quiddities and agonies of the ruling class - a rolling new york times thread

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little orphan annie back there

ultra-generic sub-noize persona (Matt P), Thursday, 14 May 2009 23:05 (7 years ago) Permalink

^yea srsly i didnt even notice that at first

johnny crunch, Thursday, 14 May 2009 23:05 (7 years ago) Permalink

guys do you realize what this means? the economic crisis is even affecting rich people! this means it is really newsworthy!! it's like when straight people started getting hiv!!!

Tracer Hand, Thursday, 14 May 2009 23:35 (7 years ago) Permalink

what's a quiddity?

Philip Nunez, Thursday, 14 May 2009 23:36 (7 years ago) Permalink

think of the barefoot girls laying on dogs on the porches of brick homes in silver spring, md. x-post

ultra-generic sub-noize persona (Matt P), Thursday, 14 May 2009 23:36 (7 years ago) Permalink

“I feel as if I am finally at home,” she exclaimed as soon as we moved into the house. She could settle down and do the things she had always been best at: making a new home, nurturing her children and loving me.

Tracer Hand, Thursday, 14 May 2009 23:38 (7 years ago) Permalink

But eventually:

The frosted-crystal shade on a beloved Italian floor lamp was cracked. The dog had gnawed the leg on her Biedermeier chair.

Tracer Hand, Thursday, 14 May 2009 23:44 (7 years ago) Permalink

The Khaki Class

man, i love collages (J0rdan S.), Thursday, 14 May 2009 23:44 (7 years ago) Permalink

Thread of ;_;

Dom P's Rusty Nuts (Noodle Vague), Thursday, 14 May 2009 23:46 (7 years ago) Permalink

I can't really join in on any rich-people schadenfreude here, because it sounds to me like this guy is not of some far-distant social class, and the $4k alimony/child-support + take-home of $2.75k equation actually does sound pretty rough to me -- what's weird about it is to read the contention that this felt like a natural situation to wind up falling into; I suppose at that age and social situation it might, but of the many people I know who take home around that much money a month, I can surely tell you that not that many of them expect homes on it, and I'm not even just talking about the ones in New York.

nabisco, Thursday, 14 May 2009 23:52 (7 years ago) Permalink

I mean, judging by that equation we might estimate an income in the general neighborhood of $100k a year, which is certainly pleasant but not some sort of distant class of wealth and privilege whose travails I might comfortably laugh at.

nabisco, Thursday, 14 May 2009 23:54 (7 years ago) Permalink

On one hand -- ugh, fuck this guy.

On the other hand, I have to give him credit for a little reality check. I just paid off the last of my credit card debt and I have a fixed rate mortgage, so I need to quit waking up at 4 a.m. and worrying about money.

On the 3rd hand, nice work of him to pull his story together and sell it to W.W. Norton.

resistance is feudal (WmC), Thursday, 14 May 2009 23:56 (7 years ago) Permalink

you've got three hands? surely you can swing a book deal out of that.

macaulay culkin's bukkake shocker (bug), Friday, 15 May 2009 00:04 (7 years ago) Permalink

it's true, nabisco - he never really was that rich, especially by the standards of the new york times - but he sure lives and writes like he is. which is of course where the trouble started. getting a monthly keelhaul from the ex didn't help, either - i wonder if he writes about that in his book? - but i think this man's most basic problem was imagining that a take-home of $2500 monthly was enough to buy a half-mil pile. it's enough to make a casual reader think that the financial crisis really is a result of damn fools like him. in any case, this thread isn't for schadenfreude per se - but don't let that stop you - it's a record of what kinds of voices the new york times tends to lean on.

Tracer Hand, Friday, 15 May 2009 00:44 (7 years ago) Permalink

i'm struck by his weaselly evasion of responsibility - despite the mea culpa undertones, he makes his wonderful new lady friend sound like a spendthrift bitch and says that his total lack of financial awareness was a symptom of the "same infection" that brought low the titans of industry. fat chance, ed.

