Is there a name for that genre of turn-of-the-90s pop-rock with the positive vibes, huge guitar leads, and gated drums?

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Examples:

School of Fish, "Three Strange Days"
Michael Jackson, "Black Or White"
Roxette, "Joyride"
Jesus Jones, "Right Here, Right Now" (doesn't have the drums tho)

et cetera. In a lot of ways this stuff is a logical progression of things that are generically "80s" (the Phil Collins drums especially) but there's still a distinctive sound to these '90-'91 rock singles. I remember ads that used to run for "Awesomely 90s" K-Tel type CDs, and they were full of this stuff and absolutely nothing that I would later think of as "90s Rock." One can imagines an entire alternate, Nirvanaless 90s rock history-that-might-have-been.

So what do we call this music? And what are some more examples? What about stuff from later in the decade that fits in just fine with this evolutionary tree, turning a total blind eye to grunge? Etc.

Doctor Casino, Monday, 27 August 2007 22:01 (7 years ago) Permalink

That's an interesting question, but unfortunately I can't place the School of Fish or Roxette songs at the moment. And wasn''t the Jesus Jones song more associated with a Madchester/baggy thing, or even Grebo?

dell, Monday, 27 August 2007 22:47 (7 years ago) Permalink

So what do we call this music?

Revolting.

Daniel, Esq., Monday, 27 August 2007 23:14 (7 years ago) Permalink

I kid, I kid.

Daniel, Esq., Monday, 27 August 2007 23:15 (7 years ago) Permalink

Do you guys think that "Black or White" was Michael Jackson's last compelling (musical) moment? 'Cos I'm inclined to think that it was.

dell, Monday, 27 August 2007 23:17 (7 years ago) Permalink

post-Cannibals

Curt1s Stephens, Monday, 27 August 2007 23:18 (7 years ago) Permalink

Modern Rock

M@tt He1ges0n, Monday, 27 August 2007 23:21 (7 years ago) Permalink

Do you guys remember people around that time saying "I listen to progressive music"? (which meant they listened to the "Modern Rock" format radio station circa '90/'91)

dell, Monday, 27 August 2007 23:27 (7 years ago) Permalink

School of Fish was proto-Seattle.

rogermexico., Tuesday, 28 August 2007 01:50 (7 years ago) Permalink

Was Earth Song before or after Black & White? I always thought there was a good song there, but it was pretty cheesy.

rockapads, Tuesday, 28 August 2007 02:28 (7 years ago) Permalink

nu-Freedom Rock

gershy, Tuesday, 28 August 2007 02:43 (7 years ago) Permalink

I think the Spin Doctors fit this description, esp. the drums and positive vibes. I'm not sure I'd say they have huge guitar leads, but then I wouldn't say that about "Black or White" either.

Also no way is "Black or White" Michael Jackson's last compelling musical moment...unless you mean Dangerous; because "In the Closet" is badass.

Euler, Tuesday, 28 August 2007 03:02 (7 years ago) Permalink

post-Cannibals

roffles

Trayce, Tuesday, 28 August 2007 03:10 (7 years ago) Permalink

Do you guys remember people around that time saying "I listen to progressive music"? (which meant they listened to the "Modern Rock" format radio station circa '90/'91)

YES!!

baaderonixx, Tuesday, 28 August 2007 08:06 (7 years ago) Permalink

Dada - "Dizz Knee Land"
Toad The Wet Sprocket

Elvis Telecom, Tuesday, 28 August 2007 08:22 (7 years ago) Permalink

"life is a highway"
the escape club!
kick-era inxs pretty much fits this description

tipsy mothra, Tuesday, 28 August 2007 13:58 (7 years ago) Permalink

Re: Michael Jackson, "You Rock My World" is pretty great.

Jordan, Tuesday, 28 August 2007 14:13 (7 years ago) Permalink

three strange days really is the king song of this genre.

M@tt He1ges0n, Tuesday, 28 August 2007 14:16 (7 years ago) Permalink

Do you guys remember people around that time saying "I listen to progressive music"?

