frat rap

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idk yes the music is terrible (to my ears) but if they can garner some kind of following in this day of balkanized music taste and make a living off of this, and the music is harmless, more power to them I guess, even if they won't be blowing up on pitchfork anytime soon

dayo, Sunday, 13 March 2011 01:42 (3 years ago) Permalink

oh fratrap.tumblr.com is a real thing... huh

«( «_«)» zzzz «(«_« )» (Lamp), Sunday, 13 March 2011 01:43 (3 years ago) Permalink

yeah I mean like I say there's lots of music that's just kicking ass in the marketplace without much critical att'n. Creed, for several years, were selling out arenas & scanning insane numbers and nobody who cared about music had ever heard of them. Devotchka sells & draws like you wouldn't believe. world is huge, lots of populations/demographics that we don't even hear or think about because we do not dig what they're into

five gone cats from Boston (underrated aerosmith bootlegs I have owned), Sunday, 13 March 2011 01:44 (3 years ago) Permalink

yah idk how much i have to say abt this as it relates to the rap game or w/e but its basically children's music - super simple, focus on repetitious sing-along chorus, void of introspection, v 'functional', its p tedious but understandable as party music.

like idk maybe theres something interesting in the way that college age kidz are making blithe & unthinking party rap music instead of dmb-esque acoustic guitar shit & how 'rap' is basically the dominant pop idiom now, & blah blah blah

«( «_«)» zzzz «(«_« )» (Lamp), Sunday, 13 March 2011 01:58 (3 years ago) Permalink

thing is a lot of frats have like a 'rap dude'---some guy in the house that prides himself on a) his knowledge of the genre ('i'm pretty into hip-hop') and b) freestyles when he's drunk, and is actually ok at it.

throw in a frat brother that can 'make beats' (ie copy shit from the 90s) and some lyrics that are written expressly for the enjoyment of frat party attendees and you have an act that can book shows on a frat house circuit

they'll make no money on merch, get paid in beer and weed, but they'll make a ton of casual fans ("oh dude i totally saw these guys at AD when i was a sophomore...it ruled! totally smoked up the DJ") and possibly parlay that into a touring act that plays college towns exclusively.

our v own aerosmith has played on TV (great work btw), but widespread panic has sold out red rocks 35 times (according to wiki) and i'd hazard one of those gigs is more lucrative than the other, both in the short- and long-term

basically: OF on Kimmel and Kanye's twitter ain't shit.

ullr saves (gbx), Sunday, 13 March 2011 02:20 (3 years ago) Permalink

omg so many truth bombs in that post

kl0p's son (k3vin k.), Sunday, 13 March 2011 03:05 (3 years ago) Permalink

Only tangentially related but: I went to see Chromeo in Oakland recently - I know they're not especially liked on ILM but I love them - and was shocked at the percentage of fratty bros in attendance. IME frat dudes like Sublime, RHCP, popular rap, or around here Bay Area rap, but tongue-in-cheek French-Canadian 80s-style electro R&B? Who knew?

champagne hippies trying to recapture their youth (Whitey on the Moon), Sunday, 13 March 2011 03:05 (3 years ago) Permalink

OAR is freaky stealth popular. There's a whole scene of dave matthews diaspora stuff that is creepy big. I just saw a live thing of some oar type band that I'd never heard of and never seen mentioned on ilx or by anyone I know. The live footage was from a sold out madison square garden

gr8080 sings the blues (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Sunday, 13 March 2011 03:08 (3 years ago) Permalink

The Arcade Fire aren't THAT bad.

