Depression and what it's really like

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see, the ratio of baked potato:topping really has to be about 1:2 for me to eat without complaint, and by that point i could just as well be gnawing drywall. for what it's worth, i don't like french fries either, unless the fry:ketchup balance is tilted to a near-farcical point

remy bean, Tuesday, 16 October 2007 02:51 (7 years ago) Permalink

Holy mother, give me those potatoes.

you can have the potatoes, give me that girl again...

chicago kevin, Tuesday, 16 October 2007 03:27 (7 years ago) Permalink

7 months pass...

Want a hug so bad and the man won't be home for three hours. Fucking THESE DAYS. These fucking days.

Trade 'man' for 'woman' and 'three hours' for '2 months'.

What's that sound effect in the Simpsons in the episode when Darlene from Roseanne tears out Bart's heart and throws it against the wall: "You won't be needing THIS anymore...ahahahahahaha"?

uuuuuuuuuunnnnngggggghhhhhhhh

Z S, Sunday, 1 June 2008 05:19 (6 years ago) Permalink

gif or it didnt happen

and what, Sunday, 1 June 2008 05:20 (6 years ago) Permalink

I'm working on it. Softcore porn+Glowing Edges effect+Music

Z S, Sunday, 1 June 2008 05:58 (6 years ago) Permalink

8 months pass...

So when does one decide to call a therapist? I can't even begin to determine if I even have some form of depression (again). I... it seems easier just to shut up about it instead of talking about it.

Nathalie (stevienixed), Friday, 6 February 2009 11:15 (5 years ago) Permalink

Awww, Nathalie. I would say, if your depression starting to interfere with your ability to function, then that's time to step in and get the medical help.

Then again, I don't know. A lot of people manage to function on autopilot and go on autopilot and look after kids and go on, even though they're feeling totally dead inside.

Only you can make that call, but if it's affecting your ability to work, to sleep, eating, your interactions with the people that you love - your standard basics - then you need to call someone in to help you out.

Good luck with it. x

Arrive Naked, Bring Prog (Masonic Boom), Friday, 6 February 2009 11:30 (5 years ago) Permalink

Thing is you can always see a therapist - see if it helps. I saw one for 2 years - found it very helpful.

Of course, they are therapists and there are therapists, one method might not work for you.

To be honest I think everyone should see one!

The Unbelievably Insensitive Baroness Vadera (Ned Trifle II), Friday, 6 February 2009 11:40 (5 years ago) Permalink

I... it seems easier just to shut up about it instead of talking about it.

For me this was crucial - I didn't want to talk about - it was too painful - to friends or family. Therapy "allows" you to do this without feeling "I'm just wasting everyone's time."

Does that make sense?

The Unbelievably Insensitive Baroness Vadera (Ned Trifle II), Friday, 6 February 2009 11:43 (5 years ago) Permalink

To be honest I think everyone should see one!

Yeah, woo. Also, everyone should spend a leisurely year in Paris, just drinking wine and eating cheese and malingering. So good for the soul.

To be honest I think you're being callous. Mental health care is really, really, really, REALLY expensive.

mose def (kenan), Friday, 6 February 2009 11:48 (5 years ago) Permalink

Er... at least around here. My medication alone costs $300 a month, not counting sessions with the doctor, and I am quickly entering a situation where I will be working to pay for my mental health so I can keep working so I can etc etc. It's like delivering pizza to pay for car repair.

mose def (kenan), Friday, 6 February 2009 11:52 (5 years ago) Permalink

Hi, welcome to The Sad Place, you must be This Depressed to enter.

mose def (kenan), Friday, 6 February 2009 11:53 (5 years ago) Permalink

I got mine on the NHS. Sorry, wasn't meaning to be callous.

The Unbelievably Insensitive Baroness Vadera (Ned Trifle II), Friday, 6 February 2009 11:54 (5 years ago) Permalink

Sorry, you touched a nerve. Nothing personal.

mose def (kenan), Friday, 6 February 2009 11:55 (5 years ago) Permalink

Natalie, have you been to see your doctor about it yet? I'd say definitely do that first if you're open to the idea (helped *a lot* when my wife had post-natal depression btw)

Frank Sumatra (NickB), Friday, 6 February 2009 11:56 (5 years ago) Permalink

i think the nice thing about a therapist is that you're paying them to listen to you talk about what's wrong (& of course hopefully help you out). It's not like a friend, where you have to consider whether or not you're making them uncomfortable or expecting too much of them or you'd actually rather hear about what's going on in their life. Going to a therapist is useful even if you're just trying to work something very temporary out of your system: there is nothing to do there but talk. I know you're not supposed to think of it this way but sometimes i sort of see the ~therapeutic space~ as the place where you talk about it so you can stay shut up about it everywhere else.

c sharp major, Friday, 6 February 2009 11:59 (5 years ago) Permalink

xps, No I wasn't thinking. I have no idea what the situation is like in Belgium for instance. I'm just a bit...er...enthusiastic about it because it did me so much good. Continues to do so, too. I get a bit carried away.

