HEY JEWS

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Yep. With family for Passover and they're huge kosher-keepers, so we're also kosher-keepers by default.

Mordy, Monday, 6 April 2009 14:42 (6 years ago) Permalink

I'm all for eating some matzah, but no way I'm koshering my kitchen.

Also: not actually Jewish, so technically not obligated to do shit.

quincie, Monday, 6 April 2009 14:42 (6 years ago) Permalink

i'm invited to a house for passover where they'll be drinking and smoking lots of trees

Surmounter, Monday, 6 April 2009 14:47 (6 years ago) Permalink

Haha, ditto. Possibly the same one.

What does koshering actually involve, anyway? I'm vaguely aware of boiling water and possibly some earth or dirt or something? I know you can kosher stainless steel sinks and dishwashers etc but not ceramic or enamel ones. It must be enough of a pain that people cover their counters for Passover rather than deal with it.

guys i need to eliminate this business associate and im really nervous (Laurel), Monday, 6 April 2009 14:50 (6 years ago) Permalink

strut around with a candle looking for leavened shit

s1ocki, Monday, 6 April 2009 14:56 (6 years ago) Permalink

Okay so I read this thread title to the tone/pace of the sample starting Front 242's 'Welcome to Paradise.'

Ned Raggett, Monday, 6 April 2009 14:58 (6 years ago) Permalink

xxp

My parents fill their sinks with boiling water, then drop a burning hot brick into the water in the sink until it overflows on the counter. I think that's how they kasher their sinks. I know one guy who uses a blowtorch.

Mordy, Monday, 6 April 2009 15:06 (6 years ago) Permalink

whoa

s1ocki, Monday, 6 April 2009 15:06 (6 years ago) Permalink

Oh yeah. You can't really blow-torch the Corian, can you. I guess I assumed you'd have to get a rabbi in for the ritual re-purification. Is that actually a DIY project? Cool!

guys i need to eliminate this business associate and im really nervous (Laurel), Monday, 6 April 2009 15:07 (6 years ago) Permalink

We got offered a couple of really cheap apartments in a Lubavitch nabe, until they found out my roomie has a dog. But I specified that we wouldn't be a religious household, or keep kosher, and they were like, whatever, we can take care of that. So...really? The oven, too?

guys i need to eliminate this business associate and im really nervous (Laurel), Monday, 6 April 2009 15:09 (6 years ago) Permalink

Self-cleaning oven.

Mordy, Monday, 6 April 2009 15:12 (6 years ago) Permalink

And yeah, this stuff can all be done DIY style. As long as you know the laws, there's nothing you need a Rabbi for.

Mordy, Monday, 6 April 2009 15:13 (6 years ago) Permalink

Awesome. I do love the endless ingenuity, practical AND theological.

guys i need to eliminate this business associate and im really nervous (Laurel), Monday, 6 April 2009 15:13 (6 years ago) Permalink

I'm celebrating Passover by saying something about it on the internet.

Zero Transfats Waller (Oilyrags), Monday, 6 April 2009 15:41 (6 years ago) Permalink

we have some matzah in the house and will probably be going to a seder. I don't bother with the kosherness, I ain't wandering in any stupid desert.

This Board is a Prison on Planet Bullshit (Shakey Mo Collier), Monday, 6 April 2009 15:52 (6 years ago) Permalink

i really like passover, am i crazy?

cutty, Monday, 6 April 2009 16:04 (6 years ago) Permalink

no its usually my fave

s1ocki, Monday, 6 April 2009 16:11 (6 years ago) Permalink

i bought kosher for passover coke yesterday. it's delicious.

right thread, Ned (mizzell), Monday, 6 April 2009 16:14 (6 years ago) Permalink

ooh nice

s1ocki, Monday, 6 April 2009 16:16 (6 years ago) Permalink

it's like thanksgiving, in april, without bread

cutty, Monday, 6 April 2009 16:18 (6 years ago) Permalink

OH SHIT PASSOVER COKE. Need.

guys i need to eliminate this business associate and im really nervous (Laurel), Monday, 6 April 2009 16:20 (6 years ago) Permalink

I am going to a seder (my first), but because the hostess can't do it on the usual night(s), we're doing it on the 18th. Pseudo-seder. But I'm still psyched. Might try to sort of keep kosher-ish just to see what it's like.