Tracer Hand, Friday, 15 May 2009 00:47 (7 years ago) Permalink

i think this man's most basic problem was imagining that a take-home of $2500 monthly was enough to buy a half-mil pile

not enough OTM in the world for this

butt-rock miyagi (rogermexico.), Friday, 15 May 2009 01:22 (7 years ago) Permalink

loooool @ tracer hand: voice of the underclass

(Palm) springs sprungs (Lamp), Friday, 15 May 2009 01:26 (7 years ago) Permalink

I had assumed we would start by renting a house or an apartment, but it quickly became clear that it was almost easier to borrow a half-million dollars and buy something.

languid samuel l. jackson (jim), Friday, 15 May 2009 01:28 (7 years ago) Permalink

n.e.way: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/05/14/garden/14aaron.html

ny times does seem to have a thing for pictures of the sprawled daughters of the leisure class in front of their itlianate mansions

(Palm) springs sprungs (Lamp), Friday, 15 May 2009 01:29 (7 years ago) Permalink

sorry Lamp i missed the part where you had a point

Tracer Hand, Friday, 15 May 2009 09:16 (7 years ago) Permalink

my takeaway from this article is that our "elite" journos are often just as ignorant and greedy as the rest of us humps -- not to mention that i feel a bit smug seeing how shitty the media's coverage of the whole real estate/subprime mess was.

Pull Slinky and Make Me Fart (Eisbaer), Friday, 15 May 2009 14:40 (7 years ago) Permalink

The Khaki Class

lol South

"the whale saw her" (gabbneb), Friday, 15 May 2009 14:45 (7 years ago) Permalink

i don't know crap about this guy, nor do i care, BUT

when i was 22 i dated this very cute but not-very-smart guy. it was long distance, so we wrote a lot of letters (this was in the lol 90s). in one letter he told me that being with me made him feel "quidity". i smugly laughed a little because i figured that he meant "tranquility" and wow was this guy adorable for not being able to use a dictionary. then i looked up the word "quidity" and realized that it was real (although not what he meant, i am 100% sure)

this thread is the first time i have ever actually seen anyone use this word. the end.

figgy pudding (La Lechera), Friday, 15 May 2009 14:46 (7 years ago) Permalink

maybe he was like "wow she thinks my made-up word means something.. what a dim-bulb"

Tracer Hand, Friday, 15 May 2009 15:08 (7 years ago) Permalink

what do you think he actually meant?

Tracer Hand, Friday, 15 May 2009 15:09 (7 years ago) Permalink

pretty sure he meant tranquility, like comfort (i remember this from context, but really this was a long time ago and i can't remember much about the situation aside from this strange misused word)

figgy pudding (La Lechera), Friday, 15 May 2009 15:14 (7 years ago) Permalink

Megan McArdle on the piece. Judge for yourself.

Ned Raggett, Friday, 15 May 2009 16:19 (7 years ago) Permalink

Actually I kind of like her points?

But not someone who should be dead anyway (Laurel), Friday, 15 May 2009 16:28 (7 years ago) Permalink

ya i mean... not really sure why this piece is as contempt-worthy as some are making it out to be. it's kind of brutally depressing.

s1ocki, Friday, 15 May 2009 16:29 (7 years ago) Permalink

It is in a 'there-but-for' sense for sure. Not that I was ever going to try and be an economics reporter for the NY Times, but as time has passed I'm beginning to think the soundest piece of advice I've ever received in regard to writing was something J. D. Considine told me years ago -- 1993 or so -- in response to a random e-mail or two I sent him. He pretty much said, "Freelancing and journalism is very hard work and you should only pursue it on a full-time basis if you are willing to stick to that level." I'm honestly glad I heeded that and I think what you see in both pieces, regardless of whatever else feeds into their respective situations, reflects that.

At the same time, I'm trying to put my finger on what still jars about McArdle's response and it seems to be this sense of keeping up with the Joneses as paramount driving factor/potential excuse. At what point is leisure travelling to Europe, for instance, a 'minimum necessity' -- and I speak as one who's been there a number of times now. Still, I realize it's a sliding scale, says the person who has participated in a CSA thing with a local farmer for some years now.

