Modern Brazil - s/d

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so we've all got our bossa nova albums and our tropicalia albums and our brazilian funk albums. the fifties, sixties and seventies have been covered pretty well. but what about more recent stuff. there was (is still?) a movement called Mangue which i think literally translates to 'swamp' and was a big hodge podge of traditional bossa & samba, rock, hip hop and electronic music.

Otto -- he's put out two albums. the first "Samba Pra Burro" is a great mix of beautiful brazilian melodies mixed with tons of electronics. some super heavy jungle breaks, but always the song comes first. his second album is "Condom Black". way less reliant on the electronic dance beats, but still some remnants. it's almost apt to describe him on this album as a male Bebel Gilberto. some of the songs are a little too sweet, but it's a great album nonetheless.

Tom Ze, even though he's an oldie, his music is still a goodie. forget the fact that Tortoise was his back up band.

Ed Motta. one of the worst albums i've ever heard in my life. i listened to it once and instantly sold it back. he's supposed to be brazilian soul, but it was really bad slick over produced modern disco.

Rita Lee. ex-lead singer of the mutantes. i picked up one of her recent solo albums for way cheap. it was completely boring AOR. kinda like a brazilian Sting.

Max De Castro. cool looking cover. kinda ick music. pretty much does modern american r'n'b in portugese. there were some nice soulful moments, but most of it was just way too slick.

on the dividing line:
Mundo Livre S.A. this is Otto's band before he went solo. they're part of that whole Mangue beat sound. had some good songs. did a bunch of genre-fucks, but my biggest problem with them was that they were around in the mid-90s and kinda had that grunge-alternative sound. i often wondered if they weren't from brazil, would i really like them? so i sold it.

still wondering about Carlinhos Brown and Chico Science. never heard them, but heard lots about them. and i hear there's some brazilian hip hop out there?

JasonD (JasonD), Tuesday, 11 March 2003 20:25 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

ps. never ever trust a DustyGroove review. they're all positive.

they normally sound like this, "Even though this isn't our favorite of [so and so]'s album, we still think it's great and you should buy it"

JasonD (JasonD), Tuesday, 11 March 2003 20:26 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

ps. never ever trust a DustyGroove review. they're all positive.

Never ever trust a Dusty Groove review 'cuz they refer to free jazz as "hippy dippy."

hstencil, Tuesday, 11 March 2003 20:26 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

You mentioned Bebel Gilberto. her album is pretty good too.

A Nairn (moretap), Tuesday, 11 March 2003 20:32 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

You mentioned Bebel Gilberto. her album is pretty good too.

but i thought that was obvious

JasonD (JasonD), Tuesday, 11 March 2003 20:33 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

and Gilberto Gil's (1998)- "O Sol De Oslo" is one of my favorite Brazilian albums.

A Nairn (moretap), Tuesday, 11 March 2003 20:41 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

but what about the kids man? what are the kids up to?

JasonD (JasonD), Tuesday, 11 March 2003 20:43 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

they normally sound like this, "Even though this isn't our favorite of [so and so]'s album, we still think it's great and you should buy it"

Pretty spot on, Jason except you forgot the obigatory exclamation point!

Does anyone else find this extremely annoying!

Mr. Diamond (diamond), Tuesday, 11 March 2003 21:18 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

lately i've been getting these e-mail fwd's from Barrett Martin (via Mike Watt's mailing list) about his experiences recording in Brazil with Brazillian musicians, and he makes it sound pretty damned interesting, aside from all the "this is how Brazil is great and how American popular music sucks" ranting.

Al (sitcom), Tuesday, 11 March 2003 21:20 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

Does anyone else find this extremely annoying!

