2009 19:21 (eight years ago) Permalink

six months pass...

More film references:
"Fuses": http://www.ubu.com/film/schneeman_fuses.html
"Three Women": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iQPnxmVJMrY

And updated links for previously mentioned films:
"Kyberneticka Babicka": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gjbHIKwoXCM
"Emperor Tomato Ketchup" (NSFW): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=46xmL9OcwrE

ernestp, Saturday, 24 October 2009 15:03 (eight years ago) Permalink

six months pass...

Ok, noob here but haven't found a more specific Don Cherry pointer so here goes.

The bass line in Percolator comes from Don Cherry's fantastic Relativity Suite album of 1973, more specifically from the end of "Tantra" or the beginning of "Mali Doussn'gouni".
The Rhodes Piano ostinato riff in Metronomic Underground I think comes from "Desireless" of the same album.

Check it out: http://thebrewingluminous.blogspot.com/2007/04/don-cherry-relativity-suite.html

AdjustMe, Tuesday, 11 May 2010 07:21 (seven years ago) Permalink

If you're a spotifyer, check out Sweden jazz giant Lennart Åbergs cover of aforementioned Don Cherry work here:

spotify:track:3f5Z65Jasm4QHl14FGQOPm

AdjustMe, Tuesday, 11 May 2010 12:14 (seven years ago) Permalink

http://cdn1.ioffer.com/img/item/139/182/933/ecHJ.jpg

JOHN WRIGHT AND CLEMENT BROWN - HI-FI SOUND STEREO TEST RECORD. Hi-Fi Sound Records HFS75 UK Stereo LP 1974.

zvookster, Tuesday, 11 May 2010 23:34 (seven years ago) Permalink

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41S2T56GREL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

Transient Random-Noise Bursts with Announcements

zvookster, Tuesday, 11 May 2010 23:36 (seven years ago) Permalink

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41jqqDkhhiL._AA300_.jpg

Transient Random-Noise Bursts with Announcements - back cover

andy ramsey credited with "persuasive percussion"

combines back covers of Enoch Light's

Persuasive Percussion and Provocative Percussion albums of the mid-'50s, which were some of the first albums to exploit the capabilities of stereo recording and 35mm film as a recording devise.

http://g-ecx.images-amazon.com/images/G/01/ciu/05/4f/1de4228348a02a7aecc34110.L.jpg
http://tralfaz-archives.com/coverart/L/Light/light_dim3b.jpg

zvookster, Tuesday, 11 May 2010 23:42 (seven years ago) Permalink

haha this is the very first time i've noticed that the cover of TRNBWA is a record player. i r incredibly unobservant

chillwave of mutilation (electricsound), Tuesday, 11 May 2010 23:47 (seven years ago) Permalink

hmm shouldn't have included cd re-issue

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2099/2213161022_2fd09a5fcb.jpg

zvookster, Tuesday, 11 May 2010 23:55 (seven years ago) Permalink

one month passes...

did anyone post this Nini Raviolette song? it's not direct, but it can't really get anymore direct

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3n95BQEfLso

jaxon, Friday, 9 July 2010 20:00 (seven years ago) Permalink

three months pass...

I love this thread...
Another film reference - Serene Velocity: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KYfNFtLSuv4

ernestp, Saturday, 23 October 2010 01:42 (seven years ago) Permalink

eleven months pass...

Jacques Siroul

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ASO4yDmwGfA

███★★★███ (PappaWheelie V), Monday, 3 October 2011 19:52 (six years ago) Permalink

wow, that was more fun than a bag of monkeys. thanks.

cw, Monday, 3 October 2011 20:42 (six years ago) Permalink

ten months pass...

What a great thread. Too bad some of the Youtubes are now unavailable

curmudgeon, Monday, 27 August 2012 01:08 (five years ago) Permalink

i just came here to post that i love this thread.

choom gangnam style (get bent), Monday, 27 August 2012 01:16 (five years ago) Permalink

these are not just songs, but clues

― Milton Parker, Friday, 9 November 2007 00:25 (4 years ago)

sleeve, Monday, 27 August 2012 03:03 (five years ago) Permalink

never read this thread before but it's cool! in the interest of restoring some of the broken links, here's a link to Emperor Tomato Ketchup: http://www.ubu.com/film/terayama_vol1.html

Thanks WEBSITE!! (Z S), Monday, 27 August 2012 03:14 (five years ago) Permalink

(The Emperor Tomato Ketchup, 1971, dir. by Terayama Shuji, that is)

Thanks WEBSITE!! (Z S), Monday, 27 August 2012 03:15 (five years ago) Permalink

I actually made an xls of four of the "Stereolab Origins" with names of the references, if anyone's interested.