Ned Raggett, Sunday, 13 March 2011 03:11 (3 years ago) Permalink

OAR played my university's spring break festival xp

dayo, Sunday, 13 March 2011 03:13 (3 years ago) Permalink

OAR/Widespread/DMB too imo et al are all part of what I consider the post-Dead extension - they came into existence when the Dead were still touring & a generation of mobile, connected college kids were starting to get into Dead shows but then Jerry died in, what, '95? and all these bands that were establishing a foothold sort of rushed to fill the space left by following the Dead all summer, and they had enough chops & affinity for the audience that they really managed to secure a spot

this is my half-assed ill-thought-through but long-held theory anyway

five gone cats from Boston (underrated aerosmith bootlegs I have owned), Sunday, 13 March 2011 03:33 (3 years ago) Permalink

Yeah, that seems about right.

phantoms from a world gone by speak again the immortal tale: (Jenny), Sunday, 13 March 2011 03:35 (3 years ago) Permalink

no that is pretty much true -- those bands are much more about smoking weed and nostalgia for things you never experienced (woodstock) than it is about frats or w/e

J0rdan S., Sunday, 13 March 2011 03:36 (3 years ago) Permalink

as an aside: who actually ~makes more money~ from music (not side ventures): kanye or the roots? like, seriously---i have seen the roots exactly twice and once was in 2002 (college show at sold out field house---so, thousands) and the other was at the x-games lol in 2005 which was broadcast live on espn

obv i'm guessing kanye makes more money (economies of scale), and more people have heard of him, but i guess my real question is: how much money can you make ~per fan~ by touring v. album sales? the frat-circuit (which extends waaaay beyond frats btw) is insanely lucrative, i'd think. college events boards and frat houses pay more than shitty dives, and if there's enough booze andno one's actively bored, then every show nets like 100% name-recognition

NB this may only apply to "small liberal-arts colleges that are relatively isolated."

ullr saves (gbx), Sunday, 13 March 2011 03:37 (3 years ago) Permalink

wow I have never heard of OAR

iatee, Sunday, 13 March 2011 03:38 (3 years ago) Permalink

also those bands that aero mentions & that we're talking about all go out and do festivals all summer & festivals none of us have ever heard of -- pretty much anywhere in the US where there is a large field or campground, somebody will organize a jam band festival, TONS of ppl will show up to get stoned, and tons of jam bands will play there -- and this happens every summer, all summer

J0rdan S., Sunday, 13 March 2011 03:42 (3 years ago) Permalink

OAR/Widespread/DMB too imo et al are all part of what I consider the post-Dead extension - they came into existence when the Dead were still touring & a generation of mobile, connected college kids were starting to get into Dead shows but then Jerry died in, what, '95? and all these bands that were establishing a foothold sort of rushed to fill the space left by following the Dead all summer, and they had enough chops & affinity for the audience that they really managed to secure a spot

this is my half-assed ill-thought-through but long-held theory anyway

― five gone cats from Boston (underrated aerosmith bootlegs I have owned), Saturday, March 12, 2011 9:33 PM (8 minutes ago) Bookmark Suggest Ban Permalink

Yeah, that seems about right.

― phantoms from a world gone by speak again the immortal tale: (Jenny), Saturday, March 12, 2011 9:35 PM (6 minutes ago) Bookmark Suggest Ban Permalink

no that is pretty much true -- those bands are much more about smoking weed and nostalgia for things you never experienced (woodstock) than it is about frats or w/e

― J0rdan S., Saturday, March 12, 2011 9:36 PM (5 minutes ago) Bookmark

nah

yr all missing the point i think

xp wait maybe not: jordan--my point was that any 'fratty' band (jam or rap or w/e) can do that.

ullr saves (gbx), Sunday, 13 March 2011 03:43 (3 years ago) Permalink

wait til ou find out what the name stands for xxp

dayo, Sunday, 13 March 2011 03:44 (3 years ago) Permalink

kanye probably makes a good deal more per engagement right now, but because he's trading on celebrity, his arc is defined. bands like Widespread Panic can work for thirty years if they want and consistently make millions of dollars every year; often these bands own their own buses, have full gear sponsorships, etc. people who're into Kanye are into the narrative of when he got good & does he keep getting better or when does he "start to suck," etc -- this narrative doesn't appeal to fans of the bands we're talking about; these bands consist largely of "players" (jazz dudes use this term just meaning "guys who can really play") who can hit a groove & hold it and that's not really something you lose if you're always out there, really you just keep getting better as long as your health holds. when you're a pop star your days are numbered. people who go see Ratdog in 2011 first saw Weir sing "Truckin'" in 1978.

