I have had it up to here waiting for the Beatles catalogue to be remastered

Message Bookmarked
Bookmark Removed
Not all messages are displayed: show all messages (2309 of them)

He's more than a competent drummer, Geir, but I don't expect you to understand that at all.

Sick Mouthy (Scik Mouthy), Thursday, 22 March 2012 12:44 (2 years ago) Permalink

He's a fantastic drummer.

nate woolls, Thursday, 22 March 2012 12:51 (2 years ago) Permalink

"Ticket to Ride" came on the radio yesterday, and all I could think about was that awesome drum beat that drives the thing.

Emperor Cos Dashit (Adam Bruneau), Thursday, 22 March 2012 14:17 (2 years ago) Permalink

What's great is that most people consider "Rain" to be Ringo's crowning moment of glory as a drummer, without considering that the tape on that was slowed down to change the key from A to G, and that he therefore played all those fills faster than we think he did.

jpattzlovevampz 2 hours ago (Phil D.), Thursday, 22 March 2012 15:02 (2 years ago) Permalink

Woahh - never heard that track before. Fabulous.

Doctor Casino, Thursday, 22 March 2012 15:42 (2 years ago) Permalink

I first heard that sped up version here:

This guy's got the bassline nailed perfectly but it really just makes you appreciated how awesome Paul is.

nate woolls, Friday, 23 March 2012 21:47 (2 years ago) Permalink

He really is. I'd love to listen to their catalogue with the bass mixed way up like that - I can never hear him properly. I only ever really pick him up on tracks like A Day In The Life or Mr Kite, which are amazing but I know there are so many treasures there.

(that guy's got a lovely tone btw)

Ismael Klata, Friday, 23 March 2012 22:12 (2 years ago) Permalink

i thought the remasters really brought the bass out tremendously compared to previous masters

konybrony (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Friday, 23 March 2012 22:15 (2 years ago) Permalink

Agreed he did a great job on "Rain". Also "Strawberry Fields Forever". I like Ringo's drumming, but even somebody as great as Jeff Porcaro, Phil Collins, Keith Moon, Bill Bruford, Lars Ulrich or Charlie Watts would still have been overshadowed by the other Fab Three. Because they were Fab'er than most anything else.

Hongroe (Geir Hongro), Friday, 23 March 2012 23:59 (2 years ago) Permalink

It's hard to imagine the Beatles with other drummers like some of those guys. I've mentioned it before, but that take of "Please Please Me" with the session drummer (ostensibly a good player) on Anthology 1 is the best proof that the Beatles would have been very different without Ringo and, in fact, may very well have not ended up being successful at all.

timellison, Saturday, 24 March 2012 01:00 (2 years ago) Permalink

http://blogcritics.org/music/article/would-the-real-drummer-on-please1/page-3/

This guy seems to have worked it out that it's Ringo on that version as well.

Mark G, Saturday, 24 March 2012 01:49 (2 years ago) Permalink

God, Paul really was like the trippiest bass player of any big 60s band! The more I'm paying attention to it, the more all his stuff from the second half of the 60s is just loopy and unpredictable as all hell. But it never really feels like he's being fussy or trying to get attention at the expense of the song, it just adds this level of complexity to the backing track that you can easily go years without noticing, except for seeing like a Beatles party cover band that seems to be lacking.... something ineffable.

Doctor Casino, Saturday, 24 March 2012 01:59 (2 years ago) Permalink

This guy seems to have worked it out that it's Ringo on that version as well.

!

Does sound reasonable that it's just an early version and Ringo wasn't playing it as well yet, listening again after reading that.

timellison, Saturday, 24 March 2012 02:23 (2 years ago) Permalink

The biggest revelation for me was how good Paul's bass playing was on the early 60's. Just listen to Please, Please Me or I Saw Her Standing There and hear how he drives the songs along. Another thing the re-masters have done is make me re-appreciate John's guitar playing. He really could make it "howl and move."