Yes but

Amateurist (amateurist), Tuesday, 11 March 2003 21:21 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

Carlinhos Brown is good but inconsistent. The 2 I have, "Alfagamabetizado," I think I spelled that right, is nice, updated Gil with interesting percussion touches. "Omelete Man" is really weird--some of it sounds like Procol Harum meets Nilsson or John Lennon, very spacey English-style pop with typical saccharine Brazilian harmonies, strings, pop esperanto lyrics, etc. Pretty good really. Suba is also good. Amon Tobin is Brazilian orig., lives in England now I believe, as a sample artist he beats Shadow or any of those guys by a mile, in my opinion.
I've also heard some of the Brazilian electronica, Caipirissima is a collection of same, some cool stuff.

You're right, above, about Dusty Groove and their reviews, although the store itself in Chicago is kinda nice and they do have good stuff if you're into classic '60s Brazilian pop and suchlike...

Jess Hill (jesshill), Tuesday, 11 March 2003 21:21 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

Do you expect unbiased reviews from someone trying to sell something?
I always make sure that I get a second opinion on a record I see at DustyGroove before buying.

oops (Oops), Tuesday, 11 March 2003 21:25 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

Wait, I just reread this thread; Al is the Barrett Martin yr talking about the guy that was in the Screaming Trees? What the heck is he doing in Brazil?

Mr. Diamond (diamond), Wednesday, 12 March 2003 06:04 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

Paul Sci-Fi Soul did you see the "best Brasilian DJ in New York" last night??

i actually have a song by Otto ona comp, it's an intensely moody tribute to Bob Marley and it really rolls, i've liked it for years.

Tracer Hand (tracerhand), Wednesday, 12 March 2003 06:10 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

Timbalada! I like the Carlinhos Brown stuff I've heard, but Timbalada is the shit. It has surdos=it is good.

Jordan (Jordan), Wednesday, 12 March 2003 13:06 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

Just saw this, it seems like most of the new stuff is either centred on Recife or Sao Paulo. (Or at least new and interesting to me)

Jason, you should definitely check out Chico Science – I think he was brilliant and his death seemed like the end of era and maybe death of mangue (friends of mine in Brazil who work with music were devastated when he died). The scene seems to be going strong tho and his old band Nacao Zumbi is still putting stuff out. I’d recommend checking out Chico first and then if you like him going for NZ. Start with “Afrociberdelia” as it should give you a sense of whether you want to go further or not.

Lately I’ve been enjoying DJ Dolores & Orchestra Santa Massa, which has traditional fiddle, etc over various beats. I don’t love the entire entire album but the first couple of tracks get me grinning ear-to-ear whenever I listen to ‘em. The DJ approach to mangue.

Zuco 103 takes a different approach to mixing electronica with Brazilian. It is more clubbeats oriented as opposed to mangue etc. and live at least Zuco are huge amounts of fun. Their new album has gotten pretty good reviews , but their first “Outro Lado” had only about 4 songs I really liked with the rest being ‘eh’ so I’m waiting for a free copy.

Lenine’s album “Na Prassao” is great. Samba mixed with rock and electronica is a v. basic description. Most people I know who are more knowledgeable about the contemp. scene than me are are big fans.

Others I like if not blown away - Pedro Luis A Parade (again mixing electronica/brazilian but from a more rock perspective) Suba (pretty strightforward samba & bossa nova over loops, “Sao Paulo Confessions” is his big work – he also produced, among others, Bebel’s "Tanto Tempo")

Seen Max de Castro but have no memory of his performance (generally not a positive sign)

From the second generation of Brazilians, as mentioned above, Bebel is doing good stuff. Only heard one track by Moreno Veloso so can’t really comment on him tho that one track was v. funky. (incidentally, one of the biggest Brazilian labels Trama (who I think put out Otto) is run by the son of Elis Regina)

All I can think of for now, will post later if brain comes back online.

H (Heruy), Friday, 14 March 2003 14:37 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

I found "Music Typewriter" pretty mediocre, nice but nothing special. I didn't realize Trama was run by Elis' son.

Jess Hill (jesshill), Friday, 14 March 2003 14:41 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

two months pass...
i was just told to check out Andrea Marquee's "Zumbi" and Rica Amabis' "Sambadelic"

anyone heard either and have comments? they sound pretty cool from the amg and amazon reviews.

