DJ RUPTURE'S TOP 5 PROBLEMS WITH TOP 10 ALBUMS OF THE YEAR LISTS

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DJ RUPTURE'S TOP 5 PROBLEMS WITH TOP 10 ALBUMS OF THE YEAR LISTS


# 3. First off: pretty much nobody who bothers to write up a "top X albums of the year" list actually buys albums. Most of them are journalists, which means they receive free copies from publicists hired by the artists/labels to repeatedly bug media workers to generate buzz about said albums.
A significant chunk of what you've read online or off- is basically rehashed "one-sheet" prose. Publicists send out info sheets along with the album, explaining the music, giving context and suggesting spin angles, hyping the CD using metaphors and comparisons and imagery that inevitably get recycled into reviews and writeups. (Happens so frequently it's funny; writers must absorb one-sheet images subconsciously.) And not just in music, of course--unimaginative journalists crib from publicity sheets all over: film, literature, news. In Washington it turns into lobbyists, and things go really haywire. In every big city you'll find a bookstore specializing in reviewer's copies of books: reviewers get free promo editions, read them, then sell 'em. Lots of CD shops turn the same trade.
Then there are the DJs like myself, who buy tons of vinyl singles yet only shell out cash for a full album when there's a song on it that we really want to play live.
Then there are the hardcore music fans with a reasonably well-paying day job, honorable folks who actually purchase CDs by artists they like. These same people probably vote regularly in local and national elections, and if their savings aren't tucked away in some sensible investment portfolio yet, they will be soon. Everybody else downloads everything. The only CDs we buy are blank.


#1 My first problem with top 10 music lists is that applying hierarchies to artistic endeavors is absurd at best. It's like talking about the weather using superlatives ("April 9th was the best sunny day of 2004!").
I'm not into dudes with big record collections pretending they can build a canon, or even wanting to try.


#2 My second problem with top 10 lists is that when music is hottest and most interesting it isn't concerned with being "the best". "The best" is always retrospective. Good music is always ahead. If you want taxidermy & placards explaining it all, go to a natural history museum. (A few years back they finally removed the stuffed dead African "Black Man" on display here in Cataluyna Spain).

More broadly, music moves in currents. For example, grime & dancefloor breakcore were cool this year, but neither genre coughed up any albums that captured the excitement of the scene it stemmed from. Both scenes flourish around singles, mixtapes, parties, radio shows, and stoned producers who rock out with their mini-entourage in the attic or basement of Mum's house, towel jammed under the door so she don't smell the skunk.

Albums coming from hot scenes tend to arrive long after the heat has moved on. Dizzee's debut CD hit so hard because it was many listeners' first grime immersion. His 2nd album paled in comparison for a lot of reasons--namely substandard beats, but his former companions blazed ahead making crazy brilliant half-music, shooting off whitelabel singles and one-off dubplates, agile and warped and fast, while expensive ads for Rascal's Showtime album lumbered by on the sides of London doubledecker buses.

This year I heard a lot of hype grime mixtapes (Logan Sama, Lord of the Mic, etc) & pirate broadcasts (Flex, Jah Mek the World, many more), and I saw a lot of amazing breakcore (Snares, Sickboy, Shitmat DJing). But albums that channeled or redirected the wild energy of sketchy FM transmissions or singed bass on overworked soundsystems... Not really.


#5 The whole "album" concept when looked at via the popular narratives of music criticism makes little sense. There's a contrived, quietly racist division between music that is naive native genius aka "street" (i.e. raw, unselfconscious, stylized representations of a lifestyle that happens in a neighborhood where you would either be afraid to rent an apartment or where you want to rent an apartment because it's edgy/has colored people living there) and music that is more brainy, less populist, less real. One of the main ways these straw-men categories are reinforced is by people condemning the latter for mistakes while praising the former for doing the same thing, and vice-versa.

When Kayne West raps about buying furniture at IKEA it's a big deal, he's breaking rules and upending conventions via behind-the-scenes confessions--look, it's a bear suit!; whereas when Anticon raps about anything at all the same people couldn't care in the least. It's good to keep an eye out for what artists can break the (unspoken?) rules and what artists people don't think any rules apply to. Rules behind the rules is what we're trying to crack here.