Damn, that was a confusing time to like college, er...modern rock, er...alternative. I'd probably just go with "pop rock". That's probably too nebulous, but it's a pretty acurate description of those acts.

On a side note, I was really into what dell calls a Madchester/baggy thing, or even Grebo at the time, but probably just called it modern rock or progressive (thanks, WHFS!). I remember hearing people refer to the city of Manchester as "Madchester", but never heard any of these genre names. Was I out of the loop, or did we 'Muricans just not latch on to these tags?

kingkongvsgodzilla, Tuesday, 28 August 2007 14:25 (7 years ago) Permalink

Wonderful picks everybody! "Dizz Knee Land" is one of those songs I've managed to hear of a million times but never actually hear before, and it fits right in there in the more "alternative" wing of the genre, along with "Three Strange Days." And yeah, "Three Strange Days" is fantastic.

From my old moldering Deadeye Dick thread:

My wife has this friend, and he showed up late to this party last year...I asked him why he'd been late and he said, "Oh well, I wanted to come earlier but I went to the Fine Line cuz my favorite band was playing"

Me: "Oh really? cool...what band?"

Him: "Dada"

His favorite band is Dada. Huh. Didn't see that coming.

-- M@tt He1geson (Matt Helgeson), Thursday, November 3, 2005 5:35 PM (Thursday, November 3, 2005 5:35 PM)

Deadeye Dick themselves probably don't quite make the cut as "Post-Cannibals," the mix is a little too thin and the tone a little too grungey. But the Spin Doctors are a really good call.

Doctor Casino, Tuesday, 28 August 2007 18:02 (7 years ago) Permalink

Haha "Three Strange Days" was the first thing I thought of when I saw this thread's title.

Would Matthew Sweet's "Girlfriend" fit into this genre, or would his retro leanings and/or later hits negate his candidacy?

Alex in Baltimore, Tuesday, 28 August 2007 18:26 (7 years ago) Permalink

I always associate "Right Here, Right Now" and EMF's "Unbelievable." (Perhaps because both were on the chart in summer 1991.)

jaymc, Tuesday, 28 August 2007 18:28 (7 years ago) Permalink

"Unbelievable" was totally on that CD whose commercial I was babbling about above!

Doctor Casino, Tuesday, 28 August 2007 18:53 (7 years ago) Permalink

btw, for anyone still catching up, videos for:

Three Strange Days
Joyride
Black Or White

"Black Or White" also features Macaulay Culkin and a pan-racial, pan-national, "the Cold War is over! the future is bright!" message which only adds to the positive vibes. See also "Right Here Right Now."

Doctor Casino, Tuesday, 28 August 2007 18:57 (7 years ago) Permalink

"the Cold War is over! the future is bright!" message

Also see: Scorpions, "Wind of Change"

jaymc, Tuesday, 28 August 2007 18:58 (7 years ago) Permalink

Would Matthew Sweet's "Girlfriend" fit into this genre

Matthew Sweet is way too rugged. : )

kingkongvsgodzilla, Tuesday, 28 August 2007 19:08 (7 years ago) Permalink

Damn, judging by the video, School of Fish were the Silverchair of their time.

kingkongvsgodzilla, Tuesday, 28 August 2007 19:10 (7 years ago) Permalink

C+C Music Factory: "Here We Go"

Kevin John Bozelka, Tuesday, 28 August 2007 19:31 (7 years ago) Permalink

haha i'd forgotten abt that dada story, but it is true. blew my mind.

geggy tah would fit this.

M@tt He1ges0n, Wednesday, 29 August 2007 16:54 (7 years ago) Permalink

Those examples at the start don't have much in common the way I see it.

Roxette and Jesus Jones were both influenced by Powerpop though, only in very different ways and with very different stylistic outcome.

