assault the well defended: Pink Floyd's "The Dark Side of the Moon"

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I hate that "Money" has a 7/4 time signature. Sure, it's very original. It also sounds fucking horrible.

daavid (daavid), Thursday, 16 June 2005 02:27 (9 years ago) Permalink

(it's in my top 5 and i think it's virtually unassailable, but that's my final comment)

PB, Thursday, 16 June 2005 02:29 (9 years ago) Permalink

I'm glad TDSOM didn't make it to the ILM Top 100 list (probably the only time it's been left out of any list).

daavid (daavid), Thursday, 16 June 2005 02:32 (9 years ago) Permalink

I don't hate Pink Floyd really. I hate the legions of angst-ridden high school boys who regard Pink Floyd as the greatest band that ever existed (although they can give no real reason for that opinion).

I think you have to look at the album (and the band as a whole) in context--I mean, sure tons of bands replicate that sound or were influenced by them to a large extent--but when you remember that they were the first people to do it, they deserve a little more credit. Many, many landmark albums meant a lot more when they first came out--Joy Division and the Pixies were pioneering, but after legions of bands have replicated that sound we'll never experience Closer or Surfer Rosa with the same awe again. I would (hesitantly) go so far as to put TDSOM in that grouping.

Jessie the Monster (scarymonsterrr), Thursday, 16 June 2005 02:41 (9 years ago) Permalink

Totally. It was a huge leap from Meddle.

Tim Ellison (Tim Ellison), Thursday, 16 June 2005 02:45 (9 years ago) Permalink

I thought there was a actually a pretty good amount of PF hate/dislike on ILM.

I think TDSOM is great, but I think it'll be a long time before I ever want to hear it again.

Lingbertt, Thursday, 16 June 2005 02:52 (9 years ago) Permalink

the album where pink floyd perfected the boring crap-plod they had been honing for several years. their first truly awful album.

"it's a great record to fuck to," if you're a necrophiliac on heavy doses of thorazine.

el sabor de gene (yournullfame), Thursday, 16 June 2005 02:59 (9 years ago) Permalink

this album's pretty great, i can't tell if i don't care for 'money' just cuz of radio beating it to death but the rest is classic.

j blount (papa la bas), Thursday, 16 June 2005 03:01 (9 years ago) Permalink

money would sound pretty good in 4/4 though

kyle (akmonday), Thursday, 16 June 2005 03:07 (9 years ago) Permalink

Jessie Monster totally OTM. At the time it came out (fun fact: I was at the Los Angeles album premiere at the Griffith Observatory in 1973) there was nothing else even close to it. I can't remember the last time I listened to it all the way through - I think it was around when the "Making Of..." DVD was released. Still have "Us And Them" on the iPod.

On the other hand, the downside to much of post-Meddle Pink Floyd is that the songs are generally more interesting when they were still kicking them around on stage before going in to "properly" record them. Everyone owes it to themselves to track down a 1972 bootleg of DSOTM when it was still called "Eclipse." Radically different in places and occasionally more interesting.

Elvis Telecom (Chris Barrus), Thursday, 16 June 2005 03:44 (9 years ago) Permalink

just listened to this earlier tonight. the backup singer(s?) on "time"/"great gig in the sky" nearly ruin my enjoyment of the entire album. so distracting and completely unnecessary.

john'n'chicago, Thursday, 16 June 2005 03:50 (9 years ago) Permalink

God I was in a bar about 3 weeks ago and they just had the stereo on the random classic rock station, and "Time" came on, and it sounded so amazing. Especially after not having heard it for at least two or three years, I think. It's really a great album, no problem at all, as good as Meddle, not faultless, still good tho, great if you're in the mood, etc.

Stormy Davis (diamond), Thursday, 16 June 2005 03:52 (9 years ago) Permalink

that "Breath in the Air" melody, which resurfaces at the end of "Time", is really sweet.

Stormy Davis (diamond), Thursday, 16 June 2005 03:52 (9 years ago) Permalink

I hated this album for so long but I finally started to warm to it. I think I would have liked it sooner if it were considered some lost downer rock classic created by burnt out depressives rather than some kind of widely celebrated classic rock touchstone.

walter kranz (walterkranz), Thursday, 16 June 2005 04:10 (9 years ago) Permalink

"Many, many landmark albums meant a lot more when they first came out--Joy Division and the Pixies were pioneering, but after legions of bands have replicated that sound we'll never experience Closer or Surfer Rosa with the same awe again."