Another example of the attempts to differentiate into existence “street music” & “bedroom music”: both breakcore and grime are weird, oftentimes abrasive peripheral dance musics being made by a handful of in-the-know producers and released through tight DIY distribution networks. But critical consensus is quick to praise grime as raw/street/populist and breakcore as individualist/bedroom even when, in absolute terms, breakcore records are selling better, the genre is more widespread and grassroots and internationally-catchy than grime. (It's like survival of the least fit!) The categorization is goofy but yes, I believe the world's 'street' is vibing more with breakcore right now.

Hmmm.. I don't remember how all this relates to reason #5... Maybe something about how albums are hastily cast, either/or style, as individual gems of idiosyncratic brilliance or shiny platinum-selling metonyms from a vibrant subaltern culture. ???

#4 My fourth problem with top 10s is my lack of a problem. People ask me to write Top 10 lists, I oblige. Everybody needs filters. Everybody has new stuff to learn from people whose tastes they trust.


#6 Problem number six: why start & stop at music? I want to see anybody's Top 10 Scary Pieces of Legislation Passed in 2004. Or the Top 10 Non-imaginary Threats to Healthy Democracies in 2004. And if people really wanna boast about how cool they are, instead of naming a bunch of musicians and rappers, why not the Top 10 Things I Did to Make A Globally Horrible Year Slightly Less Horrible.

I, for one, didn't do anything, hence all this talk about music. . .

Ricky Ben-Udi, Friday, 4 February 2005 23:54 (9 years ago) Permalink

I kind of agree, but I still like reading lists. They give me ideas.

Alex in SF (Alex in SF), Friday, 4 February 2005 23:58 (9 years ago) Permalink

what a load of shite.

"people shouldn't write about music cos it's pointless. however here are my utterly loaded opinions about various things, listen to me I am a minor indie dj"

Ronan (Ronan), Friday, 4 February 2005 23:58 (9 years ago) Permalink

This isn't really that different from M. Doughty's lambast of pazz'n'jop and every other musician-doesn't-get-critics piece.

miccio (miccio), Friday, 4 February 2005 23:58 (9 years ago) Permalink

I don't think he's saying there is anything wrong with criticism or evaluation. I think he's saying the act of ranking and prioritizing things which may only tangentially be alike is kind of weird.

Alex in SF (Alex in SF), Saturday, 5 February 2005 00:00 (9 years ago) Permalink

And Ronan if you think the entire thing is a load of shite you are either crazy or you love ALBUMS a lot more than I think you do.

Alex in SF (Alex in SF), Saturday, 5 February 2005 00:02 (9 years ago) Permalink

He makes some interesting points. Some of which I agree with. Worth reading I felt.

I don't recognise Ronan's abbreviation of that piece at all.

meh, Saturday, 5 February 2005 00:09 (9 years ago) Permalink

"A significant chunk of what you've read online or off- is basically rehashed "one-sheet" prose. Publicists send out info sheets along with the album, explaining the music, giving context and suggesting spin angles, hyping the CD using metaphors and comparisons and imagery that inevitably get recycled into reviews and writeups. (Happens so frequently it's funny; writers must absorb one-sheet images subconsciously.) "

This is so true, and it is really really really sad, and not something the general public seems to be aware of (maybe they just don't care)

Shakye Mo Collier, Saturday, 5 February 2005 00:11 (9 years ago) Permalink

I personally just like making lists, and I like saying things like "which album do i like better, x or y". No one with a brain actually thinks that his or her music opinion is sacrosanct, but it's fun to make these lists for the same reason that "Bear vs. Shark" is pondered, or etc. And it's always nice to know what someone's favorite albums are, whether it be of a year or a genre or a decade or a band or whatever.

I wouldn't call rupture a minor dj, he's one of my favorites... but he's wrong here.

polyphonic (polyphonic), Saturday, 5 February 2005 00:21 (9 years ago) Permalink

I think very clearly /rupture likes making lists too!

Alex in SF (Alex in SF), Saturday, 5 February 2005 00:23 (9 years ago) Permalink

haha "indie DJ"!

Matos-Webster Dictionary (M Matos), Saturday, 5 February 2005 01:30 (9 years ago) Permalink

"more brainy, less real"

vahid (vahid), Saturday, 5 February 2005 01:59 (9 years ago) Permalink

The one thing I totally and completely disagree with /rupture about is his assessment of grime and breakcore is totally half-assed and moronic. Talk about comparing apples and oranges. Scene based in and around and which basically rules East London vs. scene based absolutely no-the-fuck-where which appeals to a small, but loyal subcommunity of disenchanted junglists, hardcore enthusiasts and noizeniks. I mean WTF?!? Breakcore'll never have a track as important or as WIDELY heard as "I Luv U" or "POW" and comparing the two genres in terms of total record sales is specious at best.