Ashes, Pits of Ashes (leavethecapital), Saturday, 24 March 2012 03:41 (2 years ago) Permalink

They definitely did not have that 'chugging away' rhythm section, Paul was noticeably great from the very beginning.

Peppermint Patty Hearst (VegemiteGrrl), Saturday, 24 March 2012 04:04 (2 years ago) Permalink

I don't know anything about playing drums, but Ringo's drum sound is so damn bright and funky around '67. "strawberry fields" and "hello goodbye" in particular.. damn

deaths and oil painting graphics (blank), Saturday, 24 March 2012 05:04 (2 years ago) Permalink

The drums on this,

Emperor Cos Dashit (Adam Bruneau), Saturday, 24 March 2012 05:11 (2 years ago) Permalink

Yeah, the drumming on Blue Jay Way is real cool. You kinda of get the sense of Ringo and George really having each other's backs on these songs that John and Paul seem to have 50-75% checked out on. Vid, unfortunately, reminds me why I've never really felt a burning, pressing need to see Magical Mystery Tour...

Doctor Casino, Saturday, 24 March 2012 05:20 (2 years ago) Permalink

I don't know anything about playing drums, but Ringo's drum sound is so damn bright and funky around '67. "strawberry fields" and "hello goodbye" in particular.. damn

There's a few reasons for that, I think. He had really soured on touring -- likely more than he ever let on -- and was restricted to hacking away as simply as possible just to keep the songs together. No one could hear themselves, or each other, so it was left to Ringo to make sure things didn't fall apart. Fills were kept to a minimum, and there was no room for him to develop or explore new ideas on the spur of the moment. Once they were back in the studio, like the others, he probably felt like he was let off the leash. So something like "Rain" happens, where he's finally able to blast out these incredible ideas that had been stifled by touring for however many months prior.

Also, with the arrival of engineer Geoff Emerick, his close-miking and compression techniques on Ringo's drums coincided with Ringo dampening them with tea towels, giving that broad, flat sound.

we can be gyros just for one day (Tarfumes The Escape Goat), Saturday, 24 March 2012 12:17 (2 years ago) Permalink

I think my favourite Ringo drums are on Don't Let Me Down. Favourite Paul bass is pretty hard... Maybe Something?

I wish to incorporate disco into my small business (chap), Saturday, 24 March 2012 15:30 (2 years ago) Permalink

Did ringo ever use oil filled heads? Basically 2 layer tom heads with a thin layer of oil between, I know ian paice from deep purple used them to get a deader sound

konybrony (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Saturday, 24 March 2012 15:36 (2 years ago) Permalink

I don't think Ringo used those heads in the Beatles; afaik, they hadn't been invented yet, but I'm not positive.

we can be gyros just for one day (Tarfumes The Escape Goat), Saturday, 24 March 2012 16:21 (2 years ago) Permalink

6 months pass...

all i need is cash!

tylerw, Thursday, 27 September 2012 15:09 (1 year ago) Permalink

DROOL on the mono set. Man. Hopefully by 2013 I can win on Jeopardy or something and indulge in a crazy purchase like that.

Doctor Casino, Thursday, 27 September 2012 15:13 (1 year ago) Permalink

http://ultimateclassicrock.com/beatles-vinyl-box-set/

The other link takes ages (or) doesn't work for UK

Mark G, Thursday, 27 September 2012 15:15 (1 year ago) Permalink

http://theseconddisc.com/2012/09/27/completely-fab-beatles-remasters-coming-to-vinyl/

very specific and tech-y presss release there. dudes know their audience!

piscesx, Thursday, 27 September 2012 16:42 (1 year ago) Permalink

Still, some audiophiles are complaining that they're mastered from digital sources.

