DEM not gonna CON dis NATION: Rolling UK politics in the short-lived post-Murdoch era

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Fair point. Judge had no cause to mention cenotaph at all.

Strictly vote-splitting (DL), Friday, 15 July 2011 14:00 (3 years ago) Permalink

The judge gave another student 12 months last week for throwing a stick.

http://www.yorkpress.co.uk/news/9128855.Talented_student_jailed_over_riot/

that was the last arrow in my quiver of whimsy (Ned Trifle II), Friday, 15 July 2011 14:03 (3 years ago) Permalink

Judicial appointments
Senior Circuit Judge Appointment - Price QC

11 July 2011

The Lord Chancellor, the Right Honourable Kenneth Clarke QC MP has appointed His Honour Judge Nicholas Peter Lees Price QC to be a Senior Circuit Judge, Resident Judge based at Kingston Crown Court Centre effect from Monday 11 July 2011.

hmmn

nakhchivan, Friday, 15 July 2011 14:17 (3 years ago) Permalink

They're charged with 'violent disorder' rather than criminal damage, which means the penalties are much more severe. Being part of a large group and being in a public place are aggravating factors.

The whole area of the law is extremely controversial as you're not really being judged on the acts you carried out but the wider context of the event. Someone got five years, a while back, for throwing stones at police during a 'riot'.

модный хипстер (ShariVari), Friday, 15 July 2011 14:23 (3 years ago) Permalink

i see that martin rowson still hasn't mastered the felt tip

Ward Fowler, Friday, 15 July 2011 14:37 (3 years ago) Permalink

3.47pm: Breaking: David Cameron hosted Andy Coulson at Chequers this spring after his resignation in January ... More details soon ...

natalie imbroglio (suzy), Friday, 15 July 2011 14:49 (3 years ago) Permalink

He was calling him his friend a week ago

R. Stornoway (Tom D.), Friday, 15 July 2011 14:51 (3 years ago) Permalink

don't forget The Official Newscorp/UK end of season finale/Rebekah Brooks did 9/11 thread

probably not going to keep murdoch and uk politics completely separate (am i right?!?!), but started another thread because the newscorp stuff going international and it was drowning out good honest tory scum news.

caek, Friday, 15 July 2011 15:07 (3 years ago) Permalink

OK, to repost (which is disappointing) I notice that this thread has managed to spend even less time on the defense review than the mainstream media. Do people really have nothing to say? (I spent my afternoon with journos and people waiting to lose their jobs) It's another tory attack on Scotland, but this time it leaves British armed forces in an impossible position.

textbook blows on the head (dowd), Monday, 18 July 2011 19:35 (3 years ago) Permalink

As a lily-livered pacifist type, I'm not entirely unhappy that cuts are being made in defence spending, but yes, this whole thing sounds like it has fucked an entire community over. DOn't seem to be any real plans for creating new jobs there.

scraping wheatus off the wheel (NickB), Monday, 18 July 2011 19:43 (3 years ago) Permalink

I come from an air force family btw and spent my childhood on various bases, so I appreciated what a huge thing this is for the people that live there.

scraping wheatus off the wheel (NickB), Monday, 18 July 2011 19:44 (3 years ago) Permalink

Yeah, me too - I've lived my whole life on or near RAF bases (and I'm a lily-livered pacifist too, though I've recently decided on certain revolutionary exceptions). But Fox even referred to the SNP's (very unlikely to succeed) threat of independence as a reason for the decision. He's punishing communities for how they vote.

textbook blows on the head (dowd), Monday, 18 July 2011 19:54 (3 years ago) Permalink

Hadn't caught that aspect of it, but Fox has always been a huge cock.

