HUSKER DU V. Replacements

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Guitarists with high-end hearing loss and personal issues with the bass player always mix poorly. ALWAYS.

Three Word Username, Wednesday, 18 April 2012 22:26 (2 years ago) Permalink

The original vote (50-39) is almost a perfect approximation of where they stand for me--in 1985, also today. Husker Du is one of my three or four favourite bands ever, but the right song will make me intensely nostalgic for the Replacements.

clemenza, Wednesday, 18 April 2012 23:39 (2 years ago) Permalink

I note that "Hot Tub Time Machine" uses a Replacements song on the soundtrack, but nothing by Husker Du. Husker Du wins.

dlp9001, Thursday, 19 April 2012 01:13 (2 years ago) Permalink

Husker Du are a great band, but the Mats destroy them. It's just not a contest.

President Keyes, Thursday, 19 April 2012 01:15 (2 years ago) Permalink

otoh, it's just a contest

yuppie bullshit chocolate blogbait (contenderizer), Thursday, 19 April 2012 01:18 (2 years ago) Permalink

Husker Don't.

Poliopolice, Thursday, 19 April 2012 01:31 (2 years ago) Permalink

I don't know if you can just remaster Huskers. I was just listening to Candy Apple Grey on Spotify and - wow. They might need to be remixed. There is almost no bass.

Mould was a really good songwriter. "Eiffel Tower High" on that album is really put together well - great chord progression, harmonies through much of the song. Unique stuff, and very good.

timellison, Thursday, 19 April 2012 01:43 (2 years ago) Permalink

"Hardly Getting Over It"!

Exile in lolville (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Thursday, 19 April 2012 01:46 (2 years ago) Permalink

I note that Husker Du are very arguably an influence on Fucked Up, who put out one of the best albums of 2011, and that The Replacements really impressed Winona Ryder.

dlp9001, Thursday, 19 April 2012 01:55 (2 years ago) Permalink

more than arguably, i'd say

yuppie bullshit chocolate blogbait (contenderizer), Thursday, 19 April 2012 02:10 (2 years ago) Permalink

Since the Replacements never influenced any awesome 2010ees P4K approved musics like Fucked Up and since turning on chicks like Winona Ryder is totally against the rock'n'rollist constitution, I guess we have to give this round to Hart & Mould.

President Keyes, Thursday, 19 April 2012 02:14 (2 years ago) Permalink

Mould also has Sugar in his favor.

Exile in lolville (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Thursday, 19 April 2012 02:25 (2 years ago) Permalink

arguably

yuppie bullshit chocolate blogbait (contenderizer), Thursday, 19 April 2012 02:29 (2 years ago) Permalink

Sugar is not a plus.

EZ Snappin, Thursday, 19 April 2012 02:35 (2 years ago) Permalink

i want to say that the replacement had a bigger and more direct influence on american pop than husker du. a lot of people took their basic sound and sensibility and ran with it, from approximate contemporaries like soul asylum and the goo goo dolls to later descendants like the hold steady and all american rejects. then again, i suppose husker du and mould had a huge influence on emo and hardcore, so it's hard to say.

yuppie bullshit chocolate blogbait (contenderizer), Thursday, 19 April 2012 02:38 (2 years ago) Permalink

replacements

yuppie bullshit chocolate blogbait (contenderizer), Thursday, 19 April 2012 02:38 (2 years ago) Permalink

Sugar is most definitely a plus! Very little solo Westerberg is worth the time of day. Someome suggest a best-of his solo stuff and I'll give it a spin, though.

Gerald McBoing-Boing, Thursday, 19 April 2012 03:02 (2 years ago) Permalink

There actually is one:

http://www.amazon.com/Besterberg-Best-Paul-Westerberg/dp/B0007Z9RAM/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1334804761&sr=8-3

The one song I know I love is "Lookin' Out Forever." I don't remember much else.

clemenza, Thursday, 19 April 2012 03:07 (2 years ago) Permalink

Husker Du had a pretty huge and last impact on midwestern underground rock.

Trip Maker, Thursday, 19 April 2012 04:15 (2 years ago) Permalink

lastING even

Trip Maker, Thursday, 19 April 2012 04:16 (2 years ago) Permalink

Oh I guess I should have read your whole post, contederizer.