I lived through the post-pixies (and post-joy division) aftermath before I heard either band or record. when I was 15 I got a copy of Surfer Rosa and it blew my mind. A little of the power may have been gone (I was more impressed with the amazing rhythms and sounds they were making, I didnt even notice the supposedly groundbreaking quiet-loud dynamic structure everyone says nirvana and everyone else ripped off), but it still tore my mind apart and was instantly added to the classics list ( to a lesser degree, joy division too).

Dark Side Of The Moon is really just a totally boring record. It's middle school insence-burning music. You listen to it before you discover dub or punk rock or even led zeppelin.

Although, it may have actually been an interesting piece of music if Waters had had his way and made the most dry sounding record possible. it would have been pretty insane sounding, but since gilmour got it all wet it just sounds like some adult contemporary bullshit.

tonyD (noiseyrock), Thursday, 16 June 2005 04:46 (9 years ago) Permalink

You guys are missing out on the assault here. I spent a good number of years loving DSOTM and latter-day Pink Floyd way too much, so I'm glad to throw out some ammo here.

The psuedo-jazz affectations of the saxophone. Being another mainstream band that thought adding black female vocalists makes things more soulful (I'm not sure of who sings on record, but I know they were guilty of this later). AOR affectations that clip off meandering songs before they develop and make possible singles weaker because they only really fit in the scope of the album. Songs about time and money that make amazing observations.

mike h. (mike h.), Thursday, 16 June 2005 04:47 (9 years ago) Permalink

Then there's this. (Which I listen to much more often.)

Ned Raggett (Ned), Thursday, 16 June 2005 04:52 (9 years ago) Permalink

i can't decide who's more annoying. the legions of fratboys who praise the dsotm/wiz of oz mashup, the suburban loners who extract life-changing existentialist beliefs from dsotm, or the post-lydon second-rate indie douchebags who debunk all that isn't diy or ironic or part of _their_ canon.

it's a pretty good album. a tad ridiculous in parts, but contrary to popular belief, the floyd were only beginning to shove sticks up their arses when they recorded it. any post-wywh hate is justified, with exceptions. now bugger off.

you will be shot (you will be shot), Thursday, 16 June 2005 04:57 (9 years ago) Permalink

once again, i repeat: roger waters is a poor man's frank zappa. more so on most non-DSOTM records, but even here it's apparent to MY ears.

i guess that i was one of those "suburban loners" mentioned above -- went so far as to get one of those pretentious "gold CDs" of this (to show off my CD player and my alleged conossieur-ness), so i once loved it. i don't feel any need to listen to it these days, but i suspect that i'd still like it a lot if i listened to it.

p.s.: joy division STILL knocks my socks off (the pixies never knocked my socks off, but i still liked 'em fine).

Eisbär (llamasfur), Thursday, 16 June 2005 05:14 (9 years ago) Permalink

In my collection for the last 32 years, have probably played it about three times in the last 30 years, but I never got rid of it. No great feelings about it one way or the other, unlike WYWH, Animals and even The Wall, all of which I did get into fairly seriously at their respective times. I thought it a nice gesture that Syd gets a cut of the DSOTM and WYWH royalties.

Marcello Carlin (nostudium), Thursday, 16 June 2005 06:36 (9 years ago) Permalink

Elvis T, you don't happen to have that DSOTM live set on slsk, do you?

Lingbertt, Thursday, 16 June 2005 07:27 (9 years ago) Permalink

Bought when it came out, listened to it usually through headphones. But radio overkill/overexposure on this and subsequent Pink Floyd albums ruined the group for me. Even before punk broke I was beginning to find them cold & repellent. Today DSOTM holds interest mainly as a historical footnote: the use of tape, overdubs, sound effects etc weirdly prefigures the rise of sampling in rap/R&B.

m coleman (lovebug starski), Thursday, 16 June 2005 09:10 (9 years ago) Permalink

It's not terrible, it's very pleasant, easy on the ears etc. A bit like Dire Straits perhaps?

Dadaismus (Dada), Thursday, 16 June 2005 09:14 (9 years ago) Permalink

The Coldplay of the '70s!