Should say best wishes to you and yours dowd, dunno what you do but I hope yr okay.

scraping wheatus off the wheel (NickB), Monday, 18 July 2011 19:57 (3 years ago) Permalink

It's kinda up in the air at the mo, but cheers.

textbook blows on the head (dowd), Monday, 18 July 2011 20:01 (3 years ago) Permalink

i had thought the scots wanted uk armed forces off their patch??

so brycey (history mayne), Monday, 18 July 2011 20:05 (3 years ago) Permalink

Doubtless some of them do - the minority who support independence. But no-one in communities around these bases wants them to go. We should have found another of Ewen MacGregor's siblings to protect Leuchars, as they (thankfully) did Lossiemouth.

textbook blows on the head (dowd), Monday, 18 July 2011 20:09 (3 years ago) Permalink

Quite sad about this. I worked at Leuchars for 8 years and had a great time, still know a few people there and hope things will work out ok for them.

The multi-talented F.R. David (Billy Dods), Monday, 18 July 2011 20:19 (3 years ago) Permalink

Brooks's husband Charlie says bag belonged to him not Rebekah. Spokesman says: "A cleaner thought it was rubbish and put it in the bin.

What cleaner throws a computer in a bin? loool

prolego, Monday, 18 July 2011 20:21 (3 years ago) Permalink

scotland hates tories, tories hate us. this will never change.

you've got male (jim in glasgow), Monday, 18 July 2011 20:24 (3 years ago) Permalink

also the nats don't want rid of the brit armed forces, salmond campaigned against this iirc.

you've got male (jim in glasgow), Monday, 18 July 2011 20:26 (3 years ago) Permalink

Yes, he did - he gave a speech n the village hall across the road from my house. The SNP's position was that we've already lost a base, so expecting Scotland to bear 2 of it's 3 bases closed was ridiculous, so both Lossiemouth and Leuchars should stay open.

At least it will be quieter here - the Typhoons are noisy as hell. Now it'll just be rifle drills and the odd helicopter (assuming the vague ideas about an army barracks come to fruition, and even then it'll probably be about five years)

textbook blows on the head (dowd), Monday, 18 July 2011 20:29 (3 years ago) Permalink

imo the defence review is classic osbornomics, ie unserious. it wasn't a real review: if they don't want the uk to be one of the big clubs, they should make that case, but doing it as part of a defence review *and then launching into a new war* was just derrrrrrrrrrrrp.

so brycey (history mayne), Monday, 18 July 2011 20:33 (3 years ago) Permalink

Fox kept responding to questions by saying things like 'in order to achieve a regular/reservist proportion similar to the US we have to...' but he never explained why such a ratio was desirable. Of course, it's all about the £££'s, but he should have the guts to say so.

textbook blows on the head (dowd), Monday, 18 July 2011 20:38 (3 years ago) Permalink

November 2006:

Shadow Olympics minister Hugh Robertson said: "The secretary of state has admitted to a 40% increase.

"She has failed to disclose the true cost of VAT, contingency, building cost inflation and security, much of which was entirely predictable at the time of the bid.

"Today's increase is just a starting point. While the figures remain ambiguous, we can only expect further increases."

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/6167504.stm

July 2011:

The Olympic Delivery Authority has announced 88% of the building programme for London 2012 is now complete.

It has also been announced the anticipated final cost of the project fell by £16m during the last quarter.

This has prompted Sports Minister Hugh Robertson to say for the first time he is "confident" the project will come in under its £9.3bn budget.

He said: "With one year to go construction is 88% complete, ahead of time and under budget."

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-14201730

James Mitchell, Tuesday, 19 July 2011 13:23 (3 years ago) Permalink

NHS services opened to competition

stet, Tuesday, 19 July 2011 14:59 (3 years ago) Permalink

FUCK THESE PEOPLE.

natalie imbroglio (suzy), Tuesday, 19 July 2011 15:04 (3 years ago) Permalink

Wheelchair services an interesting choice for the first round, given Cameron's been talking about his troubles with them.

stet, Tuesday, 19 July 2011 15:05 (3 years ago) Permalink

Seriously, fuck these guys. They know it's completely buried.

emil.y, Tuesday, 19 July 2011 15:05 (3 years ago) Permalink

I hear Champneys in Tring treats people in wheelchairs well...