5-Hour Enmity (Tarfumes The Escape Goat), Thursday, 27 September 2012 16:57 (1 year ago) Permalink

The Mono box is a given, I spent £170 on the CD box set and don't regret it for a minute.

my opinionation (Hamildan), Thursday, 27 September 2012 19:24 (1 year ago) Permalink

I am relatively deaf to the subtleties of remastering, though I like vinyl and The Beatles, and I like the conjunction of them in mono. It would be nice to be able to buy a new quality mono pressing of any of their albums.

However, I don't understand some things. Is there the idea that a new mono pressing would sound better than an original 1960s pressing? If so why? Is it just to do with the degradation of old vinyl? Would a new pressing sound better now than a 60s pressing sounded in the 60s, or is it just that they're using technology to make it sound as good now as it once would have? I could understand that, I guess. But if a new pressing is supposed to sound better than ever, how come? Surely whatever master tapes they're sourcing the music from would have degraded sufficiently to cancel out improvements in reproducing such tapes? Or is it - another idea - that improvements in EQing and *mystery audio sauce* mean that pressings now may sound fuller/more exciting than was possible in the 1960s even if they would be less representative of what was originally intended (though arguably more representative of what the intentions of 1960s people would be had they known these things would one day be possible)?

Eyeball Kicks, Thursday, 27 September 2012 22:37 (1 year ago) Permalink

i dunno about the beatles master tapes, but there are instances of the reading technology to have improved to the point where we can hear old recordings with better fidelity than the people who first heard them.

Philip Nunez, Thursday, 27 September 2012 22:44 (1 year ago) Permalink

Surely whatever master tapes they're sourcing the music from would have degraded sufficiently to cancel out improvements in reproducing such tapes?

Not necessarily. I don't know exactly what brand or type of tape the Beatles/Martin/EMI used, but Shel Talmy, working around the same time, used the most durable tape available. In fact, it was so durable that it would wear out tape heads after heavy use (which is why studios weren't too happy with Talmy). In the long run, however, that meant the tapes for My Generation were in far better shape after 30+ years than the tapes for Who's Next (some of which disintegrated when being prepared for remix/remaster).

5-Hour Enmity (Tarfumes The Escape Goat), Thursday, 27 September 2012 22:48 (1 year ago) Permalink

These are interesting things. Would like to hear more about this stuff.

Eyeball Kicks, Thursday, 27 September 2012 22:52 (1 year ago) Permalink

For one thing original mono presses of beatle albums in good condition aren't that easy to come by

farte blanche (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Thursday, 27 September 2012 23:01 (1 year ago) Permalink

Sure, I get that. But I was wondering whether these then amounted to quality reissues or, somehow, improvements. Honestly fascinated by this. I have some original mono Beatles vinyl of variable quality. As I said, I'd love to be able to buy a new one for, say, £20, as opposed to taking a chance on a second-hand copy priced the same or more.

Eyeball Kicks, Thursday, 27 September 2012 23:07 (1 year ago) Permalink

i remember reading some article about the crazy alchemy involved in separating vocals from instruments for the beatles rock band game, something about making it sound even better than the official releases, but i could be conflating that with the rock band metallica tracks sounding better...

Philip Nunez, Thursday, 27 September 2012 23:08 (1 year ago) Permalink

there are great 60's, 70's, and 80's beatles pressings. tons of them.

scott seward, Thursday, 27 September 2012 23:09 (1 year ago) Permalink

i guess i'm always surprised that i don't see really decent or nice beatles records in my local store that often, and often times if they are there they cost more than these new reissues, so i guess i'm game to buy at least one and see how it sounds

farte blanche (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Thursday, 27 September 2012 23:12 (1 year ago) Permalink

that improvements in EQing and *mystery audio sauce* mean that pressings now may sound fuller/more exciting than was possible in the 1960s

I'm guessing that this is correct.

even if they would be less representative of what was originally intended (though arguably more representative of what the intentions of 1960s people would be had they known these things would one day be possible)?

