quiddities and agonies of the ruling class - a rolling new york times thread

Message Bookmarked
Bookmark Removed
Not all messages are displayed: show all messages (8235 of them)

little orphan annie back there

ultra-generic sub-noize persona (Matt P), Thursday, 14 May 2009 23:05 (5 years ago) Permalink

^yea srsly i didnt even notice that at first

johnny crunch, Thursday, 14 May 2009 23:05 (5 years ago) Permalink

guys do you realize what this means? the economic crisis is even affecting rich people! this means it is really newsworthy!! it's like when straight people started getting hiv!!!

Tracer Hand, Thursday, 14 May 2009 23:35 (5 years ago) Permalink

what's a quiddity?

Philip Nunez, Thursday, 14 May 2009 23:36 (5 years ago) Permalink

think of the barefoot girls laying on dogs on the porches of brick homes in silver spring, md. x-post

ultra-generic sub-noize persona (Matt P), Thursday, 14 May 2009 23:36 (5 years ago) Permalink

“I feel as if I am finally at home,” she exclaimed as soon as we moved into the house. She could settle down and do the things she had always been best at: making a new home, nurturing her children and loving me.

Tracer Hand, Thursday, 14 May 2009 23:38 (5 years ago) Permalink

But eventually:

The frosted-crystal shade on a beloved Italian floor lamp was cracked. The dog had gnawed the leg on her Biedermeier chair.

Tracer Hand, Thursday, 14 May 2009 23:44 (5 years ago) Permalink

The Khaki Class

man, i love collages (J0rdan S.), Thursday, 14 May 2009 23:44 (5 years ago) Permalink

Thread of ;_;

Dom P's Rusty Nuts (Noodle Vague), Thursday, 14 May 2009 23:46 (5 years ago) Permalink

I can't really join in on any rich-people schadenfreude here, because it sounds to me like this guy is not of some far-distant social class, and the $4k alimony/child-support + take-home of $2.75k equation actually does sound pretty rough to me -- what's weird about it is to read the contention that this felt like a natural situation to wind up falling into; I suppose at that age and social situation it might, but of the many people I know who take home around that much money a month, I can surely tell you that not that many of them expect homes on it, and I'm not even just talking about the ones in New York.

nabisco, Thursday, 14 May 2009 23:52 (5 years ago) Permalink

I mean, judging by that equation we might estimate an income in the general neighborhood of $100k a year, which is certainly pleasant but not some sort of distant class of wealth and privilege whose travails I might comfortably laugh at.

nabisco, Thursday, 14 May 2009 23:54 (5 years ago) Permalink

On one hand -- ugh, fuck this guy.

On the other hand, I have to give him credit for a little reality check. I just paid off the last of my credit card debt and I have a fixed rate mortgage, so I need to quit waking up at 4 a.m. and worrying about money.

On the 3rd hand, nice work of him to pull his story together and sell it to W.W. Norton.

resistance is feudal (WmC), Thursday, 14 May 2009 23:56 (5 years ago) Permalink

you've got three hands? surely you can swing a book deal out of that.

macaulay culkin's bukkake shocker (bug), Friday, 15 May 2009 00:04 (5 years ago) Permalink

it's true, nabisco - he never really was that rich, especially by the standards of the new york times - but he sure lives and writes like he is. which is of course where the trouble started. getting a monthly keelhaul from the ex didn't help, either - i wonder if he writes about that in his book? - but i think this man's most basic problem was imagining that a take-home of $2500 monthly was enough to buy a half-mil pile. it's enough to make a casual reader think that the financial crisis really is a result of damn fools like him. in any case, this thread isn't for schadenfreude per se - but don't let that stop you - it's a record of what kinds of voices the new york times tends to lean on.

Tracer Hand, Friday, 15 May 2009 00:44 (5 years ago) Permalink

i'm struck by his weaselly evasion of responsibility - despite the mea culpa undertones, he makes his wonderful new lady friend sound like a spendthrift bitch and says that his total lack of financial awareness was a symptom of the "same infection" that brought low the titans of industry. fat chance, ed.