Ned Raggett, Friday, 15 May 2009 16:37 (7 years ago) Permalink

Literal translation: quiddity = whatness

anatol_merklich, Friday, 15 May 2009 16:43 (7 years ago) Permalink

Ned, I read her response as being more about the foolhardiness of ever thinking ANY of those things are necessities. She seems to be (gently) chiding that whole tendency?

But not someone who should be dead anyway (Laurel), Friday, 15 May 2009 16:50 (7 years ago) Permalink

Yah... she's just sayin' that you hang with people for whom this is true, you wake up with fleas

butt-rock miyagi (rogermexico.), Friday, 15 May 2009 17:17 (7 years ago) Permalink

I think maybe something to add to McArdle's response is that we have this general cultural tendency to view attention as somehow related to money, a connection that really falls apart when it comes to writers of all sorts -- it's very easy to withhold sympathy from people writing about their woes in public, as if they're coming from a position of privilege or just courting attention, but in plenty of cases they don't have much concrete privilege and writing about their experiences is just, you know, work.

he never really was that rich, especially by the standards of the new york times - but he sure lives and writes like he is. which is of course where the trouble started. getting a monthly keelhaul from the ex didn't help, either - i wonder if he writes about that in his book? - but i think this man's most basic problem was imagining that a take-home of $2500 monthly was enough to buy a half-mil pile.

Yeah, exactly -- although if I had to summarize a problem here it would basically be that a middle-aged family-man homeowner with a decent salary expected to continue living like a middle-aged family-man homeowner with a decent salary, even after a divorce that meant the bulk of his income was going to support a family home occupied by other people. This is an unrealistic and dumb expectation to seriously act on -- you'd think that $4k would be a good monthly reminder that situations done changed -- but I can totally have sympathy for the situation itself; that would suck. It would be painful to have to support the family home you used to live in and have to support yourself and your new family on a fraction of what you're earning.

nabisco, Friday, 15 May 2009 17:47 (7 years ago) Permalink

The other thing is that -- while he can't and doesn't come out and say this directly -- his one list of charges makes me suspect a bunch of money was getting borrowed to maintain a certain lifestyle for the kids

nabisco, Friday, 15 May 2009 18:00 (7 years ago) Permalink

I thought he said that very directly just by listing all those expenses! (I note though that he does seem to say even more directly that his wife did that too.)

Ned Raggett, Friday, 15 May 2009 18:02 (7 years ago) Permalink

Haha yeah, I guess the unsayable "direct" thing I had in mind was like "these KIDS were bankrupting us (that's right, Alex, I'm talking about you)"

I was going to jump past boggling at the beach house rental and wonder about the $700 at J. Crew, but I guess if you needed, like, one good suit and some decent sweaters for Christmas presents ... the world really does hold you to your socio-economic status, doesn't it -- even beyond nobody wanting to be the guy who gets divorced and suddenly has to start showing up to work in cheap suits, it'd be tough to be the guy making $100k who's like "I got you a candy bar for Christmas!"

nabisco, Friday, 15 May 2009 18:22 (7 years ago) Permalink

yeah the erm narrative here is anyways at least partly "but banking professionals who should be my Friends and Advisors assured us it would be alright!"?

However fishy such blanket blame is in general, I'm not sure it's entirely misplaced re how things rolled out this cycle. At one point around 2006, I momentarily had a crazy amount of money in my account due to family property reorg stuff, and was by phone promptly invited to an "advisement meeting" with a dude at my bank, who tried to convince me he had the correct %ages I should place my assets in (all mediated by said bank, obv). (I still was in net debt though!) I was all very cynical and noncommittal, which is not due to my deep insight or anything, just because my current boss worked in a bank in the early 00s and has spilled much shit on how those outfits operate(d?). (My fave morsel: the guys who construct the deals don't actually inform the salespeople abt all potential downsides and builtin fees, as this may hurt their sales!)