JasonD (JasonD), Wednesday, 14 May 2003 22:07 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

Jason, I would say that Rita Lee is a definite classic, certainly not Brazilian Sting. She's charming and full of puns! Chico Science / NZ and the whole Mangue thing may be a tad culture-bound, but the power is undeniable. There are two or three tracks on CSNZ's Afrociberdelia that kick seriously. They have always been phenomenally open to genre-fucking, as you put it, but in ways that play(ed) well both at home and abroad. I won't hear a word against Mundo Livre - their sound is just so effortless. Fred 04 is one of my favourite vocalists.

Daniel (dancity), Wednesday, 14 May 2003 23:08 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

BTW, mangue translates to mangrove, or 'mangroove', as some like to call it. This is a type of all-encompassing eco-system in Northeastern Brazil that seemed to encapsulate the new movement of musical hybrids, while remaining particularly Pernambucan. Pernambuco has a staggering proliferation of musical styles, which began to be recognised by pop/rock musicians in the early 90s as an alternative to Rio / SP / Bahia. If you wnat to get further into this, I recommend Mestre Ambrosio (the only fiddle band in the world worth attention) and Nana Vasconcelos (ECM percussion legend). Alternatively seek out any maracatu band live. Thunder.

Daniel (dancity), Wednesday, 14 May 2003 23:17 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

I used to like Lenine, but his sound really drags. Ed Motta tries way to hard to sound new. Check out his uncle Tim Maia, especially his early seventies work.

Daniel (dancity), Wednesday, 14 May 2003 23:23 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

i listened to a Tim Maia album that i enjoyed, but it was an original pressing and pretty pricey.

i recently picked up Rita Lee's first album "Build Up" and have been really digging it. it was produced by one of the guys from the Mutantes, so it is still a little wacky, but has more of a big band orchestration thing going on for the beginning of the album at least (near the end it gets a bit more rocking). but i swear, the more recent album of hers i bought (from the mid to late 90s) was the pits. her charming puns would be totally lost on me since i don't speak Portuguese.

any word on those two artists i just mentioned upthread?

JasonD (JasonD), Wednesday, 14 May 2003 23:46 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

Sorry, Jason, I'm not familiar with the music of either. (Heard of A.M., but can't say more than that)

Daniel (dancity), Thursday, 15 May 2003 07:02 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

theres a comp of liuz gonzaga tunes reinterpreted by the newcomers which gives a broad overview: everything from mangue to hard rock.

the marquee and amabis discs are nice enough. nice being the word to watch.

gaz (gaz), Thursday, 15 May 2003 08:43 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

A friend of mine recently sent me a killer mangue compilation - but on a different tip sambaloco's latest compilation of drum'n'bass classics is a corker, too...

Dave Stelfox (Dave Stelfox), Thursday, 15 May 2003 09:12 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

Charlie Brown Jr.: they play hip hop and punk, with funk flavourings. Great party music!

Tuomas (Tuomas), Thursday, 15 May 2003 11:04 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

Also, from old school artists: Nana Vasconcelo's Storytelling (1995) and Uakti's Trilobyte (1997) are great recent albums. The first is sort of percussive folk/ambient record, and the second one... It's hard to describe; pseudo-classical crypto-folk music played with self made and customized instruments, perhaps?

Tuomas (Tuomas), Thursday, 15 May 2003 11:11 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

six years pass...

anybody listening to the new Ceu album?

hope this helps (Granny Dainger), Thursday, 9 July 2009 16:04 (seven years ago) Permalink

I'm curious about it, but have not heard it yet. Not that I was wowed by her prior one, but it wasn't bad.

curmudgeon, Thursday, 9 July 2009 16:17 (seven years ago) Permalink

Yeah I only felt the need to download one of the tracks from the last album. I'm 11 tracks into this one (out of 13), and it's pretty good!

hope this helps (Granny Dainger), Thursday, 9 July 2009 16:24 (seven years ago) Permalink

Nobody here into Curumin?