Alex in SF (Alex in SF), Saturday, 5 February 2005 02:07 (9 years ago) Permalink

I'm drunk so i'm just gonna agree w/ alex. he seems to haver a decent haead on his shoulder.s

djdee2005 (djdee2005), Saturday, 5 February 2005 02:21 (9 years ago) Permalink

If /rupture had put as much thought into Special Gunpowder as he did into this essay, that album wouldn't have been the mediocre anticlimax it was. Much respect to his DJ mixes/sets, though.

Blightersrock (Da ve Segal), Saturday, 5 February 2005 19:46 (9 years ago) Permalink

zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz

oskar shindig! (Jody Beth Rosen), Saturday, 5 February 2005 19:51 (9 years ago) Permalink

what the fuck is wrong with an album? shit like "singles are more real and also not racist" is such bullshit.

fauxhemian (fauxhemian), Saturday, 5 February 2005 20:59 (9 years ago) Permalink

mia is shit.

mia is shit., Saturday, 5 February 2005 21:01 (9 years ago) Permalink

faux, its more like "singles are how normal people listen to music and albums are how record companies make money."

djdee2005 (djdee2005), Saturday, 5 February 2005 21:06 (9 years ago) Permalink

I, too, love figuring out why I like one thing slightly more than another thing.

But both /rupture and ILM have latched onto another model for appreciating excellence, the mixtape/mixCD (sorry, still stuck in the mid-'90s tech-wise)...

Pete Scholtes, Saturday, 5 February 2005 21:16 (9 years ago) Permalink

ok, well i guess i'm not normal.

it just bothers me when "i like listening to something long-ish with a decent scope instead of skipping from track to track like someone with ADD" moves directly to "albums are good, singles are bad" which moves directly to "i'm racist" without any deliberation on the part of the accusing idealogue. it's true that if i'm choosing between a handful of three-minute singles, i'm much more likely to pick missy then the shins, but then you've got tons of hip-hop (Liquid Swords, 36 Chambers, Illmatic, MF Doom) or whatever that works wonders in an album format and WAY better than comparably album-oriented indie/canonical stuff. so yeah, just because someone's looking for an album/cohesive statement doesn't mean that person is William Bennett.

fauxhemian (fauxhemian), Saturday, 5 February 2005 21:50 (9 years ago) Permalink

another thing that really bugs me about the piece... i'm pretty sure any subculture, whether mixtape-/single-oriented or not, is defined in part by underground identification/indie snobbery ("indie" here meaning undiscovered, on the edge, etc.), so it's hypocritical when rupture starts invoking self-righteous anti-canon democracy, as if you can have "the hot, the now, the undie" vs. "ads on the side of a bus" in a non-canonical situation where none of that is supposed to matter. i mean, avant-garde (as in "on the edge") does not sit well with anti-foundationalism.

fauxhemian (fauxhemian), Saturday, 5 February 2005 21:59 (9 years ago) Permalink

just because someone's looking for an album/cohesive statement doesn't mean that person is William Bennett

If he implied that, I missed it.

I have a lot of sympathy for this short diatribe. I think the idea of critical payola is key: Maybe the next Pazz & Jop should ask critics which albums on the list they paid for. Not that writers discriminate between albums based one what they paid, but there's no question (in my mind) that certain albums and singles would do better in polls if they were mass mailed to critics across the country for free.

I also sympathize with his view of scenes versus recordings. Top Tens are often the only year-long summary the media offers readers to describe music in the world around them. So inadequate. And Pazz&Jop entirely leaves out live music.

He's also right about "the best" being in retrospect. How many of us critics are embarassed by Top Tens only a few months later? My goal is to start creating a running Top 100 albums and singles (with hundreds of runners up and a mixtape format, too) for the decade, or maybe for all time, which allows for late discoveries, reconsideration, and songs that stand the test of time.

I like lists, I just think they should be subjective and personal and a source for further argument. People do pay attention to these things, even the supposed downloading majority.

