"Born to Run" by Bruce Springsteen -- who really enjoys this overproduced crappy glop?

Message Bookmarked
Bookmark Removed
Not all messages are displayed: show all messages (398 of them)
You have to like over-the-top romanticism.

Mark (MarkR), Tuesday, 4 January 2005 23:47 (9 years ago) Permalink

Hmmmm. Not convinced on that. I love lots of hoarily histrionic, needlessly over-the-top Goth romantics, but they're still more restrained than this.

Alex in NYC (vassifer), Tuesday, 4 January 2005 23:48 (9 years ago) Permalink

"Racing in the Streets" is one of my favorite tunes. "Born to Run" is dreck on every level.

Riot Gear! (Gear!), Tuesday, 4 January 2005 23:50 (9 years ago) Permalink

[[raises hand]]

Matos W.K. (M Matos), Tuesday, 4 January 2005 23:51 (9 years ago) Permalink

xpost:
Alex, you listen to classic rock radio? The station Scott Muni used to be on?

I like that album, but I didn't like it for a long time when I was force-fed it on the radio back in the day. The way I get a handle on it is to focus on certain small moments, like "when the screen door slams [and] Mary's dress waves," so that I am not totally swept away by the bombast. Then I gradual divide and conquer. Sort of like an approach described on the Guided By Voices thread.

And this album wasn't supposed to be stripped down, it was deliberately Phil Spector-esque.

Of course, I prefer Darkness On The Edge of Town.

Ken L (Ken L), Tuesday, 4 January 2005 23:53 (9 years ago) Permalink

when "the screen door slams"

Ken L (Ken L), Tuesday, 4 January 2005 23:54 (9 years ago) Permalink

Alex, you listen to classic rock radio? The station Scott Muni used to be on?

I listen to Q104 on my crappy kitchen radio, because it's all we can get besides NPR and 1010 Wins (and some crappy salsa stations).

I was actually just referring to the song, not the entirety of the album.

Alex in NYC (vassifer), Tuesday, 4 January 2005 23:55 (9 years ago) Permalink

(x-post)

[[sees someone else in class raising hand, and decides to raise own hand too, even though he prefers slightly later, stripped-down bruce, and even though he agrees bruce wasn't very good at the whole production thing]]

fact checking cuz (fcc), Tuesday, 4 January 2005 23:55 (9 years ago) Permalink

darkness on the edge of town is an album i greatly enjoy. but i could lose everything else.

Hari Ashurst (Toaster), Tuesday, 4 January 2005 23:56 (9 years ago) Permalink

xxpost:
Yeah, you've gotta listen to the whole album and use a strategy like I suggested, if you so choose.

xpost:
"gradually," put tense from present to past,etc. I think I better stop now.

Ken L (Ken L), Tuesday, 4 January 2005 23:57 (9 years ago) Permalink

"when the screen door slams [and] Mary's dress waves,"

you really, really, really don't need to add that [and]. please remove it at once. it's making my eyes and my ears hurt. k bye.

fact checking cuz (fcc), Tuesday, 4 January 2005 23:58 (9 years ago) Permalink

I like it okay, but not as much as his first album, his fourth one, and probably a couple others by him. (also not as much as many, many john cougar mellencamp, bob seger, thin lizzy, boomtown rats, and iron city houserockers albums.) (it is probably better than *bat out of hell* and *slippery when wet,* though.)

chuck, Tuesday, 4 January 2005 23:58 (9 years ago) Permalink

Don't have a deep knowledge of or strong opinion on his work in general but I think this song is great. It's not stripped-down but I don't see why this is more over-the-top than Meat Loaf or The Cure or something (or even, say, Wire's "A Touching Display").

sundar subramanian (sundar), Tuesday, 4 January 2005 23:59 (9 years ago) Permalink

Just fyi, the other track they aired was -- this may not be the title -- "Sandy," about him trying to convince some girl to give up the kitschy hell hole that is Asbury Park's boardwalk anti-splendor. He has a nice sense of narrative, I suppose, but damn if i'd ever want to hear him sing it. Ugh.

Alex in NYC (vassifer), Wednesday, 5 January 2005 00:00 (9 years ago) Permalink

dave q once said something I liked a lot about him singing like a stoned alien.

sundar subramanian (sundar), Wednesday, 5 January 2005 00:01 (9 years ago) Permalink

I love this song. Never get tired of it.

