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olympus ws-210s

لوووووووووووووووووووول (lex pretend), Tuesday, 12 January 2010 00:04 (4 years ago) Permalink

Olympus WS-100

mike t-diva, Tuesday, 12 January 2010 00:05 (4 years ago) Permalink

Sony ICD-UX71 - I really like it. I've also used the Sony ICD-B510F (low end model) which does the job but has a few less features (like background noise reduction and slow playback) that feel essential now that I have the UX71.

scott pgwp (pgwp), Tuesday, 12 January 2010 00:44 (4 years ago) Permalink

I erase the original recording.

I forget what the statute of limitations is on libel, but I'd wait that out. And people might be interested in your actual audio someday (or now!).

Pete Scholtes, Tuesday, 12 January 2010 01:25 (4 years ago) Permalink

olympus vn-3100pc. it works fine but it was a panic purchase from radio shack, when i arrived in LA with two weeks worth of interviews booked, and discovered that my minidisk recorder hadn't survived the flight.

shart in a bag, light it on fire (stevie), Tuesday, 12 January 2010 09:48 (4 years ago) Permalink

I use Olympus WS210s at work.

exploding angel vagina (Scik Mouthy), Tuesday, 12 January 2010 11:06 (4 years ago) Permalink

tapes get chewed up inexplicably! someone could step on them! i could be run over by a bus!

Yeah, you joke, but seriously digital recordings can just "go away", if a tape gets chewed up or stepped on you can still salvage it.

― ke$nan (Whiney G. Weingarten), Monday, 11 January 2010 14:27

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^this, sadly. Over the weekend my PC arbitrarily decided to "lose" the first 20 minutes of my 40-minute St3phin M3rritt interview. Gutted ain't the half of it - every other interview I've ever conducted has been recorded on cassette and is still in immaculate condition, and the moment I switch to Audacity...

Background Zombie (CharlieNo4), Tuesday, 12 January 2010 11:16 (4 years ago) Permalink

I recorded a little less than a half hour of audio on Audacity about five years back and I thought it was going to blow up. So much can go wrong between pressing record and hitting save without the user even doing anything wrong.

kshighway (ksh), Tuesday, 12 January 2010 13:55 (4 years ago) Permalink

Audacity is an amazing program, but it is buggy freeware-- not something I would trust to record an interview. Plus its real strength is multi-tracking.

Mark, Tuesday, 12 January 2010 14:08 (4 years ago) Permalink

Exactly.

kshighway (ksh), Tuesday, 12 January 2010 14:09 (4 years ago) Permalink

i have an olympus 960, which i guess is practically ancient now. (i've had it i think 4 or 5 years.) it works great, i've never had a problem. i'm very aware of the potential to easily erase or lose data, but so far i've avoided that -- which puts it ahead of the various problems i've had in the past with cassettes and microcassettes.

and here's a question on transcription: do most people really transcribe their entire interviews? i almost never do that. i generally know the parts i'm interested in, so i transcribe those first. then if it turns out there's more stuff i think i need i'll go back and pick and choose. the average 60 minutes of conversation has about 5 minutes of really good quotes, maybe 10 minutes if you're talking to somebody especially smart and articulate, and anyway you're only going to have room for a handful of direct quotes as it is.

hellzapoppa (tipsy mothra), Tuesday, 12 January 2010 14:45 (4 years ago) Permalink

(the obvious exception is q&a's. which is one reason i really don't like q&a's.)

hellzapoppa (tipsy mothra), Tuesday, 12 January 2010 14:46 (4 years ago) Permalink

i usually transcribe "the good parts" and pick and choose from there

touch me i'm acoleuthic (Whiney G. Weingarten), Tuesday, 12 January 2010 14:56 (4 years ago) Permalink

ditto, who on earth transcribes the WHOLE THING? the process is distressing enough as it is

