What's the best Genesis album?

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For me, it's "And Then There Were Three" from 1978.

The best mix of pop Genesis ("Follow You, Follow Me, "Many Too Many," and "Deep in the Motherlode") and the ultra-prog side of the band ("Undertow," "The Lady Lies").

The album is filled with huge blocky synth chords and piano and just a little lead guitar from Mike Rutherford. (Prog guitar hero Steve Hackett had just left the prior year. His guitar sounds were just a atmospheric as the banks of keyboards from Tony Banks.)

I know won't most agree (No Gabriel, no Hackett) but this album is their most underrated.

sw

Steven Ward, Thursday, 3 February 2005 19:48 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

Trespass - "The Knife" = Best Genesis Album.

noodle vague (noodle vague), Thursday, 3 February 2005 19:53 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

There's only one Genesis album.

It's called Abacab.

Dereks Erdman, Thursday, 3 February 2005 19:54 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

foxtrot

kyle (akmonday), Thursday, 3 February 2005 19:54 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

I'd go with Lamb..., as it's such a thorough blend of all these elements of their sound - the theatrical bombast, the dirge-y throwdowns and massive movements, the tweaky fantasy psychedelia, etc. Plus it like has most of my favorite of their songs on it (In The Cage, The Grand Parade of Lifeless Packaging).

nickalicious (nickalicious), Thursday, 3 February 2005 19:54 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

From that period, I actually like Duke more.

But my favorite is probably Selling England...

Johnny Fever (johnny fever), Thursday, 3 February 2005 19:54 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

Geir will be here soon enough.

Jazzbo (jmcgaw), Thursday, 3 February 2005 20:27 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

Just listened to "Selling England..." this afternoon and it was brill. Have to give the ultimate nod to "The Lamb Lies Down On Broadway" though. It's a shame I never got the chance to see them do that live.

I like "Seconds Out" quite a bit as well.

kwhitehead (stephen schmidt), Thursday, 3 February 2005 21:10 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

My favourite is "Nursery Cryme" and second favourite is probably "The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway".

Pangolino again, Thursday, 3 February 2005 21:23 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

I'm not going to go to the mat for it or anything but I think there's a possibility that Invisible Touch (ESPECIALLY the second half) is being underrated here.

The Ghost of Dan Perry (Dan Perry), Thursday, 3 February 2005 21:29 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

Invisible Touch IS underrated. It's actually a pretty terrible album, but those singles were inescapable in '86-'87, and "In Too Deep" is a lovely ballad.

Alfred Soto (Alfred Soto), Thursday, 3 February 2005 21:36 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

The album has "Domino" on it, though!!!!

The Ghost of Dan Perry (Dan Perry), Thursday, 3 February 2005 21:37 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

I love it that we've got 11 posts and eight different answers. I'm going to keep the ball rolling and nominate Wind & Wuthering, where they started to find their post-Pete way and develop some pop smarts with "Your Own Special Way."

briania (briania), Thursday, 3 February 2005 21:54 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

It's an amalgam of the first six songs on Abacab and select tunes, but neither of the singles, off of Face Value.

dr. phil (josh langhoff), Thursday, 3 February 2005 22:22 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

Y'know, even as a teen when I listened to prog-stuff on a regular basis I never really got Genesis at all - too theatrical or too diffuse or too English or something, who knows. The closest I came to liking them was that first live LP with "The Knife" and "Watcher Of The Skies" and "Musical Box" - I liked those songs, or at least the noisy bits anyways. Plus I liked an average of one-song-per-LP (sometimes the single, sometimes not) from the '80s edition of the band, and that's about it. Who knows, I may give "Lamb" another try someday - just don't ask me to read the liner notes.

Myonga Von Bontee (Myonga Von Bontee), Thursday, 3 February 2005 22:31 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

Selling England by the Pound, all the way. I have not listened to Lamb Lies Down in, like, fifteen years. What's the one with "Supper's Ready"? That's no good. The live one with "Watcher of the Skies," I like it OK.

I don't mind Trick of the Tail or Wind and Wuthering, but...anyway, "Battle of Epping Forest" and "Firth of Fifth" are the two best Genesis tracks, I'd say. I guess maybe I'll get a CD of Lamb Lies Down and give it a whirl

edd s hurt (ddduncan), Thursday, 3 February 2005 22:34 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

These things are relative, but I really don't get why some people love "Epping Forest" so much. I think Gabriel said once that there were too many words squished into too little music and that's how I've always heard it, it breaks the flow of the album up something terrible.

That's the prob with most of the Genesis albums IMO, tracks that are alright, but just somehow spoil the shape. On Trespass it's "The Knife" - good as it is, it really belongs on its own, cos it's closer to Nursery Cryme than the sound on the rest of that album. On Nursery Cryme itself, it's Fountain of Salmacis - bad idea to finish a Victorian Gothic ghost story of an album with an overlong Greek myth. Even The Lamb seems to lose impetus on Side 4.

Maybe the folks arguing for the poppier albums are onto something, tho in that case I'd have Duke any day.

noodle vague (noodle vague), Thursday, 3 February 2005 22:43 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

"Genesis". I think that nearly every single song may have received radio airplay at some point in it's time...great pop album. I would put Duke at a close second and Foxtrot coming in third.

bahtology, Thursday, 3 February 2005 23:36 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

SEBTP or lamb.

captain easychord (captain easychord), Saturday, 5 February 2005 02:28 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

Trespass is my personal favorite, but I think Wind & Wuthering and A Trick of the Tail (minus the title track) is their out-and-out best.

Joe (Joe), Saturday, 5 February 2005 02:43 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

And Then There Were Three is underappreciated, I agree. "Down and Out" certainly jams and "Undertow" is quite a beautiful ballad.

Joe (Joe), Saturday, 5 February 2005 02:44 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

ten months pass...
Can anyone explain this band's massive popularity in the 80s? I just heard "Throwing It All Away" and can't imagine a song like that played on the radio today. I'm not even saying it's bad. Just . . . so different. The guy's voice, the "doo doo doo doo . . . aaahhh," the aching yuppy melancholia the production evokes. So how the hell did this stuff find a massive audience? It can't be because of the band's looks. And it's not like Genesis was all that popular in the 70s, not like Zeppelin or Floyd or anything.

rubylove, Monday, 26 December 2005 23:48 (twelve years ago) Permalink

It's the Ugly Middle-Aged White Guy Syndrome. Many of its' 80s beneficiaries include: Steve Winwood, Peter Gabriel, Clapton, Paul Simon.

Alfred, Lord Sotosyn (Alfred Soto), Tuesday, 27 December 2005 00:13 (twelve years ago) Permalink

Oh, and Genesis took off because Phil Collins was HUGE. There were Collins and Genesis songs constantly hitting the top 10 between 1984 and 1992.

Alfred, Lord Sotosyn (Alfred Soto), Tuesday, 27 December 2005 00:15 (twelve years ago) Permalink

I think the success of Abacab preceded Collins's massive solo success, didn't it? Face Value = only P.C. solo album pre-Abacab = 1 (minor) hit in "I Know There's Something Going On"

I could be wrong though

Mr Straight Toxic (ghostface), Tuesday, 27 December 2005 01:39 (twelve years ago) Permalink

Er, "I Missed Again" and a little throwaway called "In the Air Tonight"?

Alfred, Lord Sotosyn (Alfred Soto), Tuesday, 27 December 2005 01:41 (twelve years ago) Permalink

"i can't dance "had 5 top twenty singles.
i can't dance
hold on my heart
no son of mine
jesus he knows me
tell me why
http://www.lyricsfreak.com/album/4422.html

chill pollins, Tuesday, 27 December 2005 01:52 (twelve years ago) Permalink

abacab has abacab and a gem called sarah jane.was sarah jane a single.

chill pollins, Tuesday, 27 December 2005 01:53 (twelve years ago) Permalink

xpost

I am dating myself a little bit, but in my recollection, Phl solo got huge (in the US) when "In the Air" tonight was used on Miami Vice. And that gave momentum to Genesis (the yellow album). They may have had hits, even big ones, before that but -- as Alfred notes -- that's what made them huge.

Mitya (mitya), Tuesday, 27 December 2005 02:09 (twelve years ago) Permalink

"Against All Odds" hit number one before "Miami Vice" was a hit. Let's agree that his popularity was a slow phenom.

Alfred, Lord Sotosyn (Alfred Soto), Tuesday, 27 December 2005 02:24 (twelve years ago) Permalink

Face Value peaked at #7 on Billboard - I don't remember where "In the Air Tonight" went as a single but I'm pretty sure it didn't hit #1. The song got a boost from "Miami Vice" a couple of years later, as Mitya notes, but Face Value wasn't a huge blockbuster of an album or anything. The general feeling I remember from the success of Abacab was "whoa! who'da thunk it: people actually buying Genesis albums!"

Mr Straight Toxic (ghostface), Tuesday, 27 December 2005 04:07 (twelve years ago) Permalink

"Selling England By The Pound". "Foxtrot" has "Supper's Ready", but "Selling..." is slightly better overall. Every track is perfect.

Geir Hongro (GeirHong), Tuesday, 27 December 2005 04:29 (twelve years ago) Permalink

Geir you know in your heart that Nursery Cryme rules the school.

Mr Straight Toxic (ghostface), Tuesday, 27 December 2005 04:39 (twelve years ago) Permalink

"Nursery Cryme" is somewhat underproduced. Some great songs, of course, but it lacks a bit in the sound department. Plus "Selling England..." benefits from the use of synths for the first time on a Genesis album.

Geir Hongro (GeirHong), Tuesday, 27 December 2005 12:15 (twelve years ago) Permalink

"In The Air Tonight" was also in a little Tom Cruise flick called Risky Business - I think that came out in 1983 or 84? The world simply could not withstand the 1-2 punch.

I don't think "Me And Sarah Jane" was a single, but I agree its a great tune. "Like It Or Not" was another good one from Abacab. I also remember digging one of the studio tunes from 3 Sides Live - "You Might Recall" it was.

I think I have to give the album nod to the Lamb. It has the best collection of tunes for me - title track, Back in NYC, In the Cage, Grand Parade, etc. I would love to have seen that tour!

erv (Abe Froman), Wednesday, 28 December 2005 03:48 (twelve years ago) Permalink

the best genesis album is the live lamb concert that came with the first achives box with new overdubs. i love that shit.

howell huser (chaki), Wednesday, 28 December 2005 04:38 (twelve years ago) Permalink

two months pass...
Is Trick of the Tail really flatly produced? Today I've been listening to it properly for the first time in maybe 20 years, and I get the same feeling I got when I used to listen to it a lot: some of their best tunes and chord sequences, but this horrible alienating lacquer over it all that makes it sound a bit dead, somehow.

Why does the birds always shitting on me? (noodle vague), Friday, 24 March 2006 16:12 (twelve years ago) Permalink

OTM, Noodle. Could've been the best, but somehow isn't.

Mitya (mitya), Friday, 24 March 2006 19:57 (twelve years ago) Permalink

it used to be selling england by the pound but i think it is nursery cryme now. i prefer them when they are less produced. one thing i never understood is why their first album from genesis to revelation never receives any love. i quite like it. that's where they were at their most lofi.

alex in mainhattan (alex63), Friday, 24 March 2006 20:04 (twelve years ago) Permalink

trick of the tail sounds okay to me, wind and wuthering sounds awful though. the remastered cd sounds better than the old vinyl, but still muffled

kyle (akmonday), Friday, 24 March 2006 20:20 (twelve years ago) Permalink

I love the production on "Trick Of The Tail". Excellent work by David Henchel. (Same about "Wind And Wuthering")

Geir Hongro (GeirHong), Friday, 24 March 2006 21:15 (twelve years ago) Permalink

It sounds restrained, not in a good way, and there's no room for the individual instruments. What do you like about the production, G?