Al (sitcom), Wednesday, 5 January 2005 00:01 (9 years ago) Permalink

alex when people praise bruce for his 'stripped downness' they sure as hell aren't talking about born to run!

blount, Wednesday, 5 January 2005 00:02 (9 years ago) Permalink

brooce roolz. love this stuff. love meat loaf too. jukebox + those two + neil diamond + old man's pub in glasgow + vast amounts of beer + mates = absolutely fucking top night.

grimly fiendish (grimlord), Wednesday, 5 January 2005 00:04 (9 years ago) Permalink

I can't really remember the original version of "Born To Run", but it seemed a lot slower and duller than the Frankie Goes To Hollywood cover I used to love as a kid! So I think the song is great. Maybe the production's a bit overblown, and that's more your beef.

Piers, Wednesday, 5 January 2005 00:05 (9 years ago) Permalink

He has a nice sense of narrative, I suppose, but damn if i'd ever want to hear him sing it. Ugh.
It's an acquired taste. New York and Long Island radio in the 70s forced me to acquire it.
[Warning some typos may have occurred during hunting and pecking]

Ken L (Ken L), Wednesday, 5 January 2005 00:06 (9 years ago) Permalink

oh wait, we're supposed to give an opinion about the SONG, not the album? it's one of the worst songs on the album, nowhere near as good as that totally homoerotic one about sleeping at the beach house. (but i still do like it okay.)

chuck, Wednesday, 5 January 2005 00:09 (9 years ago) Permalink

Darkness on The Edge of Town (the next or *fourth* album) was where he seemed to get a little more ironic distance on himself- it was sort of his Achtung, Baby.

[Why the fcuk did I put that "and" there?]

Ken L (Ken L), Wednesday, 5 January 2005 00:09 (9 years ago) Permalink

>it seemed a lot slower and duller than the Frankie Goes To Hollywood cover<

Frankie Goes to Hollywood definitely did a better cover version of "War" by Edwin Starr than Bruce did, that's for sure. (They did theirs *first*, so I always wondered whether they influenced *him*, just like Suicide and the Dictators -- who he apparently shared studio time with in early days -- respectively may or may not have influenced the spare screaming mass-murder songs on *Nebraska and his rhyming of "growing up" with "throwing up" on his debut album)

chuck, Wednesday, 5 January 2005 00:12 (9 years ago) Permalink

But of course Frankie GTH were all ABOUT overproduced glop; that was kinda their whole point, at least as much as it was Meat Loaf's point!

chuck, Wednesday, 5 January 2005 00:15 (9 years ago) Permalink

I fucking love Born to Run to death....the fuckin' break into "at nite we sweat it out on the streets of a runaway american dream"....fuck yeah it's over the top drama queen theatrics and god bless it....it's one of those songs i instantly loved as a child when i heard it.....it made things seem bigger and more important than they really were.....Coldplay's "Clocks" is prolly like that for little kids now.....but yeah chuck is right Asbury Park is still prolly his best album but HONOR THE BOSS ALEX!!!!!!!!

I WILL NOT APOLOGIZE!

M@tt He1geson (Matt Helgeson), Wednesday, 5 January 2005 00:16 (9 years ago) Permalink

I had skin like leather
The diamond-hard look of a cobra

Ken L (Ken L), Wednesday, 5 January 2005 00:20 (9 years ago) Permalink

I think 'da Boss' most certainly would have been listening to the Frankie Goes To Hollywood debut Chuck so your theory has merit. Get thee to the Secret Influences thread!

Re FGTH being overproduced as well, absolutely and we wouldn't have it any other way! Their Born To Run version seemed so much more wound up and excited than the original. But, you know, respect to Bruce and all that.

Piers, Wednesday, 5 January 2005 00:20 (9 years ago) Permalink

(x-post)
springsteen's cover of "war" was awful! maybe the worst single he ever did. but at least it was well meaning, intended as an explicit anti-reagan song at a time when all such messages were most welcome, even if they came wrapped in an awful performance.

fact checking cuz (fcc), Wednesday, 5 January 2005 00:22 (9 years ago) Permalink

What about his cover of Jimmy Cliff's "Vietnam"? That used to have a rep.

Ken L (Ken L), Wednesday, 5 January 2005 00:24 (9 years ago) Permalink

"Vietnam" or "Trapped"? The latter was on the 'We Are the World' album.