Pilot Inspektor Leee (Leee), Monday, 27 August 2012 04:30 (five years ago) Permalink

Sure, go ahead. Useful to have all this stuff in one handy place.

Jeff W, Monday, 27 August 2012 13:32 (five years ago) Permalink

On "Ausculatation to the Nation", on Laetitia Sadier's new album Silencio, the lyrics about the G20 nations conference are taken word for word from a caller to a French political talk show.

curmudgeon, Monday, 27 August 2012 14:37 (five years ago) Permalink

But the sole song-writing credit goes to Sadier

curmudgeon, Monday, 27 August 2012 21:22 (five years ago) Permalink

never read this thread before but it's cool! in the interest of restoring some of the broken links, here's a link to Emperor Tomato Ketchup

can someone explain this film to me

The Radioheads are massive in the Man community (Shakey Mo Collier), Monday, 27 August 2012 21:35 (five years ago) Permalink

no

i know your nuts hurt! who's laughing? (contenderizer), Monday, 27 August 2012 21:54 (five years ago) Permalink

Oops, wrong link, if any of yall want to edit (COLLABARATIVE WEB2.0 omg):

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AiilJGAbZaindElpZUZwN2twSGx4TzNrTzlZY00xS2c

Pilot Inspektor Leee (Leee), Tuesday, 28 August 2012 03:03 (five years ago) Permalink

Next step: Stereolab Origins Spotify list

Moodles, Tuesday, 28 August 2012 03:04 (five years ago) Permalink

A quick search in Spotify brought this up, it's a little on the large side, but is a great start:
http://open.spotify.com/user/devastatorjr/playlist/3heKgUNitRwk19GxkWuTWc

Moodles, Tuesday, 28 August 2012 03:06 (five years ago) Permalink

OK, I got the actual list started. So far I'm through the first 4 videos, check this space for updates:

http://open.spotify.com/user/olken2000/playlist/06G3CvbMmQ90bj0KOPWM0b

Moodles, Tuesday, 28 August 2012 03:35 (five years ago) Permalink

It's not in any of the videos I don't think but "Perversion" is almost exactly the same as Velvet Underground's "What Goes On". It is literally the most blatant VU rip-off I have ever heard.

the mandy moorhols (Stevie D(eux)), Tuesday, 28 August 2012 04:55 (five years ago) Permalink

I could prob listen to the last 2 1/2 minutes of "Perversion" on a loop for all eternity and never get bored of it

the mandy moorhols (Stevie D(eux)), Tuesday, 28 August 2012 04:58 (five years ago) Permalink

seven months pass...

Thread has become too long but did we already mrention Esquivel's space age bachelor pad? Or Caetano Veloso? The residents?

I love this band's influences and references, i might consider them my favorite band simply because of it, so much commn ground for an average music geek.

Moka, Friday, 5 April 2013 17:22 (four years ago) Permalink

Eye of the volcano has an Os Mutantes thing going on.

Moka, Friday, 5 April 2013 17:42 (four years ago) Permalink

Ticker tape of the unconscious:

Song title references Anais Nin. It was the name she gave one if her dresses
http://blacknyx.tumblr.com/post/43837638270/anais-nin-in-inauguration-of-the-pleasure

Also the song samples Gal Costa. Cant remember which song.... Divino, maravilhoso?

Moka, Friday, 5 April 2013 17:51 (four years ago) Permalink

I dont know how much these count as "direct" so they probably dont count:

Joao Donato - Cada Jodel (The Beautiful One)
Similar groove to "Parsec".

http://youtu.be/8zy9-n3AJNA

Ennio Morriconne - Amore come dolore
Similar main chord sequence as Miss Modular. (Listen from 1:50 onwards).

http://youtu.be/slMuopBrglY

Also Brakhage reminds me of Mayfield's Move on up.

Moka, Friday, 5 April 2013 18:43 (four years ago) Permalink

Last one for the day:

The bassline for "Were not adult orientated" is basically a sped up sample of Joy DIvision "No love lost".

Moka, Friday, 5 April 2013 19:02 (four years ago) Permalink

three years pass...