Why does the birds always shitting on me? (noodle vague), Friday, 24 March 2006 22:29 (twelve years ago) Permalink

I haven't gone back to WaW yet, but I'm imagining it's going to sound the same way.

Why does the birds always shitting on me? (noodle vague), Friday, 24 March 2006 22:30 (twelve years ago) Permalink

I'm a big fan of Foxtrot.

M@tt He1geson (Matt Helgeson), Friday, 24 March 2006 22:45 (twelve years ago) Permalink

What do you like about the production, G?

I find it sounds more distinct, with better stereo separation and more treble, than their earlier work.

Musically, I prefer the best of the Gabriel era work, but I still think "Trick..." and "Wind...." are the ones that sound best.

Geir Hongro (GeirHong), Friday, 24 March 2006 23:01 (twelve years ago) Permalink

Hmmmm. I'll have to try it on headphones.

Why does the birds always shitting on me? (noodle vague), Friday, 24 March 2006 23:09 (twelve years ago) Permalink

I bought the remastered Selling England recently, buying Queen II on the same day...the former rather paled by comparison

Thomas Tallis (Tommy), Friday, 24 March 2006 23:40 (twelve years ago) Permalink

This has got to be a candidate:
http://www.genesismuseum.com/vinyl/sebtptaiwan200.jpg

Lotta Continua (Damian), Saturday, 25 March 2006 21:15 (twelve years ago) Permalink

Bah, now I'm getting a red X there... anyway, the image is at http://www.genesismuseum.com/vinyl/sebtptaiwan200.jpg

Lotta Continua (Damian), Saturday, 25 March 2006 22:19 (twelve years ago) Permalink

"Queen II" is an excellent and very underrated album that still pales besides "Selling England..."

Geir Hongro (GeirHong), Saturday, 25 March 2006 23:20 (twelve years ago) Permalink

I know fer damn sure that Invisible Touch is Phil Collins' best album.

Alfred, Lord Sotosyn (Alfred Soto), Saturday, 25 March 2006 23:52 (twelve years ago) Permalink

two months pass...
I just got that greatest hits album…man, I dig the shit out of everything Collins/Banks/Rutherford (/Thompson/Sturmer) done, until Invisible Touch, which is dirediredire.

I've never heard a whole album by the quintet, but I have a hard time accepting that anything they did could be as thrilling as Queen II. Jesus, the intro to "Ogre Battle" !!

veronica moser (veronica moser), Tuesday, 30 May 2006 22:11 (twelve years ago) Permalink

Nursery Cryme.
Never could get into Selling England By The Pound.

Brigadier Lethbridge-Pfunkboy (Kerr), Tuesday, 30 May 2006 22:34 (twelve years ago) Permalink

I've been listening to Lamb a lot lately, trying to get my head around it, but otherwise I pick Foxtrot.

Marmotdeth (marmotwolof), Tuesday, 30 May 2006 22:39 (twelve years ago) Permalink

Veronica apparently bought the wrong Greatest Hits album. The one to own is the 3 CD one called "Platinum Collection".

Geir Hongro (GeirHong), Tuesday, 30 May 2006 22:41 (twelve years ago) Permalink

I think the success of Abacab preceded Collins's massive solo success, didn't it? Face Value = only P.C. solo album pre-Abacab = 1 (minor) hit in "I Know There's Something Going On"

"Misunderstanding" hit top 20 before that, so the later success wasn't completely by surprise.

LOL Thomas (Chris Barrus), Tuesday, 30 May 2006 23:24 (twelve years ago) Permalink

True "Misunderstanding" sounds like a Phil Collins solo single.

Geir Hongro (GeirHong), Tuesday, 30 May 2006 23:27 (twelve years ago) Permalink

no, in fact I purchased the one Geir mentions. its just that I'm taken with that era. I like the gabriel era, but it hasn't grabbed me so much.

perhaps one should not presume that anyone that doesn't do backflips for the era one likes the most has not heard a particular comp. one would seem condescending if one was to do so.

veronica moser (veronica moser), Wednesday, 31 May 2006 03:22 (twelve years ago) Permalink

no, in fact I purchased the one Geir mentions. its just that I'm taken with the first part of the trio era. I like the gabriel era, but it hasn't grabbed me so much.

perhaps one should not presume that anyone that doesn't do backflips for the artist iteration one likes the most has not heard a particular comp. one would seem condescending if one was to do so.

veronica moser (veronica moser), Wednesday, 31 May 2006 03:23 (twelve years ago) Permalink

Is "I Know There's Something Going On" the same song that Frida did? I remember Phil Collins being on that album somewhere, but I thought maybe he played drums on it or something.

Pangolino 2, Wednesday, 31 May 2006 04:14 (twelve years ago) Permalink

I have a hard time accepting that anything they did could be as thrilling as Queen II

"The Musical Box"?

LC (Damian), Wednesday, 31 May 2006 06:54 (twelve years ago) Permalink

Phil Collins produced the Frida album, IIRC.

Joe (Joe), Wednesday, 31 May 2006 11:11 (twelve years ago) Permalink

"the musical box" is great. don't like it as much as "seven Seas" "ogre Battle" "Father to Son" or any number of tunes on QII.

veronica moser (veronica moser), Wednesday, 31 May 2006 12:40 (twelve years ago) Permalink

"The Musical Box" is a great composition that would have sounded even better if it was on one of their better produced albums such as "Selling England By The Pound" or "The Lamb Lies Down On Broadway". The production, and lack of synths, is my main problem about "Nursery Cryme".

Geir Hongro (GeirHong), Wednesday, 31 May 2006 14:37 (twelve years ago) Permalink

incidentally, said platinum collection doesn't include "man on the corner" and "No Reply at all"—disappointing! the latter is where you find Gentleman Mike Rutherford tearing it up on that big bassss. his finest moment!

his worst is his crap Keef pantomime on "I Can't Dance."

veronica moser (veronica moser), Wednesday, 31 May 2006 14:52 (twelve years ago) Permalink

There was only room for the singles from those 80s albums. While those two are among their best simple pop moments, I miss "Home By The Sea" and "Domino" considerably more. Two rare 80s moments of 70s greatness by Genesis.

Geir Hongro (GeirHong), Wednesday, 31 May 2006 15:32 (twelve years ago) Permalink

the remastered/remixed songs from nursery cryme that are on the platinum collection sound much better than the last remaster of that album; not sure what is going on with releasing the full album versions of those (sounds like they are indefinitely stalled)

kyle (akmonday), Wednesday, 31 May 2006 16:20 (twelve years ago) Permalink

actually, "home by the sea" parts 1 and 2 are included on the Platinum Collection. watch them facts, Mr. "I know everything about majestic white people music" guy!

not one person on this Earth would rather hear "Calling All Stations" from '97 than those aforementioned orphaned tunes.

or are you going to defend that tune, GH?

veronica moser (veronica moser), Wednesday, 31 May 2006 16:52 (twelve years ago) Permalink

Harold the Barrel is the most terrifyingly chilling song I have ever heard, I think. In my mind I can *see* him leaping off the building in excrutiating slow motion, so, so distinctly. Songs never give me visions this rich, ever.

Couple that with Hogweed and Seven Stones, and The Musical Box without the self-conscious middle bit, and you've got a magic run of songs.

Foxtrot hurts my brain. Apocalypse 9/8 sounds like primary school kids learning how to play their instruments.

Hotman Paris Almanac (Autumn Almanac), Saturday, 3 June 2006 01:32 (twelve years ago) Permalink

three months pass...
The middle bit is the best thing about "The Musical Box".

Geir Hongro (GeirHong), Thursday, 14 September 2006 12:44 (eleven years ago) Permalink

the best Genesis LP is Wendy & Bonnie's duh

zebedee (zebedee), Thursday, 14 September 2006 12:56 (eleven years ago) Permalink

foxtrot

M@tt He1geson: Real Name, No Gimmicks (Matt Helgeson), Thursday, 14 September 2006 13:24 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Finally jumping on here.

The Lamb, for me. Although I should give the other albums a chance.

So, all of the post Gabriel shit: DEFEND IT! Wind & Wuthering, Trick of the Tale... I asked Genesis fans about them, and they all say they are not bad but pale in comparison to everything The Lamb and before... and one friend said that Duke was the last Genesis album he didn't want to throw against the wall.

the dow nut industrial average dead joe mama besser (donut), Wednesday, 20 September 2006 04:38 (eleven years ago) Permalink

"Wind & Wuthering" and "A Trick Of The Tail" are really, really, really great albums. It's more a matter of post-Hackett than post-Gabriel really (except "And Then There Were Three" and "Duke" are both excellent pop albums, with Tony Banks still at his songwriting best)

Geir Hongro (GeirHong), Wednesday, 20 September 2006 07:30 (eleven years ago) Permalink

The middle bit is the best thing about "The Musical Box".

I think it is so good, with the fluid running synth lead etc, how it sets up the really tender "play me my song" return, which in turn sets up the huge, monolithic closing. Probably my favorite Genesis song.

a naked Kraken annoying Times Square tourists with an acoustic guitar (nickalici, Wednesday, 20 September 2006 13:10 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Has anyone said "Calling All Stations" yet?

(That's a joke, son.)

Eazy-Esteban Buttez (ESTEBAN BUTTEZ~!!!), Wednesday, 20 September 2006 13:12 (eleven years ago) Permalink

"Calling All Stations" was a huge leap in the right direction from "We Can't Dance", and it might have been quite good with a decent vocalist.

Geir Hongro (GeirHong), Wednesday, 20 September 2006 13:16 (eleven years ago) Permalink

>Foxtrot hurts my brain. Apocalypse 9/8 sounds like primary
>school kids learning how to play their instruments.

This sounds like praise!


Squirrel_Police (Squirrel_Police), Wednesday, 20 September 2006 23:42 (eleven years ago) Permalink

That one that Geir Hongo likes.

M. V. (M.V.), Thursday, 21 September 2006 00:30 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Wind & Wuthering, Trick of the Tale... I asked Genesis fans about them, and they all say they are not bad but pale in comparison to everything The Lamb and before...

W&W and Trick of the Tail are both pretty badass albums with few weak spots and are more 'economic' with regards to having none of Gabriel's penchant for running amuck lyrically (at the time), no impenetrable concepts and over-elaborate costumes...just solid writing and performances. Also, dare I say, Collins does a fantastic job as both drummer and vocalist.

Joe (Joe), Thursday, 21 September 2006 00:34 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Also, dare I say, Collins does a fantastic job as both drummer and vocalist.

He usually does. And Genesis would have been a lasting quality band had he stuck to that, and kept himself away from involving too much in the songwriting.

Geir Hongro (GeirHong), Thursday, 21 September 2006 00:42 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Gabriel sorely needed an editor in the early days. He got better.

Squirrel_Police (Squirrel_Police), Thursday, 21 September 2006 03:17 (eleven years ago) Permalink

I don't know that I'm willing to call Trick of the Tail my fave Genesis LP, but "Robbery, Assault and Battery" is probably my favorite Genesis song from either of the Gabriel or Collins eras.

Johnny Fever (johnny fever), Thursday, 21 September 2006 06:55 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Gabriel sorely needed an editor in the early days.

Ambition and indulgence should never be edited. Anyway, Tony Banks was always there, and was just as much of the musical genius Gabriel was. He sadly has lost it more than Gabriel has though.

Geir Hongro (GeirHong), Thursday, 21 September 2006 08:38 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Ambition and indulgence should never be edited.

Can't...quite...find...joke...

Everything Is Ill-Educated (noodle vague), Thursday, 21 September 2006 08:41 (eleven years ago) Permalink

"Calling All Stations" was a huge leap in the right direction from "We Can't Dance", and it might have been quite good with a decent vocalist.

Uh, Geir...pretty much anything would have been a huge leap in the right direction from "We Can't Dance".