Rickey Wright (Rrrickey), Wednesday, 5 January 2005 00:28 (9 years ago) Permalink

Wait, I always thought his song "Trapped" on the *We Are The World album was a Jimmy Cliff song; am I confused? (I've never listened to much Jimmy Cliff, outside of *The Harder They Come*) Either way, I heard it on the radio last week, for the first time in years, and it was really great -- totally anthemic upswoop and build to it, and the way he used (post-Suicide? post-disco? whatever) empty dub-type space in the arrangement was even better than what he did in "Streets of Philadelphia" years later. I'm pretty sure proto-house-music male diva Colonel Abrams had a soul hit called "Trapped" around the same time, so for some reason I have always connected them in my mind.

chuck, Wednesday, 5 January 2005 00:28 (9 years ago) Permalink

xp, obv

chuck, Wednesday, 5 January 2005 00:29 (9 years ago) Permalink

"Born to Run" the song is great, although not really among my favorite Bruce stuff.

polyphonic (polyphonic), Wednesday, 5 January 2005 00:31 (9 years ago) Permalink

I'm w/ matos and m@tt and al, this is one of the greatest songs ever, and I've never really gotten sick of it. I don't own the album but I don't remember the other songs living up to the pure surging energy of the title track, so i don't know that I would like it today.

deej ., Wednesday, 5 January 2005 00:31 (9 years ago) Permalink

Wait didn't Matos say it was bad?

xpost:
My bad. It was "Trapped." I just can't get on the good foot on this thread.

Ken L (Ken L), Wednesday, 5 January 2005 00:33 (9 years ago) Permalink

You know somebody should point out that Springsteen switched drummers from "Mad Dog" Vinnie Lopez to Max Weinberg when he made the album- whereas Mad Dog used to do this funky Latin stuff, Max was more of regular rock drummer, although after Darkness he practiced a lot to sound more like a drum machine.

Ken L (Ken L), Wednesday, 5 January 2005 00:36 (9 years ago) Permalink

he also switched pianists, from david sancious, who used to this funky jazzy stuff, to roy bittan, who did quite fine for awhile until he got ahold of a yamaha dx-7 that apparently only had a single patch on it and maybe only a single chord, which bittan was able to hold down and sustain for the entirety of about three straight albums.

fact checking cuz (fcc), Wednesday, 5 January 2005 00:40 (9 years ago) Permalink

who used to this funky jazzy stuff
fcc, you slippin'.

Ken L (Ken L), Wednesday, 5 January 2005 00:41 (9 years ago) Permalink

well ain't that the pot calling the kettle black!

fact checking cuz (fcc), Wednesday, 5 January 2005 00:43 (9 years ago) Permalink

everything fcc says I assume to be true because of his ilx id

Riot Gear! (Gear!), Wednesday, 5 January 2005 00:46 (9 years ago) Permalink

everything fcc says I assume to be true because of his ilx id

but sometimes even the truth contains typos.

fact checking cuz (fcc), Wednesday, 5 January 2005 00:49 (9 years ago) Permalink

again with the truth!

Riot Gear! (Gear!), Wednesday, 5 January 2005 00:51 (9 years ago) Permalink

I like Grimly Fiendish's Glasgow pub jukebox anecdote. The moment Born To Run (the song) made sense was when I was on the low level train to Finniestoun on my way back from a mate's flat. I'd borrowed a random mixtape to listen to on my walkman. I was pretty drunk on red wine so I liked the idea of being totally surprised. As I headed from High Street to the Argyle St station For Those About To Rock by AC/DC came on. So far so mighty. Fists pumping in the air. As the train trundled beneath the motorway it was some John Spencer tune. Pretty rocking. Then, just as the train pulls in that trem guitar riff comes in "dahh, dah dah dah daaah". The E Street Band pile in as I leap triumphantly onto the platform and race up the stairs. I feel so fucking mighty. A glorious moment. 5 minutes later I was back at my flat feeling awesome. That's the power of The Boss.

The album that got me over my indie Bruce fear was Nebraska. That album gets better with every listen. Just stunning. Darkness would seem to be my next best step. I can get them all cheap on vinyl easy peasy.

stew, Wednesday, 5 January 2005 00:51 (9 years ago) Permalink

xpost:
Is there in truth no beauty?

well ain't that the pot calling the kettle black!
Precisely.

Search is slow, otherwise I would post the link where Momus hollas for fcc.