لوووووووووووووووووووول (lex pretend), Tuesday, 12 January 2010 15:02 (4 years ago) Permalink

man do i hate transcribing

touch me i'm acoleuthic (Whiney G. Weingarten), Tuesday, 12 January 2010 15:03 (4 years ago) Permalink

yeah that's the only way that makes sense to me. i've had some friends and colleagues who for whatever reason feel compelled to transcribe everything before actually getting down to writing -- i guess maybe it helps them to hear it all again -- but that's just so time consuming, especially if it's a full-bore feature story where you've talked to a bunch of different people. i keep pretty good notes while i'm interviewing, so that i can use them as sort of an outline of what's on the recording. (plus i'll write down especially good quotes as i go, if possible, as a backup against something happening to the recorder.)

hellzapoppa (tipsy mothra), Tuesday, 12 January 2010 15:04 (4 years ago) Permalink

We have this argument all the time in the newsroom – that's why notebooks will never go out of fashion. Better to jot down pithy phrases than to waste time rewinding and fast forwarding.

Hell is other people. In an ILE film forum. (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Tuesday, 12 January 2010 15:07 (4 years ago) Permalink

i do LISTEN to the whole tape again, but certainly dont write anything down

touch me i'm acoleuthic (Whiney G. Weingarten), Tuesday, 12 January 2010 15:07 (4 years ago) Permalink

I transcribe everything, or damn close to it, but I use a lot of quotes in my features. I like to let the artist speak for themselves a lot and only throw in bits of narrative and/or interpretation between, rather than unloading some huge personal thesis and scattering a few quotes on top to support what I'm trying to put across.

neither good nor bad, just a kid like you (unperson), Tuesday, 12 January 2010 15:08 (4 years ago) Permalink

I do both. Depends on the interviewee.

scott pgwp (pgwp), Tuesday, 12 January 2010 15:15 (4 years ago) Permalink

We have this argument all the time in the newsroom – that's why notebooks will never go out of fashion.

when i was a daily beat reporter, i almost never taped anything. just notepad and pen. when you're writing short news articles you can get everything you need that way, and it's a lot faster. but when i started writing longer-form stuff, especially profiles where you really want to give a sense of a person's voice, how they talk and think, i eventually realized i really needed recordings. and one thing i've found is that no matter how good you are at note-taking, you very rarely get direct quotes accurate at anything past about two sentences. you can get the meaning of them right -- and as long as you do that, almost nobody will complain about being misquoted -- but you're going to lose or change some words. (i guess i should say "i" instead of "you," because some people are probably better at word-for-word recall than me. but i bet most people can't accurately write down more than a few sentences at a time while also conducting an interview.)

hellzapoppa (tipsy mothra), Tuesday, 12 January 2010 15:24 (4 years ago) Permalink

That's all true. We've had the other extreme here, though: students walking into offices, plunking down a tape recorder in front of a source, and sitting back, not taking a single note. Tape recorders work best when used as an archive or quasi-database, from which you can pluck information as needed.

Hell is other people. In an ILE film forum. (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Tuesday, 12 January 2010 15:27 (4 years ago) Permalink

i bet most people can't accurately write down more than a few sentences at a time while also conducting an interview

well exactly - i'm sure i'd be capable of it but to get the best interview i pretty much want to be wholly focused on what the interviewee's saying, listening out for interesting hooks or details that i can pick up on, and if half my mind and one of my hands is concerned with transcribing accurately and legibly, that's not going to happen. an interview should be like a conversation, and taking notes during one would be the equivalent of fiddling with your blackberry while talking to a friend.

لوووووووووووووووووووول (lex pretend), Tuesday, 12 January 2010 15:38 (4 years ago) Permalink

i mean i already get the whole "fuck's sake why didn't i pick up on that" feeling when listening back enough as it is, can't imagine that being less focused would improve on that

لوووووووووووووووووووول (lex pretend), Tuesday, 12 January 2010 15:38 (4 years ago) Permalink

Taping is the only way to get the true flavor of the way somebody speaks, and the amazing thing is that it's never exactly how you remember. I think the little differences matter.