And honestly, Ray "Stiltskin" Wilson was a better singer than Phil Collins. Then again, you could select anyone off the street and nine times out of ten, they'd be better than Phil Collins.

Eazy-Esteban Buttez (ESTEBAN BUTTEZ~!!!), Thursday, 21 September 2006 10:37 (eleven years ago) Permalink

six years pass...

Can I just get a gut check here - do you people like Wind and Wuthering, and if so, why? Why do so many progheads love this incredibly boring album? Or am I just not listening close enough?

frogbs, Friday, 1 February 2013 17:10 (five years ago) Permalink

spent like a month last year getting acquainted with duke, abacab and the self-titled record all of which are AWESOME

emo canon in twee major (BradNelson), Friday, 1 February 2013 17:15 (five years ago) Permalink

Foxtrot.

The Jupiter 8 (Turrican), Friday, 1 February 2013 17:36 (five years ago) Permalink

wind & wuthering is (a) mostly great (b) the perfect album to play on a cold dry windy morning

walloreinhart (Autumn Almanac), Friday, 1 February 2013 21:25 (five years ago) Permalink

Foxtrot

Jaap and roids (NickB), Friday, 1 February 2013 21:34 (five years ago) Permalink

trespass was killer when i heard it first, selling england by the pound was even greater especially that part in teh battle of epping forest where the music takes off, where it reaches this metaphysical plateau. this moment of bliss, which should last forever. but in the end nursery cryme is the one, i think. the lyric sheet with all those drawings. so english, so strange, so cruel.

miesepeter (alex in mainhattan), Friday, 1 February 2013 22:05 (five years ago) Permalink

Selling England by the Pound. Before that I only really love one song per album ("Stagnation," "The Musical Box," "Supper's Ready").

jim, Friday, 1 February 2013 22:08 (five years ago) Permalink

spent like a month last year getting acquainted with duke, abacab and the self-titled record all of which are AWESOME

cosign, this was a month well-spent

Guayaquil (eephus!), Saturday, 2 February 2013 01:47 (five years ago) Permalink

nine months pass...

I think I was very wrong about Wind & Wuthering, which is IMO not as good as Trick of the Tail but I don't find it boring or aimless any more.

frogbs, Tuesday, 19 November 2013 16:53 (four years ago) Permalink

duke btw

emo canon in twee major (BradNelson), Tuesday, 19 November 2013 17:14 (four years ago) Permalink

Your Own Special Way is beyond pukey and the irredeemable ruination of that album imo

but my heart is full of woah (NickB), Tuesday, 19 November 2013 17:17 (four years ago) Permalink

W&W i mean. Still have a soft spot for Duke though, first Genesis record I bought

but my heart is full of woah (NickB), Tuesday, 19 November 2013 17:20 (four years ago) Permalink

That was Genesis in the era when they would regularly appear in lists of footballers' favourite music alongside the Police and jazz funk.

but my heart is full of woah (NickB), Tuesday, 19 November 2013 17:22 (four years ago) Permalink

three years pass...

Foxtrot > A Trick of the Tail > Duke > Selling England by the Pound > Nursery Cryme > Invisible Touch > And Then There Were Three > Wind & Wuthering > The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway > Abacab > Trespass > Genesis > We Can't Dance > Calling All Stations > From Genesis to Revelation

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Friday, 7 July 2017 20:02 (eleven months ago) Permalink

*cracks knuckles* ok here we go

ToddBonzalez (BradNelson), Friday, 7 July 2017 20:16 (eleven months ago) Permalink

abacab
wind & wuthering
the lamb lies down on broadway
duke
a trick of the tail
foxtrot
nursery cryme
genesis
selling england by the pound
and then there were three
invisible touch
trespass
we can't dance

ToddBonzalez (BradNelson), Friday, 7 July 2017 20:18 (eleven months ago) Permalink

i feel like i'm underrating selling/attwt/invisible touch at the end there but i basically love all of those records except trespass (which is fine) and we can't dance (which is half great half horrible)

ToddBonzalez (BradNelson), Friday, 7 July 2017 20:19 (eleven months ago) Permalink

wau @ Foxtrot so high.

the Rain Man of nationalism. (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 7 July 2017 20:23 (eleven months ago) Permalink

man this would be so difficult, though I'm pretty sure Selling England is #1 and Calling all Stations is at the end of the list

frogbs, Friday, 7 July 2017 20:27 (eleven months ago) Permalink

The first live one. Docked one point for leaving off Supper's Ready.

dinnerboat, Friday, 7 July 2017 20:54 (eleven months ago) Permalink

wau @ Foxtrot so high.

― the Rain Man of nationalism. (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, July 7, 2017 1:23 PM (thirty-three minutes ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

it's all great. ppl who think "time table" is weak need to get right

ToddBonzalez (BradNelson), Friday, 7 July 2017 20:57 (eleven months ago) Permalink

'Time Table' is one of my favourites.

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Friday, 7 July 2017 21:11 (eleven months ago) Permalink

ecstatic you two have kissed and made up

the Rain Man of nationalism. (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 7 July 2017 21:26 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Man, the first part of 'Mad Man Moon' is so beautiful.

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Friday, 7 July 2017 22:36 (eleven months ago) Permalink

first side of trick is the best shit on earth

ToddBonzalez (BradNelson), Friday, 7 July 2017 22:36 (eleven months ago) Permalink

and then side two has the title track and the percussion-tastic 'Los Endos' ...

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Friday, 7 July 2017 22:59 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Of the ones I listen to:
Lamb >> Selling England By the Pound > Nursery Cryme = Foxtrot

No purposes. Sounds. (Sund4r), Saturday, 8 July 2017 01:16 (eleven months ago) Permalink

"home by the sea" is the fuckin best

ToddBonzalez (BradNelson), Saturday, 8 July 2017 01:24 (eleven months ago) Permalink

The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway
Selling England by the Pound
Foxtrot
Wind & Wuthering
A Trick of the Tail
Nursery Cryme
Abacab
and my familiarity with the albums gets hazy after that. I will listen to everything if there's a poll coming up.

jmm, Saturday, 8 July 2017 01:26 (eleven months ago) Permalink

The Gabriel albums captured my heart at a formative age so I can't really be objective about them.

jmm, Saturday, 8 July 2017 01:29 (eleven months ago) Permalink

The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway is often cited as the pinnacle of early Genesis, but I'm not really convinced that it is. While it certainly contains more music than any other Genesis studio album, there's portions of The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway that strike me as being a bit dull, and the band seem to be lacking in energy throughout - consequently, the whole thing ends up being a bit of a slog for me, even though the album has several highlights. I find the plot of the record to be a bit silly, too. A Trick of the Tail, although it captures a band in crisis due to their lead vocalist leaving, also captures a band that are re-energised and are into what they're doing.

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Saturday, 8 July 2017 03:16 (eleven months ago) Permalink

First half of Lamb is great, second half more ... nebulous.

Josh in Chicago, Saturday, 8 July 2017 03:25 (eleven months ago) Permalink

i love basically every part of the lamb

ToddBonzalez (BradNelson), Saturday, 8 July 2017 04:30 (eleven months ago) Permalink

i'll acknowledge that the first half is basically perfect and that the second half is maybe a little more unsolid but that's as far as i'll go

ToddBonzalez (BradNelson), Saturday, 8 July 2017 04:31 (eleven months ago) Permalink

The plot's no sillier than Supper's Ready, Battle of Epping Forest, other tracks where Peter is the main lyricist. I love the music and so embrace the goofiness.

I do think including the prose version of the story was a bad idea though.

jmm, Saturday, 8 July 2017 04:59 (eleven months ago) Permalink

I can ignore the lyrics on 'Supper's Ready' completely, but 'The Battle of Epping Forest', which has some nice musical parts, is far from my favourite Genesis epic.

The relative lack of energy (the title track, for example, has always felt like it needs to be a touch faster and more aggressive) and a little too much meandering padding are bigger issues for me on The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway than the lyrics, fwiw.

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Saturday, 8 July 2017 12:21 (eleven months ago) Permalink

i love basically every part of the lamb

^^^^

Will admit to not even knowing what the plot is, despite having listened to this many times. A road trip favourite for me.

No purposes. Sounds. (Sund4r), Saturday, 8 July 2017 13:30 (eleven months ago) Permalink

invisible touch is the best genesis album. not a single bad song on it.

Mr. Snrub, Saturday, 8 July 2017 13:31 (eleven months ago) Permalink

It's about Peter Gabriel wishing Bob Fosse had directed him on stage singing "On Broadway."

the Rain Man of nationalism. (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 8 July 2017 13:31 (eleven months ago) Permalink

xpost

the Rain Man of nationalism. (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 8 July 2017 13:31 (eleven months ago) Permalink

alfred otm

ToddBonzalez (BradNelson), Saturday, 8 July 2017 13:39 (eleven months ago) Permalink

essentially the wall of death falls over new york city and rael meets some wacky characters and then a bird steals his penis iirc

ToddBonzalez (BradNelson), Saturday, 8 July 2017 13:43 (eleven months ago) Permalink

I only really listen to Nursery Cryme and Trespass, think that caught them at a great juncture. & the live sets from around teh time.
& then disown the rest of their catalogue.
Just got a lotof their early BBC stuff from a Demonoid torrent.
But picked up the 2008 remasters when they happened, also Foxtrot which I didn't get into much.

Stevolende, Saturday, 8 July 2017 14:04 (eleven months ago) Permalink

2008 remasters are controversial. Some vocals/instruments mixed down, some mixed way up, iirc.

Sometimes the first half of "Lamb" is my favorite, sometimes "Abacab," sometimes sometimes "Trick of the Tail," sometimes even "Invisible Touch," but never s/t and rarely "Duke" or "And then ..." (for some reason). Usually "Selling England" is my favorite. At the very least, I think "Dancing with the Moonlit Knight" is the band's playing apex, and Peter's lyrical peak (in Genesis) as well. Sort of ... proto Morrissey?

Josh in Chicago, Saturday, 8 July 2017 14:06 (eleven months ago) Permalink

the remasters are also remixes which is why they're controversial beyond the "steve hoffman forum" sense

ToddBonzalez (BradNelson), Saturday, 8 July 2017 14:24 (eleven months ago) Permalink

duke
a trick of the tail
invisible touch
genesis
and then there were three
foxtrot
abacab
three sides live
selling england by the pound
the lamb lies down on broadway
nursery cryme
wind & wuthering

I think you could guess which Genesis era I grew up in from that list. their prog back catalogue was my first deep dive into an artist, but the gabriel albums never spoke to me as much.
I admit to never listening to anything after invisible touch, and I'm not really familiar with anything before Nursery Cryme, so my list is truncated on each side.

enochroot, Saturday, 8 July 2017 14:27 (eleven months ago) Permalink

On "Selling" and "Lamb" in particular, even "Trick" and "Wind," I find it remarkable how well Phil's drums in particular are recorded. They just sound great. They always do, too, especially ironic for a guy who helped invent the sound of '80s drums.

Until I read his book I never knew much about his pre-Genesis stuff. Like:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jzBYib_Pko8
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WwG2lvssEzo

Or

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LPOqAHN4T9c
^written and sung by Phil c. 1968

Josh in Chicago, Saturday, 8 July 2017 15:06 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Like a few others here on ILM, i've been running up-and-down their catalog -- seems like i've been listening to nothing else for the last week. Lots of treats buoyed on the back of both decades of reflection and fresh ears. Side note; why "Squonk" wasn't a single, i'll never understand; the title alone?