Something else readers of this thread might enjoy: Max Weinberg's drummer interview book- The Big Beat.

Ken L (Ken L), Wednesday, 5 January 2005 00:54 (9 years ago) Permalink

Precisely.

there i go, spouting the truth again.

fact checking cuz (fcc), Wednesday, 5 January 2005 00:56 (9 years ago) Permalink

An hour before spotting this thread I wondered to myself if the opening lines to the song were possibly the best opening lines for a rock song ever. "At night we ride through mansions of glory in suicide machines" gives me goose pimples, for real. And since I've given up the ghost of boring anti-bombast punk purism (a phase which lasted me more or less the couple months in 1994 between hearing Ramones for the first time and hearing London Calling for the first time), I've come to appreciate how well-structured the track is, going beyond just verse-chorus-verse to a perfectly-contained mini-rock-opera that stays completely focused and builds to a completely immaculate peak (the one around the 3-minute-mark, right before the "1-2-3-4/the highway's jammed with broken heroes..."). 9 times out of 10 this personally, for me, beats some snotty kid plonking on the same chords for 2:30, muttering about boredom. Beats it with a tire iron.

Still, I figure that Darkness on the Edge of Town is his best album overall, with '78-'80 being his peak.

(xp: Bruce LPs on used vinyl are like $3-4 each [The River around $6] and definitely key to the experience.)

What's this place, Biblevania? (natepatrin), Wednesday, 5 January 2005 00:56 (9 years ago) Permalink

I think with that post and that postee, we can safely lock the thread.

But wait...

Ken L (Ken L), Wednesday, 5 January 2005 01:00 (9 years ago) Permalink

"poster". WTF is a "postee"?

Ken L (Ken L), Wednesday, 5 January 2005 01:01 (9 years ago) Permalink

there i go, spouting the truth again.
Every word I type is a lie, including "and" and "butt."

Ken L (Ken L), Wednesday, 5 January 2005 01:02 (9 years ago) Permalink

It's an acquired taste. New York and Long Island radio in the 70s forced me to acquire it.

Where the hell do you think I was during that time period? Your argument holds less water than a rusty colander.

Alex in NYC (vassifer), Wednesday, 5 January 2005 01:20 (9 years ago) Permalink

One cool thing about "Thunder Road" that I don't usually appreciate but do tonight is how zingy the lyric is---the messianic vibe is there but he's simultaneously saying that it's bullshit.

Euler, Friday, 21 May 2010 22:56 (3 years ago) Permalink

I'm really embarrassed to admit this but I was never sure what the second line means. I'm guessing "suicide machines" are motorcycles (or maybe beat-up old cars) but why would they be riding through mansions of glory on them? Is he using a bit of licence with "through" here, just saying that at night, they like to drive around rich neighbourhoods (near many of these mansions) and dream of escaping their own less-rich existence? That was what I always assumed but it never seemed clear to me. Or is it something more abstract than this? I suppose "suicide machines" could also be a reference to rides at the amusement park that he mentions later - this seems silly though. Everything else in the song makes perfect sense and is almost embarrassingly moving to me.

Sundar, Friday, 21 May 2010 23:30 (3 years ago) Permalink

I just figured suicide machines were dangerous cars built to look good but that ran like shit. Like, riding in these cars is akin to committing suicide.

Josh in Chicago, Friday, 21 May 2010 23:49 (3 years ago) Permalink

I remember when this song was first a hit on FM radio. The discussion we are having now is eerily akin to the men (NOTE: I'm pretty sure the women left this thread a few years ago) were sitting around in 1975 discussing whether 'When The Swallows Come Back To Capistrano" by The Ink Spots (big hit, 1940) was overproduced glop. "...and you're scared and you're thinking that maybe we ain't that young anymore" xp Hi Anagram!

Fruitless and Pansy Free (Dr. Joseph A. Ofalt), Saturday, 22 May 2010 04:33 (3 years ago) Permalink

He laid down some serious improvised Neil Young-ish guitar thundah on the intros to 'Because the Night' and 'Prove It All Night' as late as '78, but it was definitely the early band with Lopez & Sancious that was into the jamming.

ImprovSpirit, Sunday, 23 May 2010 03:13 (3 years ago) Permalink

One of those situations where da croupier's complaints make perfect sense and I still love this stuff to death-- I can see why some wouldn't like it.