Marcello Carlin (nostudium), Thursday, 16 June 2005 09:26 (9 years ago) Permalink

I suppose it's more like Radiohead but with better vocals

Dadaismus (Dada), Thursday, 16 June 2005 09:29 (9 years ago) Permalink

I'll drink to that. Lately I've been hearing Coldplay as the 21st Century's Supertramp.

m coleman (lovebug starski), Thursday, 16 June 2005 09:33 (9 years ago) Permalink

Or Barclay James Harvest?

Dadaismus (Dada), Thursday, 16 June 2005 09:34 (9 years ago) Permalink

X, Y And Z is certainly the Be Here Now of the 21st century...

Marcello Carlin (nostudium), Thursday, 16 June 2005 09:41 (9 years ago) Permalink

Here's a quote on DSOTM from http://www.popjustice.co.uk:

"If you listen to 'Dark Side Of The Moon' while watching The Wizard Of Oz, you will fall asleep - and wake up gay"

OTM!!!

Neil Stewart (Neil Stewart), Thursday, 16 June 2005 10:34 (9 years ago) Permalink

I actually came onto this thread specifically to post that Popjustice article.

For this visiting this site IN THE FUTURE, here's a permalink:

http://www.popjustice.co.uk/2005/06/pink-floyd-vs-mcfly-whos-best.htm

Dom Passantino (Dom Passantino), Thursday, 16 June 2005 10:49 (9 years ago) Permalink

I suppose it's more like Radiohead but with better vocals

You are not alone.

"Lately I've been hearing Coldplay as the 21st Century's Supertramp."

Neither are you.

Stewart Osborne (Stewart Osborne), Thursday, 16 June 2005 10:52 (9 years ago) Permalink

Nice one, Dom!

(x-post)

Neil Stewart (Neil Stewart), Thursday, 16 June 2005 10:55 (9 years ago) Permalink

Dreadful, dreadful record. Handy to have almost everything I dislike about serious "ROCK" on one platter, but that's about it.

Soukesian, Thursday, 16 June 2005 15:59 (9 years ago) Permalink

It's okay, I guess, but kind of boring. Not really something I would get very excited about or bother to buy.

o. nate (onate), Thursday, 16 June 2005 16:18 (9 years ago) Permalink

There's a great story in Giles Smith's "Lost In Music" book where he describes listening to Dark Side just after it came out. He says he and some mates were in this older, cooler guy's basement, and your man had lit joss sticks, rolled a joint, turned off the lights and put the needle on side one. They listened in complete silence to side one, then, still silent, the guy got up dramatically, switched to side two, sat down again, they all listened to it again, in complete silence, and when it finished, there was five minutes of silence from the room. Then one of the guys let out a massive ripper of a fart. Classic!

musicjohn73 (musicjohn73), Thursday, 16 June 2005 16:56 (9 years ago) Permalink

No point in assaulting this. It is considered a great album for a reason.

Geir Hongro (GeirHong), Thursday, 16 June 2005 16:59 (9 years ago) Permalink

"Coldplay of the 70s" heh heh, I like that!
In that same spirit, I present the "Dark Side Of The Moon" of the '50s:

Myonga Von Bontee (Myonga Von Bontee), Thursday, 16 June 2005 17:00 (9 years ago) Permalink

Coldplay are great. Pink Floyd were great. And, yes, they had a lot in common.

Geir Hongro (GeirHong), Thursday, 16 June 2005 17:00 (9 years ago) Permalink

Dammit. Try again:

Myonga Von Bontee (Myonga Von Bontee), Thursday, 16 June 2005 17:04 (9 years ago) Permalink

I've come around to it. I like that they break out of 4/4 sometimes on this.

Sundar (sundar), Thursday, 16 June 2005 17:07 (9 years ago) Permalink

The people here seem to be so into rhythm, but really interesting rhythmic stuff, such as odd time signatures, they aren't into at all. Some people need to realize there is a world outside the dancefloor.

Geir Hongro (GeirHong), Thursday, 16 June 2005 17:11 (9 years ago) Permalink

There is no world outside the dance floor, Geir. We are all on the dance floor. You are dancing to the beat. Resistance is futile.

o. nate (onate), Thursday, 16 June 2005 17:13 (9 years ago) Permalink

Everyone knows Syd Barrett Floyd is the only Floyd that matters.