James Mitchell, Tuesday, 19 July 2011 15:43 (3 years ago) Permalink

Interesting choice of day to announce this eh?

a million anons (onimo), Tuesday, 19 July 2011 15:52 (3 years ago) Permalink

The Guardian has the Lansley announcement story on page 15, the Independent on page 21, The Times on page 17 and the Daily Mail on page 31. And that's your lot.

James Mitchell, Wednesday, 20 July 2011 07:16 (3 years ago) Permalink

iirc this was something that was going to happen. and now it has happened, kind of thing.

only bad dog on the street (history mayne), Wednesday, 20 July 2011 08:14 (3 years ago) Permalink

Osborne's lost his (Jonny) marbles?

R. Stornoway (Tom D.), Thursday, 21 July 2011 11:34 (3 years ago) Permalink

Dorset County Council is closing 9 of its 34 libraries, with 11 of those left to be run by unpaid volunteers and community groups.

Apparently it's OK because 75 per cent of Dorset residents never set foot inside a library.

Wonder what the percentage of primary school age children is. Oh.

James Mitchell, Thursday, 21 July 2011 14:04 (3 years ago) Permalink

They all vote Tory down there anyway, so fuck 'em, they're getting what they voted for

R. Stornoway (Tom D.), Thursday, 21 July 2011 14:06 (3 years ago) Permalink

those primary school age child tory voters are the fuckin worst

MY WEEDS STRONG BLUD.mp3 (nakhchivan), Thursday, 21 July 2011 14:07 (3 years ago) Permalink

Let them take it up with their parents

R. Stornoway (Tom D.), Thursday, 21 July 2011 14:07 (3 years ago) Permalink

d-cam is editing the next issue of the big issue o_0 o_0

whose ideas was that? good god

lex pretend, Friday, 22 July 2011 09:20 (3 years ago) Permalink

sure that's "editing" and not "selling" ?

graveshitwave (Noodle Vague), Friday, 22 July 2011 09:23 (3 years ago) Permalink

get on with running the country into the ground you prick

ledge, Friday, 22 July 2011 09:23 (3 years ago) Permalink

Yeah, in this current situation, that's bound to be a good idea.

Next up, Harold Shipman opens his own old people's home...

Mark G, Friday, 22 July 2011 09:24 (3 years ago) Permalink

d-cam is editing the next issue of the big issue o_0 o_0

whose ideas was that?

[Big Issue founder, John] Bird revealed in 2010 "My guilty secret is that I’m really a working class Tory. There, I’ve said it. I’d love to be a liberal because they’re the nice people but it’s really hard work – I can’t swallow their gullibility and I think their ideas are stupid. I’d love to be someone who wonders around in a kind of Utopian paradise seeing only the good in everybody but I just can’t. I support capital punishment for a start. I know this will destroy my reputation among middle-class liberals but I’m 64 now and I should be able to breathe a bit. Wearing the corsetry of liberalism means that every now and then you have to take it off."

R. Stornoway (Tom D.), Friday, 22 July 2011 10:44 (3 years ago) Permalink

My guilty secret is that I’m really a working class Tory

Form what i've seen of this guy over the years I wouldn't exactly call that a secret

R. Stornoway (Tom D.), Friday, 22 July 2011 10:46 (3 years ago) Permalink

"working class"

graveshitwave (Noodle Vague), Friday, 22 July 2011 10:48 (3 years ago) Permalink

Is that the British meaning of 'liberal' or the American definition?

natalie imbroglio (suzy), Friday, 22 July 2011 10:53 (3 years ago) Permalink

US I imagine, I assume the sneer used when saying it is the same in any case

R. Stornoway (Tom D.), Friday, 22 July 2011 10:54 (3 years ago) Permalink

Getting people to sell your product without having to worry about if they have enough to pay their mortgages...

Mark G, Friday, 22 July 2011 10:55 (3 years ago) Permalink

Plus, of course, being pure 'profit-share' means the minimum wage doesn't apply, right?

Mark G, Friday, 22 July 2011 10:56 (3 years ago) Permalink

I'm not slagging the whole enterprise, just defining it.