Shin Oliva Suzuki, Friday, 10 July 2009 00:09 (seven years ago) Permalink

i am now!

hope this helps (Granny Dainger), Friday, 10 July 2009 00:13 (seven years ago) Permalink

i actually have a song by Otto ona comp, it's an intensely moody tribute to Bob Marley and it really rolls, i've liked it for years.

― Tracer Hand (tracerhand), Wednesday, March 12, 2003 12:10 AM (6 years ago) Bookmark

Listening to this great track, "Bob", right now: I have it on a comp too, What's Happening in Pernambuco, which is great throughout -- but I don't think this was out in 2003, so what comp do you have it on?

I had no idea it was about Marley.

Guayaquil (eephus!), Friday, 10 July 2009 01:11 (seven years ago) Permalink

I believe Curumin is still to make his best album, but I really like the other two

Shin Oliva Suzuki, Friday, 10 July 2009 01:27 (seven years ago) Permalink

Curumin was appearing in Central Park (summerstage) NYC with Juana Molina Wednesday night. Alas, I'm in DC and no gig here

curmudgeon, Friday, 10 July 2009 03:17 (seven years ago) Permalink

two weeks pass...

Has anyone listened to the new Céu album? Sounds to me like a dub version of a Brightblack Morning Light record with some Brazilian textures - obviously. I think sometimes her music lacks punch, but it's a good album overall.

Shin Oliva Suzuki, Friday, 24 July 2009 13:03 (seven years ago) Permalink

ed mottas that bad?

titchy (titchyschneiderMk2), Friday, 24 July 2009 13:09 (seven years ago) Permalink

No, but I can't say he does outstanding work.

Shin Oliva Suzuki, Friday, 24 July 2009 13:23 (seven years ago) Permalink

You're so 2 weeks ago, Shin

hope this helps (Granny Dainger), Friday, 24 July 2009 14:19 (seven years ago) Permalink

hahaha, I really am.

this guy in NYT wrote nice things about her

Shin Oliva Suzuki, Friday, 24 July 2009 14:53 (seven years ago) Permalink

eight months pass...

Orquestra Contemporânea de Olinda,from Northeast Brazil is touring the US now with its rock meets frevo(Brazilian brass band) meets ska sound

,Apr 1 2010 8:00P
Apr 3 2010 10:00P
Apr 5 2010 6:00P
KENNEDY CENTER - WASHINGTON Washington, Washington
Apr 6 2010 8:00P
RUMBA - CHICAGO Chicago, Illinois
Apr 7 2010 8:00P
Apr 8 2010 8:00P
workshop Maciel Salú, Tiné and SHOW in New Orleans New Orleans, Louisiana
Apr 9 2010 8:00P
Apr 16 2010 9:00P
Apr 17 2010 9:00P
Teatro - OI FUTURO IPANEMA Rio de janeiro, Rio de Janeiro
Apr 18 2010 8:00P
Teatro - OI FUTURO IPANEMA Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro

curmudgeon, Monday, 5 April 2010 03:48 (six years ago) Permalink

Here's a youtube of 'em. The Washington DC show Monday night is actually from 6 to 7 and is free.

curmudgeon, Monday, 5 April 2010 04:06 (six years ago) Permalink

I'm looking forward to seeing them tonight.

curmudgeon, Monday, 5 April 2010 14:59 (six years ago) Permalink

three months pass...

Anybody see anything in this fest?

curmudgeon, Saturday, 24 July 2010 05:22 (six years ago) Permalink

I want to again mention that Maria Rita is great. I don't quite get the neglect. Maybe she's too simple? Anyway, she's certainly not in the tropicalia vein, and she's not doing crazy electronic/metal/atonal mashups, so that may contribute to a lack of interest.

_Rudipherous_, Saturday, 24 July 2010 13:16 (six years ago) Permalink

one month passes...