Tracer Hand, Friday, 15 May 2009 00:47 (5 years ago) Permalink

i think this man's most basic problem was imagining that a take-home of $2500 monthly was enough to buy a half-mil pile

not enough OTM in the world for this

butt-rock miyagi (rogermexico.), Friday, 15 May 2009 01:22 (5 years ago) Permalink

loooool @ tracer hand: voice of the underclass

(Palm) springs sprungs (Lamp), Friday, 15 May 2009 01:26 (5 years ago) Permalink

I had assumed we would start by renting a house or an apartment, but it quickly became clear that it was almost easier to borrow a half-million dollars and buy something.

languid samuel l. jackson (jim), Friday, 15 May 2009 01:28 (5 years ago) Permalink

n.e.way: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/05/14/garden/14aaron.html

ny times does seem to have a thing for pictures of the sprawled daughters of the leisure class in front of their itlianate mansions

(Palm) springs sprungs (Lamp), Friday, 15 May 2009 01:29 (5 years ago) Permalink

sorry Lamp i missed the part where you had a point

Tracer Hand, Friday, 15 May 2009 09:16 (5 years ago) Permalink

my takeaway from this article is that our "elite" journos are often just as ignorant and greedy as the rest of us humps -- not to mention that i feel a bit smug seeing how shitty the media's coverage of the whole real estate/subprime mess was.

Pull Slinky and Make Me Fart (Eisbaer), Friday, 15 May 2009 14:40 (5 years ago) Permalink

The Khaki Class

lol South

"the whale saw her" (gabbneb), Friday, 15 May 2009 14:45 (5 years ago) Permalink

i don't know crap about this guy, nor do i care, BUT

when i was 22 i dated this very cute but not-very-smart guy. it was long distance, so we wrote a lot of letters (this was in the lol 90s). in one letter he told me that being with me made him feel "quidity". i smugly laughed a little because i figured that he meant "tranquility" and wow was this guy adorable for not being able to use a dictionary. then i looked up the word "quidity" and realized that it was real (although not what he meant, i am 100% sure)

this thread is the first time i have ever actually seen anyone use this word. the end.

figgy pudding (La Lechera), Friday, 15 May 2009 14:46 (5 years ago) Permalink

maybe he was like "wow she thinks my made-up word means something.. what a dim-bulb"

Tracer Hand, Friday, 15 May 2009 15:08 (5 years ago) Permalink

what do you think he actually meant?

Tracer Hand, Friday, 15 May 2009 15:09 (5 years ago) Permalink

pretty sure he meant tranquility, like comfort (i remember this from context, but really this was a long time ago and i can't remember much about the situation aside from this strange misused word)

figgy pudding (La Lechera), Friday, 15 May 2009 15:14 (5 years ago) Permalink

Megan McArdle on the piece. Judge for yourself.

Ned Raggett, Friday, 15 May 2009 16:19 (5 years ago) Permalink

Actually I kind of like her points?

But not someone who should be dead anyway (Laurel), Friday, 15 May 2009 16:28 (5 years ago) Permalink

ya i mean... not really sure why this piece is as contempt-worthy as some are making it out to be. it's kind of brutally depressing.

s1ocki, Friday, 15 May 2009 16:29 (5 years ago) Permalink

It is in a 'there-but-for' sense for sure. Not that I was ever going to try and be an economics reporter for the NY Times, but as time has passed I'm beginning to think the soundest piece of advice I've ever received in regard to writing was something J. D. Considine told me years ago -- 1993 or so -- in response to a random e-mail or two I sent him. He pretty much said, "Freelancing and journalism is very hard work and you should only pursue it on a full-time basis if you are willing to stick to that level." I'm honestly glad I heeded that and I think what you see in both pieces, regardless of whatever else feeds into their respective situations, reflects that.