I don't think this guy deserves much point-and-laugh, btw, though it is obv somewhat funny he writes on economics.

anatol_merklich, Friday, 15 May 2009 18:55 (7 years ago) Permalink

I don't know that that's a big surface narrative, given the "I wasn't duped" and the bit about how a banking professional's refinancing maneuvers actually worked to carve down some debt

nabisco, Friday, 15 May 2009 19:00 (7 years ago) Permalink

it's about even someone who should have known better made some really dumb mistakes, which is always a story worth telling imo

s1ocki, Friday, 15 May 2009 19:11 (7 years ago) Permalink

Literal translation: quiddity = whatness

A weird thing about "quiddity" is that the first definition, "essence", seems to be the opposite of the second definition, "a trifling point". So it can either refer to the essence of something or a minor, trifling detail? Confusing. I have a feeling that it's a word that's rarely used correctly.

o. nate, Friday, 15 May 2009 19:13 (7 years ago) Permalink

my point is that there are hundreds of thousands of people with stories just like this who don't write for the new york times and have six-figure salaries who are perhaps just a leeetle more representative of the mortgage fallout going on right now - my pointing and laughing is at the editors, not this poor schmuck

Tracer Hand, Friday, 15 May 2009 19:17 (7 years ago) Permalink

well, they wanted a personal, first-perosn story, so going with a new york times writer... kinda makes sense, no?

s1ocki, Friday, 15 May 2009 19:19 (7 years ago) Permalink

he will die at some point

cool app (uh oh I'm having a fantasy), Friday, 15 May 2009 19:22 (7 years ago) Permalink

can't write about that tho

cool app (uh oh I'm having a fantasy), Friday, 15 May 2009 19:22 (7 years ago) Permalink

That's a fair point, Tracer, but the fact that the Times can be willfully class-blind is hardly news to anyone who's ever read the Style section, for instance.

o. nate, Friday, 15 May 2009 19:22 (7 years ago) Permalink

what is sadder loss or death

cool app (uh oh I'm having a fantasy), Friday, 15 May 2009 19:23 (7 years ago) Permalink

conceptually, I mean

cool app (uh oh I'm having a fantasy), Friday, 15 May 2009 19:23 (7 years ago) Permalink

loss is a kind of death, when u think about it??

rip dom passantino 3/5/09 never forget (max), Friday, 15 May 2009 19:24 (7 years ago) Permalink

imagine in that picture that the dog is dead but the money is lost

cool app (uh oh I'm having a fantasy), Friday, 15 May 2009 19:25 (7 years ago) Permalink

Cashew cheese is pretty good.

carl agatha, Friday, 2 October 2015 01:05 (9 months ago) Permalink

:/

Jeff, Friday, 2 October 2015 01:11 (9 months ago) Permalink

:/

Flamenco Drop (VegemiteGrrl), Friday, 2 October 2015 02:05 (9 months ago) Permalink

¯\_(ツ)_/¯

carl agatha, Friday, 2 October 2015 02:57 (9 months ago) Permalink

1 month passes...

A blast from the past, and a perhaps a different angle on the meritocracy quiddities

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/01/20/us/politics/20generation.html

Eleanor Celeste, at 26 if we believe the NYT, is now a "Policy Analyst for Medical and Forensic Sciences at The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy"

https://www.linkedin.com/pub/eleanor-celeste/21/10b/471

I am certain that no other qualified candidates were available, since medical and forensic sciences have only existed for about a decade or two.

El Tomboto, Wednesday, 4 November 2015 01:44 (8 months ago) Permalink

We need an update on how the Celeste family feels about Bernie Sanders.

Kiarostami bag (milo z), Wednesday, 4 November 2015 01:47 (8 months ago) Permalink

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2015/11/04/travel/new-york-city-budget-travel.html
in which the author basically proves that expensive ny is far better than non-expensive ny

a llove spat over a llama-keeper (forksclovetofu), Sunday, 8 November 2015 14:45 (8 months ago) Permalink

I'm sorry he missed out on the multiple health code-violating sushi.