I confess that I have never previously heard of Ivete Sangalo, Brazil's biggest pop star, who just sold out a show at Madison Square Garden in NYC.

curmudgeon, Monday, 6 September 2010 21:50 (six years ago) Permalink

I'm trusting the word of Jon Pareles, from the NY Times, that she's the biggest current Brazilian pop star.

curmudgeon, Monday, 6 September 2010 21:55 (six years ago) Permalink

The encore part must have been great.

curmudgeon, Tuesday, 7 September 2010 03:23 (six years ago) Permalink

I liked that more than I expected to. Why haven't any of our local Brazilian experts mentioned this person before (or have they)?

_Rudipherous_, Tuesday, 7 September 2010 03:48 (six years ago) Permalink

Sangalo is definitely "not my beach" as they say in Brazil. Her tinny rhythms and shrill voice used to get right on my nerves when I was over there.

Daniel Giraffe, Tuesday, 7 September 2010 09:33 (six years ago) Permalink

cool, I guess...

No baile funk in this Brazil best album of 2015 list, but some funky stuff I think

curmudgeon, Sunday, 31 January 2016 17:29 (eight months ago) Permalink

May be seeing Romulo Froes perform in a few days

curmudgeon, Monday, 1 February 2016 17:03 (eight months ago) Permalink

He has written for Elza Soares too

curmudgeon, Monday, 1 February 2016 21:37 (eight months ago) Permalink

Just got back from an incredible trip to Brazil (Rio and Salvador, Bahia). Alas, a connecting flight got cancelled and then our luggage got misplaced on the way there, so We missed a free Romulo Froes gig. But we did hear that MC Joao cut "Baile de favela" everywhere (that Rob mentioned upthread). Mostly a remixed version (the light remix I think its called). Thousands were chanting the words to that in a Carnival bloco parade we attended at Copocabana beach. The song certainly got stuck in our heads.

We saw a late-night Maria Rita gig, a number of bands playing Carnival gigs on various streets, the 2nd night of the Sambadrome event with samba schools composed of 1,000 or so folks, plus the amazing Salvador Campo Grande Carnaval circuit with afro-blocos like Olodum and Ilie Aiye.

curmudgeon, Saturday, 13 February 2016 17:49 (eight months ago) Permalink

I had such a great time there.

curmudgeon, Monday, 15 February 2016 00:48 (eight months ago) Permalink

curmudgeon, Monday, 15 February 2016 03:09 (eight months ago) Permalink

That was the winning performance at the Rio Sambadrome-- Manguiera paying tribute to Maria Bethania with a cast of over 4,000 people.

Carnival circuit parade in Salvador is down the street and not in a special stadium. Here's Afro-bloco Ile Aiye

curmudgeon, Monday, 15 February 2016 03:14 (eight months ago) Permalink

We also saw small more informal "blocos" in various streets of Rio and Salvador

curmudgeon, Monday, 15 February 2016 14:39 (eight months ago) Permalink

Plus just hearing Brazilian sounds in shops and restaurants and in some taxis (that weren't playing American pop)was cool too

curmudgeon, Tuesday, 16 February 2016 21:39 (eight months ago) Permalink

I need to catch up on years worth of Carlinhos Brown albums. I have not heard his 2010 Diminuto, a ballads project, but I did get Adobró, his funkier and more pop effort from that year. Plus I heard his songs for that animated movie Rio. He got an Oscar nomination for that, but didn't win.

curmudgeon, Tuesday, 23 February 2016 15:16 (eight months ago) Permalink

Friend from Brazil made this playlist:

Lots of baile funk which is not really my cup of tea, but it's interesting if you want to know what they listen to over there.