Faves in two camps:

Trespass from Gabriel-era
Duke from Collins-era

bodacious ignoramus, Saturday, 8 July 2017 15:53 (eleven months ago) Permalink

This is lovely. Adore the ToTT and WaW period Genesis. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x5Y1L2aFt8M&t=0s

Acid Hose (Capitaine Jay Vee), Saturday, 8 July 2017 16:01 (eleven months ago) Permalink

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wraejmyAK5w

Acid Hose (Capitaine Jay Vee), Saturday, 8 July 2017 16:01 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Let's try that again: https://youtu.be/x5Y1L2aFt8M

Acid Hose (Capitaine Jay Vee), Saturday, 8 July 2017 16:02 (eleven months ago) Permalink

is it weird of me to say that i don't think of genesis as an album band? they sounded great when everything came together, but a lot of the time it didn't.

i recall reading a story from the first half of the 20th century that reminded me of the pre-"supper's ready" story printed on the inside of "live". it was only a couple weeks ago but i don't remember what it was exactly. sometimes i think peter gabriel's song introductions were the best part of his era of genesis. few things are more painful than listening to phil collins trying to replicate that style on the '76 tour.

The Saga of Rodney Stooksbury (rushomancy), Saturday, 8 July 2017 16:09 (eleven months ago) Permalink

I saw The Musical Box a couple of years ago, and not only were they awesome (at the time they had a balding left-handed drummer who even sang like Phil!), but their singer nailed replicating the weird Pete intros.

Josh in Chicago, Saturday, 8 July 2017 16:44 (eleven months ago) Permalink

This one has the Phil ringer:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pmLLs4EtMAA

Josh in Chicago, Saturday, 8 July 2017 16:51 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Here's a more recent lineup doing all of "Lamb." Apparently Genesis are fans, and lent them their old slides and props:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OlX4moDYEmA

Here's a bit of Phil sitting in. He said it was a struggle:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nWZT0EHKjCk

Josh in Chicago, Saturday, 8 July 2017 16:55 (eleven months ago) Permalink

wind and wuthering
a trick of the tail
and then there were three
selling england by the pound
the lamb...
foxtrot
nursery cryme
duke

no time for the rest...

heaven parker (anagram), Saturday, 8 July 2017 17:37 (eleven months ago) Permalink

The only track I'd take off of The Lamb is Ravine, which does feel like a pointless meander at that point in the album. The other instrumentals are solid.

There's a bunch of live Waiting Rooms on Youtube. Genesis would have made a killer krautrock band.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lmeyb8bX4Uo

jmm, Saturday, 8 July 2017 21:33 (eleven months ago) Permalink

there's a great 12-minute rehearsal jam on "fly on a windshield" floating around out there (not on youtube that i can find or i'd link it). kind of reminds me of embryo for whatever reason.

The Saga of Rodney Stooksbury (rushomancy), Saturday, 8 July 2017 22:03 (eleven months ago) Permalink

I don't really know their discography very well, but I don't anything is going to top Foxtrot for me, so that's probably why. Supper's Ready has the cutest lyrics of all time.

tangenttangent, Saturday, 8 July 2017 22:30 (eleven months ago) Permalink

human bacon

ToddBonzalez (BradNelson), Saturday, 8 July 2017 23:18 (eleven months ago) Permalink

tangent - you used to write on epinions?

bodacious ignoramus, Saturday, 8 July 2017 23:47 (eleven months ago) Permalink

actually love Ravine. got fond memories of getting the double Lamb CD and skipping to try and hear The Light Dies Down the second time I played it and getting Ravine by mistake and it scaring the crap out of me. The one album they did where there's this actual undeniable undercurrent of menace to it, simliar to The White Album

PaulTMA, Sunday, 9 July 2017 00:46 (eleven months ago) Permalink

yeah i love "ravine" too. lot of harrowing empty space in the second half of the lamb

ToddBonzalez (BradNelson), Sunday, 9 July 2017 01:29 (eleven months ago) Permalink

as much as I enjoy the post-Gabriel era(s), the creepy nastiness which peaked on the Lamb all but disappeared

PaulTMA, Sunday, 9 July 2017 01:32 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Ravine gives Peter time to change out of the Slipperman costume I guess.

jmm, Sunday, 9 July 2017 02:13 (eleven months ago) Permalink

The menace made it onto Gabriel's first few solo albums. Moribund the Burgermeister is pretty Lamb-like, and there's scary shit on Melt and Security — especially in the German, which gives something like Not One of Us a vaguely fascist undertone. It was all gone, though, by So, and I don't think he's ever recaptured it. Most of Up is just kind of lamely overwrought.

dinnerboat, Sunday, 9 July 2017 03:44 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Will have to give the german versions a listen but had never previously felt the need to. Always found the first two solo albums a bit lacking

PaulTMA, Sunday, 9 July 2017 11:19 (eleven months ago) Permalink

"This is the Picture" (and "We Do What We're Told" - originally intended for PG3?) is sort of menacing, "Mercy Street" is definitely spooky.

Josh in Chicago, Sunday, 9 July 2017 12:43 (eleven months ago) Permalink

On "Selling" and "Lamb" in particular, even "Trick" and "Wind," I find it remarkable how well Phil's drums in particular are recorded. They just sound great.

The drums on A Trick of the Tail sound incredible - in fact of all the Genesis records, that's my favourite sounding of them all - particularly the remaster. Duke comes very close, though.

I don't really like the way The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway sounds... it's a bit muffled and monochromatic, I think.

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Sunday, 9 July 2017 16:59 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Trying to give And Then There Were Three a serious shot, but I can't really get into the songwriting on that album. Follow You Follow Me has a simplicity and freshness.

jmm, Sunday, 9 July 2017 17:13 (eleven months ago) Permalink

invisible touch is the best genesis album. not a single bad song on it.

― Mr. Snrub, Saturday, July 8, 2017 1:31 PM (yesterday) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

I agree that there's not a single bad song on it!

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Sunday, 9 July 2017 19:46 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Some dude's "bald Thriller" comment re: Invisible Touch couldn't have been more otm, imo!

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Sunday, 9 July 2017 20:00 (eleven months ago) Permalink

The title track, 'Land of Confusion', 'Domino' and 'Throwing It All Away' ... superb.

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Sunday, 9 July 2017 20:02 (eleven months ago) Permalink

When it comes to a sense of menace Genesis stuff, no moment on Lamb compares to the first time I saw the video to 'Mama' ...

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Sunday, 9 July 2017 23:33 (eleven months ago) Permalink

"back in nyc" is menacing af

ToddBonzalez (BradNelson), Sunday, 9 July 2017 23:37 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Give the dude credit, he had good taste in covers:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ubYDPqi6ht4

Josh in Chicago, Monday, 10 July 2017 03:35 (eleven months ago) Permalink

I always forget how much I enjoy the glassy monumentalism of Duke and (to a lesser extent) And Then There Were Three.

With 'Duke' in particular it might in part be that it reminds me (in a reverse-influence sense) of Marillion's 'Clutching At Straws'.

But tonight it occurred to me that ATTWT's 'Down And Out' reminds me of my beloved first Shy Child album!

Tim F, Monday, 10 July 2017 13:21 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Most of my listening this week has been Genesis albums. I've known the Gabriel era albums for years but A Trick Of The Tail is the only Collins one I've checked out before now. I'm surprised how much I've enjoyed these albums. Abacab and the self titled are the two that are standing out. Abacab is good all the way through apart from that obnoxious synth at the end of Dodo/Lurker. As others have said, the self titled is badly let down by Illegal Alien. It's actually quite a good tune but obviously so misguided in every other way. I think I'd still pick that album up if I saw it cheap as the rest of it is so good. It would just be like Iggy Pop's New Values where I pretend African Man doesn't exist. Interested to hear And Then There Were Three and Wind & Wuthering next. It's been really interesting following this thread as I get to know the albums.

kitchen person, Wednesday, 12 July 2017 19:28 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Abacab is a patchy follow-up to Duke, IMO. I like the title track a lot, even though it probably doesn't deserve to be that long - and 'No Reply At All' would benefit by having the obnoxious horns removed from it. I generally love horn sections, but not on Genesis and Phil Collins records where they generally sound tacky. 'Who Dunnit?' is crap, and the epics aren't particularly memorable.

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Wednesday, 12 July 2017 19:46 (eleven months ago) Permalink

I love how Abacab sounds like Genesis running into Simple Minds and The Teardrop Explodes in a crowded thoroughfare.

Tim F, Wednesday, 12 July 2017 21:20 (eleven months ago) Permalink

(Specifically referencing those bands' contemporaneous material there)

Tim F, Wednesday, 12 July 2017 21:21 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Abacab is a patchy follow-up to Duke, IMO

it's not

ToddBonzalez (BradNelson), Wednesday, 12 July 2017 21:26 (eleven months ago) Permalink

and 'No Reply At All' would benefit by having the obnoxious horns removed from it

god the next sentence was even worse

ToddBonzalez (BradNelson), Wednesday, 12 July 2017 21:26 (eleven months ago) Permalink

imo the fenix horns pretty much never sound tacky, they act as sharp punctuation wherever they're employed?

ToddBonzalez (BradNelson), Wednesday, 12 July 2017 21:34 (eleven months ago) Permalink

I love how Abacab sounds like Genesis running into Simple Minds and The Teardrop Explodes in a crowded thoroughfare.

― Tim F, Wednesday, July 12, 2017 9:20 PM (eight minutes ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

This is indeed what it sounds like, but the end result isn't as great as that description sounds because the material isn't quite there, whereas on Duke not only did they manage to incorporate elements of New Wave into their sound successfully, but they managed to balance it with their progressive tendencies and they managed to write a set of wall-to-wall very good to great material, powerfully played and impeccably produced.

It has its highlights, but it's definitely a weaker Genesis record.

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Wednesday, 12 July 2017 21:35 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Relistened to "Invisible Touch" today after reading all the reappraisals on the IT thread and...yikes. Outside of "Tonight..." I can'tt get with its über-mid-80s digi-production at all. I remembered that's when I had stopped caring.

Acid Hose (Capitaine Jay Vee), Wednesday, 12 July 2017 21:39 (eleven months ago) Permalink

The "uber-mid '80s digi-production" is part of the reason I like the album so much - another reason is that there's not a dud track on it!

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Wednesday, 12 July 2017 21:52 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Now that the connection has occurred to me I am very curious to know what a Brab thinks of Sons and Fascination.

Tim F, Wednesday, 12 July 2017 22:07 (eleven months ago) Permalink

sympathetic to capitaine jay vee's experience of invisible touch; the other day i was listening to it and was kinda annoyed at the digital space in which the songs unfold bc it made the more atmospheric sections of songs sound thin and distant. weirdly this was most pronounced during "tonight..." could've just been my mood at the time as obv i love ultra-synthetic production, unreal crystalline approximations of "real" instruments revolving coldly in an artificial environment 4ever, that's the stuff

i have never heard a simple minds record tim

ToddBonzalez (BradNelson), Wednesday, 12 July 2017 22:15 (eleven months ago) Permalink

xpost:

A connection between Genesis and Simple Minds occurred to me before, but weirdly the other way around - the bassline to 'In Trance As Mission' has always reminded me of the riff of the 'Apocalypse' section of 'Supper's Ready' ... I wonder if the early Minds were Gabriel-era Genesis fans?

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Wednesday, 12 July 2017 22:16 (eleven months ago) Permalink

but that'll change soon! xp

ToddBonzalez (BradNelson), Wednesday, 12 July 2017 22:16 (eleven months ago) Permalink

OMG Brad it must!

Given SM got Steve Hillage to produce S&F I wouldn't be surprised if they were British prog fans more generally.

Tim F, Wednesday, 12 July 2017 22:22 (eleven months ago) Permalink

I look forward to Brad being the only person on ILM to like 'Belfast Child' ...

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Wednesday, 12 July 2017 22:36 (eleven months ago) Permalink

I am a huge fan of slick '80s production in many cases ("Cupid & Psyche 85", Brian Ferry's solo stuff of the decade, anything ZTT/ Trevor Horn, etc). but I'm with ToddBonzalez re: the airless digital space the songs exist in here. Plus there's a pronounced nasal shrillness to Phil's voice on this album that grates.