At the same time, I'm trying to put my finger on what still jars about McArdle's response and it seems to be this sense of keeping up with the Joneses as paramount driving factor/potential excuse. At what point is leisure travelling to Europe, for instance, a 'minimum necessity' -- and I speak as one who's been there a number of times now. Still, I realize it's a sliding scale, says the person who has participated in a CSA thing with a local farmer for some years now.

Ned Raggett, Friday, 15 May 2009 16:37 (5 years ago) Permalink

Literal translation: quiddity = whatness

anatol_merklich, Friday, 15 May 2009 16:43 (5 years ago) Permalink

Ned, I read her response as being more about the foolhardiness of ever thinking ANY of those things are necessities. She seems to be (gently) chiding that whole tendency?

But not someone who should be dead anyway (Laurel), Friday, 15 May 2009 16:50 (5 years ago) Permalink

Yah... she's just sayin' that you hang with people for whom this is true, you wake up with fleas

butt-rock miyagi (rogermexico.), Friday, 15 May 2009 17:17 (5 years ago) Permalink

I think maybe something to add to McArdle's response is that we have this general cultural tendency to view attention as somehow related to money, a connection that really falls apart when it comes to writers of all sorts -- it's very easy to withhold sympathy from people writing about their woes in public, as if they're coming from a position of privilege or just courting attention, but in plenty of cases they don't have much concrete privilege and writing about their experiences is just, you know, work.

he never really was that rich, especially by the standards of the new york times - but he sure lives and writes like he is. which is of course where the trouble started. getting a monthly keelhaul from the ex didn't help, either - i wonder if he writes about that in his book? - but i think this man's most basic problem was imagining that a take-home of $2500 monthly was enough to buy a half-mil pile.

Yeah, exactly -- although if I had to summarize a problem here it would basically be that a middle-aged family-man homeowner with a decent salary expected to continue living like a middle-aged family-man homeowner with a decent salary, even after a divorce that meant the bulk of his income was going to support a family home occupied by other people. This is an unrealistic and dumb expectation to seriously act on -- you'd think that $4k would be a good monthly reminder that situations done changed -- but I can totally have sympathy for the situation itself; that would suck. It would be painful to have to support the family home you used to live in and have to support yourself and your new family on a fraction of what you're earning.

nabisco, Friday, 15 May 2009 17:47 (5 years ago) Permalink

The other thing is that -- while he can't and doesn't come out and say this directly -- his one list of charges makes me suspect a bunch of money was getting borrowed to maintain a certain lifestyle for the kids

nabisco, Friday, 15 May 2009 18:00 (5 years ago) Permalink

I thought he said that very directly just by listing all those expenses! (I note though that he does seem to say even more directly that his wife did that too.)

Ned Raggett, Friday, 15 May 2009 18:02 (5 years ago) Permalink

Haha yeah, I guess the unsayable "direct" thing I had in mind was like "these KIDS were bankrupting us (that's right, Alex, I'm talking about you)"

I was going to jump past boggling at the beach house rental and wonder about the $700 at J. Crew, but I guess if you needed, like, one good suit and some decent sweaters for Christmas presents ... the world really does hold you to your socio-economic status, doesn't it -- even beyond nobody wanting to be the guy who gets divorced and suddenly has to start showing up to work in cheap suits, it'd be tough to be the guy making $100k who's like "I got you a candy bar for Christmas!"

nabisco, Friday, 15 May 2009 18:22 (5 years ago) Permalink

yeah the erm narrative here is anyways at least partly "but banking professionals who should be my Friends and Advisors assured us it would be alright!"?