Geir Hongro, Wednesday, 29 August 2007 20:02 (7 years ago) Permalink

A lot of examples aren't fitting together for me, but there is a certain guitar sound running through a bunch of them that seems telling: a rhythm guitar thing, up front in the mix, somewhat think (or at least not taking up a ton of space) and usually verging on staccato or telegraph -- the opposite of the sludgy/blurry blanket the other end of alt-rock would bring in.

"Black or White" has this hardcore
School of Fish do, if I remember right
Roxette kicked this a TON, being a duo
"Two Princes" had it (most Spin Doctors, really)
"Life is a Highway"

I think the paradigm that's getting pinned down here is one where rock bands are uptempo rhythm machines, with the rhythm sections having really mild doses of funkiness or propulsion, and that's supposed to be sufficient enough on its own that the guitar doesn't need to occupy all the space above it. Whereas the alt paradigm that comes after it is very guitar-blanket and would have no truck with a guitar playing a scratch rhythm line (like the one on "Life is a Highway" especially), and the rhythm sections aren't treated as sufficient -- in fact, they usually have to lay down a fuzzy rhythm guitar just playing the chords on eighth notes before they can move on toward adding another guitar to play even simple leads.

nabisco, Wednesday, 29 August 2007 20:16 (7 years ago) Permalink

That would seem like a turn in a bad direction, and kinda was, except that the turn-of-90s stuff had a huge problem: it tended to sound like a drum machine and a Very Corny Bassist playing out of a karaoke box while some guy played rhythm Strat as if there were actually a band around. I think the late 80s and early 90s were kind of a horrible end point of using technology to make really slick, artificial music, but still aspiring to make it in the mold of, like, 60s American rock'n'roll classics, blues, funk, and all -- by the end of the 80s we were getting these weird chromed-out replicas of the old stuff, old-school R'n'R played on digital keyboards and triggered gated drums, and it started to feel uncomfortable, and that sort of thing seems to have died hard going into the next decade.

nabisco, Wednesday, 29 August 2007 20:21 (7 years ago) Permalink

Wonderful posts nabisco. I'm not sure how much I buy the narrative but it's nice to see one being floated, particularly one focusing in on "that guitar sound" that I've had a hard time putting into words.

So does this mean that there were no heirs to this lineage? That alt-rock's influence, even on people that were ultimately not consuming alt-rock albums, was to restate a certain standard of "authenticity" when one was to undertake doing genre work? That is, the bands of the late 90s working "in the mold of, like, 60s American rock'n'roll classics, blues, funk, and all" seem to have gone for a much more "organic"-sounding production. Fastball comes immediately to mind, but I suppose that a lot of the pop-rock which is so reviled by rockist CW would fit in here - Matchbox 20, Hootie, Deep Blue Something - not "alternative" bands in any sonic sense but they seem to have absorbed the ethos.

This also makes me wonder how many of the Post-Cannibals records were the result of "alt" bands showing up in the studio with producers who only knew how to make certain kinds of records. The School of Fish song seems to make a case for this - everything about it besides the production suggests that these guys walked in the door as a garage psychedelia band.

Doctor Casino, Wednesday, 29 August 2007 23:59 (7 years ago) Permalink

I just realized I saw School of Fish live. They opened for the Charlatans in early 1991.

Ned Raggett, Thursday, 30 August 2007 00:10 (7 years ago) Permalink

Just thought of another one - The Proclaimers, "500 Miles." It's a little weird, but the snare and the chunky guitar both make an appearance to my ears.

Doctor Casino, Thursday, 30 August 2007 00:22 (7 years ago) Permalink

Seems like some movie soundtrack hits from 89 and 90 might fit this bill. Interesting ideas from Nabisco here -- kind of like sounds from the 60s-channeling baby boomer demographic finally grappling with these technologies.

Mark Rich@rdson, Thursday, 30 August 2007 00:51 (7 years ago) Permalink

Oh man: the guy at the next desk is listening to "Life is a Highway."

So the more I think about it, the more I can't tell if the development I'm talking about was a good one or not. Doctor Casino is totally right: most anyone making an old-school rock'n'roll record after 92 or so would shoot for production that sounded natural, "vintage." And while this was WAY less embarrassing, it feels weird to applaud a development that put stuff in a glass case to be properly preserved and recreated.