Acid Hose (Capitaine Jay Vee), Wednesday, 12 July 2017 23:15 (eleven months ago) Permalink

I don't really notice any big difference in Phil's voice on this album, except that he was a far more accomplished singer by that point and had better control over his voice!

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Wednesday, 12 July 2017 23:20 (eleven months ago) Permalink

The endless plain of digispace + Collins' decision to shout = an often grating experience. It ruins "Tonight, Tonight Tonight" and "Anything She Does" for me.

the Rain Man of nationalism. (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Wednesday, 12 July 2017 23:46 (eleven months ago) Permalink

lol "plane"

the Rain Man of nationalism. (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Wednesday, 12 July 2017 23:46 (eleven months ago) Permalink

'Tonight, Tonight, Tonight' is perfect, IMO. Can't fault Collins' passionate vocal performance on that at all.

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Wednesday, 12 July 2017 23:54 (eleven months ago) Permalink

"the endless plane of digispace" is my favorite john cale song

ToddBonzalez (BradNelson), Thursday, 13 July 2017 00:19 (eleven months ago) Permalink

that's what I had in mind

the Rain Man of nationalism. (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Thursday, 13 July 2017 00:31 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Tonight x 3's rain of pain falls on an endless plain

Tim F, Thursday, 13 July 2017 00:42 (eleven months ago) Permalink

I recall being profoundly disappointed with abacab upon its release and I still tend to value the post-Duke material much less than what came earlier. But wow, I wasn't aware of the resistance they faced on their 1981 tour:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f8d3-CKPupM

doug watson, Thursday, 13 July 2017 15:01 (eleven months ago) Permalink

I wonder if the early Minds were Gabriel-era Genesis fans

they were never shy about it either
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n760wQHFVOo&t=2m14s
2m14s

PaulTMA, Thursday, 13 July 2017 15:16 (eleven months ago) Permalink

that may have not worked: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n760wQHFVOo

PaulTMA, Thursday, 13 July 2017 15:17 (eleven months ago) Permalink

is there a reason why The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway is not on Spotify but everything else is?

Universal LULU Nation (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Thursday, 13 July 2017 16:25 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Yeah, it's a bit strange how Genesis fans reacted badly to the band trying different things, whereas Rush had no problem bringing their audience with them. But then from '81-'85 Rush were putting out far better material.

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Thursday, 13 July 2017 17:57 (eleven months ago) Permalink

whereas Rush had no problem bringing their audience with them

idk, it's been a while since i watched the rush doc but this is not my impression of how it went down

ToddBonzalez (BradNelson), Thursday, 13 July 2017 18:05 (eleven months ago) Permalink

They might have lost a few fans who disliked their move from hard rock to progressive rock, or disliked the shorter songs and New Wave elements or disliked stuff like Hold Your Fire, but generally Rush were always perceived as a band that, no matter what they did, they did it with their integrity fully intact and cultivated a very dedicated fanbase who would follow them no matter what.

With Genesis, the audience is far more divided.

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Thursday, 13 July 2017 18:17 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Genesis lost their original lead singer/songwriter and lead guitarist. Those are pretty drastic changes.

No purposes. Sounds. (Sund4r), Thursday, 13 July 2017 18:21 (eleven months ago) Permalink

If anything, I feel like there is more continuity between Gabriel-era Genesis and the early solo Gabriel albums than between the Gabriel era and the Collins era. Rush always sounded like Lee, Lifeson, and Peart.

No purposes. Sounds. (Sund4r), Thursday, 13 July 2017 18:23 (eleven months ago) Permalink

I've tried so hard to love let alone like Simple Minds beyond "New Gold Dream" and "Glittering Prize." Jim Kerr is the wrong kind of pompous, with colleagues to match.

the Rain Man of nationalism. (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Thursday, 13 July 2017 18:31 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Peter Gabriel was never the "lead" songwriter or driving force at any point... this is one of the reasons why he left! The only LP where all the lyrics are his is on Lamb ... before that, he would mostly sing what he was given by Mike and Tony, and it was similar for Collins on the post-Gabriel albums. Even later on when Phil started writing more it was a couple of tracks at best.

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Thursday, 13 July 2017 18:32 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Rush sales remained steady (they were automatic platinum for much of the eighties) but you should see the band's faces in recent years as they've learned that millions of fans love if not prefer New World Man Rush. I'm not sure even the band loved the synths.

the Rain Man of nationalism. (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Thursday, 13 July 2017 18:33 (eleven months ago) Permalink

It's worth noting also that Hackett also left because Genesis was the Banks'n'Rutherford show... always was!

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Thursday, 13 July 2017 18:35 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Rush sales remained steady (they were automatic platinum for much of the eighties) but you should see the band's faces in recent years as they've learned that millions of fans love if not prefer New World Man Rush. I'm not sure even the band loved the synths.

― the Rain Man of nationalism. (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Thursday, July 13, 2017 6:33 PM (one minute ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

I'm sure they did, or they wouldn't have done it.

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Thursday, 13 July 2017 18:36 (eleven months ago) Permalink

seeing Rush twice in the 2000s felt like, whatever happened at the time, any old divides have long since healed, and everything as new wavey as "Time Stand Still" as proggy as "Cygnus X-1" or as meat and potatoes 70s hard rock as "Fly by Night" or "Working Man" all go down great with the multi-generational crowd

was my impression that Lifeson was a bit of a holdout on the synths and that direction was more Geddy and Peart, but I think that's just he felt like his role was being marginalized

Universal LULU Nation (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Thursday, 13 July 2017 18:37 (eleven months ago) Permalink

I'm sure they did, or they wouldn't have done it.

― The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican),

Not necessarily. Market accommodations. I'm not saying it was the only reason, and if it were the only reason the music is nevertheless terrific.

the Rain Man of nationalism. (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Thursday, 13 July 2017 18:41 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Admittedly, I listen to Lamb the most but you have to acknowledge that a lead singer and lead guitarist are pretty important in defining a rock band's sound.xps

No purposes. Sounds. (Sund4r), Thursday, 13 July 2017 18:41 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Rush went deeper into synths than they would have needed to in order to accommodate the early 80s rock market, surely. I got the impression that Lee was really intense and passionate about synths?

No purposes. Sounds. (Sund4r), Thursday, 13 July 2017 18:43 (eleven months ago) Permalink

xxpost:

It wasn't market accomodations - they were listening to The Police, Ultravox etc., liked what they heard and made music influenced by what they were hearing - y'know, like musicians do.

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Thursday, 13 July 2017 18:45 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Alfred I think you are wrong, Geddy was super into the Taurus pedals...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T8uWrP1uD9U

Universal LULU Nation (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Thursday, 13 July 2017 18:46 (eleven months ago) Permalink

But it's not a binary. Musicians have complex motives. Synthesizers and short songs were popular, and The Police were making music they like. Of course Rush would say, "Hmm, let's give it a go."

But I give up.

the Rain Man of nationalism. (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Thursday, 13 July 2017 18:47 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Admittedly, I listen to Lamb the most but you have to acknowledge that a lead singer and lead guitarist are pretty important in defining a rock band's sound.xps
― No purposes. Sounds. (Sund4r), Thursday, July 13, 2017 6:41 PM (three minutes ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

Gabriel has an immediately identifiable voice, but Collins is as close as you can get to Gabriel vocally without actually being Gabriel that it's not much of an issue, really. Gabriel blossomed creatively in his solo career, but in Genesis he wasn't the driving force at all - 'Watcher of the Skies' would have turned out near enough the same if Phil had sung it.

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Thursday, 13 July 2017 18:50 (eleven months ago) Permalink

In Genesis's case, the departure of key members at least provides a symbolic basis for drawing battle lines. It gives an easy shorthand for naming the different eras and stating one's preferences. That might account for the appearance of a rift, though it's hard to estimate actual numbers here, i.e. how much of the early fanbase dropped off. I know my mom and uncle kept buying the albums.

jmm, Thursday, 13 July 2017 18:53 (eleven months ago) Permalink

The hilarious thing about Soto's comments, re: Rush and synths is that... well, he does realise Rush were using 'em as far back as 2112, right? And they feature heavily on A Farewell to Kings and Hemispheres, too. Bizarre for a band that "don't like synths" and are only using 'em to sell records...

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Thursday, 13 July 2017 18:56 (eleven months ago) Permalink

I actually think the first glimmers of new wave/post punk in Rush musically begins really prior to their embrace of synths with Hemispheres, like the chiming guitar figure around the minute mark in La Villa Strangiato, the chorus of Circumstances, quite a bit of the early section of Cygnus X-1: Book II: Hemispheres...

Lifeson is switching to a more chorus, Roland-y type guitar tone and there's an angularity (don't shoot me for using that word) to some of the riffs that seems influenced by new music coming out. Though they are still working primarily in "70s Rush" mode, it feels transitional.

Which is to say this is prior to the first Police album, not to say the Police didn't end up being a big influence but they were moving out of the 70s mode already

Universal LULU Nation (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Thursday, 13 July 2017 18:59 (eleven months ago) Permalink

The hilarious thing about Soto's comments, re: Rush and synths is that... well, he does realise Rush were using 'em as far back as 2112, right? And they feature heavily on A Farewell to Kings and Hemispheres, too. Bizarre for a band that "don't like synths" and are only using 'em to sell records...

Oh I'm aware. Rush were like Queen that way circa The Game. And I hear things on Hemipsheres that presage what was to come.

Well, to be clear, if you watch the documentary from 2010 or 2011 the band still looks as if they have to mind that they eschewed the prog starting in 1981 (I don't think they did, as any casual listen to "Middletown Dreams" shows). Call it a signal to the older fans (whom I know) who went along with the synths because it was Rush and the eighties but sure weren't happy about it.

the Rain Man of nationalism. (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Thursday, 13 July 2017 19:02 (eleven months ago) Permalink

xpost:

Yeah, I absolutely agree with that, and it goes a long way towards explaining why it's my go-to Rush album!

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Thursday, 13 July 2017 19:05 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Rush gave up on 20 minute sides after Hemispheres but the prog elements in their sound didn't end there, or after 1981 for that matter...

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Thursday, 13 July 2017 19:10 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Tbf, I think I'm fairly unusual in only listening to Gabriel-era Genesis (although I like a couple of Collins-led singles) and I do know people who only listen to certain eras of Rush.

No purposes. Sounds. (Sund4r), Thursday, 13 July 2017 19:11 (eleven months ago) Permalink

I find it very difficult to believe you don't listen to A Trick of the Tail or Wind & Wuthering, both of which prove that Genesis was the Banks'n'Rutherford Show as much as Duke proves that Hackett wasn't really that essential either.

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Thursday, 13 July 2017 19:28 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Well, they certainly become less of a guitar band. Literally zero notable guitar leads after Hackett leaves, for better or for worse (often for better!)

Lifeson had been moving toward that Andy Summers style pretty early on the '80s, and certainly with "Permanent Waves" a simplicity (for lack of a better word) and general Police-iness has entered the scene. Lifeson's more atmospheric chords sat well with the infusion of synths. With "Grace Under Pressure," though, Geddy and Neil pushed the electronics much farther, with synths, Simmons pads, etc., and Lifeson's playing got a little simpler as well, by necessity. By "Power Windows," my understanding is that a lot of that album was sequenced (in the synth sense) before Alex really got involved, and he had to struggle to find places for his guitar (which I find funny, since I love the guitar on that record). "Hold Your Fire" is more of that, and while "Presto" pares down the electronics, it pares down everything else, too; it's a pretty spare record. By "Roll the Bones" I think Alex was bristling at being locked in to all the synths and programming, and I remember "Counterparts" being hyped as a return to guitars, and reading Alex interviews where he expressed his excitement at being album to play riffs again. Of course, as always that isn't totally the case, but it's not a coincidence that the last couple of albums are probably the band's hardest, and most guitar-centric, since the '70s.