However fishy such blanket blame is in general, I'm not sure it's entirely misplaced re how things rolled out this cycle. At one point around 2006, I momentarily had a crazy amount of money in my account due to family property reorg stuff, and was by phone promptly invited to an "advisement meeting" with a dude at my bank, who tried to convince me he had the correct %ages I should place my assets in (all mediated by said bank, obv). (I still was in net debt though!) I was all very cynical and noncommittal, which is not due to my deep insight or anything, just because my current boss worked in a bank in the early 00s and has spilled much shit on how those outfits operate(d?). (My fave morsel: the guys who construct the deals don't actually inform the salespeople abt all potential downsides and builtin fees, as this may hurt their sales!)

I don't think this guy deserves much point-and-laugh, btw, though it is obv somewhat funny he writes on economics.

anatol_merklich, Friday, 15 May 2009 18:55 (5 years ago) Permalink

I don't know that that's a big surface narrative, given the "I wasn't duped" and the bit about how a banking professional's refinancing maneuvers actually worked to carve down some debt

nabisco, Friday, 15 May 2009 19:00 (5 years ago) Permalink

it's about even someone who should have known better made some really dumb mistakes, which is always a story worth telling imo

s1ocki, Friday, 15 May 2009 19:11 (5 years ago) Permalink

Literal translation: quiddity = whatness

A weird thing about "quiddity" is that the first definition, "essence", seems to be the opposite of the second definition, "a trifling point". So it can either refer to the essence of something or a minor, trifling detail? Confusing. I have a feeling that it's a word that's rarely used correctly.

o. nate, Friday, 15 May 2009 19:13 (5 years ago) Permalink

my point is that there are hundreds of thousands of people with stories just like this who don't write for the new york times and have six-figure salaries who are perhaps just a leeetle more representative of the mortgage fallout going on right now - my pointing and laughing is at the editors, not this poor schmuck

Tracer Hand, Friday, 15 May 2009 19:17 (5 years ago) Permalink

well, they wanted a personal, first-perosn story, so going with a new york times writer... kinda makes sense, no?

s1ocki, Friday, 15 May 2009 19:19 (5 years ago) Permalink

he will die at some point

cool app (uh oh I'm having a fantasy), Friday, 15 May 2009 19:22 (5 years ago) Permalink

can't write about that tho

cool app (uh oh I'm having a fantasy), Friday, 15 May 2009 19:22 (5 years ago) Permalink

That's a fair point, Tracer, but the fact that the Times can be willfully class-blind is hardly news to anyone who's ever read the Style section, for instance.

o. nate, Friday, 15 May 2009 19:22 (5 years ago) Permalink

what is sadder loss or death

cool app (uh oh I'm having a fantasy), Friday, 15 May 2009 19:23 (5 years ago) Permalink

conceptually, I mean

cool app (uh oh I'm having a fantasy), Friday, 15 May 2009 19:23 (5 years ago) Permalink

loss is a kind of death, when u think about it??

rip dom passantino 3/5/09 never forget (max), Friday, 15 May 2009 19:24 (5 years ago) Permalink

imagine in that picture that the dog is dead but the money is lost

cool app (uh oh I'm having a fantasy), Friday, 15 May 2009 19:25 (5 years ago) Permalink

lol idk how i un-bookmarked this thread but that def belongs here

We started a new thread when this one reached 8000+ posts!

Vomits of a Missionary (bernard snowy), Thursday, 9 October 2014 22:55 (1 month ago) Permalink

maybe we should link to it and lock this one

polyphonic, Thursday, 9 October 2014 22:57 (1 month ago) Permalink

Locking this thread has been repeatedly poo-poohed for unclear reasons.