Adam Bruneau (oliver8bit), Thursday, 16 June 2005 18:16 (9 years ago) Permalink

At first, Syd was in the band, and they were great.

Then, Syd left the band, and they were still great. Only in a different way.

Geir Hongro (GeirHong), Thursday, 16 June 2005 18:25 (9 years ago) Permalink

Some people need to realize there is a world outside the dancefloor

Gier, today is the day that I write in my calendar that we agree.

(It's how this philosophy gets applied after the fact that we don't agree on...)

But Dark Side of the Moon is beyond my scope.

(Dad Rock)

PappaWheelie (PappaWheelie), Thursday, 16 June 2005 18:28 (9 years ago) Permalink

slurry of shapeless, yawnsome dreck

Wow. that's a bit harsh, no?

In any case, I don't think I can be objective about this album anymore. I used to be a huge Pink Floyd fan, and this was the first of theirs I'd layed ears on. Prior to the `Floyd, rock began and ended with Kiss for me, so Dark Side of the Moon was a real....er....ear-opener. I'd be lying if I said I played it a lot, and my freshman year of college, there was a jackass down the hall from me who literally played it EVERY DAY and soul-denting volumes, so I went out of my way not to hear it for a long time after. That said, I still think there are some truly sublime moments on it (largely thanks to Dave Gilmour's guitar).

But, I'd take Animals over it any day.

Alex in NYC (vassifer), Thursday, 16 June 2005 19:36 (9 years ago) Permalink

Also, not for nothing, but citing the Cocteau Twins as "atmospheric" is just as much of a cliche as calling Dark Side.. "atmospheric".

Alex in NYC (vassifer), Thursday, 16 June 2005 19:43 (9 years ago) Permalink

This was the first compact disc I ever owned. I still have it.

A group of us once got suckered by this guy into watching Wizard of Oz with Dark Side playing underneath it. After we made him stop the movie, a friend of mine told me that he had never heard this album before. I was surprised, but asked him what he thought of it.

He said he liked it all right, but had no idea that there was all that ambient conversation. First time he heard the laughter at the beginning, he thought that it was one of us.

Pleasant Plains /// (Pleasant Plains ///), Thursday, 16 June 2005 20:26 (9 years ago) Permalink

I was at this, why was I ever there, football camp thing the summer that damn thing came out, somewhere in the sticks, every morning I'd drink some orange juice, go fuck around in 90-degree weather, throw up the orange juice and powdered eggs I'd eaten three hours earlier, get yelled at, and then we'd all hunker down and listen to that stupid album on 8-track. So that memory alone (I decided to join band the next year) makes it a horrible experience for me. I associate it with insurance salesmen for Jesus with those elasta-band stretch white socks who were going to make Football Playin' Men of us--these coaches. Very "Dazed and Confused," only I hadn't smoked pot by then. But I kinda like those wailing chick vocals, who was that, why do I remember this since I don't own the album--Liza Strike? She was good but not as good as Merrie Clayton on the Stones tune of a few years earlier. And it freaks me out that this was considered "progress" from 1969, too, those cash registers.

Anyway, that's my story. The only Floyd I ever really liked is, of course, the first album, "Apples and Oranges" and "See Emily Play" and "Arnold Layne," and I used to enjoy those people who'd learned "Wish You Were Here" and played the song on their acoustic guitars at parties to impress people. A simpler time, and Geir, *no one* was dancing!!

edd s hurt (ddduncan), Thursday, 16 June 2005 23:36 (9 years ago) Permalink

Elvis T, you don't happen to have that DSOTM live set on slsk, do you?

It's on backup... I'll fish it out here in a couple of days - keep checking my folder.

Elvis Telecom (Chris Barrus), Thursday, 16 June 2005 23:42 (9 years ago) Permalink

Update: I've just had another incident of crossing swords with a Pink Floyd devotee. This self-same devotee pushed the idea that there was something "abnormal" about me because I owned an Eagles CD. I hated reminding him that -- according to the RIAA -- The Eagles have shifted more units than DSOTM, and that owning the compilation is actually not "abnormal" at all, but bog-standard in its common-ness. Then I stopped, because the only thing more distasteful than being forced to defend the Eagles, is being forced to defend the Eagles through Argumentum ad Populum.