But yeah, for news stories, where what someone says is more important than how they say it, notes are way better, especially, in my case, if it's over the phone and I'm typing. I stopped writing in cursive at a young age and never learned shorthand.

Pete Scholtes, Tuesday, 12 January 2010 15:47 (4 years ago) Permalink

my new year's resolution is to learn how to type :/

touch me i'm acoleuthic (Whiney G. Weingarten), Tuesday, 12 January 2010 15:51 (4 years ago) Permalink

I'm one of the psychos that usually transcribes everything -- although more and more I tend to cherrypick out the stuff I know I might use, especially if I'm pressed for time, but if the whole thing is less than one 45-minute side of a tape I like to get it all down, if only to have a complete transcript in my files.

I got a nice digital recorder for my birthday last year and I've been still using my cassette recorder and putting off making the big switch ever since, mainly because I'm a slow learner with new technology and the thing intimidates me. You guys are making me even more scared, but I really do want to start using it still.

some dude, Tuesday, 12 January 2010 15:51 (4 years ago) Permalink

x-post -- I am eternally glad for the typing class I took in high school.

Ned Raggett, Tuesday, 12 January 2010 15:51 (4 years ago) Permalink

Taping is the only way to get the true flavor of the way somebody speaks, and the amazing thing is that it's never exactly how you remember. I think the little differences matter.

this is absolutely positively otm. if I was ever an interviewee and someone sat down in front of me with a notebook and no recording device I'd be totally certain of being misquoted and would instantly lose a lot of faith in the writer.

some dude, Tuesday, 12 January 2010 15:53 (4 years ago) Permalink

I used to type 80 words a minute, but my keyboard promiscuity (three or four different Mac keyboards around the office, a PC laptop at home) has destroyed my speed. The keyboard really does make a difference.

Hell is other people. In an ILE film forum. (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Tuesday, 12 January 2010 15:53 (4 years ago) Permalink

I am eternally glad for the typing class I took in high school.

Eighth grade for me. I can't imagine doing this for a living and not being able to type like 80 wpm (which is about where I'm at).

neither good nor bad, just a kid like you (unperson), Tuesday, 12 January 2010 15:54 (4 years ago) Permalink

I actually think I sped up a lot... by transcribing a lot.

Pete Scholtes, Tuesday, 12 January 2010 16:06 (4 years ago) Permalink

I taught myself to touch type in 1996.

Mind you I lived in Harlow in Essex. There wasn't much else to do.

I transcribe everything and save it as a raw text file on my PC and back it all up once or twice a year onto a portable hard drive. It's pretty anal but I guess you never know when you'll need that quote from so-and-so about that seemingly trivial subject - until you really need it.

I email most of the raw text files to myself as well so that wherever I am I can access them. Just in case, like.

Doran, Tuesday, 12 January 2010 16:09 (4 years ago) Permalink

ditto, who on earth transcribes the WHOLE THING?

unless i'm in a hurry i try to - the times i haven't, i've usually regretted it and gone back to the tape to hear what i've missed, in case there's some game-changing morsel on there

shart in a bag, light it on fire (stevie), Tuesday, 12 January 2010 16:13 (4 years ago) Permalink

i also transcribe every (laughs) in there too, tho sometimes that's just so i can console myself that they laughed at my lame joke

shart in a bag, light it on fire (stevie), Tuesday, 12 January 2010 16:14 (4 years ago) Permalink

One of my writers bollocked me for taking loads of their [laughs] out of the piece that they'd filed. It didn't, they told me, reflect the general levels of hilarity that had taken place in the interview.

