Things you believe in despite scientific evidence to the contrary.

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5. "I can't drink orange pop it makes me hyper" - medical evidence for this is tenuous as fuck and your parents shd stop telling u this cos tbh it just gives u an excuse to go nuts when u drink some

are you saying concentrated doses of sugar do not have behavioral effects? I find this hard to believe, just based purely on personal experience alone.

― in my world of loose geirs (Shakey Mo Collier), Friday, April 1, 2011 3:48 PM (Yesterday) Bookmark Suggest Ban Permalink

Personal experience also tells us that people go crazy during a full moon, but that's wrong too.

― Christine Green Leafy Dragon Indigo, Friday, April 1, 2011 4:06 PM (Yesterday) Bookmark Suggest Ban Permalink

nah I've never noticed that. unless you're referring to PMS lol

― in my world of loose geirs (Shakey Mo Collier), Friday, April 1, 2011 4:08 PM (Yesterday) Bookmark Suggest Ban Permalink

It's an old, old urban legend among cops and medical workers, but it's still pretty well known by the general public--I'm surprised that you haven't heard of it.

― Christine Green Leafy Dragon Indigo, Friday, April 1, 2011 4:11 PM (Yesterday) Bookmark Suggest Ban Permalink

"nah I've never noticed that."

You've never heard someone say "full moon brings out the crazies"?

― Fig On A Plate Cart (Alex in SF), Friday, April 1, 2011 4:12 PM (Yesterday) Bookmark Suggest Ban Permalink

no, I mean in my personal experience I have never witnessed it. I have personally witnessed kids losing their fucking minds after eating a bunch of sugar.

― in my world of loose geirs (Shakey Mo Collier), Friday, April 1, 2011 4:15 PM (Yesterday) Bookmark Suggest Ban Permalink

Anyway, I'm just saying that you need to go by the facts in things like this, not personal experience. Personal experience is subject to all kinds of bias and preconceived notions.

― Christine Green Leafy Dragon Indigo, Friday, April 1, 2011 4:16 PM (Yesterday) Bookmark Suggest Ban Permalink

"no, I mean in my personal experience I have never witnessed it."

Most people who have to deal with the general public at night have.

― Fig On A Plate Cart (Alex in SF), Friday, April 1, 2011 4:33 PM (Yesterday) Bookmark

I believe in all of the above, plus that going outside in the cold can suppress your immune system or something.

I've seen all this shit happen, but science hasn't, I guess? I'd like to note that my dad was a scientist, I work for a scientific organization and acknowledge the scientific method is the best method of arriving at any conclusion.

Do you believe in anything that is contrary to reputable academic studies?

kkvgz, Saturday, 2 April 2011 09:05 (3 years ago) Permalink

Myself?

Alba, Saturday, 2 April 2011 09:36 (3 years ago) Permalink

ha I guessed this is what the thread wd be about. Still think there are obvious social explanations for the "sugar makes kids hype" thing and I agree that there's a complete absence of empirical evidence for it

a SB-in' artist that been in the game for a minute (Noodle Vague), Saturday, 2 April 2011 09:50 (3 years ago) Permalink

"Don't put your coat on indoors, you won't feel the benefit when you go outside."

Personal experience tells me this is 100% true, despite what every scientist ever says.

Yossarian's sense of humour (NotEnough), Saturday, 2 April 2011 09:56 (3 years ago) Permalink

I am immortal.

StanM, Saturday, 2 April 2011 09:57 (3 years ago) Permalink

Yeah, scientists would get a lot more work done if they didn't see it as a core duty to tell us about the futility of removing coats indoors.

Alba, Saturday, 2 April 2011 10:05 (3 years ago) Permalink

I don't think the budgets for curing Aids and indoor/outdoor temperature investigations really interfere with each other.

Yossarian's sense of humour (NotEnough), Saturday, 2 April 2011 10:21 (3 years ago) Permalink

j/k

Alba, Saturday, 2 April 2011 10:43 (3 years ago) Permalink

I gather that, contrary to my mother's advice, going out with wet hair does not result in colds and one cannot "catch one's death" from being rained on, proven by science.