Mark, Sunday, 23 May 2010 03:56 (3 years ago) Permalink

I really see nothing wrong with the overproduction. Wire and Bruce can coexist pretty peacefully, I think.

kelpolaris, Sunday, 23 May 2010 05:47 (3 years ago) Permalink

The hugeness of it, all that emotion and abandon, that's what I love. I get that it sound overdone or bombastic or, I dunno, cliched or whatever, but dammit, it's a fun song. This song to me is like flying down the freeway & sticking my face out of the car window like a kid. It feels good.

VegemiteGrrrl, Sunday, 23 May 2010 06:26 (3 years ago) Permalink

At what point does epic drama cross the line into bombast? Is opera bombastic? I would say that although successive live versions of "Born To Run" have crossed that line, the album version stays resolutely on the right side of it. As for "Thunder Road", to me that is as bombastic as Debussy.

anagram, Sunday, 23 May 2010 08:07 (3 years ago) Permalink

amd of course Debussy is incredible. you're not against the music of Debussy are you?

Stormy Davis, Sunday, 23 May 2010 08:15 (3 years ago) Permalink

i mean actually hearing 'Claire de Lune' for the first time was one of the most incredible experiences as a listener ever. up there with 'Born To Run', even

Stormy Davis, Sunday, 23 May 2010 08:17 (3 years ago) Permalink

amd of course Debussy is incredible. you're not against the music of Debussy are you?

Not at all, I was just holding him up as someone who is like not at all bombastic and saying that to me "Thunder Road" has the same amount of bombast, i.e. none.

anagram, Sunday, 23 May 2010 09:06 (3 years ago) Permalink

this recording makes Meat Loaf sound like fuckin' Wire. All those gloopy keyboards and honking saxes and overblown crescendos. It's like a motor-oil smeared wedding cake waiting to be toppled.

i think that's the point, and i think that's why this song is so wonderful

Worth waiting for the fannypunch at 4.02 (stevie), Sunday, 23 May 2010 10:25 (3 years ago) Permalink

early bruce feels like west side story meets happy days for me

brilliant.

Alex in NYC, Sunday, 23 May 2010 12:30 (3 years ago) Permalink

Meat Loaf is like Bruce without the restraint.

Josh in Chicago, Sunday, 23 May 2010 12:57 (3 years ago) Permalink

The West Side Story comparison doesn't even sound like a dis to me.

Sundar, Sunday, 23 May 2010 13:21 (3 years ago) Permalink

said it before, saying it now, and will say it again -- to a certain kind of person raised in the middle of New Jersey during the 80s, to never hear "born to run" ever ever ever again would not be a tragedy.

and all Springsteen up until tunnel of love has a "west side story" vibe to it.

keine Macht für dich mehr! (Eisbaer), Sunday, 23 May 2010 14:20 (3 years ago) Permalink

anyway, "born to run" isn't the ONLY overproduced glob in Springsteen's catalog. i dunno if it's even the most egregious violator of this supposed sin anyway (maybe that honor goes to "born in the USA").

keine Macht für dich mehr! (Eisbaer), Sunday, 23 May 2010 17:21 (3 years ago) Permalink

To be honest, I've never thought of "Born to Run" as overproduced so much as over-arranged, albeit thrillingly so.

Josh in Chicago, Sunday, 23 May 2010 19:31 (3 years ago) Permalink

I would tend to agree where BITUSA is concerned. It strikes me as Springsteen's slickest, most calculatedly commercial record, so to the extent one acheives that end through heavy-handed production - well, there ya go. Much of this wasn't really Springsteen's idea [though he is where the buck stops, if you will], given that he hit Jon Landau with the demo tape of 'Dancing In the Dark' saying 'Here's your fuckin' single.' With BTR they were going for the Orbison/Spector orchestral thing and they got there, so I don't know if it was OVER produced or not. I guess its a matter of whether you like your tunes densely packed. Ironically, the last two studio records sound most like logical follow-ups to BTR, in terms of their SOUND, of anything else he's done since - almost as if he's been trying to avoid that sound for years.

ImprovSpirit, Monday, 24 May 2010 15:22 (3 years ago) Permalink

finally watched that documentary that came with the "Born to Run" reissue a few years back. it's a good watch! they play some really hilarious alternate intros and outros with big string sections that will make you thank god it turned out the way it did. also a cool part about van zandt coming up with the horns part for 10th avenue freeze out.