Pete Scholtes, Saturday, 5 February 2005 22:29 (9 years ago) Permalink

dizzee's second is stronger

noizem duke (noize duke), Saturday, 5 February 2005 23:48 (9 years ago) Permalink

I _STILL_ haven't got around to typing up my top ten list... but I think I still will!

Forksclovetofu (Forksclovetofu), Saturday, 5 February 2005 23:51 (9 years ago) Permalink

but critics don't buy any music at all.

Savin All My Love 4 u (Savin 4ll my (heart) 4u), Saturday, 5 February 2005 23:55 (9 years ago) Permalink

ever??????

oskar shindig! (Jody Beth Rosen), Saturday, 5 February 2005 23:57 (9 years ago) Permalink

"but critics don't buy any music at all."

Naive creature. I could show you credit card bills that would stun you.

Dave Segal (Da ve Segal), Sunday, 6 February 2005 00:38 (9 years ago) Permalink

** Publicists send out info sheets along with the album, explaining the music, giving context and suggesting spin angles, hyping the CD using metaphors and comparisons and imagery that inevitably get recycled into reviews and writeups.**

Whoa. And here I've been reading the Village Voice all these years, thinking "where do they come up with this stuff? Are they on drugs?"

lovebug starski (lovebug starski), Sunday, 6 February 2005 00:56 (9 years ago) Permalink

Y'know what? I'll tell y'what. Sometimes, charts miss out stuff we're interested in. Critics only paint the world from one angle. Other people disagree with us.

Meanwhile, back in the rest of the world, we kick the ball over the fence and then get pleasantly surprised when next door's cabbage patch grows pretty flowers. There is no conspiracy.

noodle vague (noodle vague), Sunday, 6 February 2005 01:14 (9 years ago) Permalink

When Kayne West raps about buying furniture at IKEA it's a big deal, he's breaking rules and upending conventions via behind-the-scenes confessions--look, it's a bear suit!; whereas when Anticon raps about anything at all the same people couldn't care in the least.

this is such a weak comparison imo. me not caring about Anticon has nothing to with what rules they do or do not break, trust me Mr. Rupture.

eman (eman), Sunday, 6 February 2005 01:15 (9 years ago) Permalink

Then there are the hardcore music fans with a reasonably well-paying day job, honorable folks who actually purchase CDs by artists they like. These same people probably vote regularly in local and national elections, and if their savings aren't tucked away in some sensible investment portfolio yet, they will be soon.

WOW!!! That's me... except for the well-paying day job... and the honor... and the voting... and the savings............

do critics really not buy a lot of CDs? Enlighten me. This is a serious questions. I'm naive here, people.

poortheatre (poortheatre), Sunday, 6 February 2005 01:45 (9 years ago) Permalink

"do critics really not buy a lot of CDs? Enlighten me. This is a serious questions. I'm naive here, people."

Can't speak for anyone else, but this critic buys a lot of CDs. And vinyl. I'm not the promosexual I used to be. And even then, I was spending loads on music. But I was DJing more then, too.

Dave Segal (Da ve Segal), Sunday, 6 February 2005 04:03 (9 years ago) Permalink

There is no conspiracy.

Here's a stock response to anyone who criticizes how the music media work. If there's a conspiracy being outlined above, I missed that, too...

Pete Scholtes, Sunday, 6 February 2005 17:40 (9 years ago) Permalink

This piece just makes me think Rupture didn't spot his own record on as many year-end lists as he'd hoped he would.

pdf (Phil Freeman), Sunday, 6 February 2005 22:58 (9 years ago) Permalink

3 years pass...

This is seriously fucked up: http://www.negrophonic.com/2009/charles-holgate-and-the-publicity-game/

Matos W.K., Monday, 19 January 2009 10:56 (5 years ago) Permalink

thats pretty shady, ive always heard Zzzonked were one of the few clued up music publicists working out of london. Thats said, a brief stint in music PR was one of the grimmest things i've ever done. I'd been involved with running some long term successful events but 90% of the time i was being hassled by my boss who knew shit all about music to try and punt out albums to mags/websites which would have no interest. It was genuinely embarrassing, the whole industry is ran by clueless public school kids who can afford to spend a year as an intern and start on 12k simply because it'll impress folks back in the shires

straightola, Monday, 19 January 2009 14:11 (5 years ago) Permalink

I didn't know that dude was an MC - I got a mailout from him about FWD>> the other day which was written in, uh, grime MC parlance, which I found slightly odd and uncharacteristic at the time

Pescetarian Reich (DJ Mencap), Monday, 19 January 2009 14:43 (5 years ago) Permalink

Also I 'unno who Beccy Lindon is but she sounds like a douche and/or someone who can't read properly

Pescetarian Reich (DJ Mencap), Monday, 19 January 2009 14:46 (5 years ago) Permalink

nomad doesnt strike me as a public school boy based on what ive heard of his show with plastician but that rupture blog entry was v interesting. wonder what happened.

uk grime faggot (titchyschneiderMk2), Monday, 19 January 2009 19:52 (5 years ago) Permalink

Comments are closed.