Mark G, Friday, 22 July 2011 10:56 (3 years ago) Permalink

the same in many instances

Nothing less than the Spirit of the Age (nakhchivan), Wednesday, 3 September 2014 16:45 (2 weeks ago) Permalink

Setting according to ability for separate subjects is controversial since it is argued that it helps those with high ability and leaves those with lower ability behind.

this is really shitty writing

Nothing less than the Spirit of the Age (nakhchivan), Wednesday, 3 September 2014 16:45 (2 weeks ago) Permalink

how do private schools deal w/ differing levels?

all children of wealthy parents extremely able and clever iirc

intelligent, expressive males within the greater metropolitan (Bananaman Begins), Wednesday, 3 September 2014 16:46 (2 weeks ago) Permalink

government already denying this is a policy according to Radio 4

there are several studies that indicate that mixed ability groups raise the achievement of "less able" students far more than they inhibit the "more able" students

Daphnis Celesta, Wednesday, 3 September 2014 16:50 (2 weeks ago) Permalink

high school education in the uk is so thoroughly rotten that I struggle to deal w/ one issue in isolation

ogmor, Wednesday, 3 September 2014 16:53 (2 weeks ago) Permalink

oh yeah absolutely i think the structure's fucked top to bottom but for some reason i get extra angry when education policy continually pushes middle class prejudices over any concessions to pedagogic theory

Daphnis Celesta, Wednesday, 3 September 2014 16:56 (2 weeks ago) Permalink

cf. making 3 year-olds learn to write etc etc

Daphnis Celesta, Wednesday, 3 September 2014 16:57 (2 weeks ago) Permalink

this suggestion that every class be apportioned to a certain percentile grouping by 'ability', however that is meaured, is fairly extreme and not common in a global context

selective education for 'gifted' kids while leaving the rest 'mixed ability' is fairly common across the world

Nothing less than the Spirit of the Age (nakhchivan), Wednesday, 3 September 2014 17:04 (2 weeks ago) Permalink

yes, all kids shd be challenged but this can be achieved within mixed classes or via supplemental learning opportunities, without necessarily introducing schoolchildren to the idea of intelligence as a hierarchy

Daphnis Celesta, Wednesday, 3 September 2014 17:07 (2 weeks ago) Permalink

As far back as 2006, David Cameron said: "I want to see setting in every single school. Parents know it works. Teachers know it works. Tony Blair promised it in 1997. But it still hasn't happened. We will keep up the pressure till it does."

has anyone done any research into this presumed parental support controlling for rosy expectations rather than getting people to agree with a vague version of separate development while many of them labour under the delusion that their children will obviously be in the elite grouping

Nothing less than the Spirit of the Age (nakhchivan), Wednesday, 3 September 2014 17:11 (2 weeks ago) Permalink

as i say, education policy - across the political spectrum - seems to be more beholden to some kind of assumed folk wisdom than almost any other aspect of government in the UK. people get sentimental and stupid about their children, maybe

Daphnis Celesta, Wednesday, 3 September 2014 17:12 (2 weeks ago) Permalink

also teaching has always been held in low esteem as a profession here

Daphnis Celesta, Wednesday, 3 September 2014 17:13 (2 weeks ago) Permalink

without necessarily introducing schoolchildren to the idea of intelligence as a hierarchy

― Daphnis Celesta, Wednesday, 3 September 2014 18:07 (3 minutes ago)

they know this much anyway, it's merely a question of degree as to how much the scholastic system reinforces it

Nothing less than the Spirit of the Age (nakhchivan), Wednesday, 3 September 2014 17:16 (2 weeks ago) Permalink

i thought about that but i think it's maybe not the same: perhaps outside of educational settings children recognize that some of them are more clever than others but school is an excellent mechanism for reifying those thoughts and turning whatever learning is into one more status race

Daphnis Celesta, Wednesday, 3 September 2014 17:19 (2 weeks ago) Permalink

I've talked to a couple of teachers separately about this, and they have both said something along the lines of "everyone thinks they're an expert, because everyone has been to school". And of course confirmation bias occurs- I was surprised to read Tony Judt, of all people, defending selective grammar schools, apparently on the basis that it had done him and a lot of his Cambridge mates the world of good.