Josh in Chicago, Thursday, 13 July 2017 19:31 (eleven months ago) Permalink

I found this, though:

Geddy Lee: My love of keyboards – I guess you could call it an obsession – reached its peak on Power Windows.

Alex Lifeson: Keyboards were the new thing, so there was this attitude: ‘Let’s just push them up, they sound big and they sound cool.’

Geddy Lee: We would get caught up in the making of an album, and then maybe after it was done Alex would hear it with fresh ears, he’d be like, ‘Hmm, maybe that was too much keyboards.’ Every so often it would come up in conversation between us.

Alex Lifeson: I did see the bigger picture: I knew we were going in a new direction and this was part of it. I don’t have anything against keyboards.

Geddy Lee: Power Windows was very much an album that was out of that whole Trevor Horn school. We brought in this synthesiser guy, Andy Richards, who really brought it up a notch in terms of quality and technology. This was very attractive to me, because it was new and fresh and exciting.

Alex Lifeson: For me, that record was a challenge. But I thought: go with it and it will all work out in the end. So I did that. I just saw that there was a shift in my role.

Geddy Lee: When you’re using that many keyboards, you’re taking up so much space on the record. Then the guitar has to fit around that. With a lot of the songs on Power Windows – songs like Grand Designs and Marathon – we had so many parts already done on keyboards that on previous records the guitar would have filled. So Alex had to figure out a way in. That’s really what it required of him.

Alex Lifeson: The guitar suffered in a lot of the mixes. That’s what bothered me more than anything. The bottom line was, I just thought that we needed to preserve the core of what the band is. It’s a three-piece.

Geddy Lee: Alex did play some great stuff on that record. Like on Mystic Rhythms. Without the guitar riff, that song doesn’t work. And I really like the sound of that album. I thought it was a really strong production. There are some great songs on that record. I like Middletown Dreams a lot – you know, every once in a while we write a good melody! Overall, I thought Power Windows was a great accomplishment for us. But maybe not so much on the couple of albums after that – Hold Your Fire and Presto. On those records the keyboards were still present, but not in so positive a way. That was making the case, once again, for realigning the sound…

Josh in Chicago, Thursday, 13 July 2017 19:41 (eleven months ago) Permalink

I find it very difficult to believe you don't listen to A Trick of the Tail or Wind & Wuthering, both of which prove that Genesis was the Banks'n'Rutherford Show as much as Duke proves that Hackett wasn't really that essential either.

Lol that this is a difficult thing to believe.:)

No purposes. Sounds. (Sund4r), Thursday, 13 July 2017 20:06 (eleven months ago) Permalink

I'll give them another try some time, though.

No purposes. Sounds. (Sund4r), Thursday, 13 July 2017 20:06 (eleven months ago) Permalink

I've tried so hard to love let alone like Simple Minds beyond "New Gold Dream" and "Glittering Prize." Jim Kerr is the wrong kind of pompous, with colleagues to match.

― the Rain Man of nationalism. (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Thursday, 13 July 2017 18:31 (two hours ago) Permalink

I'm not sure I'd describe the early albums as remotely pompous!

Tim F, Thursday, 13 July 2017 20:37 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Ha yeah, I'd say the pomposity happens after New Gold Dream, not before.

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Thursday, 13 July 2017 20:58 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Once Upon a Time is one if the grosser arena sellouts.

the Rain Man of nationalism. (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Thursday, 13 July 2017 21:02 (eleven months ago) Permalink

(I'm aware that it's the consensus pick for the rot-setting-in album.

the Rain Man of nationalism. (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Thursday, 13 July 2017 21:04 (eleven months ago) Permalink

It's also stylistically about as far away from Reel to Real Cacophony as you can get!

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Thursday, 13 July 2017 21:10 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Yeah the transformation of Simple Minds across its first seven albums is almost as extreme as from A Trick of the Tail to Invisible Touch.

Tim F, Thursday, 13 July 2017 21:43 (eleven months ago) Permalink

I want to host a listening party where I take Alfred and Brad through the first six in chronological order. As with Genesis and Talk Talk the overall progression is fascinating.

Tim F, Thursday, 13 July 2017 21:45 (eleven months ago) Permalink

It's probably even more extreme when you consider the first two albums - only released six months apart but it feels like there should have been three or four albums in between the two, such is the leap between the two!

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Thursday, 13 July 2017 22:03 (eleven months ago) Permalink

this section of the wikipedia article on Once Upon a Time is kind of bathetic

Legacy[edit]

In 2008, Once Upon a Time was listed as the 864th greatest album of all time by the French retail chain Fnac.[8]

In 2013, "All the Things She Said" was featured on a radio station in Grand Theft Auto V, the fourth best-selling video game of all time (as of February 2017).

soref, Thursday, 13 July 2017 22:07 (eleven months ago) Permalink

I'm listening to A Trick of the Tail again now, and fucking hell 'Squonk' is just so good.

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Thursday, 13 July 2017 22:20 (eleven months ago) Permalink

There's a good anecdote on the Life in a Day Wikipedia about Kerr hearing Unknown Pleasures shortly after the first album came out and immediately realising they'd fucked up.

Tim F, Thursday, 13 July 2017 22:20 (eleven months ago) Permalink

It's probably the one that generally gets rated the lowest of the first five records, but I really like Life in a Day! Sparkle in the Rain is the last one I'll go anywhere near, but it's far more tolerable than what came after.

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Thursday, 13 July 2017 22:25 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Sparkle is alright, but that's when the vocals go a little bit Bono for the first time. Can tolerate the singles from Once Upon A Time but otherwise the quality just plummets to this sub-U2 wasteland.. I forget the name of that 'I Travel' rehash but it's absolutely putrid. And then came Street Fighting Years.

PaulTMA, Thursday, 13 July 2017 23:19 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Genesis lost their original lead singer/songwriter and lead guitarist. Those are pretty drastic changes.

― No purposes. Sounds. (Sund4r)

way to piss off the "trespass" thread

The Saga of Rodney Stooksbury (rushomancy), Friday, 14 July 2017 01:35 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Ha, well, you got me there. Really, as my list above shows, I just listen to the albums with Gabriel and Hackett.

No purposes. Sounds. (Sund4r), Friday, 14 July 2017 01:38 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Oh, i'm pissed; but not for that --it's this talk of Rush that makes me ill.

Never the twain.

bodacious ignoramus, Friday, 14 July 2017 05:17 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Rush were the superior band, though, in terms of energy (no longer-than-they-need-to-be meandering 12 string guitar detours), playing/instrumental proficiency (Peart > Collins, obviously), production (even the early Rush LP's sound better than Trespass and Nursery Cryme), songwriting ('Turn it on Again' is excellent, but not as excellent as 'The Spirit of Radio' ... also '2112' and 'Cygnus X-1: Book II' are superior compositions to 'Supper's Ready'), lyricism ('Subdivisions' alone crushes anything Genesis came up with), adaptability (Rush absorbed new wave elements far more successfully) etc. I could go on and on...

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Friday, 14 July 2017 12:41 (eleven months ago) Permalink

I think I'd disagree on the songwriting, plus both Collins and Gabriel are better vocalists than Geddy Lee. I'd struggle to choose although I'm not a huge fan of either band - though I do really like both in places.

Gavin, Leeds, Friday, 14 July 2017 12:53 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Yeah, Gabriel and Collins are both better singers and have better voices that are easier to listen to and Genesis probably sold more records, but overall Rush crush Genesis in every way.

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Friday, 14 July 2017 13:02 (eleven months ago) Permalink

(and I like Genesis)

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Friday, 14 July 2017 13:02 (eleven months ago) Permalink

but overall Rush crush Genesis in every way.

These kind of statements...

I mean - come on.

Acid Hose (Capitaine Jay Vee), Friday, 14 July 2017 13:32 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Both bands have made their share of good to great albums. What are you basing the crushing power of Rush on lol?

Acid Hose (Capitaine Jay Vee), Friday, 14 July 2017 13:35 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Ok - just saw your post upthread. Wow.

Acid Hose (Capitaine Jay Vee), Friday, 14 July 2017 13:36 (eleven months ago) Permalink

I think Genesis absorbed the New Wave ( and US r&b) influences so well they appeared like almost natural fits when it happened. Rush sounded awkward at times when incorporating New Wave elements.

Acid Hose (Capitaine Jay Vee), Friday, 14 July 2017 13:40 (eleven months ago) Permalink

I disagree, I think that the run of albums from Permanent Waves to Power Windows sound very natural and unforced in their adoption of New Wave styles.

Duke sounds natural and unforced too, but I can't say the same for Abacab and Genesis, particularly the former.

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Friday, 14 July 2017 14:09 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Rush blow after Signals; only drooling fan-boys would fail to see that Genesis have at least a half-dozen classic records where Rush have maybe two.

...and i like Rush

bodacious ignoramus, Friday, 14 July 2017 14:36 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Genesis have 6 classics, whereas Rush have 8 - so there y'go, yet another level on which Rush annihilate Genesis.

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Friday, 14 July 2017 14:41 (eleven months ago) Permalink

i don't think any of the rush albums that absorb new wave are as consistent as duke, abacab, or even shapes

ToddBonzalez (BradNelson), Friday, 14 July 2017 14:41 (eleven months ago) Permalink

also peart is a terrible lyricist

ToddBonzalez (BradNelson), Friday, 14 July 2017 14:43 (eleven months ago) Permalink

xpost Not Moving Pictures or Permanent Waves or Signals? I disagree.

Peart > Collins, obviously

No way. They are very different drummers, but Peart is not "clearly" superior, unless you subscribe to the Peart-is-the-greatest-drummer-of-all-time stance. Collins and Peart are equally creative and talented, and for a time equally busy/chops-heavy. Still, not to bash on Peart at all (because he's awesome and I like Rush better than Genesis, too), but I couldn't imagine him filling all the stylistic roles Collins has, from Zep to Motown to fusion to ... I mean, it just goes on. Collins is like one of those great session drummers able to impart his own personality with each performance. And he grooves and swings, which Peart, for all his awesomeness, just doesn't do much of. Or need to do!

Josh in Chicago, Friday, 14 July 2017 14:44 (eleven months ago) Permalink

80-82 is my favourite era of Rush so I do think they win on the new wave front. That said I've never thought of Genesis as being particularly new wavy anyway bar a handful of songs - their '80s albums are quite eclectic but to me they lean more towards just straight MOR/rock. I guess there was a lot of overlap at that time.

Gavin, Leeds, Friday, 14 July 2017 14:48 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Duke and Invisible Touch are the only two albums that could remotely compete with anything that Rush released 1980-1985. In terms of Rush's discography from the beginning up to 1985 and Genesis' discography in the same period, the Rush albums are relatively filler and fat-free.

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Friday, 14 July 2017 14:48 (eleven months ago) Permalink

@josh oh i was talking mostly about signals, grace under pressure, and power windows. signals is my fav rush record but even then i don't like it as much as duke. idk, maybe it's time to spend more time with the rush catalog lol

ToddBonzalez (BradNelson), Friday, 14 July 2017 14:50 (eleven months ago) Permalink

...and here i thought we could be friends. Eight classic Rush records... you're high (and Invisible Touch sux).

Josh; you are wise -- my arguments would be better expressed if filtered through your pen.

bodacious ignoramus, Friday, 14 July 2017 14:52 (eleven months ago) Permalink

I find the idea that Peart doesn't "groove" or "swing" really funny and pretty much demonstrates a lack of knowledge about the guy's drumming. Of course, naturally, from a purely technical perspective alone Peart > Collins, but there's more to Peart's drumming than that. He was at his peak for longer too.

