Joni Mitchell: Classic or Dud

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I'm not normally one for the acoustic singy-songwrity pantheon but I'll be gosh-darned if "Blue" doesn't just *floor* me. So for that, classic.

Trouble is, I'm too unfamiliar with the rest of her work. Enlighten me but answer the thread question as well, please. ;-)

Venga, Friday, 13 April 2001 00:00 (13 years ago) Permalink

Dud, Dud and thrice Dud. Annoyingly "twee" hippy songstress with a piercing warble that could make dogs' heads explode. Ick!

alex in nyc, Friday, 13 April 2001 00:00 (13 years ago) Permalink

Is she related to Grant and Phil?

DG, Friday, 13 April 2001 00:00 (13 years ago) Permalink

I liked "Urge for Going" and "Conversation". Poor homebound Canadian girl!! True though, she does warble too much. Final verdict-dud.

Joseph Wasko, Friday, 13 April 2001 00:00 (13 years ago) Permalink

Classic. I remember that on one ill-advised attendance of a cadet leadership camp, mentally replaying her better songs in my head was pretty much what got me through the week. Now admittedly I was fourteen and high-strung at the time, but I still reckon she was, when on form, an unbeatable lyricist. The true classic in her back catalogue is _Hejira_, which of course everyone needs, as it strikes the perfect balance between her early directness and her later abstraction (and her early warbling and later nicotine-enhanced rasp, for that matter).

Tim, Friday, 13 April 2001 00:00 (13 years ago) Permalink

The single worst artist to ever live? Not only do I hate her on principle, but I found Blue to be the most painful album to get through this side of Pink Moon.

Otis Wheeler, Saturday, 14 April 2001 00:00 (13 years ago) Permalink

'Hejira' is the only album I've heard- 'Song for Sharon' and 'Coyote' in particular are excellent. The lyrics and instrumentation floor me.

Geordie loves it fretless, Saturday, 14 April 2001 00:00 (13 years ago) Permalink

Pure garbage. Not fit to pick the toenails of Leonard Cohen, Nick Drake, Tim Buckley. Bloody ugly, as well.

Johnathan, Saturday, 14 April 2001 00:00 (13 years ago) Permalink

cobblers. She was & is HOT!!! "Hejira" is a truly beautiful record, better than all that dylan shite wot folks from old-fart magazines get all hot & bothered over. Joni=classic!

x0x0

norman fay, Saturday, 14 April 2001 00:00 (13 years ago) Permalink

HOT!!! Joni Mitchell! Now you're just being silly.

Johnathan, Saturday, 14 April 2001 00:00 (13 years ago) Permalink

No, he's NOT! (though it's beside the point)

I got "Blue" and "Ladies of the Canyon" for my parents, not thinking I'd ever want them for myself. And why is it that 'warbling' should be considered a bad sound to listen to? Her voice on those two records is lovely!

youn, Saturday, 14 April 2001 00:00 (13 years ago) Permalink

I figure there's just something I don't get about her music. I've tried it on for size lotsa times over the years & the only song i ever developed a lasting liking for is "The Jungle Line" off "The Hissing Of Summer Lawns".
I'm glad I still don't get it actually, it means I'm (still) Not Adult-Oriented.

Duane Zarakov, Saturday, 14 April 2001 00:00 (13 years ago) Permalink

I have Blue and Court And Spark and like both a lot. Blue, especially. I do think, though, that my appreciation has something to do with nostalgia. The whole hippie outlook of that kind of music, (and the sound, too) were what the softer side of the radio was all about when I was a kid in the 70s (both records came out a few years before I would have heard them; but the late 70s still had plenty of that singer/songwriter stuff going.) So I'm not going to cram it down anyone's throat, just because I have certain associations from a certain time & place. I will say that Blue has some fantastic melodies & I'm going to say Classic just on the basis of those two records. I guess I'm more of a hippie than a punk.

Mark, Sunday, 15 April 2001 00:00 (13 years ago) Permalink

Dud as hell. One only needs to listen to her whining at the Isle of Wight festival. Along those lines, the whole of the 60's folk revival (with Dylan et al) has always escaped my sphere of likes, or even my sphere of intellectual appreciation. It just seems so fake. Or maybe I'm just a cynic.