five gone cats from Boston (underrated aerosmith bootlegs I have owned), Sunday, 13 March 2011 03:44 (3 years ago) Permalink

like, they're on the 45th edition of this one http://www.campzoe.com/schwagstock45.html

J0rdan S., Sunday, 13 March 2011 03:45 (3 years ago) Permalink

gbx there is a lot of truth to what you're saying

J0rdan S., Sunday, 13 March 2011 03:45 (3 years ago) Permalink

the fact that the majority of their acronym consists of words that you don't put in acronyms should have been reason enough for your school to boycott this band. they should just be R.

xp to dayo

also what do they sound like? I don't want to youtube it

iatee, Sunday, 13 March 2011 03:46 (3 years ago) Permalink

bonnaroo is obv a huge festival & they get tons of huge acts now but they still bill the string cheese incident on the same line as lil wayne

J0rdan S., Sunday, 13 March 2011 03:47 (3 years ago) Permalink

that is real talk, aero

but i still think that the main thing as far as the jam-band/college lol issue is concerned w/r/t to 'frat rap' is that the dead extension kinda carved out a bunch of trade routes that lead to weird underground popularity that can outstrip, in money and devotion, the reach of 'main-stream' artists.

i mean ICP is the apotheosis of this shit---i'm guessin they are ACTUALLY more popular than the dead ever was

many xps lol saturday

ullr saves (gbx), Sunday, 13 March 2011 03:49 (3 years ago) Permalink

(not to prompt a dead v. ICP popularity contest---just that ICP has, simply by existing ~when~ they exist, pushed more units and sold more tickets (maybe) than the Dead. )

ullr saves (gbx), Sunday, 13 March 2011 03:51 (3 years ago) Permalink

OMG this shit is awful, just now hearing some of the youtubes posted. also- is that article whiney posted for real???

The group's third member is D.J. Kid Swift, a highly ranked professional disk jockey. "The d.j.of a rap album," Shecter explained, "is the guy who manipulates the record on the turntable to produce a scratching sound."

"They will probably be as big or even bigger than The Beastie Boys because they have total crossover appeal," Ratner said of the group.

"I've been interested in the music since rap came out, when I was around eleven years old," Shecter said in his Cabot House room, which is decorated with posters of rap groups Erik B. & Rakim.

like, this kid is explaining what a DJ is to harvard students?? eric b. & rakim referred to as "groups" plural? and bigger than the beastie boys/???? like.. fuck i dont even know what to say, this is so stupid

thank you ilxor for starting this much needed thread (ilxor), Sunday, 13 March 2011 03:59 (3 years ago) Permalink

also- is "O.A.R." a play on the term "A.O.R."? never heard them btw but am v aware of their existence in the dave matthews fanbase world

thank you ilxor for starting this much needed thread (ilxor), Sunday, 13 March 2011 04:01 (3 years ago) Permalink

O.A.R. (short for Of a Revolution) is an American rock band

J0rdan S., Sunday, 13 March 2011 04:01 (3 years ago) Permalink

looooool wtf

thank you ilxor for starting this much needed thread (ilxor), Sunday, 13 March 2011 04:02 (3 years ago) Permalink

also what do they sound like? I don't want to youtube it

I think they have a trumpet player?

dayo, Sunday, 13 March 2011 04:03 (3 years ago) Permalink

what ethnicity is he

iatee, Sunday, 13 March 2011 04:04 (3 years ago) Permalink

he may have dreads

dayo, Sunday, 13 March 2011 04:05 (3 years ago) Permalink

so he's white?

iatee, Sunday, 13 March 2011 04:06 (3 years ago) Permalink

*nods*

dayo, Sunday, 13 March 2011 04:08 (3 years ago) Permalink

*lols*

ullr saves (gbx), Sunday, 13 March 2011 04:11 (3 years ago) Permalink

is that article whiney posted for real???

Not only is it real, I think everyone on this thread missed a certain something a few paragraphs in:

Brett Ratner, a sophomore at New YorkUniversity, is the group's manager and executiveproducer. "I heard a demo of the group, I thoughtthey were great and I thought the Harvard imagewas great," he said. "So I got $10,000, finishedthe record, and got a five-record deal with Sire."