Tracy Michael Jordan Catalano (Jordan), Monday, 19 January 2009 19:54 (5 years ago) Permalink

not only that, article has been removed.

mark e, Monday, 19 January 2009 19:56 (5 years ago) Permalink

probably for the best. even if it's all true, i don't think it looks that professional to post it publicly like that (although i guess it got the desired result).

Tracy Michael Jordan Catalano (Jordan), Monday, 19 January 2009 20:07 (5 years ago) Permalink

So what was the deal with this?

Alex in SF, Monday, 19 January 2009 20:14 (5 years ago) Permalink

Can someone post the original article here?

I missed it on the blog.

ilxor, Monday, 19 January 2009 20:19 (5 years ago) Permalink

musician/publicist beef

8====D ------ ㋡ (max), Monday, 19 January 2009 20:22 (5 years ago) Permalink

here's a google cache, up for a little while.

moonship journey to baja, Monday, 19 January 2009 20:23 (5 years ago) Permalink

basically he got money and a couple of hundred promo CDs from the label that put out rupture's recent mix CD. then he didn't return calls or emails for six months, and when they finally got a hold of him he couldn't explain the promo work he'd done or where the CDs had gone. rupture's blaming him for not getting the mix CD into any magazines, shops or online review sources.

moonship journey to baja, Monday, 19 January 2009 20:25 (5 years ago) Permalink

more curious about the comments box, personally.

moonship journey to baja, Monday, 19 January 2009 20:29 (5 years ago) Permalink

(although i guess it got the desired result).

It probably got a threatening cease-and-desist letter. It was a facsinating post, tho.

Daniel, Esq., Monday, 19 January 2009 20:40 (5 years ago) Permalink

it was the dubstep stuff that toally lost them -- that stuff is, like, hard work to dance to! you have to be invested in that kind of groove -- its alienating

*plop*ism rules (deej), Thursday, 16 December 2010 16:41 (4 years ago) Permalink

is funny that a lot of djs seem to think dubstep-based stuff is malleable enough to mix up with other stuff (i think in many cases it is) when as you say it can be as 'alienating' as angry dnb

modrić in paradise (blueski), Thursday, 16 December 2010 16:44 (4 years ago) Permalink

well it raises the question of whether dude wants to be an "everybody fun time" dj or a guy who's being , i guess, a bit more didactic with his dj sets? i don't really have an opinion either way, i do hate it when djs ignore what the crowd clearly wants, but at the same time i can see that /rupture is on a bit of a different mission

the jazz zinger (s1ocki), Thursday, 16 December 2010 16:45 (4 years ago) Permalink

i mean thats the hard part about DJing! ppl venerate harvey partly because he'll spin a set where you know zero tracks but he sequences/selects so well that it doesnt matter ... thats incredibly hard to do

*plop*ism rules (deej), Thursday, 16 December 2010 16:47 (4 years ago) Permalink

fair point!

the jazz zinger (s1ocki), Thursday, 16 December 2010 16:49 (4 years ago) Permalink

i mean its fine if rupture wants to spin for rupture fans -- i just felt a lil sheepish inviting ppl who arent really into that kind of thing like "you guys will have a good time" & then they're all like :-/

*plop*ism rules (deej), Thursday, 16 December 2010 16:49 (4 years ago) Permalink

i'm not sure i'd take that sort of casual dancer to a dj rupture show?