JM, Monday, 16 April 2001 00:00 (13 years ago) Permalink

'My Old Man' (Blue) astonishes me. I used to hear it as a kid, and rediscovering it recently made me shiver with - with memory, nostalgia, something recovered, I suppose; but also with what felt like its innate qualities, the extraordinary intuitive suppleness of the melody, her delivery of it, the plangency of the piano chords. The one thing that let me down was reading the lyrics (I'd not really made them out from listening), which didn't measure up to the sheer emotional charge of the pure aural experience at all.

the pinefox, Wednesday, 18 April 2001 00:00 (13 years ago) Permalink

I hate "Big Yellow Taxi" with a passion called hate, to paraphrase Mr Weller and Ms Headon. But wherever "Night In The City" is (not on 'Blue' I don't think), I like it there.

More to the point, did anyone see that Norwegian girl doing Joni Mitchell on Stars In Euro Eyes?

Tom, Thursday, 19 April 2001 00:00 (13 years ago) Permalink

Yeah Tom ...she had scary teeth

Geordie Racer, Thursday, 19 April 2001 00:00 (13 years ago) Permalink

"whining"? "Warbling"? Are some posters getting Ms Mitchell mixed upw/joan baez? (now she was *d*u*d*!) I think Joni Mitchell's voice is very pure-sounding, not warbly at all.

x0x0

NoRMaN FaY, Thursday, 19 April 2001 00:00 (13 years ago) Permalink

By 'warbling', I thought people meant that she used vocal effects - modulations in pitch, etc. - too much, with the implication that her singing was skilled, but heartless, like Mariah Carey's. I think her voice sounds very pure, too, and didn't know that the terms were mutually exclusive.

Norman, it's funny that you mention Joan Baez in relation to this. Joan Didion has this essay about her in which she writes: "When it was time to go to high school, her father was teaching at Stanford, and so she went to Palo Alto High School, where she taught herself "House of the Rising Sun" on a Sears, Roebuck guitar, tried to achieve vibrato by tapping her throat with her finger, and made headlines by refusing to leave the school during a bomb drill." I love the myth that's suggested by these facts, esp. in relation to the setting.

youn, Thursday, 19 April 2001 00:00 (13 years ago) Permalink

10 months pass...
That's an interesting thread. The positions are quite clear. I'd say my favorite post in here was the Pinefox's. "My Old Man" is an emotionally very intense song with great lyrics: "But when he's gone. Me and them lonesome blues collide. The bed's too big. The frying pan's too wide". She delivers this song in a pure and vulnerable way which is typical for her. As a lyricist she is a genius. A line like "I could drink a case of you and I would still be on my feet" is simply beautiful. I always loved her crystal-clear articulation. So it really makes me wonder that the Pinefox did not get the vocals on "My Old Man".

She warbled most on the first album where she sings false in places. That record is even for me as a fan hardly bearable. I am with Tom concerning "Big Yellow Taxi". Musically it is terrible whereas from the lyrics and the premonition of men destroying nature it is pure genius. "Woodstock" is another of her melodically inferior songs. "Last Flight Tonight" also never gripped me. Absolutely essential are "Blue", "Court and Spark" and "Hejira".

BTW Joan Baez who I always found too folky made a great album in 1992 called "Play Me Backwards".

alex in mainhattan, Sunday, 24 February 2002 01:00 (12 years ago) Permalink

surely it is women who destroy nature, with their lipstick and their hairspray...

as i am allergic to the entire countryside, i liked that they paved over paradise and put up a parking lot: asphalt = better than pollen dust, IMO

mark s, Sunday, 24 February 2002 01:00 (12 years ago) Permalink

she is so yearningly honest , i find that refreshing

anthony, Tuesday, 26 February 2002 01:00 (12 years ago) Permalink

Some reasons to admire Joni:

1. The completely unique sound she gets out of an acoustic guitar on "Blue". 'A Case Of You' = classic.

2. "The Hissing Of Summer Lawns": my definition of Pazz & Jop. Also includes Burundi music way before it was fashionable to do things like this.

3. A band like Nazareth can do great covers of her material. Also her vocal lines are ideal fodder for bootlegs (as Fluke demonstrated years ago). Recontextualisation and all that.

4. She kept Jaco busy - hence fewer shitty Jazz Rock records were made.

(I'm joking about No.4 alex!)