✖✖✖ (Moka), Tuesday, 23 February 2016 19:21 (eight months ago) Permalink

From that playlist here's a famous one, Anitta. I kinda love how at the beginning of the video there's a full blown commercial for tang. What's up with that:

✖✖✖ (Moka), Tuesday, 23 February 2016 19:27 (eight months ago) Permalink

This is the big hit though:

✖✖✖ (Moka), Tuesday, 23 February 2016 19:29 (eight months ago) Permalink

Sounds like the pirate version of Redfoo's red thang. Not sure if it's a sample or a steal.

✖✖✖ (Moka), Tuesday, 23 February 2016 19:30 (eight months ago) Permalink

So I saw Maria Rita sing in the same 2,500 person hall in Rio that baile funk DJ Marlboro was performing in the next night.

curmudgeon, Tuesday, 23 February 2016 20:03 (eight months ago) Permalink

Listening now to Ava Rocha, who mixes samba with rock. She made Ben Ratliff of the NY Times top 10 album list

curmudgeon, Wednesday, 24 February 2016 13:48 (eight months ago) Permalink

Others and I have also mentioned Ava upthread

curmudgeon, Wednesday, 24 February 2016 14:15 (eight months ago) Permalink

Still lots of stuff for me to get hip to, or catch up on from both old and young Brasileros

curmudgeon, Monday, 29 February 2016 16:26 (seven months ago) Permalink

Article includes a link to a video with the song and guide to the dance steps

curmudgeon, Sunday, 13 March 2016 18:44 (seven months ago) Permalink

It's opposing the Brazilian Workers Party, the current Brazilian president and the last one, all of whom the protesters assert is corrupt. Some on the left may think this is painting with too broad a brush

curmudgeon, Sunday, 13 March 2016 18:53 (seven months ago) Permalink

I'm thinking so myself but I don't speak Portuguesee or really know the issues.

curmudgeon, Monday, 14 March 2016 13:46 (seven months ago) Permalink

New album from Ceu from Sao Paulo

There’s a group of broad-minded musicians at the heart of “Tropix,” and two of them were Céu’s partners in producing the album. Hervé Salters, a French keyboardist who also works under the moniker General Elektriks, is one. Pupillo, who plays drums in the superdynamic Brazilian band Nação Zumbi, is the other. Their contribution feels intuitive and deep-simmered: Even when a track flaunts its electronic timbres, as on “Rapsódia Brasilis,” there’s a tendril of folkloric imprecision. And the inverse holds true, so that a traditionally samba-esque confection, “Varanda Suspensa,” receives an underlay of contemporary rhythm programming

curmudgeon, Thursday, 24 March 2016 18:15 (seven months ago) Permalink

the political atmosphere in Brazil now--

curmudgeon, Thursday, 24 March 2016 20:38 (seven months ago) Permalink

Listened to some of the new Ceu album this morning. I liked what I heard---artsy bossa nova pop, though I can some rolling their eyes at that.

curmudgeon, Monday, 28 March 2016 12:56 (seven months ago) Permalink

Love the new Céu album

Shin Oliva Suzuki, Monday, 28 March 2016 13:42 (seven months ago) Permalink

Just got back from an incredible trip to Brazil


The Céu album sounds pretty good so far.

_Rudipherous_, Monday, 28 March 2016 16:03 (seven months ago) Permalink

three weeks pass...

I like that easy-going Teresa Cristina album Ben Ratliff reviewed in the NY Times back in January.

curmudgeon, Tuesday, 19 April 2016 14:04 (six months ago) Permalink

one month passes...

On Friday singer Caetano Veloso performed a free show for thousands outside the landmark Ministry of Culture building in Rio that is occupied by protesters. The crowd turned one of his classics into a sing-along of “I hate Michel Temer.” Earlier, another crowd there sang “Temer out” to a melody from Carl Orff’s opera, “Carmina Burana” during an orchestral concert.

Other “Temer out” chants were also heard at free concerts by major Brazilian artists such as Ney Matogrosso in Sao Paulo on Saturday night, and “Temer Never” flashed on a screen during Sunday’s performance by rapper Criolo.

curmudgeon, Monday, 23 May 2016 14:01 (five months ago) Permalink

one month passes...