Ooooh and I'm in charge of making charoset for the pseudo-seder, so recipes pls!

quincie, Monday, 6 April 2009 16:24 (6 years ago) Permalink

lol i read that coke thing really wrong.
xposts

tehresa, Monday, 6 April 2009 16:25 (6 years ago) Permalink

Also: how much hebrew vs. english at your seder?

quincie, Monday, 6 April 2009 16:25 (6 years ago) Permalink

I never understood why anything other than unleavened bread is necessary though? I mean no bread as a symbol/reminder of events passed makes sense, keeping kosher out of respect for the period I can see, but, like not being allowed to eat corn? What's up with that?

mehlt, Monday, 6 April 2009 16:32 (6 years ago) Permalink

um are you unfamiliar with the passover story or what

This Board is a Prison on Planet Bullshit (Shakey Mo Collier), Monday, 6 April 2009 16:33 (6 years ago) Permalink

oh snap

s1ocki, Monday, 6 April 2009 16:35 (6 years ago) Permalink

During Passover, Jews refrain from eating chometz: anything that contains barley, wheat, rye, oats, and spelt, and is not cooked within 18 minutes after coming in contact with water. No leavening is allowed. This signifies the fact that the Hebrews had no time to let their bread rise as they made a hurried escape from Egypt.
Jews of different backgrounds do not observe all of the same rules. Ashkenazi Jews, who come from Europe (most Jews in America), also avoid corn, rice, peanuts, and legumes as they are also used to make bread and may have other grains mixed in. These items are known as kitniyot.

mizzell, Monday, 6 April 2009 16:35 (6 years ago) Permalink

I thought it was anything that swells in contact with water? Or something like that. No corn syrup, in any case, which gives us delicious REAL SUGAR COKE.

guys i need to eliminate this business associate and im really nervous (Laurel), Monday, 6 April 2009 16:38 (6 years ago) Permalink

The Torah instructs a Jew not to eat (or even possess) chometz all seven days of Passover (Exodus 13:3). "Chometz" is defined as any of the five grains (wheat, spelt, barley, oats, and rye) that came into contact with water for more than 18 minutes. This is a serious Torah prohibition, and for that reason we take extra protective measures on Passover to prevent any mistakes.

Which brings us to another category of food called "kitniyot" (sometimes referred to generically as "legumes"). This includes rice, corn, soy beans, string beans, peas, lentils, peanuts, mustard, sesame seeds and poppy seeds. Even though kitniyot cannot technically become chometz, Ashkenazi Jews do not eat them on Passover. Why?

The Smak (Rabbi Moshe of Kouchi, 13th century, France) explains that products of kitniyot appear like chometz products. For example, it can be hard to distinguish between rice flour (kitniyot) and wheat flour (chometz). Therefore, to prevent confusion, all kitniyot was prohibited.

mizzell, Monday, 6 April 2009 16:40 (6 years ago) Permalink

I'm throwing myself in with the Sephardic camp this year.

quincie, Monday, 6 April 2009 16:42 (6 years ago) Permalink

Take a Hot Dog
and make it Kosher

the drummer from the hilarious 1990's Britpop act Gay Dad (wanko ergo sum), Monday, 6 April 2009 16:45 (6 years ago) Permalink

Oh makes more sense, and yes, I know the story, but I'm wondering why go so much further than just bread, I mean, Matzah is just unleavened bread, still has wheat in it and all, it's not like they didn't have enough time to cook pasta when escaping Egypt.

mehlt, Monday, 6 April 2009 16:46 (6 years ago) Permalink

Keep hearing the spoken intro to "One Step Beyond" when I see this thread title.

•--• --- --- •--• (Pleasant Plains), Monday, 6 April 2009 16:47 (6 years ago) Permalink

Which is to say, eating corn is a long ways away from letting bread rise.

mehlt, Monday, 6 April 2009 16:48 (6 years ago) Permalink

Keep hearing the spoken intro to "One Step Beyond" when I see this thread title.