Spirit of Match Game '76 (silby), Thursday, 9 October 2014 23:27 (1 month ago) Permalink

we must bear witness without ceasing

j., Thursday, 9 October 2014 23:35 (1 month ago) Permalink

2 weeks pass...

mobile.nytimes.com/2014/11/02/fashion/how-uber-is-changing-night-life-in-los-angeles.html?referrer=

puff puff post (uh oh I'm having a fantasy), Sunday, 2 November 2014 16:45 (3 weeks ago) Permalink

^^^
This one should be reposted on this thread every month or so on general principle

RAP GAME SHANI DAVIS (Raymond Cummings), Sunday, 2 November 2014 22:17 (3 weeks ago) Permalink

from the uber link that didn't embed:

Rick Garcia, 59, a retired Army major who said he became an Uber driver to fund a vacation, starts and often ends his shifts downtown. “It’s changing in the blink of an eye,” said Mr. Garcia, a Los Angeles native raised in Echo Park, as he wound his way along one-way streets lined with Art Deco buildings, some empty, others now home to yoga studios and juice bars. “There’s a lot of New Yorkers here, and they’re saying it’s almost like New York.”

True enough: The district is drawing comparisons to SoHo in the early 1980s, when former warehouses morphed into galleries and artist lofts. In downtown Los Angeles, a visible homeless population (thousands bed down nightly in nearby Skid Row, according to city estimates) crosses paths with European tourists and designers in drop-crotch trousers (the area is also home to the fashion district). In September, a branding agency started a monthly publication, LA Downtowner, to highlight local businesses and street style.

...

“I find myself going down there a lot and taking friends that are coming to visit, because there’s so much cool stuff to do,” said Lara Marie Schoenhals, 30, a writer and Mr. O’Connell’s roommate. On a recent night, she bounced from drinks at the Ace to dinner at a Roy Choi hot spot in nearby Koreatown then more drinks at a new bar in West Hollywood. “I can just, like, YOLO with Uber,” she said.

puff puff post (uh oh I'm having a fantasy), Sunday, 2 November 2014 22:46 (3 weeks ago) Permalink

dibs on new DN

Vomits of a Missionary (bernard snowy), Sunday, 2 November 2014 22:59 (3 weeks ago) Permalink

... it is done

I can just, like, YOLO with Uber (bernard snowy), Sunday, 2 November 2014 23:01 (3 weeks ago) Permalink

The Uber one is fine right up until
“If you’re going to the airport, you use UberX, who cares,” said Mr. Heitzler, the Venice artist. “But if you have to go to a party at the Chateau” — the see-and-be-seen celebrity-magnet Chateau Marmont — “you at least go black car. Or even a giant S.U.V. There’s nothing better than getting out of a giant S.U.V. at the Chateau by yourself.”

Kiarostami bag (milo z), Sunday, 2 November 2014 23:59 (3 weeks ago) Permalink

when i'm rich i'm going to buy the chateau marmont and redevelop it into a portal to hell

linda cardellini (zachlyon), Monday, 3 November 2014 00:11 (3 weeks ago) Permalink

The Uber one is fine right up until
“If you’re going to the airport, you use UberX, who cares,” said Mr. Heitzler, the Venice artist. “But if you have to go to a party at the Chateau” — the see-and-be-seen celebrity-magnet Chateau Marmont — “you at least go black car. Or even a giant S.U.V. There’s nothing better than getting out of a giant S.U.V. at the Chateau by yourself.”

― Kiarostami bag (milo z), Sunday, 2 November 2014 23:59 (Yesterday) Permalink

This is a world I'll never, ever understand.

RAP GAME SHANI DAVIS (Raymond Cummings), Monday, 3 November 2014 01:10 (3 weeks ago) Permalink

hooo boy, you can imagine the daughter of that author being VERY pissed

Steve 'n' Seagulls and Flock of Van Dammes (forksclovetofu), Monday, 3 November 2014 21:30 (3 weeks ago) Permalink

That was just gross.

carl agatha, Monday, 3 November 2014 21:48 (3 weeks ago) Permalink

That phenomenon is way too far past funny or charming by the time a person hits 32 for that article to be amusing.

my jaw left (Hurting 2), Monday, 3 November 2014 21:55 (3 weeks ago) Permalink

in re uber, just saw a story about a woman who took an uber for her birthday not realizing 9x surge pricing was in effect, basically ended up with like a $350 tab for a 20 minute cab, which equaled most of her rent money for the month. (I assume she was probably either drunk or not a regular uber user to miss that, although I wouldn't know, having never taken an uber).