Y'know, I'm almost pining for the days when I had to fend off an ICP fan. It was much more fun to bitch about the Incredible Shiteness of ICP instead of the Incredible Shiteness of Floyd. "ICP" merely sounds like the name of an evil corporation; whereas "Pink Floyd" sounds like the name of the flounciest redneck at the truckstop diner.

Lord Custos Omicron (Lord Custos Omicron), Tuesday, 21 June 2005 01:24 (9 years ago) Permalink

That's an interesting parallel Ian. I would say that Rock Bottom is similarly monochrome and dirge-like but there is a real feeling of pain and catharsis that makes it captivating. There's a definite energy to the album, even if it's a negative, mournful energy. DSOTM feels like more of an aimless depression -- the sound of a disaffected whiner just giving up. I think there's a similar parallel between Nick Drake (who I like musically but never listen to because it's such an energy drain) and early Leonard Cohen who is equally if not more depressed but brings a sort of cynical energy to the doom and gloom.

walter kranz (walterkranz), Tuesday, 21 June 2005 01:51 (9 years ago) Permalink

Okay, one last jab and I'll drop the subject...
The Cure's "Disintegration" >>> Pink Floyd's "Dark Side of the Moon"
I defy anyone to try to prove this wrong.

Lord Custos Omicron (Lord Custos Omicron), Tuesday, 21 June 2005 01:57 (9 years ago) Permalink

an acquaintance thought that the lyrics to 'prayers for rain' were actually 'president reagan' (which he highly approved of). thus, dud.

mookieproof (mookieproof), Tuesday, 21 June 2005 02:06 (9 years ago) Permalink

That's an interesting parallel Ian. I would say that Rock Bottom is similarly monochrome and dirge-like but there is a real feeling of pain and catharsis that makes it captivating. There's a definite energy to the album, even if it's a negative, mournful energy. DSOTM feels like more of an aimless depression -- the sound of a disaffected whiner just giving up.

this is SO right. rock bottom is also laced with wyatt's sense of humour, which makes it an immensely more appealing album.

el sabor de gene (yournullfame), Tuesday, 21 June 2005 02:27 (9 years ago) Permalink

Yes, the humor gives a solution to the despair (or in the case of DSOTM, not quite despair but lethargy) doesn't it? It also helps that Rock Bottom is a bit more rough around the edges. It has a human element that is lost from DSOTM with all of it's cool slickness. That's cool in the original sense of the word: a shiny, distancing veneer.

walter kranz (walterkranz), Tuesday, 21 June 2005 02:40 (9 years ago) Permalink

i listened to this today for the first time in many years and skipped most of it. but breath through time is still excellent, and us and them and brain damage are pretty untouchable. Still I think this album has the first appearance of Roger Waters annoying "madman cackling in the background" which goes on to sully "Dogs" and, well, all of the Wall. It sounds so stupid. I can image the rest of the band sighing as he insists on tracking different laughs.

kyle (akmonday), Tuesday, 21 June 2005 02:43 (9 years ago) Permalink

It sounds so stupid. I can image the rest of the band sighing as he insists on tracking different laughs.

Also see Axl Rose going "Yow!" all over the good parts of the Use Your Illusion albums. I would've been right behind ya, Izzy.

Pleasant Plains /// (Pleasant Plains ///), Tuesday, 21 June 2005 03:57 (9 years ago) Permalink

1 year passes...
downloaded and listened to and loved TIME again today.
couple of years ago i saw it featured as background music on (and somehow perfectly suited to) that FASHION TV channel on SKY.

you can say what you like about the self-indulgence, the would-be jazz affectations, the 'suburban loner' isms referenced up top and tie yrself in endless knots about why it sold so many who to and such...but you really can't beat TIME.

the major flaw i think if there is one on this album is gilmour's vocals but no one's mentioned that so maybe it's just me.

pisces (piscesx), Tuesday, 4 July 2006 11:06 (8 years ago) Permalink

Being another mainstream band that thought adding black female vocalists makes things more soulful

B-b-b-b-but she's white!