So apparently there's nothing wrong with getting rain-drenched on the way somewhere and having to stay like that all day, and it is mere coincidence that every time this has happened I've felt under the weather for a couple of days afterwards. Suspicious of this!

dimension hatris (a passing spacecadet), Saturday, 2 April 2011 11:49 (3 years ago) Permalink

I have a lingering feeling - rather than a belief - left over from childhood that trees and plants can somehow 'sense' my presence when I'm near them.

Bob Six, Saturday, 2 April 2011 12:20 (3 years ago) Permalink

^Had never thought about that before, but now I'm kinda freakin' out triffids-style.

kkvgz, Saturday, 2 April 2011 12:29 (3 years ago) Permalink

I wouldn't sweat it, cabbages are really bad at running after you.

Boobage Dirtbag (Noodle Vague), Saturday, 2 April 2011 12:32 (3 years ago) Permalink

was talking to this cuet girl a little while ago when she said something totally earnest about chemtrails, which prompted an immediate exchange of SIGNIFICANT LOOKS between me and my bro

bernard snowy, Saturday, 2 April 2011 12:44 (3 years ago) Permalink

Mixing your drinks = terrible hangover. This is scientific nonsense (alcohol is alcohol is alcohol) but I KNOW FROM EXPERIENCE that if I mix my drinks, I will DEFINITELY get a worse hangover.

Alba - its all good, I was joking too. I always forget that dry never works on the interwebs!

Yossarian's sense of humour (NotEnough), Saturday, 2 April 2011 14:34 (3 years ago) Permalink

ref bias favouring manchester united

the salmon of procrastination (darraghmac), Saturday, 2 April 2011 14:43 (3 years ago) Permalink

plenty of scientific evidence imo

Boobage Dirtbag (Noodle Vague), Saturday, 2 April 2011 14:45 (3 years ago) Permalink

actually I think science supports that

GODDAMMIT xpost

San Te, Saturday, 2 April 2011 14:45 (3 years ago) Permalink

oh no there are studies, you're just selecting specific instances that support your etc etc

the salmon of procrastination (darraghmac), Saturday, 2 April 2011 14:46 (3 years ago) Permalink

I guess this is contrary to the spirit of the thread, but I had to reluctantly admit the other week that I don't actually believe in ghosts. I grew up hearing ghost stories from people I believed, credible grown-up people, so that was the one supernatural thing I sort of incorporated into my otherwise secular/agnostic view of the world. But, really, no. I don't believe in ghosts. Sigh. It was sort of sad to let it go.

something of an astrological coup (tipsy mothra), Saturday, 2 April 2011 14:53 (3 years ago) Permalink

Martin Scorsese will one day make another (non-documentary) great film.

clemenza, Saturday, 2 April 2011 15:16 (3 years ago) Permalink

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/02/07/health/07real.html

I still believe mixing alcohol makes you sicker

Mordy, Saturday, 2 April 2011 15:24 (3 years ago) Permalink

there's only one way to prove this

dayo, Saturday, 2 April 2011 15:31 (3 years ago) Permalink

I think I've proved this many times already in my life

Mordy, Saturday, 2 April 2011 15:32 (3 years ago) Permalink

Diet Coke is totally good for you.

Darin, Saturday, 2 April 2011 15:35 (3 years ago) Permalink

On a similar note, that chicken caeser salad with fried pancetta is the healthy option.

Yossarian's sense of humour (NotEnough), Saturday, 2 April 2011 15:37 (3 years ago) Permalink

Mixing your drinks = terrible hangover

I think this observation is founded on a contingent factor, since people who mix different drinks are often people who run out of whatever they started out drinking, but keep on by drinking whatever else is available to them until they run out of every kind of alcohol they can lay their hands on. Hangovers often ensue.

Aimless, Saturday, 2 April 2011 17:10 (3 years ago) Permalink

The full moon thing i pretty much believe. The night of the supermoon everyone i was with went completely nuts, including myself.