Kiarostami bag (milo z), Sunday, 8 November 2015 19:21 (8 months ago) Permalink

1 month passes...

looking at a recipe for squash salad in today's time magazine I encountered this glittery gem of the ruling class. last phrase perfectly sums up effete manhattan 2015 :(

We were eating dinner at Houseman, a restaurant opened by the chef Ned Baldwin on the once-quiet far-western side of SoHo, now called Hudson Square. It is a spare, welcoming room, with walls of white brick, warm lighting, smooth wooden tables the color of Bridgehampton sand — a neighborhood restaurant for those who live amid art and commerce, who travel widely, who want to eat simply and well.

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/12/20/magazine/a-new-winter-roast.html?ref=topics&_r=0

an emotionally withholding exterminator (m coleman), Sunday, 20 December 2015 16:24 (7 months ago) Permalink

i prefer my tables to be more southampton sand colored, sry house man

INTOXICATING LIQUORS (art), Sunday, 20 December 2015 16:32 (7 months ago) Permalink

say what you will, NYT knows the audience for its restaurant feature articles.

those readers who are truly of the upper crust want to look into a flattering mirror that only reflects what they hope others will envy about them. the aspiring middle class readers yearn to imagine themselves in some dim corner of that image. finally, there are the many hate-readers. the times has got them all covered.

a little too mature to be cute (Aimless), Sunday, 20 December 2015 19:07 (7 months ago) Permalink

1 month passes...

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/20/dining/la-chine-review.html?ref=dining&_r=0

But at the risk of undermining my populist credentials, I’d suggest New York could use more Chinese restaurants that are as expensive as our most ambitious French and Italian places.

no worries Pete, your populist credentials are non existent. to be fair he calls for better quality ingredients and more "creativity" from chefs and yeah there is a longstanding NYC assumption that Chinese food should be cheap. but for my money (pun intended) he doesn't bother to document many expensive ingredients (save for lamb loin) here and the creativity seems limited to some Japanese style raw fish starters which, as every other restaurant critic has been saying for 10 years, are a cliche. I love reading about restaurants especially places I can't afford or would never go to but the Times coverage in this area grows more and more effete, exclusive, and (buzz word alert) entitled. This sentence is telling: paying a lot is now "one of the pleasures" of dining out.

an emotionally withholding exterminator (m coleman), Wednesday, 20 January 2016 15:36 (6 months ago) Permalink

"one of the pleasures" is not a quote from the review, BTW, it's a critical trope I read now in all kinds of reviews

an emotionally withholding exterminator (m coleman), Wednesday, 20 January 2016 15:39 (6 months ago) Permalink

one of the pains of reading a lot is you notice lazy writing

an emotionally withholding exterminator (m coleman), Wednesday, 20 January 2016 15:41 (6 months ago) Permalink

spent some time yesterday reading some of the 1000+ comments about his Per Se downgrade. i don't know why i did that.

scott seward, Wednesday, 20 January 2016 15:43 (6 months ago) Permalink

The lady had dropped her napkin.

More accurately, she had hurled it to the floor in a fit of disillusionment, her small protest against the slow creep of mediocrity and missed cues during a four-hour dinner at Per Se that would cost the four of us close to $3,000. Some time later, a passing server picked up the napkin without pausing to see whose lap it was missing from, neatly embodying the oblivious sleepwalking that had pushed my guest to this point.