The Unbelievably Insensitive Baroness Vadera (Ned Trifle II), Friday, 6 February 2009 12:12 (5 years ago) Permalink

If cost is an issue then look into CBT, it's remarkably quick - ten sessions max on the NHS - and has really done wonders for me, just in terms of getting out of the mental rut I was in, transforming my attitude, restoring confidence etc.

talk me down off the (ledge), Friday, 6 February 2009 12:20 (5 years ago) Permalink

Cost is not that big of an issue but, well, finding a good therapist is. Belgium has good healthcare. I think I could check with my doctor first and then it would be even cheaper? I had one but he ignored my cries for help in regard to my panic attacks. Really strange. I wanted to ask: "Why don't you HEAR me when I talk about my panic attacks?" Instead I just gave up and stopped going. I'm not sure if I need to. I have the (wrong) idea that this is me, this is how I feel at times so why bother with addressing this "problem". I also feel I'm a bit silly for being this way because I simply don't have anything to complain about. Yes, I know, that's not really the issue. I also don't like talking about it cause I just start crying. IF I don't, then I can just pretend it's not here/there/anywhere.

I don't think it's postnatal depression unless hahaha it extends to 16 months after giving birth. haha

Nathalie (stevienixed), Friday, 6 February 2009 12:47 (5 years ago) Permalink

I dunno, it can last for quite a while. But whatever it is, I'd say it's still worth giving your doctor a go first.

Frank Sumatra (NickB), Friday, 6 February 2009 13:08 (5 years ago) Permalink

If your doctor refuses to listen to you when you bring up panic attacks, then that's cause to find a new doctor. A good doctor pays attention to their patient's mental state of health, as well as physical. If you told your doctor that you were having sharp pains in your head, and he just ignored you, instead of sending to check you for migraines, would you keep going to him? Why should mental health be any different? Panic attacks are a symptom - they're a sign that the mind is in distress and needs some kind of attention. You can't just ignore them like that, if you're a doctor.

Arrive Naked, Bring Prog (Masonic Boom), Friday, 6 February 2009 13:32 (5 years ago) Permalink

6 months pass...

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=depressions-evolutionary

kinda inneresting

iatee, Monday, 31 August 2009 18:04 (5 years ago) Permalink

That is really really really interesting and also reminds me to post this point from an article in Discover Magazine called "The Seven Deadly Sins" (sadly I don't think the art is avail online):

Most of us perceive ourselves as slightly smarter, funnier, more talented, and better-looking than average. These rose-colored glasses are apparently important to mental health, the psychological immune system that protects us from despair. "Those who see themselves as they truly are -- not so funny, a bad driver, overweight -- have a greater chance of being diagnosed with clinical depression," says Julian Paul Keenan, director of the cognitive imagine laboratory and professor of psychology at Montclair State University in New Jersey.

For most of us, it takes less mental energy to puff ourselves up than to think critically about our own abilities. In one recent neuroimaging study by blah blah in Japan, volunteers who imagined themselves winning a prize or trouncing an opponent showed less activation in brain regions associated with introspection and self-conscious thought than people induced to feel negative emotions such as embarrassment.

The Lion's Mane Jellyfish, pictured here with its only natural predator (Laurel), Monday, 31 August 2009 18:29 (5 years ago) Permalink

In one recent neuroimaging study by blah blah in Japan

...by who?

Ned Raggett, Monday, 31 August 2009 18:36 (5 years ago) Permalink

Oh fine. It's a long description and I was typing it out by hand. Gawd.

Hidehiko Takahashi of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Japan.

The Lion's Mane Jellyfish, pictured here with its only natural predator (Laurel), Monday, 31 August 2009 18:39 (5 years ago) Permalink

Those who see themselves as they truly are -- not so funny, a bad driver, overweight

thanks for your opinion julian

lol @ "blah blah"

fo shza my tza (Curt1s Stephens), Monday, 31 August 2009 18:42 (5 years ago) Permalink

xpost -- Haha, no worries, I just thought this was a copy/paste from an online article and I was boggling a bit.

Ned Raggett, Monday, 31 August 2009 18:43 (5 years ago) Permalink

"Prof. Blah, well known for his self-deprecation..."

