THE VAULT OF ILX Top 100 HORROR Movies Poll Voting Thread (voting closes May 9)

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i will also stan for hour of the wolf. good news, it's available on Netflix Instant and it's only 90 minutes so if y'all have nothing else to do y'all should watch it.

i've only seen a few parts of threads -- the parts immediately before, during and immediately after Sheffield gets nuked. the day after doesn't hold a candle to those scenes.

onibaba o'reilly (Eisbaer), Monday, 16 April 2012 18:41 (2 years ago) Permalink

add some more >>>>>'s then

xp

diamanda ram dass (Edward III), Monday, 16 April 2012 18:41 (2 years ago) Permalink

on the subject of Ingmar-horror, i'll also stan for the virgin spring ... you get to see a young, buff Max von Sydow uproot a birch tree, rip off its branches and flog himself before doing his ass-whuppin'. it's also available on HuluPlus.

onibaba o'reilly (Eisbaer), Monday, 16 April 2012 18:43 (2 years ago) Permalink

The Day After was like a soap opera with some mild sadness in it.

With Threads, I felt like some of the actors actually died making the movie

an independent online phenomenon (DJP), Monday, 16 April 2012 18:46 (2 years ago) Permalink

the day after shook up RonaldRreagan to the point where he thanked the director after he signed a missile treaty with the Soviets. but not even threads could melt Margaret Thatcher's cold reptilian heart.

onibaba o'reilly (Eisbaer), Monday, 16 April 2012 18:49 (2 years ago) Permalink

i thought that the day after, while soapy, eventually managed to be quite powerful. haven't seen threads for comparison.

BEMORE SUPER FABBY (contenderizer), Monday, 16 April 2012 18:52 (2 years ago) Permalink

threads really is in a class by itself, not sure if I'd vote for it in a horror poll tho

I mean it is trying to disturb and horrify, and is wildly successful in doing so, but there's a social conscience aspect to its intent that doesn't really jive w/ my conception of horror

that said SEE THREADS

repeat if you have not seen threads SEE THREADS

this will be your final warning

diamanda ram dass (Edward III), Monday, 16 April 2012 18:57 (2 years ago) Permalink

The Day After is like having your mom give you a long lecture about being careful when walking through the park by yourself at night

Threads is like walking through the park at night and being jumped by three muggers who kick you in the face until all of your teeth are knocked out, jump up and down on each of your limbs until they shatter, then strip you naked, drag you out to the sidewalk and throw your battered body in front of a speeding bus

an independent online phenomenon (DJP), Monday, 16 April 2012 18:58 (2 years ago) Permalink

that makes me never want to see threads. it's a fitting description of stuff like funny games and kidnapped, my single least favorite approach to "horror".

BEMORE SUPER FABBY (contenderizer), Monday, 16 April 2012 19:00 (2 years ago) Permalink

xpost I'd vote for a movie that actually depicted that, provided the muggers were backwoods, incestuous triplets.

jungleous butterflies strange birds (Eric H.), Monday, 16 April 2012 19:00 (2 years ago) Permalink

i mean, threads is supposed to be more moving that just brutal and despairing, right?

BEMORE SUPER FABBY (contenderizer), Monday, 16 April 2012 19:01 (2 years ago) Permalink

do plan to watch it no matter what

BEMORE SUPER FABBY (contenderizer), Monday, 16 April 2012 19:01 (2 years ago) Permalink

There's a heavy Italian bias to the things i nominated. Along with the big names like Argento, Bava, Fulci and Martino, i'd definitely recommend catching something by Aldo Lado. A lot of his films (Night Train Murders, for example) aren't all that good but the first two he directed, Who Saw Her Die? and The Short Night Of Glass Dolls, are excellent.

Who Saw Her Die? is an obvious riff on Don't Look Now, as George Lazenby rushes around Venice trying to work out who murdered his daughter, but i prefer it in a lot of ways. The Morricone score is one of his best too.

The Short Night Of Glass Dolls is arguably even better. Jean Sorel is found "dead" in the street and carted off to a mortuary. He's actually only paraylsed and has to work out, from his mortician's slab, what happened to him. It has one of the most memorable endings in the genre.

Une semaine de Bunty (ShariVari), Monday, 16 April 2012 19:03 (2 years ago) Permalink

Testament is like discovering that your dog just finished eating an entire box of D-Con.

Harried Ice Craw (Deric W. Haircare), Monday, 16 April 2012 19:04 (2 years ago) Permalink

Except instead of your dog IT'S YOUR ENTIRE FAMILY.

Harried Ice Craw (Deric W. Haircare), Monday, 16 April 2012 19:05 (2 years ago) Permalink

that makes me never want to see threads. it's a fitting description of stuff like funny games and kidnapped, my single least favorite approach to "horror".

see, this is partly why I'd never rep threads as a horror film. it's drama, or maybe heavy dystopian sci-fi. it takes the concept of nuclear winter and extends it out to its logical conclusion in a very matter of fact way. it's harrowing in the same way holocaust films are harrowing. there's nothing gothic or grand guignol about it.

diamanda ram dass (Edward III), Monday, 16 April 2012 19:06 (2 years ago) Permalink

A lot of straight horror films could stand to be more 'matter of fact' and less 'grand guignol'.