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Friday, 14 July 2017 14:54 (eleven months ago) Permalink

oy vey. Can there be a Genesis Vs Rush poll so we can go back to matters at hand? lol

Acid Hose (Capitaine Jay Vee), Friday, 14 July 2017 15:17 (eleven months ago) Permalink

xpost You are totally wrong about Peart. His parts are totally precise, totally arranged, totally deliberate and totally not spontaneous. And totally awesome. That's their brilliance! Even his solos are totally composed! Not a dig on him, just a very different style that does not demand groove or swing or whatever. Anyway, let's go to the tape:

Neil Peart does Buddy:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aT9333XiR4U

Phil Collins big band:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JT5UslpgPUA

I mean, neither is playing the Village Vanguard.

Peart did stay at his peak longer, I'll give you that. But he worked really hard at that, too - taking lessons, reassessing/changing his technique - and it played a big role in his retirement.

Don't get me wrong, they're both great! But Neil Peart is perfect for Rush and only for Rush. Collins is far more versatile.

Josh in Chicago, Friday, 14 July 2017 16:09 (eleven months ago) Permalink

I mean, Collins doing his best Jaki here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KXDrTZMVINo

Josh in Chicago, Friday, 14 July 2017 16:11 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Through-composing and arranging ones parts has nothing to do with ones ability to "swing" ...

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Friday, 14 July 2017 16:17 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Sure. But it does discredit an occasional looseness and spontaneity as an attribute. Peart is like a machine, which is what I love about him. Not a time-keeping machine, just a total wind-up do his thing machine.

Josh in Chicago, Friday, 14 July 2017 16:25 (eleven months ago) Permalink

It's a different discussion, but I've often wondered about certain rarified virtuosos, if they're so into their thing that that's all they can do. Again, that's not a dig at Peart at all. But I was really impressed several months ago coming across some video of Mike Portnoy playing the Beatles. Not that I like Portnoy's playing - I hate Dream Theatre - but I was just impressed he could set aside ego and do his best Ringo. Could a guitarist as prima facia virtuoso as, say, Steve Vai, even play a sloppy version of "Wild Thing?" Without doing his weedle-weedle? I saw a clip of Adrian Belew once - he's another guitarist who just does his thing - and he was talking about influences, and it was a bit like pulling teeth. The interviewer finally got him to concede Hendrix, and then it took another round of coaxing to get Belew to even minimally demonstrate some Hendrix-like licks.

Anyway, Peart's, yeah, through-composed approach to drums is (or was) essentially unique. That's what makes him special. But it's also what makes it so hard for me to compare him to other drummers.

Josh in Chicago, Friday, 14 July 2017 16:28 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Josh has it right -- Peart is a technician; adept, yes, but still a craftsman.

bodacious ignoramus, Friday, 14 July 2017 16:34 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Sure. But it does discredit an occasional looseness and spontaneity as an attribute.

Rush were never about jamming/improvising and neither really were Genesis, but that doesn't mean they couldn't do it and of course being musicians of their calibre I'm sure they could. Basically, your argument boils down to "Collins is a better drummer because he's done more session work", and I disagree.

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Friday, 14 July 2017 16:37 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Peart > Bruford > Palmer > Collins > White

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Friday, 14 July 2017 16:41 (eleven months ago) Permalink

i might as well add to this clusterfuck by asserting that genesis vs. rush is not a great debate to me because i do not feel that Rush is prog qua prog anyway, they are a hard rock band with prog tendencies.

I can't articulate why but trust me I am absolutely right.

Universal LULU Nation (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Friday, 14 July 2017 16:54 (eleven months ago) Permalink

..and sh@kedown has it right as well

bodacious ignoramus, Friday, 14 July 2017 17:01 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Yep, they were very much that from 1975-1977 ... but it highlights another strength Rush have over Genesis: they rocked more. Like I said earlier, no far-too-long meandering 12 string guitar detours.

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Friday, 14 July 2017 17:05 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Rush were never about jamming/improvising and neither really were Genesis

the majority of genesis songs were born out of collective jamming

ToddBonzalez (BradNelson), Friday, 14 July 2017 17:07 (eleven months ago) Permalink

they talk about this all the time

ToddBonzalez (BradNelson), Friday, 14 July 2017 17:07 (eleven months ago) Permalink

xxpost:

I mean, it's called progressive rock, so too right the rocking is important.

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Friday, 14 July 2017 17:09 (eleven months ago) Permalink

I see the bands as having different goals.

Universal LULU Nation (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Friday, 14 July 2017 17:12 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Rush also had a musical sense of humor that Genesis lacked.

I firmly come down on the Rush side of the debate. And I agree Rush isn't really a prog band. I just won't say Peart is a better drummer than Collins. The latter is (was) a virtuoso, but was so much more versatile. Peart is the best Rush drummer we will ever see, which is enough, but not everything. Each one of the most creative drummers ever, regardless.

Josh in Chicago, Friday, 14 July 2017 17:13 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Rush also had a musical sense of humor that Genesis lacked.

Which is also to say, Rush may or may not be prog, but they most certainly were never art-rock.

Josh in Chicago, Friday, 14 July 2017 17:15 (eleven months ago) Permalink

xxxpost:

It doesn't matter how the songs were born - I'm perfectly sure several Rush songs were written and arranged that way and I know for a fact that the majority of Genesis songs weren't born out of collective jamming - maybe after Duke, certainly not before. Genesis' finished songs were mostly as set in stone as Rush's were.

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Friday, 14 July 2017 17:17 (eleven months ago) Permalink

I'd argue that Rush in the '80s were art rock.

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Friday, 14 July 2017 17:20 (eleven months ago) Permalink

the new Gier

bodacious ignoramus, Friday, 14 July 2017 17:26 (eleven months ago) Permalink

I know for a fact that the majority of Genesis songs weren't born out of collective jamming

the lamb was born out of jamming! they talk about it in the freakin' doc!

i mean improvisation is just fast composition blah blah blah

ToddBonzalez (BradNelson), Friday, 14 July 2017 17:28 (eleven months ago) Permalink

The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway =/= "the majority of Genesis songs"

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Friday, 14 July 2017 17:39 (eleven months ago) Permalink

phil also made the v labored point in the lamb reissue doc that the lamb and "hold on my heart" were the product of people playing in a room together and that that's the thing tying the whole genesis discography together but ok pls enjoy yourself turrican

ToddBonzalez (BradNelson), Friday, 14 July 2017 17:44 (eleven months ago) Permalink

LOL @ "the new Geir" ... Wasn't Gabriel-era Genesis Geir's favourite band? Doubt he would have stood for them being compared unfavourably to Rush. He woulda been wrong, but no surprises there.

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Friday, 14 July 2017 17:45 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Wow, Genesis played in a room together, fucking hell...

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Friday, 14 July 2017 17:46 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Anyway, I'm gonna give A Trick of the Tail another spin, I'm in the mood to listen to the not-at-all-arranged-or-composed-and-totally-improvised likes of 'Dance on a Volcano' and 'Los Endos', not to mention 'Mad Man Moon' and the title track, which I hear Banks improvised from beginning to end and then brought to the band...

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Friday, 14 July 2017 17:53 (eleven months ago) Permalink

For what it's worth, Gabriel-era Genesis had mystique. Rush never did. Not a criticism, and Genesis never rocked as hard.

More importantly, who wore the better '80s hair? Was it Phil's never ending mullet or Geddy's raccoon hat?

dinnerboat, Friday, 14 July 2017 18:06 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Josh has it right -- Peart is a technician; adept, yes, but still a craftsman.

Unless I misunderstand what you mean by "technician" and "craftsman", this is not at all what I get from Josh's posts. If anything, he seems to be arguing that Collins is superior as a technician while Peart is so idiosyncratic that he only really works with Rush.

No purposes. Sounds. (Sund4r), Friday, 14 July 2017 18:11 (eleven months ago) Permalink

I don't think Collins is a superior technician, but I do think they are equally good drummers. Just that Peart's playing is pretty much only suited to Rush, whereas Collins can and does play well in numerous situations. Like, I have no doubt Vinnie Colaiuta could play anything Peart could, and then some, but Peart could not play "Nightshift" by the Commodores. And I have no doubt that Jeff Porcaro could play Rush songs, too, but Peart could not play "Billie Jean." Or Steely Dan, for that matter. Not that he needs to! Peart is perfect for Rush, and exceptional. But it's sort of like a conversation I had with a friend about the Edge. I don't rate the Edge as a guitar player, but if I was forming a U2 tribute band he would absolutely be my first pick. (Except Peart is awesome, of course.)

Josh in Chicago, Friday, 14 July 2017 18:24 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Porcaro was a great drummer and everything, but... no!

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Friday, 14 July 2017 18:27 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Y'see, Peart has very rarely done any work outside of Rush, but this has little to do with how well Peart would cope outside of Rush, and more to do with... well, if you're in a band with musicians of the calibre as the three members of Rush, then anything else is going to feel like a step down.

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Friday, 14 July 2017 18:31 (eleven months ago) Permalink

and y'know, it's turned into a TS: Collins vs. Peart, but Lee also knocks Rutherford into a cocked hat bass-wise and Lifeson is superior to Hackett. Rush didn't have a keyboard player per se., but they could always be relied on to provide tasteful synthesiser sounds on their records. Some of the synth sounds on Abacab and Genesis are a bit obnoxious.

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Friday, 14 July 2017 18:34 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Lee also knocks Rutherford into a cocked hat bass-wise and Lifeson is superior to Hackett.

No argument on this front.

musicians of the calibre as the three members of Rush, then anything else is going to feel like a step down.

Ha, this is no doubt how someone like, say, John McLaughlin might think of a band like Rush! (No offense to Rush intended.)

Josh in Chicago, Friday, 14 July 2017 18:48 (eleven months ago) Permalink

yeah i mean i like Rush but like I don't know like there's like several thousand jazz dudes that would knock them on their butts

Universal LULU Nation (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Friday, 14 July 2017 18:57 (eleven months ago) Permalink

or like Rik Emmitt from Triumph just to site another Canadian 70s/80s power trio, I'd say he's on par with Lifeson

Universal LULU Nation (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Friday, 14 July 2017 18:58 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Seriously? Rik Emmett?

No purposes. Sounds. (Sund4r), Friday, 14 July 2017 19:14 (eleven months ago) Permalink

I like Triumph fine on the radio (and own Thunder Seven) but they seem like pretty straightforward AOR to me. I can't recall anything where they've done the ambitious things Rush did with rhythm and harmony; nor do I think Emmett showed a command of a couple of different rock guitar styles like Lifeson did.

No purposes. Sounds. (Sund4r), Friday, 14 July 2017 19:24 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Also, you had Banks/Collins/Rutherford as the three-piece Genesis line-up, but they required extra musicians in order to play live - not so with Rush, who could replicate everything with only the three of them. Geddy multitasking with synths, bass, pedals and vocals. That's talent.

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Friday, 14 July 2017 19:25 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Seriously? Rik Emmett?

― No purposes. Sounds. (Sund4r), Friday, July 14, 2017 2:14 PM (twenty-six minutes ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

haha ok i'm trolling but i find this whole conversation really bad IMO

Question: is Rush better or worse musicians than Booker T & the MGs?

Universal LULU Nation (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Friday, 14 July 2017 19:42 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Ha

No purposes. Sounds. (Sund4r), Friday, 14 July 2017 19:50 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Actually, come to think of it, Tony Banks is no Keith Emerson, Rick Wakeman or Patrick Moraz either. Far from that level, I'd say.

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Friday, 14 July 2017 19:57 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Turrican - wanna buy you a beer now; you're taste is yours alone. You can't really like Genesis if you don't appreciate Banks.

Josh/Sund4r -- Peart is like a cabinet maker, in the best sense.

...try Webb or Tate if you like drums

bodacious ignoramus, Friday, 14 July 2017 20:04 (eleven months ago) Permalink

it is i think p widely accepted that beyond collins genesis were kinda not as qualified as other prog bands chops-wise but they had a unusually great pop sensibility

ToddBonzalez (BradNelson), Friday, 14 July 2017 20:10 (eleven months ago) Permalink

"tony banks is no rick wakeman" wow you're blowing my mind

ToddBonzalez (BradNelson), Friday, 14 July 2017 20:10 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Thank God

Universal LULU Nation (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Friday, 14 July 2017 21:21 (eleven months ago) Permalink

What happened to this thread.