Movie soundtracks are a great example of this, Mark! I'd trace it back toward the early 80s, where you have two things going: (a) the shine and ambition of prog and "yacht rock" have kinda died, and (b) you have one of rock's early generations first hitting the question of how to be an older rocker. (E.g., Rod Stewart is all over MTV).

And if you look at big movie-sountrack type hits in particular, a ridiculous number of them are pastiches of rock's early days -- a lot of them lyrically about the roots of rock:

- Huey Lewis is all "The Heart of Rock and Roll is the Beat"
- George Thoroughgood is doing "Bad to the Bone" blues pastiche
- Billy Joel is going further back and doing doo-wop pastiche like "Uptown Girl"
- "Old Time Rock and Roll" by Bob Seger!
- I would kinda class "Footloose" here too
- and stuff like Aretha singing "Freeway of Love!"

Plus stuff like Mellencamp and Tom Petty -- it was like everyone soldifying a mythology of what rock'n'roll was, only nobody yet felt like there was some great incompatibility between classic rock/soul and 80s production techniques. (It surely helped that the people working in big studios, the session players, the label heads and producers, and plenty of the stars had genuinely been working since the glory days.)

Point being that seems to fall apart right around "Life is a Highway," or something. (I would go on and on about the details of this, but I don't think they're hard to imagine; there was a kind of changing of the guard here, I think.)

nabisco, Thursday, 30 August 2007 20:59 (7 years ago) Permalink

Spin Doctors didn't have gated drums at all! Aaron Comess was a sick drummer, dudes

Whiney G. Weingarten, Thursday, 30 August 2007 21:10 (7 years ago) Permalink

B-52's "Roam" may fit into this.

Whiney G. Weingarten, Thursday, 30 August 2007 21:11 (7 years ago) Permalink

And those early 90's Def Leppard singles

like "Let's Get Rocked"

Whiney G. Weingarten, Thursday, 30 August 2007 21:11 (7 years ago) Permalink

There really should be a name for this kind of thing. It's like the hair-metal aesthetic, only with "party rock" instead of hair metal.

nabisco, Thursday, 30 August 2007 21:13 (7 years ago) Permalink

Get rocked here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B05EDye9QII

Whiney G. Weingarten, Thursday, 30 August 2007 21:13 (7 years ago) Permalink

There is so much wrong with that video, I don't even know where to start.

Whiney G. Weingarten, Thursday, 30 August 2007 21:14 (7 years ago) Permalink

Soup Dragons, "Divine Thing"

jaymc, Thursday, 30 August 2007 21:23 (7 years ago) Permalink

I have been rocked by that video.

I didn't remember that I owe the expression "let's get the rock out of here" to that song! I probably say that ten times a week!

Euler, Thursday, 30 August 2007 21:24 (7 years ago) Permalink

- Huey Lewis is all "The Heart of Rock and Roll is the Beat"

I'll be pedantic: "The Heart of Rock and Roll is still Beating" was the lyric.

kingkongvsgodzilla, Thursday, 30 August 2007 21:24 (7 years ago) Permalink

Another name for that genre: "hot new country" (e.g. Alan Jackson "Chattahoochee").

Euler, Thursday, 30 August 2007 21:26 (7 years ago) Permalink

Big Audio Dynamite II, "Rush"
The Farm, "Groovy Train"

jaymc, Thursday, 30 August 2007 21:30 (7 years ago) Permalink

This is the continuing application of mid 80s pop production to rock music, right? Sound of Bob Clearmountain on Bryan Adams Reckless and Hall & Oates Big Bam Boom, and of Mutt Lange on tons of stuff (AC/DC, Def Lep, Huey Lewis, the Cars' Heartbeat City, etc.). Kind of based in dance music in the first place - Clearmountain worked with Chic. Vic Maile did some similar stuff in England, though he's more associated with hard rock bands.