Oh no, forgot Ceu is in DC tomorrow night and have other plans I can't get out of.

curmudgeon, Monday, 27 June 2016 19:01 (four months ago) Permalink

a band called Fellini namedropped by Ceu

her rousing interpretation of “Chico Buarque Song,” a song by the cult post-punk São Paulo band Fellini that honors Buarque, a legendary songwriter, musician and man of letters. Describing her teenage love of the Velvet Underground and Joy Division, she decided to bring some of that post-punk aesthetic into Tropix via Fellini.

“When I heard [Fellini] I fell in love with their sound,” she says. “It was so raw and interesting. It talks about what I was trying to do with Tropix: a very dark way of being in Brazil, which is so colorful. I liked the whole album, and I choose this song because I like the melody and it’s so wonderfully strange to have Chico Buarque, such an important and brilliant composer, in this post-punk song.”

curmudgeon, Tuesday, 28 June 2016 20:38 (four months ago) Permalink

one month passes...

From the Olympic opening ceremony with Anitta, Caetano Veloso, Gilberto Gil and more

curmudgeon, Saturday, 6 August 2016 04:27 (two months ago) Permalink

Video is gone. Anyone have a complete list of the musicians who performed? I missed a chunk of it, heard Gil was in the hospital for kidney issues recently, wasn't sure he was going to be there.

Fastnbulbous, Saturday, 6 August 2016 12:59 (two months ago) Permalink

Wish I had noticed when it was up.

The Rest Is A Cellarful of Noise (James Redd and the Blecchs), Saturday, 6 August 2016 15:18 (two months ago) Permalink

Shin Oliva Suzuki, Saturday, 6 August 2016 15:40 (two months ago) Permalink

By the way, NYT did a good job in this playlist

Shin Oliva Suzuki, Saturday, 6 August 2016 15:44 (two months ago) Permalink

Yeah, I was hesitant to read at first but it turned out to be decent, they covered a lot of ground.

The Rest Is A Cellarful of Noise (James Redd and the Blecchs), Saturday, 6 August 2016 15:49 (two months ago) Permalink

Glad they mentioned Chico Science & Nacão Zumbi. Would have also been nice to see Lenine and Moreno+2 in there.

Fastnbulbous, Saturday, 6 August 2016 16:38 (two months ago) Permalink

NY Times music crits Ratliff and Pareles have both been to Brazil multiple times and been writing about it for awhile, so its not too surprising that its a good job. Ratliff is now leaving the NY Times to teach at NYU, so I wonder if Pareles will be able to pick up from him on the Brazilian music coverage. Ratliff covered more obscure artists than Pareles.

curmudgeon, Sunday, 7 August 2016 14:55 (two months ago) Permalink

More discussion and stuff for opening ceremony here:

Caetano Veloso S and D

curmudgeon, Sunday, 7 August 2016 17:08 (two months ago) Permalink

Ava Rocha Tour USA is coming!

August 5th – Joe’s Pub (New York) 9:30 pm - $ 15
425 Lafayette St, New York, NY rocha

August 6th – Nublu (New York) - 11 pm - $10
Brasil Summerfest’s Closing Party
62 Avenue C, New York, NY (East Village)

August 9th – Trans-Pecos Brooklyn (New York)
915 Wycoff Av, Ridgewood, Queens, NY
8:00 pm - concert Marcos Campello+ Steve Dalachinsky
8:30 pm - Nigth - film by Paula Gaitán
10:00 pm - concert Ava Rocha

August 12th – Tropicalia (Washington) - 11 pm
2001 14th St NW, Washington, DC 20009

August 13th – Nublu (New York) - 10 pm - special guest Gui Amabis
151, Avenue C, between 9/10th Streets , East Village


Ava Rocha launches her first tour in the United States

curmudgeon, Sunday, 7 August 2016 20:48 (two months ago) Permalink

Saw a pic of Caetano around the Olympics on Instagram holding a sign in Portuguese saying that their interim President must go

curmudgeon, Monday, 8 August 2016 14:02 (two months ago) Permalink

Was out of town for weekend and sadly missed Ava Rocha's only non-NYC gig on her short debut US tour of a week

curmudgeon, Monday, 15 August 2016 14:17 (two months ago) Permalink

Carnival portion of Olympics closing ceremony is great

curmudgeon, Monday, 22 August 2016 02:34 (two months ago) Permalink

DJs played lively music and some spectators got out of out their seats to dance — and do the “wave.”