Telephoneface (Adam Bruneau), Saturday, 2 April 2011 17:41 (3 years ago) Permalink

"I can't drink orange pop it makes me hyper" - medical evidence for this is tenuous as fuck and your parents shd stop telling u this cos tbh it just gives u an excuse to go nuts when u drink some

Sunkist has caffeine in it, and Sunkist is what I think of when I think of orange pop. So chalk one up for "your parents" here.

Josh in Chicago, Saturday, 2 April 2011 17:43 (3 years ago) Permalink

The "Law of Attraction" — which I guess isn't so mystical as to be unbelievable. Obv if you think the world is a horrible place and all people are cruel and evil, you'll find plenty of evidence to support your opinion. The converse is also true.

corey, Saturday, 2 April 2011 17:47 (3 years ago) Permalink

I don't necessarily absolutely believe this, but the theories that a higher power, aliens or giants built the pyramids, nascar lines and macchu picchu makes me linger on the possibility for longer than I should.

"Everything that is solid melts into air" (captain rosie), Saturday, 2 April 2011 17:55 (3 years ago) Permalink

I actually went to Egypt and saw the pyramids, the Sphinx, etc, as part of a school art history class. I was with real 20+ year Egyptologists and every day they would point to something and say things like "This statue is carved from the hardest stone in the world, and either must have been polished continuously over tens of thousands of years, or carved with lasers." When we got to a quarry where they supposedly chiseled out multi-ton obelisks with perfect geometry out of the side of a mountain using only wooden stakes and stones - in one piece, mind you, the Egyptologists were just openly joking "Yeah, it was probably aliens".

I mean there are plenty of scientific theories on how they did all that, but when you see it in person, you see the scale of everything, and the aliens theory just makes more sense.

Telephoneface (Adam Bruneau), Saturday, 2 April 2011 18:28 (3 years ago) Permalink

that would be rad; i want to believe

obliquity of the ecliptic (rrrobyn), Saturday, 2 April 2011 18:32 (3 years ago) Permalink

i have had trees talk to me on many occasions (non-stoned), and i believe what they had to say

obliquity of the ecliptic (rrrobyn), Saturday, 2 April 2011 18:34 (3 years ago) Permalink

the aliens theory just makes more sense

(sputters) waht? space aliens make more sense than super-paranormal human powers enhanced by controlled breeding? These super-paranormal have disappeared from present-day humans only because they were the exclusive property of Atlantians, who all perished. You can look it up!

Aimless, Saturday, 2 April 2011 18:34 (3 years ago) Permalink

That I can function as a competent human being.

Publicidad de Sexo (Abbbottt), Saturday, 2 April 2011 18:38 (3 years ago) Permalink

:)

corey, Saturday, 2 April 2011 18:47 (3 years ago) Permalink

I mean there are plenty of scientific theories on how they did all that, but when you see it in person, you see the scale of everything, and the aliens theory just makes more sense.

I had the exact opposite reaction when I went to Egypt. Seeing just how hot and dry the country was, but with that fairly dependable source of irrigation to support a pretty intensive agricultural system made me realise that once the harvest was in, there was plenty of time to figure out ways to float massive blocks of marble around on the Nile and make stuff out of them.

trishyb, Saturday, 2 April 2011 19:40 (3 years ago) Permalink

I have a lingering feeling - rather than a belief - left over from childhood that trees and plants can somehow 'sense' my presence when I'm near them

have you ever actually hugged a tree? watch out for ants.

tremendoid, Saturday, 2 April 2011 19:42 (3 years ago) Permalink

Frogs and toads are the exact same animal, dolphins are fish because they look like fish, moths are ugly butterflies and squid is just the plural of octopus.

Dust, Saturday, 2 April 2011 21:59 (3 years ago) Permalink

Birds are reptiles.

(I mean, they sort of are, aren't they?)

Tarfumes The Escape Goat, Saturday, 2 April 2011 22:01 (3 years ago) Permalink

I am all over that full moon thing, having seen loads and loads and loads of people go immensely troppo right on a full moon. If the moon can affect tides and we have water in our brains then surely it has the capacity to affect the water in our brains. I AM A SCIENTIST. Also the way in which people's behaviour falls into their astrological sign is frequently spooky (although I don't know whether I ~believe~ that one).