Don't eat that - EAT THIS

This Board is a Prison on Planet Bullshit (Shakey Mo Collier), Monday, 6 April 2009 16:51 (6 years ago) Permalink

passover is a great holiday.
G R E A T

BUT, the Haggadahs have not arrived in the mail from my grandfather yet and I'm also getting a bit nervous about seating... also, anyone have a good veggie matzoh ball soup recipe? vegetarians certainly won't eat teh brisket.

ian, Monday, 6 April 2009 16:55 (6 years ago) Permalink

good god how do vegetarians ever survive during Passover without the grains?

quincie, Monday, 6 April 2009 16:58 (6 years ago) Permalink

apparently quinoa is ok.

mizzell, Monday, 6 April 2009 16:59 (6 years ago) Permalink

good to qui-know-a

rip dom passantino 3/5/09 never forget (max), Monday, 6 April 2009 17:00 (6 years ago) Permalink

Seven days of quinoa and matzah sounds . . . constipating.

quincie, Monday, 6 April 2009 17:00 (6 years ago) Permalink

Can we turn this thread also into a list of all of the awesome things about being jewish in general?

quincie, Monday, 6 April 2009 17:01 (6 years ago) Permalink

1. Chosen people.
2. Latkes

ian, Monday, 6 April 2009 17:02 (6 years ago) Permalink

3. Talmud

ian, Monday, 6 April 2009 17:03 (6 years ago) Permalink

4. hot sabbath sex

This Board is a Prison on Planet Bullshit (Shakey Mo Collier), Monday, 6 April 2009 17:03 (6 years ago) Permalink

5. Neuroses

This Board is a Prison on Planet Bullshit (Shakey Mo Collier), Monday, 6 April 2009 17:04 (6 years ago) Permalink

6. control of the media/money

good god how do vegetarians ever survive during Passover without the grains?

― quincie, Monday, April 6, 2009 11:58 AM (2 minutes ago) Bookmark Suggest Ban Permalink

This may explain my increased secularism that started around the time I became vegetarian.

mehlt, Monday, 6 April 2009 17:04 (6 years ago) Permalink

6. Noodle kugel

quincie, Monday, 6 April 2009 17:05 (6 years ago) Permalink

7. Tikkun olam as commandment

quincie, Monday, 6 April 2009 17:07 (6 years ago) Permalink

7. anything heimische...

suggest bánh mi (suzy), Monday, 6 April 2009 17:08 (6 years ago) Permalink

mishnaic literature does talk about gehenna as a place where ur sins are purified before you can enter olam haba, but ur right it's barely touched upon in the tanakh - the famous allusion to the afterlife in the tanakh is Genesis 25:8 by yitzchak who the verse says was "gathered unto his people," which seems euphemistic but also particularly suggests to me some kind of ancestral afterlife. the reason i always heard for the lack of afterlife talk in the bible is bc judaism's focus is on repairing this world and turning it into a home for god - whereas christianity + islam are focused on the world to come. i do think this is a major theological break + the sorta subtext for original sin in christianity which can never be solved, so the best you can do is believe + enjoy god in the afterlife. by contrast the major focus in judaism is the age of the messiah when all the earth has been repaired + made divine.

Mordy, Friday, 17 April 2015 19:51 (2 months ago) Permalink

is it really cool to raise your kid with that kind of mocking contempt for other religions?

xp

circa1916, Friday, 17 April 2015 19:53 (2 months ago) Permalink

like tellingly in the 13 principles of faith maimonidies mentions, "the belief in divine reward and retribution," which could refer to heaven/hell or could just refer to this world, and then "The belief in the arrival of the Messiah and the messianic era," followed by "The belief in the resurrection of the dead," the last two of which are completely concerned w/ this world. none of the principles say anything about having to believe in heaven or hell.

Mordy, Friday, 17 April 2015 19:53 (2 months ago) Permalink

when I'm answering questions from a 7yo about whether the devil is literally, physically real, then it's not so much mocking contempt as being honest. the devil is not a literal person that is going to punish her and take her to hell for being a bad person (no matter what Antonin Scalia says). I consider it my responsibility to educate her in the traditions of her culture (Judaism) and to give her my honest views. The devil is definitely a Christian construct, and as such I felt it was my job to point out to her that it's not an idea I or our family or Jews give any credence to. I did discuss some of the more interesting stories that center around the devil (Faust, Dante's Inferno, to a lesser extent the Book of Job, etc.) She gets a lot of second-hand Catholic stuff from kids at school so I do my best to provide some context to what she hears, deferring to my (primarily lapsed) Catholic in-laws on the finer points.

xp

Οὖτις, Friday, 17 April 2015 20:01 (2 months ago) Permalink

good point about Maimonides Mordy. Yeah I haven't gotten into any non-Tanakh stuff with her - she's only 7 and just in her first year of sunday school so this has been her first exposure to a lot of non-holiday-specific biblical stories and theological ideas