Jeff W, Tuesday, 26 February 2002 01:00 (12 years ago) Permalink

1 year passes...
she uses capos well

amateurist (amateurist), Friday, 29 August 2003 07:45 (11 years ago) Permalink

"blue" reminds me of summer camp. fond memories.

amateurist (amateurist), Friday, 29 August 2003 07:50 (11 years ago) Permalink

Uber Classic! I have to second Jeff's points about the amazing angular guitar tones she got (cf. Blue) and the pazz and jop..
Lyrically she is much more than the fay hippie she's been portrayed as. She's got a great gift of observation re. people and relationships, which I guess puts her in the 'mature' category... Also, that kind of hippie outlook, she started out with, gave her a great perspective on the end of that dream during the 70s, as fantastically displayed on her classic trilogy: Court & Sparks, Hissing of Summer Lawns and Hejira

Fabrice (Fabfunk), Friday, 29 August 2003 08:02 (11 years ago) Permalink

While I find "Blue" slightly overrated, here excellent mid 70s output ("Court And Spark", "Hissing Of Summer Lawns", "Hejira") definitely makes her classic. No doubt about that.

Geir Hongro (GeirHong), Friday, 29 August 2003 10:12 (11 years ago) Permalink

ok how big a bummer is it when Geir likes what u like

J0hn Darn1elle (J0hn Darn1elle), Friday, 29 August 2003 12:01 (11 years ago) Permalink

...and conversely how reassuring it is to find that Geir likes an artist you loathe

Dadaismus (Dada), Friday, 29 August 2003 13:38 (11 years ago) Permalink

she uses capos well

and/or multiple alternate tunings, some of her own invention, i believe?

she's one of the greats, compositionally, subject-matter-wise and maybe persona-wise. and yes, arguably hot, if you like the personality. and probably harder than anyone who thinks she's "twee".

Both For the Roses and Court and Spark are arguably better than Blue. Her best singing (and guitar-playing?) may be on the otherwise middling though convenient pre-C&S-greatest-hits live Miles of Aisles

gabbneb (gabbneb), Friday, 29 August 2003 13:49 (11 years ago) Permalink

j0hn otm.

amateurist (amateurist), Friday, 29 August 2003 13:59 (11 years ago) Permalink

Saskatchewan ROOLZ

Horace Mann (Horace Mann), Friday, 29 August 2003 17:33 (11 years ago) Permalink

I'm not sure why I never answered this the first time around. Joni's one of my all-time favorites. Just listened to Don Juan's Reckless Daughter the day before yesterday, The Hissing of Summer Lawns is also a great one. Her dour seriousness as of late is a bit of a pity, but what a huge talent.

Sean (Sean), Friday, 29 August 2003 17:55 (11 years ago) Permalink

I love Blue. I dunno ´bout her later stuff, though.

Francis Watlington (Francis Watlington), Friday, 29 August 2003 18:12 (11 years ago) Permalink

gabbneb her tunings are often fairly conventional (open D and G are probably her most used non-standard tunings). she has a real grace with the open tunings (e.g., "you turn me on (i'm a radio)") that requires a level of skill fairly uncommon, maybe someone like malkmus, someone who can sing and (uppercase) PLAY pretty sophisticated lines simultaneously.

gygax! (gygax!), Friday, 29 August 2003 18:19 (11 years ago) Permalink

Geir Hongro has made me listen to Court and Spark again after I had mentally filed it away as something to sell or to give to my parents, and I'm glad. There's a version of 'Just Like This Train' on one of those KCRW compilations, which I like a lot. I'm trying to figure out why the arrangements on the album aren't as straightforward for me.

youn, Friday, 29 August 2003 18:21 (11 years ago) Permalink

(but possibly her inventedness is maybe variations on D and G... hey! again kinda like malkmus!)

gygax! (gygax!), Friday, 29 August 2003 18:21 (11 years ago) Permalink

Also, having Charles Mingus call you up and say here's some songs I wrote for you, why don't you put some lyrics to them is pretty classic.