By the time you get to the 90s, the drums aren't quite so prominent & boomy, the once-trendy new wave dance elements starting to shrivel, more naturalistic production coming back into favor.

Bob Standard, Thursday, 30 August 2007 21:31 (7 years ago) Permalink

That's not pedantry, that's important: I've spent decades thinking Huey's pointing out that, like, rhythm is the foundation of rock'n'roll music!

nabisco, Thursday, 30 August 2007 21:34 (7 years ago) Permalink

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JMDcOViViNY

this is the video i saw

and what, Monday, 17 March 2008 16:44 (6 years ago) Permalink

^ban

Dom Passantino, Monday, 17 March 2008 16:46 (6 years ago) Permalink

tza/latebloomer what was that rock station out of anderson in the 90s? i think they only played tool, come as you are, and mysterious ways

and what, Monday, 17 March 2008 16:46 (6 years ago) Permalink

stfu dom

and what, Monday, 17 March 2008 16:46 (6 years ago) Permalink

u need to go back to crying over a fat girl while listening to the eels & get off my case for digging good times rock music

and what, Monday, 17 March 2008 16:47 (6 years ago) Permalink

They're not really "good times" music, their entire last album was about how dumb people who live on council estates are.

qf: Defend The Indefensible: The Lyrics to 'I Predict A Riot'

Dom Passantino, Monday, 17 March 2008 16:49 (6 years ago) Permalink

Kaiser Chiefs and Spin Doctors are two quite different kinds of awful.

Bodrick III, Monday, 17 March 2008 16:49 (6 years ago) Permalink

Yes, isn't it awful how those who hate recent bands writing great melodic songs meet with opposition on ILM these days? Wasn't it so much better back in 2001 when everyone agreed that melodic music should be buried forever and white males with guitars should never again be allowed to make music?

-- Geir Hongro, Thursday, October 18, 2007 8:35 AM (4 months ago) Bookmark Link

^^^only other time Kaisers have ever been defended on ILX

Dom Passantino, Monday, 17 March 2008 16:51 (6 years ago) Permalink

is this like when whiney expected me to be familiar with gym class heroes lyrics

and what, Monday, 17 March 2008 16:52 (6 years ago) Permalink

Actually, it's not just Geir, you've got the British National Party agreeing with you as well: http://www.bbc.co.uk/6music/news/20060824_bnp.shtml

Dom Passantino, Monday, 17 March 2008 16:53 (6 years ago) Permalink

lyrnyrd skynyrd wanted george wallace for president and eazy e was a republican, who gives a fuck

and what, Monday, 17 March 2008 16:53 (6 years ago) Permalink

BNP championing a typically English sounding band is hardly a suprise, is it?

But that doesn't mean there is anything wrong with sounding typically English. In fact, it's great, as there is no other country that has such a great legacy and such a great typical style.

Geir Hongro, Monday, 17 March 2008 17:30 (6 years ago) Permalink

i think there was a reflective sound in house music from around this period too

deej, Monday, 17 March 2008 17:31 (6 years ago) Permalink

Hmmm... what could have happened at the turn of the 90s that people felt good about, I wonder?

Bodrick III, Monday, 17 March 2008 17:48 (6 years ago) Permalink

i bought a rawkus hoodie?

and what, Monday, 17 March 2008 17:50 (6 years ago) Permalink

That's pretty good going, considering the label wasn't founded until 1996.

Bodrick III, Monday, 17 March 2008 18:01 (6 years ago) Permalink

best episode of quantum leap ever

M@tt He1ges0n, Monday, 17 March 2008 18:04 (6 years ago) Permalink

Al, there's all kinds of pockets and zips on my pants, and they're way too big for me...

Bodrick III, Monday, 17 March 2008 18:09 (6 years ago) Permalink

"In fact, it's great, as there is no other country that has such a great legacy and such a great typical style."

ouch. completely discounting the land mass that gave birth to the blues, and jazz. nice

outdoor_miner, Monday, 17 March 2008 19:39 (6 years ago) Permalink

I consider Germany a much more important country in the history of music than the US.