my jaw left (Hurting 2), Monday, 3 November 2014 21:56 (3 weeks ago) Permalink

the thing about that dopey 32 piece is it has the same qualities as the onion editorial cartoon piece where the guy is railing about not getting paper money for his empty bottles or whatever; there's the deep despicable andy rooney sickness of an unearned, hateful whiine

Steve 'n' Seagulls and Flock of Van Dammes (forksclovetofu), Monday, 3 November 2014 22:03 (3 weeks ago) Permalink

The app will tell you if there's surge pricing in effect, but it could be easy to miss and from my experience, there's no real rhyme or reason to why surge pricing goes into effect. xp

carl agatha, Monday, 3 November 2014 22:05 (3 weeks ago) Permalink

The one time I considered Uber I went through the whole process of dling the app and setting up the account and then saw that the price was exactly the same as a yellowcab (which are easy to get late at night by my job). P much the only time I take cabs is on work's dime when I have to stay super late, so it's not much of a thing for me.

my jaw left (Hurting 2), Monday, 3 November 2014 22:11 (3 weeks ago) Permalink

hooo boy, you can imagine the daughter of that author being VERY pissed

― Steve 'n' Seagulls and Flock of Van Dammes (forksclovetofu), Monday, November 3, 2014 4:30 PM Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

Pretty sure the authors are not old enough to have a 32-year-old daughter.

my jaw left (Hurting 2), Monday, 3 November 2014 22:19 (3 weeks ago) Permalink

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/09/realestate/an-east-village-apartment-share-for-recent-graduates.html

Can we refer to these people as...quiddiots?

my jaw left (Hurting 2), Friday, 7 November 2014 17:20 (2 weeks ago) Permalink

oh hey they almost lived above rosario's!

chinavision!, Friday, 7 November 2014 17:30 (2 weeks ago) Permalink

So they signed on for a year, paying a broker fee of 12 percent of a year’s rent, or a bit more than $4,000. Because all the rooms are comparable in size, they split the rent evenly, at $933 each, with one paying $994 on a rotating basis.

this doesn't seem quiddy to me? Like, ymmv and all but a grand a month for rent in manhattan is a good deal honestly and they seem to be living at their means

Steve 'n' Seagulls and Flock of Van Dammes (forksclovetofu), Friday, 7 November 2014 18:59 (2 weeks ago) Permalink

yeah, there's no whining or absurdity there? They sacrificed space to live where they wanted - which you can get away with when you're 23, and lots of people in other parts of the country would say about people living in Brooklyn/etc..

Kiarostami bag (milo z), Friday, 7 November 2014 20:55 (2 weeks ago) Permalink

I have no idea what their "means" are, mostly just smdh at the NYC rental market.

my jaw left (Hurting 2), Friday, 7 November 2014 21:06 (2 weeks ago) Permalink

(Marge Simpsin voice): "Hmmmm . . . it's true, but he shouldn't say it."

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/09/opinion/sunday/pricey-doughnuts-pricier-homes-priced-out-readers.html?smid=fb-share&_r=1

Οὖτις Δαυ & τηε Κνιγητσ (Phil D.), Sunday, 9 November 2014 15:08 (2 weeks ago) Permalink

Jay Kallio
NY, NY 3 minutes ago

I am probably one of the poorest subscribers the Times has, having struggled through two cancers, the second of which is totally disabling and terminal, and I live on approximately $800/month. Being homebound, I splurge on internet access and a Times subscription, although I usually cannot afford to eat the last week of the month. I became a subscriber after the Times paid me $300 to participate in several focus groups last year, as someone who has be a loyal reader for 40 plus years. I had previously been one of the many readers "left behind" when the paywall was adopted. I used the money to purchase a subscription.