Sean (Sean), Friday, 29 August 2003 18:22 (11 years ago) Permalink

(but ultimately maybe more like richard thompson, burt jansch or even anne briggs)

gygax! (gygax!), Friday, 29 August 2003 18:26 (11 years ago) Permalink

the title track to "court and spark" was running through my head last night, despite not having heard it for years.

i wish i liked anne briggs more.

amateurist (amateurist), Friday, 29 August 2003 18:26 (11 years ago) Permalink

(i wish i knew who anne briggs or bert jansch were shocker)

gabbneb (gabbneb), Friday, 29 August 2003 19:02 (11 years ago) Permalink

they are some guitarists i got into in college shortly after i first heard the led zeppelin bbc session ("white summer/black mountain side") and how it was page's electric rip of several bert jansch songs. it turns out jansch learned the originals from friend/partner anne briggs... but primarily 60s british folk stuff, he was in pentangle and had a lengthy solo career, she stopped playing after a couple records.

gygax! (gygax!), Friday, 29 August 2003 19:08 (11 years ago) Permalink

anne briggs was an english folk singer who started out singing unaccompanied traditional ballads for topic records. later she made a few singer-songwriter type records, with a traditional quality to them. she was very good-looking and had a reputation as a free spirit. she dated bert jansch, who is a v. famous english guitar player/songwriter/singer who wrote "needle of death" and was in pentangle. briggs was a pretty good guitar player too and a decent songwriter. i don't like her voice much on the ballads stuff, it's been claimed as unadorned but it sounds florid to me. the lp the time has come though is very pretty.

just noticed gygax's post. well, a 2nd opinion then.

amateurist (amateurist), Friday, 29 August 2003 20:11 (11 years ago) Permalink

i mean she was good looking and a free spirit since every liner note written about her seems to mention those things. apologies.

amateurist (amateurist), Friday, 29 August 2003 20:11 (11 years ago) Permalink

I find For The Roses quite frustrating. Some great stuff on there, but so much of it sounds so... awkward.

Tim Finney (Tim Finney), Saturday, 30 August 2003 07:10 (11 years ago) Permalink

dated bert jansch, who is a v. famous english guitar player/songwriter/singer

That should read v. famous SCOTTISH guitar player etc., hope you never meet Bert on a dark night!

Dadaismus (Dada), Sunday, 31 August 2003 12:43 (11 years ago) Permalink

thx for the correction.

amateurist (amateurist), Sunday, 31 August 2003 19:07 (11 years ago) Permalink

I can't believe the amount of dissent; without doubt, classic.

christoff (christoff), Friday, 5 September 2003 12:59 (11 years ago) Permalink

3 years pass...

Expanded 2CD remasters of "Court And Spark", "Hissing Of Summer Lawns" and "Hejira" were supposed to have been released by January this year. They are not yet in the shops half a year later.
Does anyone know what happened and when and if they are due?

Geir Hongro, Wednesday, 11 July 2007 20:20 (7 years ago) Permalink

she dumped them in the ocean, I heard.

sw00ds, Wednesday, 11 July 2007 20:26 (7 years ago) Permalink

Joni Mitchell has revealed some of the details surrounding her four-disc box set Love Has Many Faces: A Quartet, a Ballet, Waiting to Be Danced. Originally meant as a tidy best-of compilation, the project took a couple years to complete, as the singer-songwriter tried to construct a clear narrative through handpicked selections from her 17 albums.

i know this is obvious, but it is completely absurd that it would take anyone 2 years to come up with a playlist for a four-disc box set. for her own music! jesus christ joni, just clear out a couple afternoons on your calendar and focus, it doesn't have to be so hard

Karl Malone, Thursday, 16 October 2014 00:42 (4 days ago) Permalink

how involved was she in the sequencing for hits? i've always felt like it's an exceptionally great greatest hits compilation. i'm curious to see how she sequences her career now - which of the early tracks she feels warmest about today. idk. i wouldn't buy the boxset tho esp since i already have every lp so who needs it.

Mordy, Thursday, 16 October 2014 00:44 (4 days ago) Permalink

i know this is obvious, but it is completely absurd that it would take anyone 2 years to come up with a playlist for a four-disc box set. for her own music! jesus christ joni, just clear out a couple afternoons on your calendar and focus, it doesn't have to be so hard

― Karl Malone

idk have you seen the XTC poll?

guess that bundt gettin eaten (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Thursday, 16 October 2014 01:30 (4 days ago) Permalink

maybe joni created a poll for her own songs, submitted a new entry every day for two years, checked in recently to view the results— and blam! box set.

I dunno. (amateurist), Thursday, 16 October 2014 03:08 (4 days ago) Permalink

"What do you mean my royalty checks are getting smaller? How many records am I selling? What?! When did that happen? No one is buying my records anymore? Wait, so you're saying no one is selling any records anymore? Not even Jackson Browne? Wow. What's that? You think I should tour? Yawn, next. Is there some other way to get a paycheck that doesn't involve making new music, or playing live? A boxed set? Cool, let me spend two years on it. Hey, can we get it in that Pono that Neil keeps talking about?"