Don't know it this has been mentioned but Miss Modular is metaphorically about an art technique called eye trick (trompe l'oeil)

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trompe-l%27œil

✖✖✖ (Moka), Tuesday, 5 April 2016 16:42 (one year ago) Permalink

I always took it to be about optical illusions, specifically the graphics found on the album itself

Check Yr Scrobbles (Moodles), Tuesday, 5 April 2016 17:20 (one year ago) Permalink

five months pass...

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=irvssTCvYP0#t=1m7s";>Stereolab - University Microfilms International</a> vs. <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b5266zb0fTw#t=1m49s";>Liliental - Wattwurm</a>

You be the judge!

3×5, Thursday, 22 September 2016 23:55 (one year ago) Permalink

Well I sure butchered that post. Anyway you can still make the comparison.

3×5, Thursday, 22 September 2016 23:56 (one year ago) Permalink

University Microfilms International Vs. Liliental - Wattwurm

3×5, Thursday, 22 September 2016 23:58 (one year ago) Permalink

That Liliental track is fantastic.

I uploaded this a number of years back thinking of Stereolab xp

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ASO4yDmwGfA

PappaWheelie V, Friday, 23 September 2016 00:01 (one year ago) Permalink

the lyrics to 'john cage bubblegum' =

c'est le plus beau
et c'est le plus triste
c'est le plus beau
paysage du monde

are from 'le petit prince'

http://www.capsurlemonde.org/sahara/petit-prince-7.html

donna rouge, Friday, 23 September 2016 00:06 (one year ago) Permalink

That Jacques Siroul record is very Stereolab. There's a lot of 70s library music that sounds quite a bit like Stereolab.

Guy Boyer & Guy Pedersen - Manège Concerto

3×5, Friday, 23 September 2016 01:48 (one year ago) Permalink

Stereolab - Refractions In The Plastic Pulse Vs. Kraftwerk - Ananas Symphonie

3×5, Friday, 23 September 2016 01:54 (one year ago) Permalink

Olv 26 off Emperor Tomato Ketchup has the lyrics "nous irons tous au paradis", surely a reference to Polnareff's "on ira tous au paradis".

Zelda Zonk, Friday, 23 September 2016 01:57 (one year ago) Permalink

Strange that this was never on that Stereolab Origins series.
Stereolab - Revox (+ a few other tracks) vs. The Modern Lovers - Roadrunner

3×5, Friday, 23 September 2016 01:58 (one year ago) Permalink

from moodles' spotify list:

The 5th Dimension - Up, Up and Away (2:45)
ABBA - Dancing Queen (3:50)
Alain Goraguer - Déshominisation (I) (3:50)
Erik Satie - Six gnossiennes - 1. Lent (3:02)
Alessandro Alessandroni - Una storia (3:08)
Olivier Messiaen - Chant d'amour 1 (8:00)
Olivier Messiaen - Turangalîla 1 (5:05)
Andrew Rudin - Hybris (7:27)
Archie Shepp - Bakai (9:59)
The Archies - Sugar, Sugar (2:47)
B.J. Thomas - Raindrops Keep Fallin' on My Head (3:02)
Brigitte Fontaine - Une fois mais pas deux (2:47)
Can - Father Cannot Yell (7:03)
Canned Heat - On the Road Again (4:56)
The Castaways - Liar, Liar (1:52)
The Casualeers - Dance, Dance, Dance (2:40)
The Cinderellas - Baby Baby (I Still Love You) (2:37)
Cluster - Caramel (3:09)
Don Cherry - Brown Rice (5:15)
Donna Summer - Down, Deep Inside (6:06)
Eden Ahbez - Myna Bird (2:19)
Emil Richards - Garnet (January) (2:28)
The Fall - Slates, Slags, Etc. (6:34)
Faust - It's a Rainy Day, Sunshine Girl (7:32)
Francis Hime - Passaredo (3:06)
Frank Zappa - Peaches en Regalia (3:38)
Gal Costa - Divino, maravilhoso (4:20)
Gustav Holst - Neptune, the Mystic (7:58)
John Barry - 007 and Counting (3:31)
Kraftwerk - Autobahn (22:43)
Krzysztof Komeda - Pushing the Car (1:49)
Krzysztof Komeda - Main Title (2:16)
Laurie Anderson - O Superman (For Massenet) (8:27)
Marcus Belgrave - Space Odyssey (12:34)
Neu! - Hallogallo (10:07)
Neu! - Für Immer (11:17)
New Birth - Got to Get a Knutt (7:37)
Perrey & Kingsley - One Note Samba/Spanish Flea (2:07)
Peter Thomas - Angel of Promise (1:08)
Piero Piccioni - Blue Rhythm Festival (3:45)
Sérgio Mendes - Primitivo (3:57)
Silver Apples - Ruby (2:32)
Steve Reich - Four Organs (15:38)
Steve Reich - Section VIII (3:28)
Suicide - Cheree (3:42)
Suicide - Frankie Teardrop (10:26)
Sun Ra - Angels and Demons at Play (2:54)
Sun Ra - Love in Outer Space (3:53)
The Velvet Underground - European Son (7:52)
The Velvet Underground - What Goes On (4:55)
The Velvet Underground - Sister Ray (17:27)
Yes - Starship Trooper (9:28)