Harried Ice Craw (Deric W. Haircare), Monday, 16 April 2012 19:08 (2 years ago) Permalink

I'd actually argue that, in a lot of cases, the extent that a horror film veers away from 'matter of fact' is the extent to which it pulls its punches. I enjoy a great deal of stylistic variation within the genre, but the pulled punches are the reason I find very little of the genre legitimately scary.

Harried Ice Craw (Deric W. Haircare), Monday, 16 April 2012 19:10 (2 years ago) Permalink

see, this is partly why I'd never rep threads as a horror film. it's drama, or maybe heavy dystopian sci-fi. it takes the concept of nuclear winter and extends it out to its logical conclusion in a very matter of fact way. it's harrowing in the same way holocaust films are harrowing. there's nothing gothic or grand guignol about it.

I sort of agree with that, though I do think the ending takes it close to horror. But I am making an exception for its inclusion by voting for it on how much it makes me TERRIFIED, which I'm not going to judge many of the other films by.

Also, I know what DJP's getting at with his analogy (it's brutally intense) but I find it is more the deep dark futility of all action that gets to me, rather than any overt display of brutality.

emil.y, Monday, 16 April 2012 19:11 (2 years ago) Permalink

Oh, I want to second ShariVari's recommendation of Short Night of Glass Dolls, too. Probably won't be high up on my ballot, but is pretty likely to make it in.

emil.y, Monday, 16 April 2012 19:12 (2 years ago) Permalink

Given that The Day After more or less ruined my childhood, I don't think I'm going to watch Threads.

On my first pass through the nominations list, I've already got 53 yeses, 56 maybes, 22 movies to revisit, and 36 that I want to watch before voting.

lolsob

Polly biscuit face (carl agatha), Monday, 16 April 2012 19:16 (2 years ago) Permalink

I just culled it down to the 60 I'd actually seen and plan to weed out from there

an independent online phenomenon (DJP), Monday, 16 April 2012 19:17 (2 years ago) Permalink

OH BTW y'all really need to watch Apaches, too

it will ruin your life

an independent online phenomenon (DJP), Monday, 16 April 2012 19:18 (2 years ago) Permalink

Now Apaches has the bluntness and random, wonton death I've come to expect from great horror.

jungleous butterflies strange birds (Eric H.), Monday, 16 April 2012 19:19 (2 years ago) Permalink

I wonder if they'll let me take a three-week sabbatical from work to get this all sorted out.

Polly biscuit face (carl agatha), Monday, 16 April 2012 19:20 (2 years ago) Permalink

I have a shortlist of 80 or so that I might conceivably vote for(including the five or six movies I'd like to try and watch before voting) pared down from a list roughly three times as long of movies I've seen (and largely wouldn't dream of voting for).

Harried Ice Craw (Deric W. Haircare), Monday, 16 April 2012 19:20 (2 years ago) Permalink

the only apaches i could find on Netflix was some East German propaganda film from 1973. although Stalinist propaganda and life behind the Iron Curtain were quite awful, i'm assuming that this isn't the horror film apaches that people are talking about now?!?

onibaba o'reilly (Eisbaer), Monday, 16 April 2012 19:31 (2 years ago) Permalink

this is also something horrible & european from the 1970s and it's also about apaches:

onibaba o'reilly (Eisbaer), Monday, 16 April 2012 19:32 (2 years ago) Permalink

apaches was a public service type flick from the UK to convince kids not to play on farm equipment

diamanda ram dass (Edward III), Monday, 16 April 2012 19:33 (2 years ago) Permalink

here ya go

diamanda ram dass (Edward III), Monday, 16 April 2012 19:34 (2 years ago) Permalink

*thread goes silent as everyone watches apaches*

diamanda ram dass (Edward III), Monday, 16 April 2012 19:40 (2 years ago) Permalink

I think the thing that pushes Apaches firmly into the realm of horror is the aparent nonchalance of the adults. Oh, three of your playmates have died on that farm in as many days? Well, pay it no mind, dear. Run along and play now. It's infanticide by proxy, I tells ya.

Harried Ice Craw (Deric W. Haircare), Monday, 16 April 2012 19:40 (2 years ago) Permalink

more discussion of Apaches here: Public information HORROR film.

an independent online phenomenon (DJP), Monday, 16 April 2012 19:42 (2 years ago) Permalink

Hmmmm. Amaches may be getting a couple points.

HE HATES THESE CANS (Austerity Ponies), Monday, 16 April 2012 19:49 (2 years ago) Permalink

I think the thing that pushes Apaches firmly into the realm of horror is the aparent nonchalance of the adults. Oh, three of your playmates have died on that farm in as many days? Well, pay it no mind, dear. Run along and play now.

i interpret this more as LOL Britishes than LOL horror.

onibaba o'reilly (Eisbaer), Monday, 16 April 2012 19:53 (2 years ago) Permalink

just submitted a ballot. i think most of the ilx hardcore horror crew would not be happy with it, it's pretty canonical and i tend to favor non-gore-heavy movies, but i had a few idiosyncratic choices that i wanted to make sure got points or else i wouldn't have bothered voting

congratulations (n/a), Monday, 16 April 2012 19:55 (2 years ago) Permalink

Oh, y'know, I shoulda nominated Burnt Offerings. That movie creeped the hell out of me.

something of an astrological coup (tipsy mothra), Monday, 16 April 2012 20:00 (2 years ago) Permalink

It's on there, I think.