Geir Hongro, Monday, 17 March 2008 20:24 (6 years ago) Permalink

Catsupppppppppppppp dude 茄蕃, Monday, 17 March 2008 20:27 (6 years ago) Permalink

hongro may you be a ho that goes forever unsaved

M@tt He1ges0n, Monday, 17 March 2008 20:53 (6 years ago) Permalink

7 months pass...

I'll never know whether to blame Dom or Geir more for derailing what was previously my favorite thread I ever started.

Doctor Casino, Saturday, 18 October 2008 03:16 (5 years ago) Permalink

1 month passes...

Also, several years late and not really in the genre at all.... but germane to any discussion of Post-Cold-War Rock: Phil Collins's ridiculously upbeat "Dance Into The Light." We are one world - we have-a one voice!

(The production is closer to the overstuffed world-beat of "Circle of Light" than anything on this thread.)

Doctor Casino, Saturday, 22 November 2008 06:14 (5 years ago) Permalink

I thought Skynyrd was anti-Wallace. "Boo boo boo!"

If Timi Yuro would be still alive, most other singers could shut up, Saturday, 22 November 2008 06:30 (5 years ago) Permalink

1 year passes...

Will anyone ever do like a loving, detail-obsessed revival/pastiche record for this sound?

Doctor Casino, Thursday, 18 February 2010 03:58 (4 years ago) Permalink

I saw Dada live open up for Uncle Tupelo on the tour after Anodyne came out. I seem to remember them being pretty good actually, but I don't ever remember hearing one of their CDs.

I don't quite know about the huge guitar part as they were a bit more subdued, but I think Del Amtri's "Kiss This Thing Goodbye" fit into this genre. They got brighters and sunnier as they went on, but I think Toad the Wet Sprocket might fit into this too.

earlnash, Thursday, 18 February 2010 05:17 (4 years ago) Permalink

1 month passes...

actually I think this blows "Black and White" away...

failboat fucking captain (Drugs A. Money), Wednesday, 24 March 2010 22:26 (4 years ago) Permalink

1 year passes...

Doesn't really fit at all (more I guess period "college rock" generically) but the vibes are so positive! Like a mellowed-out "Dizz Knee Land."

Freddy Jones Band - In A Daydream

Doctor Casino, Wednesday, 4 May 2011 14:12 (3 years ago) Permalink

1 year passes...

I'm on like three hours of sleep and can't turn it up loud enough to actually hear anything but I'm pretty sure Rod Stewart's "Forever Young" is involved somehow.

Doctor Casino, Saturday, 22 December 2012 15:20 (1 year ago) Permalink

Doctor Casino, Saturday, 22 December 2012 15:20 (1 year ago) Permalink

Hrrrrmrmrmr, yeah, I dunno. Much fuller sound than these other things, and no chunky/scratchy rhythm guitar up front. On the other hand, the solo is exactly the kind of legible, arcing sound I hear on these other records, and the clobbering drums come in on the second chorus but good. And overall it's got the same kind of propulsive, "Edge of Seventeen" feeling as some of these.

Great song IMO.

Doctor Casino, Saturday, 22 December 2012 16:53 (1 year ago) Permalink

1988 and a bit more countryfried but I love Jerry Harrison's "Rev It Up" for this vibe.

Tim F, Saturday, 22 December 2012 17:59 (1 year ago) Permalink

I like many Rod Stewart songs from this period ("Crazy About Her," "Downtown Train," "Lost in You") but "Forever Young" -- ick. And it hasn't gone away.

the little prince of inane false binary hype (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 22 December 2012 18:15 (1 year ago) Permalink

Never heard that before! Yeah, I buy it.

Euler made the "New Country" connection above and I think that whole area would be interesting to explore. In general (and I am out of my depth here) but it seems like country tries to avoid sounding like it was made by studio robots, as a rule - there's the faith/image that at some point there was a hard-playin', tight backing band that gets together and records. So something like Travis Tritt's "T.R.O.U.B.L.E." starts out sounding like it's going to totally be one of these songs; there's a huge thudding WHAMMMO drum like two seconds in - but then the rest of the band shows up and starts to boogie.