always need more tbh

mookieproof, Friday, 23 September 2016 02:13 (one year ago) Permalink

sadly, a lot of the cool stuff you all are finding isn't available on spotify

Al Moon Faced Poon (Moodles), Friday, 23 September 2016 02:17 (one year ago) Permalink

Maybe not a perfect match, but there's a couple places in the three-part Jenny Ondioline that sound inspired by the two-part Shoulder Pads by The Fall.

3×5, Friday, 23 September 2016 02:21 (one year ago) Permalink

Space Age Bachelor Pad Music Vs. Beach Boys - Look

3×5, Friday, 23 September 2016 03:16 (one year ago) Permalink

Refractions In The Plastic Pulse Vs. Electric Light Orchestra - The Whale

Again, how direct a reference is this? I can hear elements of a number of Stereolab songs in The Whale.

Two other Prog instrumentals that sound like Stereolab are Tic Tic Tic It Wears Off by Todd Rundgren, and The Fish by Yes. I haven't been able to connect them directly to any specific Stereolab songs, though.

3×5, Friday, 23 September 2016 03:28 (one year ago) Permalink

The Rundgren track reminds me of a lot of their later-period stuff

Al Moon Faced Poon (Moodles), Friday, 23 September 2016 03:34 (one year ago) Permalink

Beach Boys - Look also reminds me of People Do It All The Time

Al Moon Faced Poon (Moodles), Friday, 23 September 2016 03:52 (one year ago) Permalink

The biggest stretch in the Stereolab Originals series is the link between Cybele's Reverie and Une fois mais pas deux by Brigitte Fontaine, I think. However, there are Brigitte Fontaine elements across Emperor Tomator Ketchup.

Monstre Sacre Vs Brigitte Fontaine - Brigitte

3×5, Friday, 23 September 2016 04:05 (one year ago) Permalink

Moodles, absolutely. Your match is better than mine.

3×5, Friday, 23 September 2016 04:07 (one year ago) Permalink

Stereolab Origins Compared Anamorphose to Four Organs by Steve Reich. They both have the same gimmick of holding the note one beat longer, then another beat longer, but other than that, they don't sound too much alike, and Four Organs is a pretty irritating record. I would choose Palm Springs by Social Climbers as a replacement.

3×5, Friday, 23 September 2016 04:32 (one year ago) Permalink

…and The Fish by Yes. I haven't been able to connect them directly to any specific Stereolab songs, though
The bass at the start of "Retrograde Mirror Form" (on Microbe Hunters) sounds a lot like The Fish

Jeff W, Friday, 23 September 2016 11:47 (one year ago) Permalink

another Astrud Gilberto - Beginnings

mahb, Friday, 23 September 2016 13:53 (one year ago) Permalink

re: Monstre Sacre, there's also an Erik Satie piece on my list that sounds like a strong precursor, I wonder if Brigitte Fontaine was influenced by the same piece

Al Moon Faced Poon (Moodles), Friday, 23 September 2016 14:30 (one year ago) Permalink

Miss Modular <- Jean-Pierre Mirouze - Sexopolis?

(sorry if already posted, couldn't see it)

a passing spacecadet, Friday, 23 September 2016 15:05 (one year ago) Permalink

ooh, good one!

Al Moon Faced Poon (Moodles), Friday, 23 September 2016 15:18 (one year ago) Permalink

The first time I ever heard Stereolab, the immediate connection I made was Sesame Street. The first song I heard was Brakhage and it immediately reminded me of a vintage Sesame Street vignette. It might have been this, specifically. But I've never heard them list Sesame Street as an influence.