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/13/dining/pete-wells-per-se-review.html?ref=dining&_r=0

scott seward, Wednesday, 20 January 2016 15:45 (6 months ago) Permalink

oh yeah, I did the same thing. Thought about that review and specifically the napkin anecdote while posting the above. I mean, taking down Per Se is a public service of sorts and for $325 + a pop diners should be treated like royalty but that whole thing with the lady's napkin and the prissy way it's written kinda turned my stomach and made me think fuck all y'all.

an emotionally withholding exterminator (m coleman), Wednesday, 20 January 2016 15:49 (6 months ago) Permalink

I mostly enjoy Pete Wells reviews, but yeah it's ridiculous when he pretends to champion the common man's interests while dining at Thomas Keller restaurants.

on entre O.K. on sort K.O. (man alive), Wednesday, 20 January 2016 15:53 (6 months ago) Permalink

Of course it's kind of the weird position of an NYTimes food critic to be (I imagine) just below the line of rich enough to eat in places like that with any regularity, yet to have the expectations of a person who could.

on entre O.K. on sort K.O. (man alive), Wednesday, 20 January 2016 15:58 (6 months ago) Permalink

how dare they allow that napkin to run free

from the perspective of a gay man, i will post them now (forksclovetofu), Wednesday, 20 January 2016 16:13 (6 months ago) Permalink

Also I get the impression that truly rich people don't take on that kind of hyper-consciousness when they eat in places like that, it's just another fucking dinner to them.

on entre O.K. on sort K.O. (man alive), Wednesday, 20 January 2016 16:19 (6 months ago) Permalink

i'm also guessing that most real rich people are treated like friggin' gold when they go to those places.

scott seward, Wednesday, 20 January 2016 16:33 (6 months ago) Permalink

i've waited tables in two star restaurants, there's a degree of entitlement you've never imagined but it's just as often shrugged off as unnecessary

from the perspective of a gay man, i will post them now (forksclovetofu), Wednesday, 20 January 2016 17:10 (6 months ago) Permalink

4 weeks pass...

lol I accidentally "kudos"ed that and I can't un"kudos" it

on entre O.K. on sort K.O. (man alive), Thursday, 18 February 2016 17:17 (5 months ago) Permalink

LOL

[1] I want to apologize for using the term riff raff. It was insensitive and counterproductive.

Hadrian VIII, Friday, 19 February 2016 13:05 (5 months ago) Permalink

Hovering your cursor over the "Kudos" icon kudoses it? That seems like an abuse of internet convention.

jmm, Friday, 19 February 2016 13:49 (5 months ago) Permalink

I shouldn’t have to see the pain, struggle, and despair of homeless people to and from my way to work every day.

quid/ag the sentence

art, Friday, 19 February 2016 14:11 (5 months ago) Permalink

http://www.businessinsider.com/im-a-self-made-millionaire-and-im-convinced-there-are-only-5-ways-to-get-rich-2016-2
This is straight trolling but of particular shame worthiness

4. Only do wealthy activities
The number one wealth killer is when a person of promise hangs out in places of poverty. Many times, people put themselves in poor places, which surrounds them with poor people. Get away from poor places if you want to avoid poor people. Dwelling along with poor people in poor places will never make you rich.
When I was a teenager, I used to play basketball with negative people in negative places. I constantly witnessed smoking, cursing, and other disrespectful behaviors every moment of the game. Even though I didn't partake in their antics, I was still a product of my environment, which deeply affected my general performance in life.
Many people tolerate negative conditions like this. They don't realize how much the subtle influence of gossip, violence, and drama impacts them. Moreover, if you're not on prosperity, you're in poverty. Find out how you can partake in wealthy activities. For me, instead of playing basketball, I started visiting luxury homes and car dealerships. It changed my life.

ulysses, Wednesday, 24 February 2016 16:19 (5 months ago) Permalink

somebody really likes Trading Places

erry red flag (f. hazel), Wednesday, 24 February 2016 16:37 (5 months ago) Permalink

Hmmm....yes, I could play basketball....or I could VISIT LUXURY HOMES!

Hadrian VIII, Thursday, 25 February 2016 11:23 (5 months ago) Permalink

3 weeks pass...

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/03/20/fashion/millennials-mic-workplace.html

meet the new boss, same as the old boss

Mr. Altchek recalled a companywide meeting last September that coincided with the religious holidays Yom Kippur and Eid al-Adha. An Anglo-Pakistani employee asked why management had announced a flexible time off policy for the Jewish holiday, but not for its Muslim counterpart.