Doctor Casino (Doctor Casino), Tuesday, 4 July 2006 14:20 (8 years ago) Permalink

The horrible blues lifts are but an inch from clapton-esque hardware shop blues by numbers. Intro to Time is great tho...

gekoppel (Gekoppel), Tuesday, 4 July 2006 14:28 (8 years ago) Permalink

i recently got a CD rip of the "quadraphonic mix" of DSOTM, so I've been listening to this for the first time in probably 5 or 6 years. Sounds great! Sure, it's got some clunkers (actually, just "Money"), but "Time" and "Us and Them" are still really wonderful tracks, despite the over-exposure. I fondly recall going to the Griffith Park Observatory as a teen many many years ago for the DSOTM laser show. It was totally wild. (by the way, the quad mix doesn't sound super different, at least to me. do i need a quad set up? probably.)

Tyler W (tylerw), Tuesday, 4 July 2006 15:04 (8 years ago) Permalink

Christ, I don't remember this thread existing at all, and I replied to it twice a year ago!

Anyways, the case against: It's too slow. "On The Run" is the only track with any real energy - not that NRG was ever Floyd's specialty. And it's mostly useless as audio accompaniment to "The Wizard Of Oz", unless you've got much better drugs than me.

[If this were a "Defend the indefensible" thread, I'd say that a cerebral soulless part of me will always retain a certain fascination/satisfaction with the sheer lushness of this sort of state-of-the-art pre-'80s recording. That'll never change. But there are so many other Floyd LPs I'd sooner listen to when I'm in the mood for Floyd, which is rare.]

M. Agony Von Bontee (M. Agony Von Bontee), Tuesday, 4 July 2006 17:34 (8 years ago) Permalink

Isn't a large part of this albums legendary run on the charts due to it being used as a hi-fi demonstration LP? Some good proportion of it's sales were to Classical buffs who wanted to test the dynamic range of their stereo set ups.

bendy (bendy), Tuesday, 4 July 2006 17:38 (8 years ago) Permalink

Can we do Abbey Road next? Now that's what I call overrated shite.

dr lulu (dr lulu), Tuesday, 4 July 2006 18:11 (8 years ago) Permalink

HEAR HEAR GOOD CHAP

sleeve (sleeve), Tuesday, 4 July 2006 18:19 (8 years ago) Permalink

2 years pass...

The psuedo-jazz affectations of the saxophone. Being another mainstream band that thought adding black female vocalists makes things more soulful (I'm not sure of who sings on record, but I know they were guilty of this later). AOR affectations that clip off meandering songs before they develop and make possible singles weaker because they only really fit in the scope of the album. Songs about time and money that make amazing observations.

― mike h. (mike h.), Thursday, June 16, 2005 4:47 AM (3 years ago) Bookmark Suggest Ban Permalink

I don't think it matters, but wasn't the female singer actually white? Your point still stands though

iago g., Sunday, 2 November 2008 01:43 (5 years ago) Permalink

Whatever happened to Custos?

Naive Teen Idol, Sunday, 2 November 2008 01:49 (5 years ago) Permalink

Custos = Dom

№ 1 (libcrypt), Sunday, 2 November 2008 01:53 (5 years ago) Permalink

people who go out of their way to attack records like Dark Side are pathetic to me. I mean, it's not one of my favorites, but it isn't offensive or anything. Like it or don't, jesus.

Kevin Keller, Sunday, 2 November 2008 02:00 (5 years ago) Permalink

Hey, I like it! I think Christgau's comment about it being kitsch says more about him than it

iago g., Sunday, 2 November 2008 02:09 (5 years ago) Permalink


Doris Troy

energizing the base (briania), Sunday, 2 November 2008 02:12 (5 years ago) Permalink

They were actually playing that Dub Side of the Moon thing in the bar I was in last night. Pretty good, and bot just in that "Well, it's better than the reggae tribute to the Police" way.

If Timi Yuro would be still alive, most other singers could shut up, Sunday, 2 November 2008 02:13 (5 years ago) Permalink

ftr There were three black female backing singers on Dark Side doing the three part harmony stuff, the vocalist on The Great Gig is Claire Torry who is white.

MaresNest, Sunday, 2 November 2008 20:42 (5 years ago) Permalink

Thanks MaresNest, I knew she was white.

iago g., Sunday, 2 November 2008 22:49 (5 years ago) Permalink

1 year passes...