Moreno, Monday, 24 May 2010 17:14 (3 years ago) Permalink

BITUSA >>>>> Born to Run

Filmmaker, Author, Radio Host Stephen Baldwin (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Monday, 24 May 2010 17:16 (3 years ago) Permalink

wait, Lord Sotosyn likes the album with the 80s gated drums better? Heavens! ;)

in which we apologize for sobering up (underrated aerosmith albums I have loved), Monday, 24 May 2010 17:35 (3 years ago) Permalink

xxpost, yeah that is a good doc. That SVZ scene with the horns is great!

VegemiteGrrrl, Monday, 24 May 2010 17:37 (3 years ago) Permalink

:-) '80s gated drums, and some of the most obvious pandering I can think of. BITUSA doesn't even touch BTR for me, though it has some terrific songs. I've always been a sucker for 'I'm Going Down' of all things, and 'No Surrender' & 'Bobbie Jean' give me chills as I boogie. Lots of the other things leave me cold plus the record as a whole hasn't aged as well as I'd hoped.

ImprovSpirit, Monday, 24 May 2010 17:41 (3 years ago) Permalink

Steve is a horn-arrangin' mo-fo. He's done a lot of that for Southside Johnny's band(s) too.

ImprovSpirit, Monday, 24 May 2010 17:42 (3 years ago) Permalink

Now, I don't consider "overproduced" as anything but a windmill, because I love stuff being slickly produced, but I reckon "Born In The USA" is a GREAT production, and by far the best produced of all Springsteen albums.

As far as "Born To Run" is considered, the problem isn't so much the level of production as the choice of sound. Sure there are a lot of great songs that do make it a great album, and I do understand what the sound is aiming at. The problem being, the Spectoresque wall of sound was largely obsolete already by the time stereo was becoming more important than mono in the late 60s. The wall of sound idea has never fitted with stereo sound, it was designed for mono and does really only work in mono.

Tied Up In Geir (Geir Hongro), Monday, 24 May 2010 18:08 (3 years ago) Permalink

:-) '80s gated drums, and some of the most obvious pandering I can think of. BITUSA doesn't even touch BTR for me, though it has some terrific songs. I've always been a sucker for 'I'm Going Down' of all things, and 'No Surrender' & 'Bobbie Jean' give me chills as I boogie. Lots of the other things leave me cold plus the record as a whole hasn't aged as well as I'd hoped.

"No Surrender" is the only song that does nothing for me on an album that's never stopped giving me pleasure. I know some people go to Springsteen for frills and bombast, but I'll take the focused pathos of "Darlington County" and "Downbound Train."

Not my favorite Springsteen though: it's still Tunnel of Love.

And, yeah, "I'm Goin' Down" is my favorite of the singles. Great oral sex metaphor too.

Filmmaker, Author, Radio Host Stephen Baldwin (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Monday, 24 May 2010 18:28 (3 years ago) Permalink

I think it's a shame Springsteen rarely plays "I'm Going Down," and that when he does he can barely do it with a straight face. Then again, it's a ridiculously simple, repetitive song, so ...

Geir is sort of right, re: mono, but "Born to Run" (the album and the song) isn't exactly a showcase for stereo separation effects.

Josh in Chicago, Monday, 24 May 2010 18:31 (3 years ago) Permalink

Also, gated drums not that big of a deal on most of "BitUSA" (esp. compared to "Tunnel"), intro to the title track aside, and that's largely because that intro is so stark a simple snare crack wouldn't fill up enough space. The rest of that album is pretty much band-in-a-room, which is one of many reasons I'm always puzzled by stories of Bruce's studio perfectionism. Gary Katz he is not.

Josh in Chicago, Monday, 24 May 2010 18:47 (3 years ago) Permalink

@ Alfred: Oh my. I had forgotten about "Downbound Train." I love that one.

"Darlington County" always struck me as something that might've been left off of a John Fogerty LP, but it is a bit of good fun.

@ Josh: I'm not hearing much panning on BTR either, which may at least partially nullify the (well stated) monophonic argument. Then again I'm sure that the recording process was much different during the days of mono, thereby changing things on the front-end as well as the ultimate sound reproduction.

ImprovSpirit, Monday, 24 May 2010 19:27 (3 years ago) Permalink

"Darlington County" always struck me as something that might've been left off of a John Fogerty LP

But then, I would say that CCR were one of the most important influences on Springsteen when he perfected his style.