also clowning dubstep for being ~DIFFICULT~ music that only BOY NERDS are into doesn't work when, y'know, we get top 10 dubstep hits these days

lex diamonds (lex pretend), Thursday, 16 December 2010 16:53 (4 years ago) Permalink

on your island nation of boy nerds

max, Thursday, 16 December 2010 16:54 (4 years ago) Permalink

i think for my personal taste the combination of eclecticism w/out the sparks of a, like, common aesthetic net (like balaeric or quiet storm or...etc) with obscurity make his sets harder to dance to for extended periods ... if he stuck w/ obscurity but kept a common groove (an all-uk funky set or w/e), or if he was all over the place but was dropping in more cheese/pop remixes (& the occasional wu sample sorta has the opposite effect, i think), then it would feel more 'balanced' for the kind of set i like to go out & dance all nite to

but otoh i do think his sets are interesting/educational. damning w/ faint praise maybe, but im serious about not being bored -- just not really feeling compelled to dance

*plop*ism rules (deej), Thursday, 16 December 2010 16:55 (4 years ago) Permalink

naw i felt kinda the same way when i saw him...

the jazz zinger (s1ocki), Thursday, 16 December 2010 16:55 (4 years ago) Permalink

i'm not sure i'd take that sort of casual dancer to a dj rupture show?

― lex diamonds (lex pretend), Thursday, December 16, 2010 10:53 AM (1 minute ago) Bookmark

haa. id think the 'casual dancer' is the guy downloading dubstep shows & checking out rupture live at the empty bottle, not the teachers who go dancing at evil olive every weekend

but that jab aside i know what you mean & i realize that now -- i guess i just had been given a diff impression abt his sets

*plop*ism rules (deej), Thursday, 16 December 2010 16:56 (4 years ago) Permalink

max OTM

o tannenbaum, o judge (crüt), Thursday, 16 December 2010 16:56 (4 years ago) Permalink

u can dance in olive gardens in chicago??

the jazz zinger (s1ocki), Thursday, 16 December 2010 16:57 (4 years ago) Permalink

only the evil ones

*plop*ism rules (deej), Thursday, 16 December 2010 16:57 (4 years ago) Permalink

when you're there, you're family

o tannenbaum, o judge (crüt), Thursday, 16 December 2010 16:57 (4 years ago) Permalink

evil olive is a palindrome :O

*plop*ism rules (deej), Thursday, 16 December 2010 16:58 (4 years ago) Permalink

Ned Rag evil Olive Garden

o tannenbaum, o judge (crüt), Thursday, 16 December 2010 16:58 (4 years ago) Permalink

~whoa~

the jazz zinger (s1ocki), Thursday, 16 December 2010 17:00 (4 years ago) Permalink

amazing

*plop*ism rules (deej), Thursday, 16 December 2010 17:00 (4 years ago) Permalink

O:

taj mahazzle (cozen), Thursday, 16 December 2010 17:02 (4 years ago) Permalink

did we just discover we're in the matrix or something

the jazz zinger (s1ocki), Thursday, 16 December 2010 17:03 (4 years ago) Permalink

Ned Rag evil Olive Garden is also an anagram of

Ned. A Dealer, Glove Virgin.

modrić in paradise (blueski), Thursday, 16 December 2010 17:03 (4 years ago) Permalink

Ned: A Gargled Revive Lion

modrić in paradise (blueski), Thursday, 16 December 2010 17:06 (4 years ago) Permalink

"common aesthetic net (like balaeric or quiet storm or...etc) with obscurity make his sets harder to dance to for extended periods"

I actually totally agree with this btw. /rupture is a great dj, but he's not really a "let's all dance all nite to this great dj" kind of dj.

Fig On A Plate Cart (Alex in SF), Thursday, 16 December 2010 17:12 (4 years ago) Permalink

it just didnt feel like he was maintaining the vibe

yeah ok this is a thing -- the one time i saw him dj i did think he maintained a vibe, and i danced and kept dancing, and the people around seemed to be doing the same, but it's true that it was ~eclectic~. But unless I'm going out to a house or techno night I don't really expect the music to stick to one groove or one theme? And while recognising stuff is pretty fun, it isn't exactly essential. (also i fucking hate the whole 'cheese' thing)

idk, i really like dancing, so.

c sharp major, Thursday, 16 December 2010 17:21 (4 years ago) Permalink

Ned: A Gargled Revive Lion

This I can see.

Ned Raggett, Thursday, 16 December 2010 17:44 (4 years ago) Permalink

i love /rupture's original post. great think-piece by a respectable musician (which, i suppose, is simply par for the course for his writing). if i were to respond, in the midst of making my own year-end albums list, it'd be as such:

# 3. First off: pretty much nobody who bothers to write up a "top X albums of the year" list actually buys albums.

agree this is lame. which is why i don't put albums on my year-end list that i haven't gone out of my way to buy, listen through and absorb thoroughly (i.e. at least 4-5 times, often many more).