Οὖτις, Friday, 17 April 2015 20:04 (2 months ago) Permalink

outis, so cool that conversations with your daughter are intellectually fascinating/ challenging for the both of you, you're lucky to have each other as interlocutors

mordy, sorry for referring to tanakh as old testament, that was faux pas (more dumb of me than offensive i guess?)

drash, Friday, 17 April 2015 20:50 (2 months ago) Permalink

tanakh = acronym for torah, neviim (prophets) and ksuvim (writings)
OT generally refers I think only to Torah portion but OT isn't a Jewish idiom (obv bc you can only have an OT if u have a NT) so idk it could maybe include all of tanakh

Mordy, Friday, 17 April 2015 20:53 (2 months ago) Permalink

huh wiki on the OT is p interesting - actually the OT includes a bunch of stuff (to varying degrees depending on the denomination) *not* in the Tanakh

Οὖτις, Friday, 17 April 2015 21:01 (2 months ago) Permalink

is it really cool to raise your kid with that kind of mocking contempt for other religions?

xp

― circa1916, Friday, April 17, 2015 8:53 PM (Yesterday) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

he said he made clear his thoughts on the matter, not that he made it a matter of doctrine or stated it as fact to his child. plus, well, he's not wrong.

Hammer Smashed Bagels, Saturday, 18 April 2015 01:13 (2 months ago) Permalink

Christianity should be mocked and ridiculed more IMHO but then again it just plays into the martyr complex that some of that sect already has so...

Hammer Smashed Bagels, Saturday, 18 April 2015 01:14 (2 months ago) Permalink

might be more balanced to clarify that nothing in any jewish holy book is actually physically true either

een, Saturday, 18 April 2015 13:34 (2 months ago) Permalink

We werent discussing any jewish texts. If she had asked me if moses was a real person i'd be inclinex to say yes. If she'd asked me if jacob really wrestled an angel i would've explained it as a metaphor.

Οὖτις, Saturday, 18 April 2015 14:27 (2 months ago) Permalink

i was about to joke that while i'm sure shakey won't mislead his kid re the veracity of the torah, i intend to, and to dismiss the teachings of christianity so yell at me. but then i started thinking about 'truth' as it pertains to holy scripture + divinity and how 'this is what i believe' differs from 'this is what our ppl believe,' the latter inaugurating a person into a larger community that contains various nuances for what meaning is, what truth is, etc, but that uses particular texts as the foundation for these discourses. like is there a huge difference between 'the revelation at mount sinai definitely happened and it was the event that formally established the ppl of israel' and 'for the last 2 thousand years jews have lived + died as part of a people who trace their constitution to the revelation at mount sinai'? i suppose the former matters more if you're a certain kind of historian or an atheist but the latter is really what 'belief' means in a faith community: 'this is what we're about.' and re christianity, it isn't just as absurd as judaism bc it has been the largest antagonistic body to judaism, a theology that claimed to supersede the beliefs of judaism, that contradicted the fundamental tenants of idol worship w/ its innovation re the son of god, and who has been responsible for the deaths of many jews over the last 2k years. it's 'more false,' not bc it's less historically accurate, but bc it is (or for the most part was) a direct threat to 'what our ppl believe.' nb this gets into a certain kind of tribalism that is probably even more problematic for modern secularism/liberalism than believing patently absurd stories, but i think it does explain why story absurdity doesn't really bother most religious ppl. it's less important what i believe and more what i believe the people around me believe (or more what i believe my parents believe).

Mordy, Saturday, 18 April 2015 14:51 (2 months ago) Permalink

^that's why i felt referring to tanakh as old testament was faux pas on my part: not just re accuracy of denotation, but referring to sacred jewish text(s) with terminology of Christianity, i.e. as inscribed within Christian framework which presumed both to appropriate & supersede those texts

(faux pas for me especially because i’m not a Christian)

drash, Saturday, 18 April 2015 15:16 (2 months ago) Permalink

btw drash, i meant to mention to you that the chapter in heschel's prophets "prophecy and psychosis" is exceptionally good and even worth jumping ahead too (esp if you find the early prophet-specific chapters slow going)

Mordy, Saturday, 18 April 2015 15:29 (2 months ago) Permalink

Yes the "this is what our people believe" is the framework i'm trying to provide. It's def tribal but that's the way the world is.