― Josh in Chicago, Wednesday, October 15, 2014 6:53 PM (3 hours ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

i do wonder about these geezers who could depend on reliable royalty checks for a few decades and then, fairly suddenly, it all dries up.

like carole king. no doubt she raked in millions every year from publishing royalties alone ("you make me feel like a natural woman" / "you've got a friend" /etc.), and i'm betting the checks have been a lot smaller lately.

I dunno. (amateurist), Thursday, 16 October 2014 03:11 (4 days ago) Permalink

on the other hand, maybe michael bay decides to include "porpoise song" in transformers 79 and it's payday again

I dunno. (amateurist), Thursday, 16 October 2014 03:12 (4 days ago) Permalink

You know Carole King just had a hit musical based on her life and songs, right?

Don A Henley And Get Over It (C. Grisso/McCain), Thursday, 16 October 2014 03:19 (4 days ago) Permalink

that's true... maybe she wasn't a good example.

let's take this guy: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thom_Bell

i imagine his royalties from back catalog sales of philly soul have diminished in the past 15 years.

or someone like, uh, neil diamond.

you know what i mean.

I dunno. (amateurist), Thursday, 16 October 2014 03:42 (4 days ago) Permalink

never mind.

I dunno. (amateurist), Thursday, 16 October 2014 03:42 (4 days ago) Permalink

ilx: the most pedantic place on earth

I dunno. (amateurist), Thursday, 16 October 2014 03:43 (4 days ago) Permalink

Some artists do get hung up on decisions like that; several have mentioned that they can't hear their own records without getting distracted (at least) by thinking about studio and other situations, incl backstories of the songs--plus being insecure and obsessive: Mogellons/delusional parasitosis: http://www.ent.uga.edu/pubs/EkbomCurrPsychiatryRpts.pdf
Plus, lingering effects of polio, which she's cited re not touring anymore--also if her voice really is shot, though it wasn't on studio tracks from about 10 years ago, live tapes a few years older---hey, if Dylan can manage, like every night...
At one point, she said that reunion with her daughter had taken away the need to make make music.

dow, Thursday, 16 October 2014 03:47 (4 days ago) Permalink

I think it's about time that Joni Mitchell put out a boxed set. Good for her.

banjoboy, Thursday, 16 October 2014 03:48 (4 days ago) Permalink

Might not be financial as much as the urge to do something more, whatever she can. She already did the versions w strings for inst.; mostly pretty good too.

dow, Thursday, 16 October 2014 03:50 (4 days ago) Permalink

ts: box set vs. boxed set

I dunno. (amateurist), Thursday, 16 October 2014 03:50 (4 days ago) Permalink

I live Joni

calstars, Thursday, 16 October 2014 03:59 (4 days ago) Permalink

amateurist I definitely think there are a lot of artists for whom the royalties eventually "dry up." I kind of doubt that's the case for Joni since she's canonized and also gets covered all the time. She also doesn't strike me as someone who blew all her fortunes on a lavish lifestyle, but who knows.

my jaw left (Hurting 2), Thursday, 16 October 2014 05:32 (4 days ago) Permalink

I wonder how much coin Joni rakes in every Xmas season due to "River"?

Don A Henley And Get Over It (C. Grisso/McCain), Thursday, 16 October 2014 06:46 (4 days ago) Permalink

I can't even think of what Joni would blow wads of money on -- one-of-a-kind handmade scarves? A rustic villa in the Italian countryside? Whalewatching tours?

my jaw left (Hurting 2), Thursday, 16 October 2014 06:57 (4 days ago) Permalink

treatments for her psychosomatic disease?

and Hurting, yeah i wouldn't think joni is one whose royalties dried up... but surely even people like her saw a pretty big dip in the last 15 years. i just feel bad for those middle-level artists whose retirement was probably bet on the continued appearance of royalty checks.

I dunno. (amateurist), Thursday, 16 October 2014 08:25 (4 days ago) Permalink

Luckily she didn't buy her housemaid a car.