I've read a handful of 90s Stereolab articles that cite Esquivel as an influence, but I don't know that Stereolab themselves cite Esquivel, and I don't actually here the connection there at all.

3×5, Friday, 23 September 2016 17:55 (one year ago) Permalink

^There was an Esquivel comp called Space Age Bachelor Pad Music out at the time, is why?

Jeff W, Friday, 23 September 2016 21:16 (one year ago) Permalink

I think it's because there was a lounge revival in the mid-90s, right when Stereolab changed their sound, and for some reason Esquivel also made a comeback, and so they got lumped together. When I listen to him, or Martin Denny, it just doesn't have that association for me. The letter h, however...

3×5, Sunday, 25 September 2016 05:29 (one year ago) Permalink

Esquivel is pretty awesome, one of the more experimental artists from the whole "lounge" era who used theremins and synths in his stuff. Martin Denny is pretty much straight jungle lounge music whereas Esquivel can be far freakier.

AdamVania (Adam Bruneau), Sunday, 25 September 2016 16:23 (one year ago) Permalink

Stereolab (ft. Herbie Mann!) covered Esquivel in the latter part of this medley of "One Note Samba/Surfboard":

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nEyZSbmVoxM

Jersey Al (Albert R. Broccoli), Sunday, 25 September 2016 17:37 (one year ago) Permalink

Here's the original:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2NglD0H-cps

Jersey Al (Albert R. Broccoli), Sunday, 25 September 2016 17:39 (one year ago) Permalink

Also the people who are looking for Smile-era Beach Boys connections, you'd probably have a field day with Stereolab member/muse/svengali Sean O'Hagan's project The High Llamas' records Gideon Gaye & Hawaii.

Jersey Al (Albert R. Broccoli), Sunday, 25 September 2016 17:45 (one year ago) Permalink

three months pass...

Another prog interlude: Camel - Migration

3×5, Monday, 2 January 2017 19:47 (ten months ago) Permalink

eight months pass...

Another Todd Rundgren: The Night The Carousel Burned Down

3×5, Monday, 25 September 2017 17:34 (one month ago) Permalink

I think that "One Note Samba/Surfboard" medley was done as reparation for nicking bits of both too blatantly previously.

Mark G, Tuesday, 26 September 2017 06:48 (one month ago) Permalink

The bass line of Metronomic Underground is awfully close to The Revolution Will Not Be Televised... hadn't really caught that before

cosmic brain dildo (Sparkle Motion), Tuesday, 26 September 2017 15:08 (one month ago) Permalink

iirc it's stolen directly from a Yoko Ono track on Appproximately Infinite Universe

sleeve, Tuesday, 26 September 2017 15:09 (one month ago) Permalink

got a flexidisc of "famous instrumentals" recently that had "One Note Samba" on it

flappy bird, Tuesday, 26 September 2017 18:10 (one month ago) Permalink

Metronomic Underground/Revolution Will Not Be Televised similarity is already noted upthread.

The Yoko Ono song in question is Mind Train, from "Fly"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PK-k0kCSJcM

Οὖτις, Tuesday, 26 September 2017 18:23 (one month ago) Permalink

thank you!

sleeve, Tuesday, 26 September 2017 18:25 (one month ago) Permalink

that track is so siqq

kurt schwitterz, Tuesday, 26 September 2017 18:54 (one month ago) Permalink

That Yoko track sounds like Can with yoko instead of damo.

✖✖✖ (Moka), Tuesday, 26 September 2017 19:03 (one month ago) Permalink

I've often wondered how Ono & Lennon connected to krautrock - like, who actually gave them those records and what were they listening to - cuz its impact is really obvious on those first few Yoko records

Οὖτις, Tuesday, 26 September 2017 19:07 (one month ago) Permalink

Probably Klaus, right?

flappy bird, Tuesday, 26 September 2017 19:08 (one month ago) Permalink

that's my guess, but I've never seen it specifically discussed anywhere

Οὖτις, Tuesday, 26 September 2017 19:09 (one month ago) Permalink

CAN seems like the most obvious thing they must have heard, maybe Faust (they initially made something of a splash in the UK press), maybe Schnitzler and Roedelius too idk

Οὖτις, Tuesday, 26 September 2017 19:13 (one month ago) Permalink

they were jacked into the German experimental art scene from the beginning

AdamVania (Adam Bruneau), Wednesday, 27 September 2017 14:44 (one month ago) Permalink


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