#1 My first problem with top 10 music lists is that applying hierarchies to artistic endeavors is absurd at best. It's like talking about the weather using superlatives ("April 9th was the best sunny day of 2004!").
I'm not into dudes with big record collections pretending they can build a canon, or even wanting to try.

agree. what if it's not positioned as canon-building, or applying a hierarchy, but more along the lines of, "here's a snapshot of what i really enjoyed listening to in 20xx"?

#4 My fourth problem with top 10s is my lack of a problem. People ask me to write Top 10 lists, I oblige. Everybody needs filters. Everybody has new stuff to learn from people whose tastes they trust.

precisely. i read year-end lists to learn what people i trust have enjoyed in a given year (and then explore many of those albums myself). i write my own lists because lots of irl family/friends/acquaintances are well aware i have a deep, long-standing interest in music, and are curious what i've been listening to, or would recommend. for me, it's a basic crowd-sourcing exercise, in both directions.

#6 Problem number six: why start & stop at music? I want to see anybody's Top 10 Scary Pieces of Legislation Passed in 2004. Or the Top 10 Non-imaginary Threats to Healthy Democracies in 2004.

The Top 10 Everything of 2010
http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/completelist/0,29569,2035319,00.html

i genuinely thought when i first joined that he was the admin (ilxor), Thursday, 16 December 2010 17:49 (4 years ago) Permalink

btw the ned raggett anagrams in this thread are A+

i genuinely thought when i first joined that he was the admin (ilxor), Thursday, 16 December 2010 17:50 (4 years ago) Permalink

I definitely see things in relation to Italian chain restaurants in a new light.

Ned Raggett, Thursday, 16 December 2010 17:51 (4 years ago) Permalink

one thing that's changed since rupture's original statement is that it's a lot easier for the likes of me to listen to a lot more albums (and if it wasn't for this i would probably not have maintained half the interest i do in EOY lists and album-centric criticism generally).

modrić in paradise (blueski), Thursday, 16 December 2010 17:52 (4 years ago) Permalink

I think rupture was more interesting when pop actually reflected somewhat aspects of his aesthetic - "get ur freak on", "oochie wally" etc - this acted as the pop flavor to his sets without being all underscored "look, cheesy pop music!"

the replacement of that stuff by dubstep in the stitching together role reduces not just the recognition quotient but also the colour and, I think, the thematic intensity, though I did quite like Uprooted or whatever it was called.

Tim F, Thursday, 16 December 2010 21:35 (4 years ago) Permalink

I liked hearing him drop a track from the new Gil Scott Heron album when I saw him

o tannenbaum, o judge (crüt), Thursday, 16 December 2010 21:36 (4 years ago) Permalink

didn't his last album come out earlier this year -- Solar Life Raft? i'll find a spot for that at year's end, it's really good!

i genuinely thought when i first joined that he was the admin (ilxor), Thursday, 16 December 2010 21:46 (4 years ago) Permalink

I liked hearing him drop a track from the new Gil Scott Heron album when I saw him

― o tannenbaum, o judge (crüt), Thursday, December 16, 2010 3:36 PM (22 minutes ago) Bookmark Suggest Ban Permalink

thats cool but w/ his asethetic id rather he drop like 'the bottle' or something ... production on the new one is too close to his stuff as is

*plop*ism rules (deej), Thursday, 16 December 2010 22:00 (4 years ago) Permalink

Yeah Solar Life Raft is from earlier in the year. It's kind of Uproot Jr, I guess, but pretty much inferior in every way.

Fig On A Plate Cart (Alex in SF), Thursday, 16 December 2010 22:17 (4 years ago) Permalink

hey, you're mean

i genuinely thought when i first joined that he was the admin (ilxor), Thursday, 16 December 2010 22:36 (4 years ago) Permalink

Sorry, I generally really like /rupture and his mixes, but that one struck me as being filled with pretty ho hum tracks.

Fig On A Plate Cart (Alex in SF), Thursday, 16 December 2010 23:02 (4 years ago) Permalink

9 months pass...

http://pitchfork.com/news/44101-new-release-nettle-el-resplandor-the-shining-in-dubai/

Interesting concept. On Sub Rosa!