“So I told her, ‘Great point, being inclusive and respectful of all religious affiliations is incredibly important to Mic,’” Mr. Altchek said.

Afterward, in front of a smaller group, he was approached by a younger, entry-level employee who said that there were two words missing from his reply. “I was a bit confused and said, ‘O.K., what were those?’” he recalled. “And she said: ‘I’m sorry. I didn’t hear an apology.’”

Mr. Altchek did not think such a comment belonged in a workplace, especially his.

“I was a little taken aback by the tone, but I told her I would address it and make sure the person who asked the question wasn’t offended by the answer,” he said. “You have to control your temper. It was in front of a bunch of people, which was probably better, because I was forced to be calm.”

That employee is no longer with the company. (Mr. Altchek said she was let go for “performance-related issues.”)

meet the new employee, same as the old employee

“People are here from morning to night, and we don’t want to leave,” said Elizabeth Plank, 28, a high-energy reporter who lives in the East Village and hosted a video series called “Flip the Script,” which seeks to challenge assumptions like, “What Happens When a Lady ‘Manspreads.’”

Ms. Plank contrasted her freedoms at Mic to her previous job at a feminist nonprofit organization, which she regarded as exemplifying the outdated work practices of older people.

“We called people on phones and we — I don’t know — we faxed people,” Ms. Plank said, sounding exasperated. “And we had to mail things. And no one really took my opinion into consideration.”

At Mic, she was able to dabble in different jobs and negotiate grandiose titles like “executive social editor.” Often, she prefers the theater of tweeting back and forth with the editor she sits next to rather than speaking face to face.

“If you can be young at heart, I think it makes your personal, and not only your work life, better,” added Ms. Plank, who left for Vox last month after two and a half years at Mic.

ulysses, Sunday, 20 March 2016 23:01 (4 months ago) Permalink

the graf directly following ulysses' first quoted section has the reporter saying "A sense of entitlement is not the only stereotype attached to millennials in the workplace." lol so asking for an apology for religious discrimination is 'entitlement', in the opinion of this reporter? ceo fella actually sounds p reasonable about it

illegal economic migration (Tracer Hand), Sunday, 20 March 2016 23:31 (4 months ago) Permalink

that article is horrible, it's like two anecdotes surrounded with random fluffy assertions that seem either obviously dumb and wrong or pointless and unprovable.

intheblanks, Monday, 21 March 2016 00:03 (4 months ago) Permalink

yep

ulysses, Monday, 21 March 2016 06:28 (4 months ago) Permalink

“We called people on phones and we — I don’t know — we faxed people,” Ms. Plank said, sounding exasperated. “And we had to mail things. And no one really took my opinion into consideration.”

ulysses, Monday, 21 March 2016 06:30 (4 months ago) Permalink

the "young at heart" quote is worse, at least the "we faxed people" one makes sense. Either way, both smack of cherry-picking quotes to make someone look like an idiot. Which is fair game, I guess.

intheblanks, Monday, 21 March 2016 22:52 (4 months ago) Permalink

http://fusion.net/story/283080/nyt-millennial-trend-story/

ulysses, Wednesday, 23 March 2016 21:20 (4 months ago) Permalink

2 weeks pass...
3 weeks pass...

(maybe one for the gentrification thread, but it's NYT specific, so...)

sisterhood of the baggering vance (Doctor Casino), Tuesday, 3 May 2016 23:15 (2 months ago) Permalink

I read that link at first as "WHY nyt real estate stories..." and was intrigued.

Life is a series of disappointments.

bothan zulu (El Tomboto), Wednesday, 4 May 2016 03:04 (2 months ago) Permalink

2 weeks pass...
2 months pass...

a rare edition of "the hunt" that feels like what hunting for an apartment in new york feels like for most people
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/07/24/realestate/a-bed-stuy-apartment-well-known-terrain.html

thrusted pelvis-first back (ulysses), Friday, 22 July 2016 15:05 (1 week ago) Permalink


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