Xp

Οὖτις, Saturday, 18 April 2015 15:30 (2 months ago) Permalink

even for a non-believer like me it is easy to tell how fucked with the original prophecies were by butthurt Johannine folk who couldn't rectify that the "Messiah" had been killed. But it's still fascinating, from a historical perspective, to read about the evolution of Christianity over time, particularly Bart Ehrman's books. I just ordered "When Jesus Became God", but I find that "Jesus, Apocalyptic Prophet of the New Millenium" was my favorite.

Hammer Smashed Bagels, Saturday, 18 April 2015 15:33 (2 months ago) Permalink

but, if I ever *have* kids (looking lesser and lesser likely by the day) it's not like I'd disown them for being religious. But if any one of my damn Black Sabbath albums went missing on account of that they'd be sent to Siberia.

Hammer Smashed Bagels, Saturday, 18 April 2015 15:34 (2 months ago) Permalink

(thanks for chapter rec; might read it in advance of getting there; but enjoying early chapters v much so far)

drash, Saturday, 18 April 2015 15:46 (2 months ago) Permalink

x-post--Ha ha. "Dad, you are a heathen and I had to smash your Black Sabbath albums"

curmudgeon, Saturday, 18 April 2015 16:02 (2 months ago) Permalink

i was about to joke that while i'm sure shakey won't mislead his kid re the veracity of the torah, i intend to, and to dismiss the teachings of christianity so yell at me. but then i started thinking about 'truth' as it pertains to holy scripture + divinity and how 'this is what i believe' differs from 'this is what our ppl believe,' the latter inaugurating a person into a larger community that contains various nuances for what meaning is, what truth is, etc, but that uses particular texts as the foundation for these discourses. like is there a huge difference between 'the revelation at mount sinai definitely happened and it was the event that formally established the ppl of israel' and 'for the last 2 thousand years jews have lived + died as part of a people who trace their constitution to the revelation at mount sinai'? i suppose the former matters more if you're a certain kind of historian or an atheist but the latter is really what 'belief' means in a faith community: 'this is what we're about.' and re christianity, it isn't just as absurd as judaism bc it has been the largest antagonistic body to judaism, a theology that claimed to supersede the beliefs of judaism, that contradicted the fundamental tenants of idol worship w/ its innovation re the son of god, and who has been responsible for the deaths of many jews over the last 2k years. it's 'more false,' not bc it's less historically accurate, but bc it is (or for the most part was) a direct threat to 'what our ppl believe.' nb this gets into a certain kind of tribalism that is probably even more problematic for modern secularism/liberalism than believing patently absurd stories, but i think it does explain why story absurdity doesn't really bother most religious ppl. it's less important what i believe and more what i believe the people around me believe (or more what i believe my parents believe).

― Mordy, Saturday, April 18, 2015 9:51 AM (1 hour ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

yeah i think all this is repulsive, guess that's my tribe

een, Saturday, 18 April 2015 16:09 (2 months ago) Permalink

fwiw i don't think christians or atheists are repulsive. i just don't think that their beliefs are my beliefs. if we're really going to talk tribalism, i guess we need to talk about being pro intertribal relations and being pro abolishing the tribes.

Mordy, Saturday, 18 April 2015 16:12 (2 months ago) Permalink

bc i'm not embarrassed to say that i prefer the former to the latter

Mordy, Saturday, 18 April 2015 16:13 (2 months ago) Permalink

no i do too, just physical empirical verifiable truth is not something i can compromise

een, Saturday, 18 April 2015 16:15 (2 months ago) Permalink

l,r een, mordy

nakhchivan, Saturday, 18 April 2015 16:18 (2 months ago) Permalink

lol

drash, Saturday, 18 April 2015 16:43 (2 months ago) Permalink

no i do too, just physical empirical verifiable truth is not something i can compromise

― een, Saturday, April 18, 2015 12:15 PM (4 hours ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

Who is asking you to compromise physical empirical verifiable truth? The 'repulsive' thing is to ignore history. How can you be for physical empirical verifiable truth and also be for throwing out evidence?