I'm delighted to see all the high end coverage of things that bear zero relevance to my life, because I know the advertising so accrued is what lowers the subscription rate so that people like me can afford access. I'm thrilled you can finance the investigative reporting that would not otherwise be possible. I worked in health care all my life and our wealthy patients were essential to paying adequate fees to compensate for the unreimbursed care, and poorly paid services we provide on a regular basis. Many businesses use this model to provide a sliding scale to those who cannot afford full price.

When I see the mansions and luxury goods I know you are not publishing those articles for people like me. You are going out there and doing years of painstaking, dangerous, challenging, groundbreaking journalism for me. That, my friends, is exactly how I like it!

iatee, Sunday, 9 November 2014 16:41 (2 weeks ago) Permalink

that one has to be a joke, right

iatee, Sunday, 9 November 2014 16:41 (2 weeks ago) Permalink

Οὖτις Δαυ & τηε Κνιγητσ (Phil D.), Sunday, 9 November 2014 17:21 (2 weeks ago) Permalink

I asked the executive editor, Dean Baquet, whom he has in mind when he directs coverage and priorities.

“I think of The Times reader as very well-educated, worldly and likely affluent,” he said. “But I think we have as many college professors as Wall Street bankers.”

TracerHandVEVO (Tracer Hand), Sunday, 9 November 2014 19:31 (2 weeks ago) Permalink

we got both kinds

TracerHandVEVO (Tracer Hand), Sunday, 9 November 2014 19:31 (2 weeks ago) Permalink

rich AND well-off

TracerHandVEVO (Tracer Hand), Sunday, 9 November 2014 19:31 (2 weeks ago) Permalink

My thoughts exactly.

Orson Wellies (in orbit), Sunday, 9 November 2014 19:43 (2 weeks ago) Permalink

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/15/nyregion/conflicts-in-new-york-city-parks-as-homeless-population-rises.html

two things:

1. you couldn't interview more than one homeless person for this story?
2. unless you're on your own property (or in a dog run), it's never, ever cool to unleash your dogs. that's something that pisses me off beyond belief.

RAP GAME SHANI DAVIS (Raymond Cummings), Wednesday, 19 November 2014 02:17 (1 week ago) Permalink

Other areas are still grappling with large clusters of homeless people, which can sometimes lead to clashes. One morning this fall, Cheryl Pientka was walking her cairn terrier, Sasha, in Fort Greene Park in Brooklyn. While she almost never lets her dog off the leash, on this day she did, near a group of homeless people who had taken to sleeping under the trees between the tennis courts and DeKalb Avenue.

“She went over and started sniffing a man who was lying on the ground, and he jumped up and started swearing,” said Ms. Pientka, a literary agent, who recalled that the man threatened sexual assault. “He was over six feet tall and 200 pounds. It was totally unacceptable.”

calstars, Wednesday, 19 November 2014 03:00 (1 week ago) Permalink

Just happened to let her dog off the leash near where some vagrants were reposing

my jaw left (Hurting 2), Wednesday, 19 November 2014 03:08 (1 week ago) Permalink

today someone let their leashed dog come up and sniff me while I was waiting for the bus. I recoiled, and they walked away silently mocking my recoiling. In conclusion, dog people are entitled fucking shits.

Geoffrey Splenda, the first Baron Splenda (silby), Wednesday, 19 November 2014 03:41 (1 week ago) Permalink

Pretty ugly article but the readers pick comments are very good, hearteningly so

my jaw left (Hurting 2), Wednesday, 19 November 2014 03:44 (1 week ago) Permalink

Guess it's not just profs and bankers reading after all

my jaw left (Hurting 2), Wednesday, 19 November 2014 03:46 (1 week ago) Permalink

that reminds me, getting cold out, time to make some donations

Geoffrey Splenda, the first Baron Splenda (silby), Wednesday, 19 November 2014 03:46 (1 week ago) Permalink


You must be logged in to post. Please either login here, or if you are not registered, you may register here.