Trip Maker, Thursday, 19 April 2012 04:17 (2 years ago) Permalink

"Makes No Sense at All" is a mind=blowing record. To go from punk rock to bubblegum is one thing, but to get there from HARDCORE is another!

timellison, Thursday, 19 April 2012 04:40 (2 years ago) Permalink

Not to mention that it's just done so artfully.

timellison, Thursday, 19 April 2012 04:41 (2 years ago) Permalink

you mean the song or flip you wig in general?

yuppie bullshit chocolate blogbait (contenderizer), Thursday, 19 April 2012 04:58 (2 years ago) Permalink

No, that song in particular.

timellison, Thursday, 19 April 2012 05:10 (2 years ago) Permalink

timellison, Thursday, 19 April 2012 05:33 (2 years ago) Permalink

westerberg's shtick has aged sorta badly for me although there are some great tunes

feel like mould is partly responsible for emo. his songs don't move me as much as they did (i was much more into his husker stuff back in the day), but hart's best stuff sounds better as time goes on.

buzza, Thursday, 19 April 2012 05:46 (2 years ago) Permalink

hart's best stuff sounds better as time goes on

otm, though i love a lot of mould's stuff too

yuppie bullshit chocolate blogbait (contenderizer), Thursday, 19 April 2012 05:54 (2 years ago) Permalink

i suppose husker du and mould had a huge influence on emo and hardcore

also a massive influence on nirvana's nevermind; i remember krist saying around the time of release that their blend of melody and noise wasn't anything revolutionary, that husker du did it before.

i love both bands. they're both very, very different from each other, despite being nominally from the same genre and geographically the same area. husker du are intense, but the mats are maudlin. different flavours for different moods.

I accidentally sonned your dome (stevie), Thursday, 19 April 2012 06:49 (2 years ago) Permalink

husker du for me w/o hesitation.

husker du>grant hart solo>replacements>bob mould solo>chris mars solo>nova mob>paul westerberg solo>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>sugar which is a nightmare that i am glad got left back in the early 90s forever

Badu and a sax run hand-in-hand (jjjusten), Thursday, 19 April 2012 06:53 (2 years ago) Permalink

i know i am forgetting something obvious in there but whatever

Badu and a sax run hand-in-hand (jjjusten), Thursday, 19 April 2012 06:54 (2 years ago) Permalink

i love sugar's first two, but i do understand the hate.

I accidentally sonned your dome (stevie), Thursday, 19 April 2012 06:57 (2 years ago) Permalink

The Replacements just seem like so much more interesting a band. So much more interested in exploring, even if much of the time they were only going to new musical places to take the piss. I like them both, and in the 80s probably liked Huskers more, but I listen to the Replacements much more often these days - they have a timelessness about them that Husker Du just don't. I'd take the Let It Be-Tim-Pleased to Meet Me run over anything in the Husker Du catalogue,

And Bob Mould's pissy, sancimonious book made me sick of his self-pitying ass.

Viva Brother Beyond (ithappens), Thursday, 19 April 2012 08:26 (2 years ago) Permalink

"sanctimonious", even.

Viva Brother Beyond (ithappens), Thursday, 19 April 2012 08:26 (2 years ago) Permalink

The Replacements just seem like so much more interesting a band. So much more interested in exploring

If Zen Arcade wasn't more exploratory than any one album the Replacements ever did then I'll eat my Gibson Flying V sideways.

Friends of Mr Caeiro (NickB), Thursday, 19 April 2012 08:36 (2 years ago) Permalink

I'll rep for Sugar, but yeah like Stevie I can understand people not liking them.

Let's not forget that the Du weren't the only ones with production issues; if their records were under-produced, then Replacements records post-Let it Be were horribly over-produced.

good luck in your pyramid (Neil S), Thursday, 19 April 2012 08:40 (2 years ago) Permalink

when i interviewed sst's joe carducci for my black flag book, he argued vociferously that du's albums didn't need remastering, and that they weren't badly produced: what you hear is what they sounded like, and what they wanted to sound like, that sheet of white noise guitar sound, grant's weird, jazzy drums, the pin-prick bass sound. i sort of feel you have to embrace what they are; when i first started checking the du out, after copper blue, i was alienated at first by grant's drums, by that thin, hissy guitar sound, but that's what i grew to love about them - the anti-rock gestures, the pull back from bombast.

I accidentally sonned your dome (stevie), Thursday, 19 April 2012 09:14 (2 years ago) Permalink

at heart, i relate to both bands very much emotionally: the appeal to me of the replacements, beyond their booze-sodden downward spirals and sozzled bonhomie, are songs like 'here comes a regular', 'sixteen blue', 'androgynous' - the real gut-punch balladic moments. 'the ones who love us best are the ones we'll lay to rest and visit us on holidays at best / the ones who love us least are the ones we'd die to please and if its any consolation i can't begin to understand' is just an astonishing lyric, one of the best in pop.

whereas husker du just totally soundtracked whatever angsts, etc i had as a kid, and i have a real visceral attachment to pretty much all of zen arcade - 'broken home broken heart' especially - 'too far down', 'hardly getting over it', 'don't want to know'... it just taps into a seam of post-adolescent confusion/bleakness that's probably not too healthy, but to which i can relate (or related, i guess) very powerfully.