The crowd also got to see performers shake it to frevo, a frenetic dance that, if it’s even possible, makes samba seem like a staid ballroom affair. Holding a small umbrella, the dancers jumped up and down, seeming to march and incorporate acrobatics at the same time.

They shook it to “Vassourinhas,” which means “small brooms,” a popular song that was also the name of a famous club in the northeastern city of Recife.

During Sunday’s closing ceremony, singer Mariene de Castro was showered water that resembled rain, which put out the Olympic cauldron’s flames.

curmudgeon, Monday, 22 August 2016 15:58 (two months ago) Permalink

Elza Soares who was mentioned upthread has a Pitchfork best album. Just noticed Sherburne's end of July review

curmudgeon, Friday, 26 August 2016 18:52 (two months ago) Permalink

That's the same album curmudgeon and I were praising in 2015.

11 hours ago, Kiko Dinucci, the guitarist on the Soares, released a third album with Metá Metá (which includes Jucara Marcal): MM3

Shinzō Abe as Super Mario (Sanpaku), Friday, 26 August 2016 21:05 (two months ago) Permalink

Oops, just noticed your byline, curmudgeon.

Anyway, the full Metá Metá album on spotify

Shinzō Abe as Super Mario (Sanpaku), Friday, 26 August 2016 23:13 (two months ago) Permalink

one month passes...

Just saw Andy Beta's September Pitchfork review of a Goma Gringa label compilation called "desconstrucao" (as opposed to the Portuguese singer who moved to Sao Paulo Eugenia Melo E Castro album of the same name)

the musicians clustered around São Paulo’s current “samba sujo” (dirty samba) scene relish their hometown’s pallor. For those struck by the sound of Elza Soares’ A Mulher do Fim do Mundo from a few months ago, this twelve-track comp culled from the early days of the Goma Gringa Discos label is the next logical step in exploring modern Brazilian music. It features a similar cast of players and musicians from Soares’ album, including saxophonist/arranger Thiago França and Rodrigo Campos.

...Most acts rotate through a stable of players, be they Juçara Marçal, Kiko Dinucci, Marcelo Cabral, Romulo Fróes, Sérgio Machado, Campos, or França, which the press release states “are not a movement, [but] togetherness in motion, always linked from one project to the next.” Almost any selection here contains strands of native samba, post-punk’s rumble, Afrobeat’s driving rhythm, blats of avant-jazz that seem to dilate space, as well as flashbacks to ’60s Tropicália, itself a mutation of Brazilian pop music interacting with outside influences.

curmudgeon, Wednesday, 19 October 2016 03:36 (one week ago) Permalink

Desconstrução gathers tracks from several albums already considered landmarks in Brazilian music of the 21st century: Juçara Marçal’s Encarnado (2014), the trio Metá Metá’s Metá Metá (2011) and MetaL MetaL (2012), Rodrigo Campos’s Bahia Fantástica (2012) and Conversas com Toshiro (2015), Thiago França’s Malagueta, Perus e Bacanaço (2013) and Space Charanga R.A.N. (2015), and Vicente Barreto’s Cambaco (2015).
released September 19, 2016

curmudgeon, Wednesday, 19 October 2016 04:19 (one week ago) Permalink

I like the more melodic and more rocking tracks over the avante-jazzy ones, on the comp

curmudgeon, Thursday, 20 October 2016 18:36 (one week ago) Permalink

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