Tim F, Thursday, 16 October 2014 09:36 (4 days ago) Permalink

Royalty payments fascinate me and I could discuss'em forever. How much would she make a year, ya think?

guess that bundt gettin eaten (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Thursday, 16 October 2014 10:56 (4 days ago) Permalink

She probably make a mint off the Counting Crows cover, our suffering for her gain I suppose. Aside from that, I have no idea. Musician's income always break down in weird ways. But:

amateurist I definitely think there are a lot of artists for whom the royalties eventually "dry up."

I'd say "all artists with few exceptions". (Except film composers, it seems.)

fgti, Thursday, 16 October 2014 12:05 (4 days ago) Permalink

Oh big $ if you can turn your catalogue into a hit musical, in case any musicians here had a catalogue that could be turned into a hit musical

fgti, Thursday, 16 October 2014 12:10 (4 days ago) Permalink

She probably make a mint off the Counting Crows cover, our suffering for her gain I suppose.

Or how about the Janet Jackson sample?

how's life, Thursday, 16 October 2014 12:31 (4 days ago) Permalink

Think the income for a lot of established artists comes more from investments, not that some of them (Billy Joel, L.Cohen) don't have their personal Madoffs, as it turns out, The ones who actually get enough royalties to invest, that is--for the other side, see an epic and cogent discussion in Ruth Brown's autobio, Miss Rhythm: backstory of the Rhythm & Blues Foundation, set up to establish, collect and distribute what a lot of artists, famous and otherwise, should have been receiving all through their careers (Atlantic Records giving a new meaning to "loss leader").
Not so much of a problem with white classic rock royalty, it seems. Indeed, remember reading in Billboard, early in the Napster era, that big companies weren't offering good deals to new artists because had so much tied up in long term deals w Clapton, Phil Collins etc.

dow, Thursday, 16 October 2014 13:17 (4 days ago) Permalink

I think the key is when someone covers your song. Your own album, the labels fuck you over and do everything they can not to pay you what's owed. But when someone covers your song, it seems like the payout comes much faster, perhaps for legal/licensing reasons. We've talked about it before, but I've always wondered what, say, Wire makes off REM. Or, you know, Leonard Cohen from his surprise credit on "Automatic for the People."

Josh in Chicago, Thursday, 16 October 2014 13:30 (4 days ago) Permalink

Well if you own the publishing (i.e. the composition itself) and someone covers it, you get paid through ASCAP/BMI iirc. There's no licensing issue to deal with, it's a "compulsory license." I think this is right, anyway -- I did study this at one point but never actually worked in the field so it's rusty.

my jaw left (Hurting 2), Thursday, 16 October 2014 14:16 (4 days ago) Permalink

I think ASCAP/BMI basically keep track of performances/radio plays/sales of the cover version for you.

my jaw left (Hurting 2), Thursday, 16 October 2014 14:16 (4 days ago) Permalink

royalties checks for legacy artists are probably still pretty good. I'm still getting checks (they don't pay the rent, but they help with it) on stuff I released twenty years ago that almost nobody's ever heard of. there is, as the last number of posts illustrate, a huge system of how publishing money works, and a lot of options (sell your publishing outright / license your songs / other people cover them and you get your percentage / etc) - these options are easier to exploit if you're more famous or have written songs lots of people recognize. Hurting's right about the compulsory license.

But Joni Mitchell probably isn't issuing the boxed set because her royalties stream from 30-year-old back catalog suddenly dried up. It probably experienced a the same sharp correction everybody else experienced right around 2001, but the checks are probably still pretty good.

The Complainte of Ray Tabano, Thursday, 16 October 2014 14:28 (4 days ago) Permalink

Wish Joni had a boat named 'James Blake'

GhostTunes on my Pono (Sufjan Grafton), Thursday, 16 October 2014 15:12 (4 days ago) Permalink

I would think Joni's got money coming in from a bunch of different streams - let's not forget she's also a painter

Οὖτις, Thursday, 16 October 2014 15:23 (4 days ago) Permalink

Would think (unless he got ripped off on older publishing too) Cohen might do alright from covers of "Hallelujah" alone (various heard in syndicated TV eps pretty often, most often Rufus Wainwright's---Willie Nelson's is my fave, maybe cos he doesn't sound too fervent)

dow, Thursday, 16 October 2014 15:27 (4 days ago) Permalink

I guess I can see how being a legacy artist who's not constantly performing could still have some precarity -- the money can probably be unpredictable and you have to stretch it to last a long time. So Mitchell = probably not poor, but maybe needs to do a new project once in a while to ensure comfortable retirement.