Barry Gordy (Neil S), Wednesday, 3 September 2014 17:46 (2 weeks ago) Permalink

the signature experience of being in various higher classes or groups in school (schools with some degree of academic selection on entry too) or 'gifted' type programmes outside of school hours is that the status dysphoria is probably at its most pronounced within those groups that are the supposed beneficiaries

for example the first group in mathematics was divided into two and within the new first group, which was very small, the slower kids seemed to get terribly downcast about their progress, as well as being subject to various unkindnesses from those without

if this were a martin samuel column he would probably post an embed of shot by both sides now

Nothing less than the Spirit of the Age (nakhchivan), Wednesday, 3 September 2014 17:49 (2 weeks ago) Permalink

ftr i am favour of some form of 'gifted education', although if it were invented ex nihilo it wouldn't look like anything in the current uk education sector, public or private, and it would be important that its boundaries are fluid rather than set at a certain juncture and fixed forever more

my discomfort with this is less for its inegalitarianism and more that when abstracted it becomes a sort of utilitarian argument not categorically dissimilar to the 'we need to ensure future raymond kurzweils are given infinite nurture for the benefit of humanity' arguments that high functioning types come up with....and that invites the plausible argument that the world needs fewer proto-kurzweils

Nothing less than the Spirit of the Age (nakhchivan), Wednesday, 3 September 2014 18:00 (2 weeks ago) Permalink

a thought I had in high school was that what parents who sent their kids to private schools were paying for was for certain kids not to be there. the loudest exponents of private schooling I have met have been motivated/aspirational types who went to shit state schools (yr post-thatcher working class in ilx terms mb). streaming might seem like another means to a similar end.

extra provision for kids who are struggling most, esp those with special needs, seems obviously most important, & ime the lowest sets always seemed to have the most resources concentrated on them (smaller classes, lots of assistants etc.). I think some streaming is inevitable when you're preparing students for different GCSE papers

ogmor, Wednesday, 3 September 2014 18:33 (2 weeks ago) Permalink

right

p much with daphnis on this. will outline my own experiences (from the similar position to nakh of being generally towards the high-achieving end of top sets, yah boo sucks etc)

basically, there was absolutely no need to stream, even under the auspices of 'scholarship classes', 'oxbridge classes' & so forth. (the former & increasingly the latter are obviated, at high-end private school level, by extrascholarly tuition, hai dere)

in state schools, parents won't be able to afford tuition so much (but setting might encourage them to go down this route increasingly. money in the bank!)

actually though there's no need and it striates the school in ways that are entirely unhelpful, ensconcing complexes of intellectual superiority & inferiority that take years to erode (learning how stupid i truly was took a very long time & repeat ilx shamings to achieve) and don't reflect anything other than application towards testing

at the gifted & talented weekend/summer school courses i devise and run, i often teach classes whose ages vary between 14 and 18, 11 and 15 & so forth. some kids are already extremely well-versed in the material i'm teaching, some not at all. some are forthright and confident, some not. but here's the thing: they collaborate, work together, support one another, contribute, supply content, take something from the activity. some take more, some take less. that's ok. the main thing is that they've all chosen to be there, doing that activity, and they're prepared to give it a go

rather than setting we should be breaking down outdated notions of hierarchy-by-age, hierarchy-by-ability & allow students to commingle more abstractly, imo. this has the side benefit of not seeming quite so much the machine churning out baked entrepreneurs, kurzweils who've got nothing to boast aside from their own carefully-nurtured ambition, their sense of competition calibrated through the appellations of high achievement & elite cadres

imago, Wednesday, 3 September 2014 20:51 (2 weeks ago) Permalink

a thought I had in high school was that what parents who sent their kids to private schools were paying for was for certain kids not to be there.