Ned Raggett, Monday, 31 August 2009 18:43 (5 years ago) Permalink

i'm not that great of a driver, tevs

Thought you were regal/Now who needs "Boston Legal"? (M@tt He1ges0n), Monday, 31 August 2009 18:44 (5 years ago) Permalink

No, as I already said, the damn article ISN'T AVAILABLE ONLINE.

The Lion's Mane Jellyfish, pictured here with its only natural predator (Laurel), Monday, 31 August 2009 18:46 (5 years ago) Permalink

When one considers all the evidence, depression seems less like a disorder where the brain is operating in a haphazard way, or malfunctioning. Instead, depression seems more like the vertebrate eye—an intricate, highly organized piece of machinery that performs a specific function.

ehhhh......

call all destroyer, Monday, 31 August 2009 18:47 (5 years ago) Permalink

I don't know about that guy, but my eye is invertebrate.

Aimless, Monday, 31 August 2009 18:53 (5 years ago) Permalink

i think he's talking about the dude from korn's mic stand

Thought you were regal/Now who needs "Boston Legal"? (M@tt He1ges0n), Monday, 31 August 2009 18:58 (5 years ago) Permalink

Most of us perceive ourselves as slightly smarter, funnier, more talented, and better-looking than average.

So most people are basically all running around thinking they are better than the other? That's funny. Me, I belong in the group prone to depression, I guess, or rather I think I'm pretty darn average to below average.

Nathalie (stevienixed), Monday, 31 August 2009 19:25 (5 years ago) Permalink

Keenan is also using transcranial magnetic stimulation to disrupt deliberate self-deprecation -- the type of unctuous, ingratiating behavior that seems humble but is actually arrogance in disguise. Patterns of brain activation during self-deprecation are fundamentally the same as those during self-deceptive pride, Keenan is finding. Both are forms of one-upmanship. "They're in the same location and seem to serve the same purpose: putting oneself ahead in society," he says.

The Lion's Mane Jellyfish, pictured here with its only natural predator (Laurel), Monday, 31 August 2009 19:30 (5 years ago) Permalink

When one considers all the evidence, depression seems less like a disorder where the brain is operating in a haphazard way, or malfunctioning. Instead, depression seems more like the vertebrate eye—an intricate, highly organized piece of machinery that performs a specific function.

ehhhh......

I don't see anything wrong with the analogy fwiw

fo shza my tza (Curt1s Stephens), Tuesday, 1 September 2009 01:11 (5 years ago) Permalink

as someone who has been a loved one to depressed ppl i'm not agreeing or disagreeing with the analogy but it's just kinda ehhhhhhh

call all destroyer, Tuesday, 1 September 2009 01:13 (5 years ago) Permalink

don't know what actual depressed ppl might say fwiw

call all destroyer, Tuesday, 1 September 2009 01:13 (5 years ago) Permalink

it kinda depends on how you define "malfunctioning" ...

what happened? i am confused. (sarahel), Tuesday, 1 September 2009 01:14 (5 years ago) Permalink

i guess all i mean is when my dad was really depressed if someone had told me his depression was "an intricate, highly organized piece of machinery that performs a specific function" i would have probably assaulted them.

call all destroyer, Tuesday, 1 September 2009 01:16 (5 years ago) Permalink

a parasite can also be defined as such ...

what happened? i am confused. (sarahel), Tuesday, 1 September 2009 01:17 (5 years ago) Permalink

yeah i totally get this desc

tehresa, Tuesday, 1 September 2009 01:18 (5 years ago) Permalink

i dont think call all destroyer doesnt "get" the description

fleetwood (max), Tuesday, 1 September 2009 01:20 (5 years ago) Permalink

shut up max

tehresa, Tuesday, 1 September 2009 01:21 (5 years ago) Permalink

no YOU

fleetwood (max), Tuesday, 1 September 2009 01:22 (5 years ago) Permalink

^^ this what depression is really like

what happened? i am confused. (sarahel), Tuesday, 1 September 2009 01:22 (5 years ago) Permalink

reading these last few posts has been depressing

Mr. Que, Tuesday, 1 September 2009 01:26 (5 years ago) Permalink

Going on a pathetic archive.org binge, looking up friends webpages from high school, and somehow ended up at a photoagallery from a few weeks ago of a friend who just got married, one of my very best friends from back in the day. He looks so happy with his bf (I guess his husband now), I have so few real friends anymore. Anyway, sad lonely guy just thinking about things on the internet, but god, FUCK 2009 so far

OLIGARHY (Z S), Sunday, 6 September 2009 06:48 (5 years ago) Permalink

waaah fergettit

OLIGARHY (Z S), Sunday, 6 September 2009 06:49 (5 years ago) Permalink

everything must die!

Nhex, Sunday, 6 September 2009 09:45 (5 years ago) Permalink


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