Doran, Tuesday, 12 January 2010 16:18 (4 years ago) Permalink

ill transcribe a whole interview if im still feeling kind of lost about how to write the piece. usually i know my angle by the time the interview is done so ill just cherrypick.

max, Tuesday, 12 January 2010 16:20 (4 years ago) Permalink

x-post -- I am eternally glad for the typing class I took in high school.

this was literally the only class my parents insisted i take in high school, and i've thanked them for it many times.

back on transcribing/listening to interviews: is there anyone who doesn't hate listening to themselves conducting an interview? if so i envy you. there's the "sound of my own voice" part, which is annoying and awkward, but there's also just all the little things i do or say to keep people talking or to try to draw them out on one thing or another, some of which inevitably end up in dead ends or nonsequiturs. and even though i understand what i'm doing, the strategies of trying to adapt to the personality or whatever of the person i'm talking to, i just tend to think i sound like an idiot.

hellzapoppa (tipsy mothra), Tuesday, 12 January 2010 16:21 (4 years ago) Permalink

back on transcribing/listening to interviews: is there anyone who doesn't hate listening to themselves conducting an interview?

i think it has seriously damaged my self esteem, no lie. i sound like a huge putz, and also a toady, and also sometimes i don't know EVERYTHING about the person i'm interviewing and they get mad.

shart in a bag, light it on fire (stevie), Tuesday, 12 January 2010 16:25 (4 years ago) Permalink

It didn't, they told me, reflect the general levels of hilarity that had taken place in the interview.

"Sure it was about how the mysterious death of his entire family due to throwing themselves backwards on forks inspired him to write a despairing three CD masterwork but it was REALLY funny!"

Ned Raggett, Tuesday, 12 January 2010 16:26 (4 years ago) Permalink

is there anyone who doesn't hate listening to themselves conducting an interview?

Hahah, having dug out those old cassettes I'd mentioned and relistened to them over the past month: eurgh.

Ned Raggett, Tuesday, 12 January 2010 16:27 (4 years ago) Permalink

Love the one you're with.

Pete Scholtes, Tuesday, 12 January 2010 16:41 (4 years ago) Permalink

i also transcribe every (laughs) in there too, tho sometimes that's just so i can console myself that they laughed at my lame joke

I tried to quote Ron Mael saying I was a smart guy in an interview once but the editor was having none of it

in retrospect he was probably mocking my eagerness to prove I "got" his band anyway

MPx4A, Tuesday, 12 January 2010 16:44 (4 years ago) Permalink

"ournalists who try to spell an interviewee's laugh"

Inspiration for the sex robot sprang from the September 11 attacks (acoleuthic), Tuesday, 12 January 2010 16:50 (4 years ago) Permalink

Read that as 'onanists' and thought "Well..."

Ned Raggett, Tuesday, 12 January 2010 16:52 (4 years ago) Permalink

haha i'd misquoted and edited the j out with the preceding a...i'll never make a music-writer

Inspiration for the sex robot sprang from the September 11 attacks (acoleuthic), Tuesday, 12 January 2010 16:52 (4 years ago) Permalink

i like how when someone says, "nobody's ever asked me that before," it can either mean, "huh, that's a good question" or "jesus you're an idiot" depending on their tone and inflection.

hellzapoppa (tipsy mothra), Tuesday, 12 January 2010 16:53 (4 years ago) Permalink

(i inferred the latter from a sighing iris dement.)

hellzapoppa (tipsy mothra), Tuesday, 12 January 2010 16:54 (4 years ago) Permalink

Probably shouldn't have asked her "So what do you think of the Goo Goo Dolls song about you?"

Ned Raggett, Tuesday, 12 January 2010 16:56 (4 years ago) Permalink

Yeah, I tried to sneak Mark E Smith saying "They were alright guys. Cool guys like you John" past some subs but to no avail.

I mean journalism has broken my body and come close to snapping my mind. All I wanted was a quote of The Fall lead singer saying I was cool in print - even if he said it because he was pissed and I'd just bought him two pints of San Miguel - but would they grant me that one indulgence? Would they fuck.

Transcribing is the fucking bane of my life. I've only ever said "LOL" out loud once. And that was to Polly Harvey. You can almost *hear* her looking at my like I've just beamed down from planet Daft Cunt.

Doran, Tuesday, 12 January 2010 17:04 (4 years ago) Permalink


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