At the same time, I think traces of this whole thing may have survived longer in country than anywhere else - rock went through various phases of sludge and wash and guitars-in-the-red, but clean, bright, super-shiny sounds never entirely went away in country. And you have people like Mutt Lange doing their biggest records way later - "Man! I Feel Like A Woman" is totally the heir of this sound, to the point where they decided to do a Robert Palmer pastiche for the video even though it's not actually a "retro"-styled song.

Doctor Casino, Saturday, 22 December 2012 18:16 (1 year ago) Permalink

(that's an xpost)

I love "Forever Young" - but in the way of a song I remember hearing a fair number of times as a kid and then never again until, like, last week. Where are you hearing it? I must go to different dentist's offices or something.

Doctor Casino, Saturday, 22 December 2012 18:17 (1 year ago) Permalink

I hear it at least twice a week on A/C and oldie stations.

the little prince of inane false binary hype (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 22 December 2012 18:19 (1 year ago) Permalink

Oh yeah -- country is where rock's been at since at least the nineties

the little prince of inane false binary hype (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 22 December 2012 18:20 (1 year ago) Permalink

Wow, had no idea it had any shelf life at all. Crazy how much variety there still is in those things in the Clear Channel age.

Doctor Casino, Saturday, 22 December 2012 18:23 (1 year ago) Permalink

I think Sheryl Crow's second album had a through-line from this stuff (though the percussion is more '90s americana).

something of an astrological coup (tipsy mothra), Saturday, 22 December 2012 21:02 (1 year ago) Permalink

Hmmm, not entirely hearing that one, but maybe someone more up on Mitchell Froom can piece together the arc there?

Doctor Casino, Saturday, 22 December 2012 22:53 (1 year ago) Permalink

Mitchell Froom's trick is to create "unconventional" sounds in a pop context.

the little prince of inane false binary hype (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 22 December 2012 22:59 (1 year ago) Permalink

Belinda Carlisle's hits or Bryan Adams' Waking Up The Neighbours material to thread

Master of Treacle, Sunday, 23 December 2012 05:19 (1 year ago) Permalink

Teenage Fanclub's "Star Sign" would fit this mold, rite?

Also, perhaps, Jellyfish - "That Is Why", maybe the La's "There She Goes". If it had arrived a few years later, I'd include XTC's "Mayor of Simpleton" (their biggest US hit, despite the lyric about not being able to write a big hit song). If it had arrived a few years earlier, Hootie's "Time".

I've always liked this microgenre, whatever it may be called.

Lee626, Sunday, 23 December 2012 20:04 (1 year ago) Permalink

Wow, right on about Bryan Adams. "Can't Stop This Thing We Started" and "All I Want Is You" are definitely right in there. Trending a little rootsier but yeah. Will have to dig into the other last couple things, not familiar with 'em.

Doctor Casino, Tuesday, 25 December 2012 17:09 (1 year ago) Permalink

Would this count?

MarkoP, Tuesday, 25 December 2012 20:32 (1 year ago) Permalink

Right on!

Doctor Casino, Thursday, 27 December 2012 01:35 (1 year ago) Permalink

Richard Marx is one of those guys that was really popular and all over the radio for few years, yet I can't remember any of his songs

Lee626, Thursday, 27 December 2012 09:24 (1 year ago) Permalink

This was one of those things, no?

DJ Smoove Groothe (staggerlee), Sunday, 30 December 2012 00:42 (1 year ago) Permalink

Wow, never heard this before. I think it fits. Sounds like another one that started out as a different kind of band and found themselves sounding Post-Cold-War in the studio. Some overlap with the clean-sounding, poppier side of college/alt rock, e.g. Gin Blossoms.

Doctor Casino, Monday, 31 December 2012 21:12 (1 year ago) Permalink


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