― ogmor, Wednesday, 3 September 2014 19:33 (2 hours ago)

this is part of it but there are positive, if merely auratic elements too

engineering the absence of non-desired groups seems more like a foundational element of the current mainstream state sector, now under the auspices of pseudo-marketisation, so that where this was once achieved once by catchment areas/land values alone, now these schools are further differentiated by their division of aptitudes, sports technology colleges vs humanities and enterprise academies etc

Nothing less than the Spirit of the Age (nakhchivan), Wednesday, 3 September 2014 20:58 (2 weeks ago) Permalink

and lj i was reminded of those classes you were teaching here too

'gifted education', which is no more dreadful than any other euphemism circulated for it, at least in the humanities should be more about encouraging reflexity of thought, of getting to engage as early as possible in something like 'critical thinking'

the objective would be to bind something like conscience, to consider value systems rather than the sort of mimetic redeploying of tropes that you know will get you, or rather force the examiner to give you an a* which is virtually all most clever kids are doing at school

this is already achieved to some extent in mathematical subjects where the approach to 'gifted' kids begins by getting them to use the material of the normal syllabus in non-obvious fashions

Nothing less than the Spirit of the Age (nakhchivan), Wednesday, 3 September 2014 21:10 (2 weeks ago) Permalink

absolutely agree, and ftr my courses largely do require some consideration of the metaphysical-educational, the process of study and induction itself. even with my primary tuition client i'm trying to ensconce some level of critical thinking, of close analysis of terms that transcends the dull presumptions appended in the classroom

imago, Wednesday, 3 September 2014 21:14 (2 weeks ago) Permalink

Private schools absolutely stream, they re also highly selective, so they are streaming within whatever strata they have chosen. I went to an elite public school and even there streaming can be very restrictive and divisive. I needed up in the bottom set for French and was basically told that I was no good at languages. I persevered, took on german as well and got a teacher who taught rather than drilled language. That unlocked my I can speak three non-english european languages with reasonable and varying degrees of fluency, read a newspaper in a few more and I'm now making great strides in Mandarin.

Streaming only serves to tell students that they are no good at something, and sends the message to teachers (in many cases) that they don't need to bother because those children aren't worth the effort.

American Fear of Pranksterism (Ed), Thursday, 4 September 2014 02:39 (1 week ago) Permalink

Panic stations

Looks like a desperate attempt to cling onto power for a bit longer. I don't see the issue - you can't legislate on the basis that Labour *might* win the election and *might* be dependent on Scottish MPs for a majority (even if both of those things are the most likely outcome as things stand). There's no reason you couldn't have the general election in 2015 and if Labour end up with a majority while they have Scottish MPs, but then lose this majority a year later, then they either have to form a coalition then or we have another election in 2016.

Turtleneck Work Solutions (Nasty, Brutish & Short), Thursday, 4 September 2014 08:50 (1 week ago) Permalink

I persevered, took on german as well and got a teacher who taught rather than drilled language

Stokes or Rees?

imago, Thursday, 4 September 2014 08:56 (1 week ago) Permalink

(and yeah, your experience sounds about right)

imago, Thursday, 4 September 2014 08:57 (1 week ago) Permalink

There is no way in hell the Conservative Party would keep Cameron in the event of a Yes vote. The fury from Tory backbenchers will be so intense it would lead to a vote of no confidence / calls for his resignation or a level of rebellion that would break the coalition. He might be able to hang on but he would be severely weakened. We could be in for a year of complete chaos.

Matt DC, Thursday, 4 September 2014 09:41 (1 week ago) Permalink

The No approach in Scotland is now turning towards "Cameron's going to lose, don't worry about it, you can vote No in safety". Which is the weirdest thing to see Tories saying.

http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/76b900ae-337b-11e4-85f1-00144feabdc0.html#axzz3CLapbeCm

stet, Thursday, 4 September 2014 11:57 (1 week ago) Permalink

education policy - across the political spectrum - seems to be more beholden to some kind of assumed folk wisdom than almost any other aspect of government in the UK

Pretty sure this is also true for science, health, drugs... seems that any policy area which actually has a strong evidence base will have its own team of qualified independent experts whose advice is routinely ignored.

michelin star cross'd lovers (ledge), Thursday, 4 September 2014 12:03 (1 week ago) Permalink


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