On the other hand, I'd think that it would be easy to overstate the potential problem regarding original intention. Vinyl masterings are, I think, always different sounding, involving different gear and different engineers. It's never going to sound exactly like the tape and a mastering done now could well sound more like the tape than one done fifty years ago. I'm sure it just varies a lot depending on the particular instance.

timellison, Thursday, 27 September 2012 23:18 (1 year ago) Permalink

I mentioned on ILV that I got an '80s U.K. mono pressing of A Hard Day's Night less than a week ago. It is sourced from digital but I think the sound on it is really impressive.

timellison, Thursday, 27 September 2012 23:20 (1 year ago) Permalink

people still buying the old mfsl boxes for 800+. and there is a reason for that. they're great. you can still find individual mfsl pressings for 4o-50. not cheap, but kinda worth it. even a mono parlophone revolver or whatever can be found online for 40+. also worth it. japanese pressings in the 70's and 80's were great. i get nice capitol/apple beatles records all the time at the store. some of them are unbelievable.the earlier the pressing the better. i try to find the perfect white album. i have one now that is preeeeeeetty near perfect. sounds insane. a jaw-dropper.

i wasn't a fan of the cd remixes so i doubt i'd buy one of these.

there are also nice mono parlophone reissues of various vintages. they sound great too.

they have been repressed sooooo many times. the only ones i wouldn't recommend would be 80's-era american copies.

scott seward, Thursday, 27 September 2012 23:21 (1 year ago) Permalink

there are great 60's, 70's, and 80's beatles pressings. tons of them.

I think I have some of those! Do you think the new ones are useful? Honestly I don't get it. Apart from maybe just being able to pick up a new mono copy of Revolver for £20 instead of a worn-out, roughed-up copy that the shop put up on the wall for the same price. You think there's something new to hear in this? Genuine question. I'd trust your ears over my own.

Eyeball Kicks, Thursday, 27 September 2012 23:22 (1 year ago) Permalink

You sort of answered the questions already.

Eyeball Kicks, Thursday, 27 September 2012 23:23 (1 year ago) Permalink

i wasn't a fan of the cd remixes

For the record, there have been no remixes...

timellison, Thursday, 27 September 2012 23:25 (1 year ago) Permalink

they'll probably sound nice and shiny. and be really loud.

scott seward, Thursday, 27 September 2012 23:25 (1 year ago) Permalink

i call them remixes cuz i don't like them. or how they were made.

scott seward, Thursday, 27 September 2012 23:26 (1 year ago) Permalink

They're just another mastering job.

timellison, Thursday, 27 September 2012 23:26 (1 year ago) Permalink

i remember reading some article about the crazy alchemy involved in separating vocals from instruments for the beatles rock band game, something about making it sound even better than the official releases, but i could be conflating that with the rock band metallica tracks sounding better...

― Philip Nunez, Thursday, September 27, 2012 7:08 PM (11 minutes ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

From about 1966 on, the Beatles would fill up four tracks, bounce these down to one track of another four track, fill up the remaining three tracks, and so on. Naturally, they couldn't bounce down too many times, as the sound quality would degrade. But what I think they did for Rock Band (and for the 1999 Yellow Submarine Songtrack, and for Love) was go back to the original pre-bounced multitracks, sync them all up, and were therefore able to separate the individual elements.

5-Hour Enmity (Tarfumes The Escape Goat), Thursday, 27 September 2012 23:26 (1 year ago) Permalink

For the record, there have been no remixes...

George Martin did stereo remixes of Help! and Rubber Soul in 1986/87 for the first wave of CDs.

5-Hour Enmity (Tarfumes The Escape Goat), Thursday, 27 September 2012 23:27 (1 year ago) Permalink

That's true. And there's the Yellow Submarine Songtrack CD also.

timellison, Thursday, 27 September 2012 23:28 (1 year ago) Permalink


You must be logged in to post. Please either login here, or if you are not registered, you may register here.