©Oz Quiz© (Adam Bruneau), Saturday, 18 April 2015 21:02 (2 months ago) Permalink

thread needs more tanuki

Premise ridiculous. Who have two potato? (forksclovetofu), Saturday, 18 April 2015 23:29 (2 months ago) Permalink

you would totally feel Gizmo after midnight, wouldn't you

Hammer Smashed Bagels, Sunday, 19 April 2015 05:13 (2 months ago) Permalink

ew

Οὖτις, Monday, 20 April 2015 16:37 (2 months ago) Permalink

omg *feed* not feel. *smh*

Hammer Smashed Bagels, Tuesday, 21 April 2015 02:16 (2 months ago) Permalink

3 weeks pass...

neat. wonder if one could (or i assume one might) derive some hermeneutic significance from variation in percentage...?

drash, Wednesday, 20 May 2015 03:07 (1 month ago) Permalink

absolutely. leviticus is the most cited + also the part of tanach most concerned w/ ritual + legal practice. esther is really high (56.89% cited) but i bet most of that is in tractate megillah - the one that deals w/ all the laws of purim (and all the associated stories). probably lots of connections to make, esp if you could better map which parts are cited in which tractates.

Mordy, Wednesday, 20 May 2015 03:44 (1 month ago) Permalink

2 weeks pass...

my local federation paper just laid off its entire editorial staff :(
http://www.philly.com/philly/business/20150604_Philadelphia_s_Jewish_Exponent_lays_off_its_local_editorial_team.html

Mordy, Thursday, 4 June 2015 13:26 (4 weeks ago) Permalink

2 weeks pass...

like tellingly in the 13 principles of faith maimonidies mentions, "the belief in divine reward and retribution,"

I've been teaching my kids that in Judaism we do good things because they're good and we're commanded to do them, not because we'll be rewarded for doing them or punished for not doing them. But maybe I'm just wrong about this? I feel like I'm constantly revealing the spottiness of my Jewish education in this thread.

Guayaquil (eephus!), Wednesday, 24 June 2015 03:15 (1 week ago) Permalink

nah that's a valid angle

Οὖτις, Wednesday, 24 June 2015 15:33 (1 week ago) Permalink

belief in divine reward and retribution does not necessarily imply that there's a clear-cut commodity-exchange type of relationship between God and people. God is ultimately unfathomable, after all

Οὖτις, Wednesday, 24 June 2015 15:35 (1 week ago) Permalink

different groups emphasize different things. When I went to a Litvish yeshiva they definitely emphasized the idea of schar v'onesh (punishment + reward) and that's a well-known trope in non-chassidic ultra orthodoxy. my family's particular chassidic sect downplays it in favor of tikkun olam type ideas (dirah b'tachtonim - making the world here a fit dwelling place for g-d) so it doesn't have a huge amount of currency in my community but it's obv still one of the articles of faith so you can't dismiss it entirely.

Mordy, Wednesday, 24 June 2015 17:37 (1 week ago) Permalink

Yeah I like that idea, do good things not anticipating a reward, but because they are good in themselves.

AdamVania (Adam Bruneau), Wednesday, 24 June 2015 17:54 (1 week ago) Permalink

Kant ennit

Οὖτις, Wednesday, 24 June 2015 17:57 (1 week ago) Permalink

wow I totally missed this whole "shellfish in the NY water supply" controversy

wonder what the rabbinical reasoning was in allowing it

Οὖτις, Friday, 26 June 2015 18:06 (6 days ago) Permalink

http://www.newyorker.com/books/page-turner/how-the-talmud-became-a-best-seller-in-south-korea?intcid=mod-yml

― Mordy, Tuesday, June 23, 2015 7:40 PM (3 days ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

it's kind of sad, but my heart gets lighter every time i read a news story about jews in a foreign country and it's /not/ about anti-semitism

wizzz! (amateurist), Friday, 26 June 2015 23:46 (6 days ago) Permalink

although....

Other Jews I spoke to were concerned that Tokayer’s Talmud was helping popularize Jewish stereotypes in South Korea. Even positive stereotypes, some said, can be dangerous. As Dan Sneider, the associate director for research at the Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center at Stanford, and a former congregant of Tokayer’s synagogue in Japan, put it, “The line between ‘Jews, aren’t they incredible’ and ‘Jews, aren’t they somehow dangerous and sinister’ can be pretty thin,” particularly in countries like South Korea and Japan, where the dearth of Jews means they are essentially “an abstraction.”

wizzz! (amateurist), Friday, 26 June 2015 23:52 (6 days ago) Permalink

i had no idea julia wertz was in the new yorker!

like a giraffe of nah (forksclovetofu), Saturday, 27 June 2015 02:44 (5 days ago) Permalink


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