RIP Roger The Hat

It was with sadness that we heard the news this week that Roger "The Hat" Manifold, a prominent and much loved roadie in the 1970s for Pink Floyd, Johnny Winter, and many others, passed away on October 31st, 2009. He got his famous nickname due to his habit of wearing a top hat (and other such headwear) during his roadie duties.

He is best known to Floyd fans as one of the more notable voices heard on The Dark Side Of The Moon, providing lines such as "Live for today; gone tomorrow. That's me!" and "I mean they're gonna kill you, so if you give them a short, sharp shock, they don't do it again.... I mean, good manners don't cost nothing, do they? Eh?"

Elvis Telecom, Thursday, 12 November 2009 02:06 (4 years ago) Permalink

2 years pass...

A suggestion that on later CD pressings a faintly audible orchestral version of The Beatles's "Ticket to Ride" can be heard after "Eclipse", over the album's closing heartbeats, may be due to a remastering error.[47]

Wow, I've been wondering about that for years. I always assumed this was intentional. And I never knew it was "Ticket To Ride..." Thats... kinda amazing.

billstevejim, Wednesday, 15 February 2012 04:47 (2 years ago) Permalink

I don't have a problem with this record at all. The only real criticism I could level at it, is that if I'm in completely the wrong mood, 'Us And Them' draaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaags like a motherfucker.

Turrican, Friday, 17 February 2012 23:11 (2 years ago) Permalink

pink floyd rules

tylerw, Friday, 17 February 2012 23:13 (2 years ago) Permalink

I hate the sound of this record

max buzzword (Shakey Mo Collier), Friday, 17 February 2012 23:16 (2 years ago) Permalink

forward he cried
from the rear
and the Pink Floyd rules

Euler, Friday, 17 February 2012 23:16 (2 years ago) Permalink

A suggestion that on later CD pressings a faintly audible orchestral version of The Beatles's "Ticket to Ride" can be heard after "Eclipse", over the album's closing heartbeats, may be due to a remastering error.
if you play "ticket to ride" backwards you can hear ringo say "pinnnnk floyyyyyd rullllles"

tylerw, Friday, 17 February 2012 23:19 (2 years ago) Permalink

In fact, come to think of it: Nick Mason's drumming. Are those drum tracks completely laced with marijuana or could he just not be bothered? :D His drumming has this real 'I caaaaan't beeeeee arrrrsed' feeling about it, which I really don't get from many other Pink Floyd albums.

Turrican, Friday, 17 February 2012 23:20 (2 years ago) Permalink

huh, the part where the drums come in on us and them is like my favorite part of this record

tylerw, Friday, 17 February 2012 23:23 (2 years ago) Permalink

hell yes

Euler, Friday, 17 February 2012 23:23 (2 years ago) Permalink

should I turn off "Jamaica Jerk-Off" to listen to "Us & Them"

ridiculous question, I know

Euler, Friday, 17 February 2012 23:24 (2 years ago) Permalink

The most powerful drumming on the record has to be on either 'Time' or 'Eclipse'. The part where 'Brain Damage' segues into 'Eclipse' is THE moment on this record for me.

Turrican, Friday, 17 February 2012 23:25 (2 years ago) Permalink

I have no idea what this means but it rules

Euler, Friday, 17 February 2012 23:26 (2 years ago) Permalink

should I turn off "Jamaica Jerk-Off" to listen to "Us & Them"

ridiculous question, I know

― Euler, Friday, February 17, 2012 11:24 PM (1 minute ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

Yes :)

Turrican, Friday, 17 February 2012 23:26 (2 years ago) Permalink

I think if you read that graph starting right when "Us & Them" starts, it rules

Euler, Friday, 17 February 2012 23:27 (2 years ago) Permalink

lollll i love that graph.

tylerw, Friday, 17 February 2012 23:28 (2 years ago) Permalink

wtf

Euler, Friday, 17 February 2012 23:28 (2 years ago) Permalink

by which I mean, it rules

Euler, Friday, 17 February 2012 23:29 (2 years ago) Permalink

no idea what i was on about 6 years ago re Gilmour's vocals. i love those vocals!

piscesx, Saturday, 18 February 2012 04:34 (2 years ago) Permalink

So I guess I'm the only one whose ever turned up the volume really loud after the "Eclipse" fadeout. I was like 13 when this happened, so forgive me.

billstevejim, Saturday, 18 February 2012 04:36 (2 years ago) Permalink


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