Fig On A Plate Cart (Alex in SF), Saturday, 24 September 2011 15:00 (3 years ago) Permalink

nice

hardcore oatmeal (Jordan), Saturday, 24 September 2011 17:57 (3 years ago) Permalink

1 year passes...

Nicely sharing all of his major (minus the 58.46 one) mixes from 2001-2012:

http://www.negrophonic.com/dj-rupture-mixes-free-download/

This stuff still sounds fresh to my ears after all these years.

One bad call from barely losing to (Alex in SF), Tuesday, 18 December 2012 01:19 (2 years ago) Permalink

haha i was like 'oh jeez do we seriously have to talk about his stupid meta list EVERY december?'

some dude, Tuesday, 18 December 2012 01:21 (2 years ago) Permalink

Hahaha this was the /rupture thread with the most recent posts so I just used it. Sorry.

One bad call from barely losing to (Alex in SF), Tuesday, 18 December 2012 01:22 (2 years ago) Permalink

s'cool

some dude, Tuesday, 18 December 2012 01:22 (2 years ago) Permalink

sick

have a sandwich or ice cream sandwich (Jordan), Tuesday, 18 December 2012 01:43 (2 years ago) Permalink

genuinely the most teeth rattling bass i've ever experienced was Rupture at Primavera a few years back. I was way too hungover to deal with it. Remember he played some Four Tops remix that was very sick

Number None, Tuesday, 18 December 2012 01:55 (2 years ago) Permalink

I think his remarks could withstand some more discussion. I don't see anyone saying it in this thread but I'm sure it's been said here before, if not by me then someone else. The LP is a format designed primarily for marketing purposes. It is a way to tack on extra value to a collection of singles, basically. It's also very limited by physical constraints.

Sure some artists manage to break out of the limitations of this format but increasingly few, I'd say 99.9% of albums contain a significant amount of filler. I guess I do have an issue with ADD because I find it really hard to take anymore. I'd rather hear 10 original songs with unique perspectives from 10 artists than 10 songs by 1 artist, with 8 of them being a watered-down rehash of the original concept. I've listened to a total of maybe 2 albums this year honestly. One would probably get some love from fans of /rupture -- Romanian Dan Habarnam's uniquely heavy and cosmic take on minimalist bass music, released on dBridge's exit records. And of course the other one was Jiaolong.

So...any recommendations on top mixes to check out from what /rupture is offering? Thanks for putting those up.

viborg, Tuesday, 18 December 2012 12:24 (2 years ago) Permalink

Gold Teeth Thief and Uproot are the "famous" ones. I like Minesweeper Suite and Porque Soy Sonidero Y Voy A Muchos Lugares a lot too.

One bad call from barely losing to (Alex in SF), Tuesday, 18 December 2012 12:47 (2 years ago) Permalink

...in honour of the original post, we should probably rank all the mixes...

m0stlyClean, Tuesday, 18 December 2012 19:42 (2 years ago) Permalink

Gold Teeth Thief was pretty formative for me, and later on I listened to Uproot & Solar Life Raft a bunch when they came out. Change the Mood is a dope 2012 club set, and has the most personal association for me (there's a great remix of one of my tracks on there for one). Looking forward to going through some of the ones I've missed.

have a sandwich or ice cream sandwich (Jordan), Friday, 21 December 2012 20:35 (1 year ago) Permalink

Alright in order of personal preference:

Gold Teeth Thief
Porque Soy Sonidero Y Voy A Muchos Lugares
Minesweeper Suite
58.46 Mix (not available on the site because apparently Jace doesn't love it)
Uproot
2004 Post-Election Mix (also not on the site)
Low Income Tomorrowland
Bidoun Sessions (Mutamussik mix on same CD just below Minesweeper Suite for me though)
Secret Google Cheat Codes
Cumbia Mix for BBC1
Solar Life Raft

Everything up to Secret Google Cheat Codes is excellent and got quite a bit of play. The 2011-12 mixes I don't much recall. I have some other things of his (a great hour long set from Maida Vale from 2002, a 90 minute one for Resonance FM from 2004, a live set from 2005 I think, 3 hours of ambient mixes he did for a WFMU giveaway) that are all worthwhile as while. And his WFMU radio show (despite me no longer having the time/energy to listen much to it) is generally great too.

One bad call from barely losing to (Alex in SF), Saturday, 22 December 2012 20:43 (1 year ago) Permalink


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