Tim F, Friday, 14 July 2017 21:21 (eleven months ago) Permalink

xxpost:

Well, it's true - I'm unsure about them having an "unusally great" pop sensibility too, at least not until later on.

However, despite Genesis' limitations I think they made some great music together - and when it's great, it's really great.

Remember, I never once said that I hated Genesis, just that Rush were the superior band.

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Friday, 14 July 2017 21:25 (eleven months ago) Permalink

I'm unsure about them having an "unusally great" pop sensibility too

supper's ready is catchy as shit

ToddBonzalez (BradNelson), Friday, 14 July 2017 21:30 (eleven months ago) Permalink

anyway tim f otm

ToddBonzalez (BradNelson), Friday, 14 July 2017 21:30 (eleven months ago) Permalink

This thread is a prog epic. So many parts!

Josh in Chicago, Friday, 14 July 2017 21:37 (eleven months ago) Permalink

The message board version of "Gates Of Delirium "!

Acid Hose (Capitaine Jay Vee), Friday, 14 July 2017 21:42 (eleven months ago) Permalink

"X band is clearly superior to Y band on the following Z criteria" is the part of ILM that deservedly gets written out of official history.

Tim F, Friday, 14 July 2017 21:44 (eleven months ago) Permalink

X, the band, is clearly superior to Yes on the following Zomg! criteria.

Josh in Chicago, Friday, 14 July 2017 21:46 (eleven months ago) Permalink

^^^^ allowable

Tim F, Friday, 14 July 2017 21:47 (eleven months ago) Permalink

*cranks Moving Pictures*

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Friday, 14 July 2017 21:50 (eleven months ago) Permalink

One thing I was wondering last night was "who was heavily influenced by the post-prog Genesis albums?"

Duke is too prog I think to sound too much like stuff that isn't also at least partially steeped in prog traditions. As I said upthread it reminds me a lot of Marillion's Clutching at Straws, which I guess was an example of a band who had effectively been histrionic early-Genesis understudies grappling with the same question of how to transition to "proper" songwriting (rather than just "pop" per se), and is also the only Marillion album I listen to very much.

But surely there must have been many artists influenced by Abacab / Genesis / Invisible Touch? And I don't mean in a generic "no one got out of the 80s alive" sense, but as in, these particular albums (or maybe just one of them!) were a specific stylistic touchstone??

In some ways these three albums sound very, erm, "Canadian" to me? I wonder if Jane Siberry was a fan of this era of Genesis?

Tim F, Friday, 14 July 2017 21:58 (eleven months ago) Permalink

That's an interesting question and one that I've been pondering myself over the last couple of days - the most obvious answer I could come up with was Marillion, who you've mentioned as being heavily influenced by Gabriel-era Genesis, although I'm sure they continued to follow Genesis into the '80s. Ultimately, though, I don't know - a lot of what I'm thinking of that happened after Invisible Touch could be considered to be a reaction against it in some way.

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Friday, 14 July 2017 22:07 (eleven months ago) Permalink

I've always thought that Tears for Fears "Songs from the Big Chair" was very influenced by post prog Genesis. Especially at its, well, proggiest - Broken, Mother's Talk - but also how the drums, Strats and synthesizers sound.

Josh in Chicago, Friday, 14 July 2017 22:12 (eleven months ago) Permalink

God, "You Might Recall" from the Abacab sessions is insanely good. I don't know why I hadn't heard it before.

jmm, Friday, 14 July 2017 22:17 (eleven months ago) Permalink

xpost oooh yes that's a good answer. Also just the general glassy grandeur of the songs is kind of positioned halfway between Duke and the rest of new pop.

Tim F, Friday, 14 July 2017 22:18 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Prog coincidence or no, credits on that TfF album include Jerry Marotta (Peter Gabriel's drummer) and Mel Collins (from King Crimson). Phil himself plays drums on the next album, on "Woman in Chains."

Josh in Chicago, Friday, 14 July 2017 22:21 (eleven months ago) Permalink

In some ways these three albums sound very, erm, "Canadian" to me? I wonder if Jane Siberry was a fan of this era of Genesis?

Ha, when you put it that way, I bet Gowan was into pop Genesis.

No purposes. Sounds. (Sund4r), Friday, 14 July 2017 22:28 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Indio's Big Harvest (also Canadian) has always reminded me of post-So Peter Gabriel. ha, I see that David Rhodes played with both.

doug watson, Friday, 14 July 2017 23:33 (eleven months ago) Permalink

But really, Tim, speaking as a Canadian, I have no idea WTF you mean

doug watson, Friday, 14 July 2017 23:34 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Songs from the Big Chair doesn't remind me of Genesis at all.

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Friday, 14 July 2017 23:43 (eleven months ago) Permalink

It's basically a mid '80s synthpop record with a bicycle pump shoved up its arse.

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Friday, 14 July 2017 23:49 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Vinnie Colaiuta could play anything Peart could, and then some, but Peart could not play "Nightshift" by the Commodores. And I have no doubt that Jeff Porcaro could play Rush songs, too, but Peart could not play "Billie Jean."

Josh, you complete me.

didgeridon't (Ye Mad Puffin), Friday, 14 July 2017 23:51 (eleven months ago) Permalink

the "who had better chops" thing is always pretty silly but particularly silly in this case. I mean by any measure both these bands had a buttload of chops, more chops than any band would reasonably need and both used them to make some of the most ludicrous and awesome rock music, by no reasonable standard would you say well the problem with Rush or Genesis? just didn't have the chops, shoulda taken more lessons

Universal LULU Nation (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Friday, 14 July 2017 23:56 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Of course not, but Rush do have the superior chops.

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Friday, 14 July 2017 23:58 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Also the idea that Neil Peart couldn't play 'Billie Jean' is hilarious - of course he could, but it probably wouldn't interest him to do so.

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Saturday, 15 July 2017 00:00 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Stop now

Tim F, Saturday, 15 July 2017 00:01 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Of course not, but Rush do have the superior chops.

― The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Friday, July 14, 2017 4:58 PM (one minute ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

someone get me out of this loop

ToddBonzalez (BradNelson), Saturday, 15 July 2017 00:01 (eleven months ago) Permalink

lol ok man like I just listen to Supper's Ready and all I can't think is man too bad Banks isn't even more of a wanker cuz this really could use Rick Wakeman jizzing Canterbury Tales analog synth all over the track like a frickin firehose

Universal LULU Nation (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Saturday, 15 July 2017 00:06 (eleven months ago) Permalink

off this topic I think it's interesting, Abacab is 81 and Signals is 82, which at that point the two bands are as stylistically similar as they ever got, like there's not a million miles between Abacab's title track and Subdivisions.

one thing we never considered is a band that was influenced by post Gabriel Genesis might have been Rush themselves

Universal LULU Nation (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Saturday, 15 July 2017 00:08 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Geddy picked Nursery Chryme as of his favorite albums of all time in The Quietus:

Genesis - Nursery Crime
Well I was a big fan of Genesis and Peter Gabriel. That was when I first discovered the notion of a 'concept' and that it could be an adventurous and lively place and not dull at all. It is a very playful and compelling record. I fell in love with the sound of it. I was totally entranced by it and wanted to know how they had done it. This is part of the roots of Rush. The creation of a flexible concept. The parallels are obvious.

Universal LULU Nation (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Saturday, 15 July 2017 00:12 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Nah, Signals is just basically natural evolution from Moving Pictures... they were headed in that direction anyway.

It's well known they were influenced by Gabriel-era Genesis, though... Lifeson claims one of the lead guitar parts on 'The Fountain of Lamneth' is influenced by Hackett. It doesn't matter though, the took those influences and improved on them colossally.

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Saturday, 15 July 2017 00:20 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Cosigning Tim's request to stop as I'm getting flashbacks to Grade 10

doug watson, Saturday, 15 July 2017 00:28 (eleven months ago) Permalink

This discussion would have been over again if the Genesis hardcore hadn't protested so much... but I agree, let's suck it up and move on.

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Saturday, 15 July 2017 00:32 (eleven months ago) Permalink

*again=ages ago.

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Saturday, 15 July 2017 00:32 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Yes Turrucan it was definitely the.... Genesis faithful...that were belaboring the point

Universal LULU Nation (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Saturday, 15 July 2017 00:46 (eleven months ago) Permalink

we're just like the stevie nicks coven that keeps ruining he fleetwood mac threads

ToddBonzalez (BradNelson), Saturday, 15 July 2017 00:56 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Haha

Tim F, Saturday, 15 July 2017 01:00 (eleven months ago) Permalink

To be fair Brad, suggesting that music doesn't necessarily resolve into a rigid hierarchy of objective greatness is pretty ruinous.

Tim F, Saturday, 15 July 2017 01:16 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Ok, the moment that none of you have been waiting for..

The Lamb Lies Down On Broadway
Abacab
Genesis
Foxtrot
Duke
Selling England By The Pound
Trick Of The Trail
Wind & Wuthering

(bit of a drop in quality here)

Trespass
Nursery Crime
Then There Were Three
Invisible Touch
We Can't Dance

I haven't heard the first and last albums yet but nothing I've read has convinced me I should give them a shot.

A big thank you to the posters on here who've made me listen to the Collins era with an open mind. I was missing out on some really great music (especially Abacab).

kitchen person, Sunday, 16 July 2017 02:40 (eleven months ago) Permalink

I haven't heard the first and last albums yet but nothing I've read has convinced me I should give them a shot.

― kitchen person

the first album is really good if you're into '60s-era bee gees!

The Saga of Rodney Stooksbury (rushomancy), Sunday, 16 July 2017 03:56 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Stopped reading that list after the third entry, tbh.

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Sunday, 16 July 2017 10:03 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Glad you found some new titles to enjoy. Turrican is toxic; pay him no mind -- i called him the new "Gier" but that's too good for his foul, over-bloated ego. Call him Turdican, or just Turd for short.

bodacious ignoramus, Sunday, 16 July 2017 13:22 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Ha!

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Sunday, 16 July 2017 16:01 (eleven months ago) Permalink

this is so the most metal non-metal song evah

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gTuJQL8GBqY

Neanderthal, Sunday, 16 July 2017 16:25 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Yeah, I fucking love that track - both musically and lyrically. In fact, if we were to poll this band, all three of the Nursery Cryme epics would make it onto my ballot without hesitation.

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Sunday, 16 July 2017 16:28 (eleven months ago) Permalink

I haven't heard it in many years but there are so many great parts I forgot about, listening to it now.

Neanderthal, Sunday, 16 July 2017 16:31 (eleven months ago) Permalink

The swelling mellotron on the intro to 'The Fountain of Salmacis' is one of my favourite moments in a Genesis song ever, as well as the rocking out sections in 'The Musical Box' etc. etc. As much as I find Nursery Cryme, in a way, to be a bit of a dry run for Foxtrot, it's got some stunning moments on it. With a better production job it could have even been one of their best ever.

The Anti-Climax Blues Band (Turrican), Sunday, 16 July 2017 16:33 (eleven months ago) Permalink

The early epics rock hardest on Genesis Live. Plus that album cover is one of my favourite rock images.

dinnerboat, Sunday, 16 July 2017 18:41 (eleven months ago) Permalink

The shredding guitar solo bits on "Musical Box" feel a bit proto-Maiden to me.

No purposes. Sounds. (Sund4r), Sunday, 16 July 2017 20:32 (eleven months ago) Permalink

something something two-handed tapping something

The Saga of Rodney Stooksbury (rushomancy), Monday, 17 July 2017 01:27 (eleven months ago) Permalink


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