my jaw left (Hurting 2), Thursday, 16 October 2014 15:29 (4 days ago) Permalink

remember that cohen had all his money fucked away by an unscrupulous manager some years ago

that said, i'm sure that royalties from hallelujah (not to mention his endless touring) have kept him well in the black ever since

I dunno. (amateurist), Friday, 17 October 2014 11:08 (3 days ago) Permalink

Cohen has said that touring has largely refilled those coffers.

guess that bundt gettin eaten (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 17 October 2014 11:10 (3 days ago) Permalink

This is an interesting topic that really deserves its own thread. FWIW when Richard Wright of Pink Floyd (stratospheric, I know) died his estate was worth £24 million.

goth colouring book (anagram), Friday, 17 October 2014 11:46 (3 days ago) Permalink

All Who tours undertaken between 1989 and 2002 were done to keep John Entwistle out of debt. Ironically, much of his debt was incurred because he went out-of-pocket keeping his solo band on club tours that never broke even (though his spending on guitars, basses, cars, taxidermied fish, and a collection of medieval armor probably didn't help). When he died, all his possessions had to be auctioned off to pay outstanding debts and settle his estate's tax.

Montgomery Burns' Jazz (Tarfumes The Escape Goat), Friday, 17 October 2014 14:11 (3 days ago) Permalink

Worth keeping in mind that Richard Wright had many Floyd writing credits on albums that sell bazillions. Entwistle ... less so.

Josh in Chicago, Friday, 17 October 2014 15:43 (3 days ago) Permalink

I would read an entire book on this stuff. It's fascinating to me how a single savvy decision like making sure to get co-writing credit or just how good/bad the terms of a certain deal are can become such a make or break for an artist for years to come.

my jaw left (Hurting 2), Friday, 17 October 2014 15:47 (3 days ago) Permalink

sideline, but there was already a Joni box set, guys

http://www.amazon.com/Studio-Albums-1968-Joni-Mitchell/dp/B0097AQEOK/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1413561012&sr=8-1&keywords=joni+mitchell+box

and its incredibly inexpensive and wonderful

Jimmywine Dyspeptic, Friday, 17 October 2014 15:50 (3 days ago) Permalink

wow, that's a great deal

my jaw left (Hurting 2), Friday, 17 October 2014 15:52 (3 days ago) Permalink

Indeed. Would also like to hear her choice & sequence of tracks, her implicit narrative.

dow, Friday, 17 October 2014 15:55 (3 days ago) Permalink

I would read an entire book on this stuff. It's fascinating to me how a single savvy decision like making sure to get co-writing credit or just how good/bad the terms of a certain deal are can become such a make or break for an artist for years to come.

― my jaw left (Hurting 2), Friday, October 17, 2014 11:47 AM (19 minutes ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

This one is pretty great:
http://www.amazon.com/You-Never-Give-Your-Money/dp/0061774189

Montgomery Burns' Jazz (Tarfumes The Escape Goat), Friday, 17 October 2014 16:09 (3 days ago) Permalink

Indeed. Would also like to hear her choice & sequence of tracks, her implicit narrative.

― dow, Friday, October 17, 2014 10:55 AM (17 minutes ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

it's called iTunes, and it's free!

I dunno. (amateurist), Friday, 17 October 2014 16:13 (3 days ago) Permalink

sort of

I dunno. (amateurist), Friday, 17 October 2014 16:13 (3 days ago) Permalink

Is Joni still represented by Elliott Roberts? If he's been able to keep Neil Young solvent, she should be a cakewalk.

Don A Henley And Get Over It (C. Grisso/McCain), Friday, 17 October 2014 16:42 (3 days ago) Permalink

no Who album has ever sold as much as Pink Floyd album. It's like comparing, I dunno, Tom Petty sales to Zep's.

guess that bundt gettin eaten (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 17 October 2014 16:47 (3 days ago) Permalink

Yeah, I'm pretty sure Dark Side has sold more than the Who's whole catalog combined.

Montgomery Burns' Jazz (Tarfumes The Escape Goat), Friday, 17 October 2014 16:49 (3 days ago) Permalink

money, it's a gas

I can't make my waterface turn into a *fart* (Sufjan Grafton), Friday, 17 October 2014 16:55 (3 days ago) Permalink


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