I accidentally sonned your dome (stevie), Thursday, 19 April 2012 09:22 (2 years ago) Permalink

when i interviewed sst's joe carducci for my black flag book, he argued vociferously that du's albums didn't need remastering, and that they weren't badly produced: what you hear is what they sounded like, and what they wanted to sound like, that sheet of white noise guitar sound, grant's weird, jazzy drums, the pin-prick bass sound. i sort of feel you have to embrace what they are; when i first started checking the du out, after copper blue, i was alienated at first by grant's drums, by that thin, hissy guitar sound, but that's what i grew to love about them - the anti-rock gestures, the pull back from bombast.

Does it have to be quite so murky though? The problems really started when they tried to "produce" the records, Flip Your Wig is so dry it sounded like they were playing in a padded cell. As for Warehouse, my initial reaction at the time was "what the fuck is this production even supposed to be?", and my opinion hasn't changed.

O00O0O00O (Matt #2), Thursday, 19 April 2012 09:43 (2 years ago) Permalink

oh, i totally think they need remastering/remixing, no argument here. but if that remastering/remixing made grant's drums sound more like Malcolm Travis's drums, that would suck, as much as i would have wished them to sound like that when i first heard du.

I accidentally sonned your dome (stevie), Thursday, 19 April 2012 09:59 (2 years ago) Permalink

would Carducci be one of those guys who thinks shitty production = real life/

Exile in lolville (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Thursday, 19 April 2012 10:06 (2 years ago) Permalink

anyway it's often Sugar >>>>> Husker these days.

Exile in lolville (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Thursday, 19 April 2012 10:06 (2 years ago) Permalink

i think carducci's thing is that spot did a fine job capturing the group at the time, and that a lot of modern remastering ruins the original music. but i'm also guessing carducci mainly listens to original vinyls, as when i protested about how much better the merge cd of dinosaur's 'you're living all over me' was compared to sst's release (notably it didn't have a two second gap between kracked and sludgefeast), he argued again that there was nothing wrong with the originals.

he's a pretty fascinating guy, even if i don't agree with everything he says.

I accidentally sonned your dome (stevie), Thursday, 19 April 2012 10:15 (2 years ago) Permalink

If Zen Arcade wasn't more exploratory than any one album the Replacements ever did then I'll eat my Gibson Flying V sideways

Hootenanny. And anyway after ZA Husker Du only got less diverse. They needed more wacko Hart sea shanties and acoustic ballads, not less.

Let's not forget that the Du weren't the only ones with production issues; if their records were under-produced, then Replacements records post-Let it Be were horribly over-produced

Tim sounds awful. Please To Meet Me is better, clearer. Near enough right for the band at that point. Don't Tell A Soul is the one that's over produced.

Hart's drumming became more more boring as the band became more formulaic - never used a hi hat, those same drum intros in a million songs, the same drum fills. I like him, but 20 songs of that on Warehouse is too much. And that snare sound on Flip Your Wig is one of the worst I've ever heard.

Master of Treacle, Thursday, 19 April 2012 12:02 (2 years ago) Permalink

Around 1984, when I first distinguished Husker Du from the flow of underground bands on my local college station, I thought their sound was fantastic, and exactly what I wanted: more noise, more chiming overtones, more roar. Chorus modulation and digital delay were still on the upswing then, peaking in the next few years with Cocteau Twins and The Cult and Joshua Tree and such. Now it sounds anchored to the mid-80s. In their original context, Husker Du really attacked in a way that is kinda lost now, though it's preserved best by the Eight Miles High single, probably 'cause there's more dynamics- the sparser opening and break in the middle.

In retrospect, each SST band was poorly produced in their own special way, but it's surely the way they intended to sound. And it sounded shittier on those first gen SST compact discs, for sure. The bands on Touch & Go, and then Sub Pop, where the Sabbath obsession came to the fore, ended up defining expectations for how loud underground rock "should" sound. By 87/88 there was something regressive and almost jokey about how the Butthole Surfers or Green River low end stood out among the tinsely haze of Squirrel Bait and Naked Raygun and other Huskerish bands.

bendy, Thursday, 19 April 2012 13:04 (2 years ago) Permalink

I accidentally sonned your dome (stevie), Thursday, 19 April 2012 14:52 (2 years ago) Permalink

pplains, Thursday, 19 April 2012 14:59 (2 years ago) Permalink

Damn, have not heard this 7" in like 18 years.

http://www.myspace.com/moldbeforeyou/music/songs/bob-mould-hates-me-37003185

Sonic Youth parody is pretty good too.

pplains, Thursday, 19 April 2012 15:09 (2 years ago) Permalink

Grant Hart is the most fascinating person in either of these bands his somewhat erratic but fascinating and often brilliant post huskers career makes westerbergs solo career look like such embarrassment

Grants the best most natural pop songwriter of these guys by a mile

Mississippi Butt Hurt (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Thursday, 19 April 2012 15:17 (2 years ago) Permalink

agreed, grant is awesome. bob is more consistent, but grant's peaks are higher.

I accidentally sonned your dome (stevie), Thursday, 19 April 2012 15:23 (2 years ago) Permalink


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