Polly biscuit face (carl agatha), Monday, 16 April 2012 20:00 (2 years ago) Permalink

Wait, no. Sorry!

Polly biscuit face (carl agatha), Monday, 16 April 2012 20:01 (2 years ago) Permalink

I mean, I don't think it's probably a good movie. But as a teenager, it spooked me.

something of an astrological coup (tipsy mothra), Monday, 16 April 2012 20:04 (2 years ago) Permalink

I'd actually argue that, in a lot of cases, the extent that a horror film veers away from 'matter of fact' is the extent to which it pulls its punches. I enjoy a great deal of stylistic variation within the genre, but the pulled punches are the reason I find very little of the genre legitimately scary.

"punches" certainly have something to do with horror, but aren't usually all that scary in and of themselves (jump scares notwithstanding). a film that simply and graphically depicted an child being burned with a lighter for an hour or two couldn't be accused of pulling any punches, but it probably wouldn't be at all scary. it would simply be repulsive and dispiriting. i completely disagree with deric here. matter of factness has no relationship to scariness. i'm not more scared by a knife wielding maniac in a film than a ghost simply because i think the former is more likely to exist. i'm not more scared by realism than fantasy. the scariest thing, imo, are the inchoate shapes the evocatively sculpted unknown can conjure in our minds. this is david lynch's best trick, and his films are hardly "matter of fact".

BEMORE SUPER FABBY (contenderizer), Monday, 16 April 2012 20:05 (2 years ago) Permalink

the scariest thing, imo, are the inchoate shapes the evocatively sculpted unknown can conjure in our minds.

see, I think the scariest thing is subject-verb disagreement

an independent online phenomenon (DJP), Monday, 16 April 2012 20:06 (2 years ago) Permalink

lol THINGS

BEMORE SUPER FABBY (contenderizer), Monday, 16 April 2012 20:10 (2 years ago) Permalink

I actually think we're agreeing in a weird way, contenderizer. When I say 'matter of fact' in this context, I'm not talking about bluntness or jump scares or realism (crazy dude vs. Lovecraftian Other) but rather the method of presentation. Camera tricks and spoooooky scores and anything OTT and showy are always, AFAIC, going to undercut any scares that a horror movie might've otherwise delivered. I'd argue that, by the definition I'm utilizing, Lynch's films are incredibly 'matter of fact' and, as a result, super effective. I suppose 'subtle' is a better word? It's about creating a substrate of normalcy that lulls the viewer into a false sense of security before letting things go horribly awry.

Harried Ice Craw (Deric W. Haircare), Monday, 16 April 2012 20:19 (2 years ago) Permalink

agreed, contenderizer. mystery/the unknown is much more effective than laying everything out. making something familiar/normal/matter-of-fact takes away what makes it frightening - or if it's something sadistic or disgusting that really shouldn't be normalized/made familiar, then it's just cruel and depressing

Chris S, Monday, 16 April 2012 20:21 (2 years ago) Permalink

Camera tricks and spoooooky scores and anything OTT and showy are always, AFAIC, going to undercut any scares that a horror movie might've otherwise delivered.

i'm even more lost now. lynch relies heavily on effects and music to generate a sense of dread.

figure you're drawing a distinction between that which reads as "horror cliche" and other means of generating atmosphere. on that level, i agree. old-fashioned "spooky" organ doesn't seem scary anymore because it's become familiar.

BEMORE SUPER FABBY (contenderizer), Monday, 16 April 2012 20:27 (2 years ago) Permalink

I mean, I can see the horror of being forced to face some abject condition, like Cronenberg-style body horror, but if it veers too much in to some demystified, scientifically-clinical, almost sociopathic perspective on the condition then it's taking away the alienation and repulsion that actually makes it horrific and becomes a sociopathic gaze

Chris S, Monday, 16 April 2012 20:29 (2 years ago) Permalink

re apaches: LOL death by drowning in animal shit

onibaba o'reilly (Eisbaer), Monday, 16 April 2012 20:29 (2 years ago) Permalink

on the subject of Ingmar-horror, i'll also stan for the virgin spring ... you get to see a young, buff Max von Sydow uproot a birch tree, rip off its branches and flog himself before doing his ass-whuppin'. it's also available on HuluPlus.

Does its availability on HuluPlus make it horror too?

Kevin John Bozelka, Monday, 16 April 2012 20:31 (2 years ago) Permalink

I think Through a Glass Darkly is the creepiest of the Bergmans I've seen. (Whether or not it's a horror film.)

something of an astrological coup (tipsy mothra), Monday, 16 April 2012 20:33 (2 years ago) Permalink


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