Tied Up In Geir (Geir Hongro), Monday, 24 May 2010 22:46 (3 years ago) Permalink

Yes, this is true. The CCR influence seems to have really kicked in around the time of The River.

I might counter with the notion that CCR & John Fogerty (solo) are vastly different from one another in terms of quality, which is why I chose to cite Fogerty. "Center Field" is no "Who'll Stop the Rain," to give an over-simplified example.

ImprovSpirit, Tuesday, 25 May 2010 14:55 (3 years ago) Permalink

lol @ ppl in 2010 calling 80s production values 'overproduced'

its like why GROCERY BAG and not saddam? (deej), Wednesday, 26 May 2010 00:54 (3 years ago) Permalink

???

hope this helps (Granny Dainger), Wednesday, 26 May 2010 01:03 (3 years ago) Permalink

lol @ ppl in 2010 calling 80s production values 'overproduced'

i DID say that it was "a supposed sin," didn't i?

:-)

Aspergers Makes My Pee Smell Funny (Eisbaer), Friday, 28 May 2010 16:06 (3 years ago) Permalink

1 year passes...

ripping

bear, bear, bear, Sunday, 20 May 2012 11:44 (1 year ago) Permalink

Nice. That one is still in his live set.

curmudgeon, Sunday, 20 May 2012 19:13 (1 year ago) Permalink

1 year passes...

The problem is not the production. The problem is Bruce's awful mumbly singing style. you hear the song with that rockin' drum intro "DUGGA-DUGGA DUHHHHHHHHHHH...." and you hear that classic guitar riff and the glockenspiel comes in and the guitars are rocking and it crescendoes and you think "Alright! Here we go, it's time to rock!"... and then Bruce's voice comes in "mmrrghhyears mmrrf fff out on the streets uff runaway Amurrrican dreams." and it's like dude! Enunciate! How are we supposed to fantasize riding through mansions of glory and suicide machines when we can't understand what the hell you're saying?

Mr. Snrub, Tuesday, 11 June 2013 03:41 (10 months ago) Permalink

Allan Clarke of the Hollies did this song much better before Bruce's version was even released:

Mr. Snrub, Tuesday, 11 June 2013 03:42 (10 months ago) Permalink

bruce's mumbling is the best part for me. i don't think his Romanticism would be palatable if it wasn't blunted by the grizzled weight of experience. that kind of writing needs to be grounded in some way by melancholy.

Treeship, Tuesday, 11 June 2013 03:50 (10 months ago) Permalink

That Clarke track, which I'd never heard, is fine, but it really splits the difference between Bruce and, dunno, Jackson Browne.

Josh in Chicago, Tuesday, 11 June 2013 03:55 (10 months ago) Permalink

I think I've kind of always wanted Bruce Springsteen to sound more like Jackson Browne so I am digging this. Also reminding me again of the existence of the Hold Steady who did a pretty decent pastiche on "Stuck Between Stations."

Doctor Casino, Tuesday, 11 June 2013 13:08 (10 months ago) Permalink

Dude! Enunciate!

copter (waterface), Tuesday, 11 June 2013 13:19 (10 months ago) Permalink

i always figured that mumbling thing was the product of severe underbite + not opening mouth to speak

Poliopolice, Tuesday, 11 June 2013 14:12 (10 months ago) Permalink

Also, for a belter, Bruce back then was pretty shy. So maybe it was a form of modesty manifesting itself at the wrong time in the wrong song? He opens up his voice more as the song goes on, though.

Josh in Chicago, Tuesday, 11 June 2013 14:32 (10 months ago) Permalink

I always figured that mumbling thing was the product of Dylan/Van Morrison emulation (and is really the major thing I DO like about "Born To Run.") Like, enunciation was not the thing that made Rolling Stones records rock.

New Authentic Everybootsy Collins (Dan Peterson), Tuesday, 11 June 2013 14:33 (10 months ago) Permalink

Bruce back then was pretty shy

Think it's fair to say he's overcome it since

Bees Against Racism (Tom D.), Tuesday, 11 June 2013 14:50 (10 months ago) Permalink

i like his bad vocals and mumbling on this song

dyl, Tuesday, 11 June 2013 18:35 (10 months ago) Permalink


You must be logged in to post. Please either login here, or if you are not registered, you may register here.