Yes, THAT Brett Ratner.

Ned Raggett, Sunday, 13 March 2011 04:13 (3 years ago) Permalink

yep. article is from 1988, not everyone knew what a DJ was, ilxor

Whiney On The Goon (Whiney G. Weingarten), Sunday, 13 March 2011 05:02 (3 years ago) Permalink

also like frat audiences are responsible for like 95% of the dubstep bought in america, mostly by people youve never heard of, with like the other 5% being the dubstep pitchfork writes about and we post about

Whiney On The Goon (Whiney G. Weingarten), Sunday, 13 March 2011 05:04 (3 years ago) Permalink

yeah, i've been holding onto this theory that dubstep is the new jam music

J0rdan S., Sunday, 13 March 2011 05:05 (3 years ago) Permalink

this seems like a claim that you'd want to support with figures or links to sales stuff or something, even with the qualifier "like" in front of the "95%"

five gone cats from Boston (underrated aerosmith bootlegs I have owned), Sunday, 13 March 2011 05:07 (3 years ago) Permalink

dude, when ppl on 4chan have 400 post threads about dubstep, they're not talking about "King Midas Sound" and shit

Whiney On The Goon (Whiney G. Weingarten), Sunday, 13 March 2011 05:09 (3 years ago) Permalink

I don't think more made up statistics is what aero was asking for

iatee, Sunday, 13 March 2011 05:12 (3 years ago) Permalink

Thanks to this type of thread I've developed a morbid fascination with these types of bands. I actually like Widespread Panic a bit, but I was already familiar w/ them since I have some frat bros in the extended family. never listened to OAR tho. As someone whos aspires to be involved in the performing side of music someday, should I be worried about lettting this stuff into my head? I'd hate to start busting out the DMB's "Warehouse" riff by accident.

As for dubstep being the new jam music, thats OTM. I started going to EDM parties in Portland in 2007, when it was the last tail end of jaded techno scenesters (glory days: 1999), a smattering of E'd up baby gangsters, and a young hardcore raver group in attendance. Then dubstep hit, and I see football jocks from high school at all the big raves now. I knly know this b/c I see it on facebook, not from attending

Franklin_The_Turtle, Sunday, 13 March 2011 05:12 (3 years ago) Permalink

Fascinating info-graphic of Widespread Panic's career of touring, which starts around the time the Dead release "Touch of Grey" solidifying the jam band thing among Gen Xers in Southern college towns. Roachclips and golf clubs.

bendy, Sunday, 13 March 2011 05:16 (3 years ago) Permalink

full sized
http://www.thebarnpresents.com/wp-content/uploads/wsp25.jpg

bendy, Sunday, 13 March 2011 05:16 (3 years ago) Permalink

my theory is based purely on personal anecdotes etc -- just feel like lots of stoners i come across are listening more to beat based music nowadays, and that leans a lot towards dubstep since it's not dance oriented

J0rdan S., Sunday, 13 March 2011 05:19 (3 years ago) Permalink

if those guys ever listen to some black metal high it's gonna totally broaden their horizons

five gone cats from Boston (underrated aerosmith bootlegs I have owned), Sunday, 13 March 2011 05:21 (3 years ago) Permalink

it took me way too long to figure out what those mysterious boxes and arrows on that chart were

iatee, Sunday, 13 March 2011 05:22 (3 years ago) Permalink

O.A.R. is well known for its live performances because the band often creates variations to songs at each concert, making it rare to hear a song played the exact same way twice. The band also incorporates jam elements in their concerts, resulting in many of their live songs running anywhere between 5 and 18 minutes each. O.A.R.'s unique concert performances have led many people to believe they are one of the top live bands today.

dayo, Sunday, 13 March 2011 05:35 (3 years ago) Permalink

At their live shows, O.A.R. has been known to cover a variety of songs by artists such as Bob Dylan, U2, the Grateful Dead, Billy Joel, The Beatles, Simon and Garfunkel, and Bob Marley.

dayo, Sunday, 13 March 2011 05:42 (3 years ago) Permalink


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