You Say Various Things (Autumn Almanac), Saturday, 2 April 2011 22:10 (3 years ago) Permalink

yeah that whole thing recently about how the parameters were wrong and you are probably a different sign was weird b/c I am totally Scorpio, even though my TRUE sign, now, is Virgo (?? I think, I can't remember)

LISTEN SHITBIRD (rip van wanko), Saturday, 2 April 2011 22:18 (3 years ago) Permalink

We have this book called 'BIRTHDAYS' which maps everyone to a very specific set of traits based on their birthday, and it's seriously like 08% accurate. I'm convinced it was all just mde up by some bored out-of-work writer but it's still chillingly accurate.

You Say Various Things (Autumn Almanac), Saturday, 2 April 2011 22:20 (3 years ago) Permalink

*98% accurate

You Say Various Things (Autumn Almanac), Saturday, 2 April 2011 22:20 (3 years ago) Permalink

Lister: What makes you think these aliens exist?

Rimmer: They must do, Lister! There's so many things that are strange and
odd. So many things we don't have any explanation for.

Lister: Like, um, why do intelligent people buy cinema hot dogs? Do you
mean that sort of weird and mysterious thing?

Rimmer: No, Lister, I mean like the pyramids. How did they move such
massive pieces of stone without the aid of modern technology?

Lister: They had massive whips, Rimmer. Massive, massive whips.

did you notice "you spin me round" was playing in the background? (snoball), Saturday, 2 April 2011 22:24 (3 years ago) Permalink

I believe Red Dwarf was one of the best shows ever.

You Say Various Things (Autumn Almanac), Saturday, 2 April 2011 22:25 (3 years ago) Permalink

I don't believe homeopathy works and am happy to lol at alternative medicine (and be enraged by people who fleece ill people out of money with it) all day BUT I do not find it completely impossible that water that has had stuff in solution in it and now doesn't may possibly, conceivably have a slightly different molecular organisation to before

(but, uh, not to the extent of curing diseases because it once had a millionth of a stinging nettle in or w/e)

(I have heard physicists and chemists say that water does some weird shit we don't totally understand, but I am not a scientist so I don't remember the details, and obv nobody should give a shit what a non-scientist says about wacko fringe "science")

(I like to overuse parentheses even though they are scientifically proven to be harmful to post coherence)

dimension hatris (a passing spacecadet), Saturday, 2 April 2011 22:37 (3 years ago) Permalink

there are going to be some very angry scientists on this thread very soon

kraudive, Saturday, 2 April 2011 22:46 (3 years ago) Permalink

not me. I'm enjoying the crazy.

kraudive, Saturday, 2 April 2011 22:47 (3 years ago) Permalink

Mixing your drinks = terrible hangover

I think this observation is founded on a contingent factor, since people who mix different drinks are often people who run out of whatever they started out drinking, but keep on by drinking whatever else is available to them until they run out of every kind of alcohol they can lay their hands on. Hangovers often ensue.

This was basically Kingsley Amis's explanation as well, and I give it a lot of weight since he drank a bit.

Josefa, Saturday, 2 April 2011 23:30 (3 years ago) Permalink

that would sway me

You Say Various Things (Autumn Almanac), Sunday, 3 April 2011 09:21 (3 years ago) Permalink

i dont believe in or know anything about astrology, but at the same time i do totally ~fit my sign~

orange soda update: at the grocery store today i noticed that diet crush has sugar in it!!! wtf. that leaves only fanta zero and offbrand for my diet orange soda needs. read your labels folks!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

ℳℴℯ ❤\(◕‿◕✿ (Princess TamTam), Sunday, 3 April 2011 15:37 (3 years ago) Permalink

I am all over that full moon thing, having seen loads and loads and loads of people go immensely troppo right on a full moon. If the moon can affect tides and we have water in our brains then surely it has the capacity to affect the water in our brains. I AM A SCIENTIST.

OTM. Totally buy the moon thing. A friend who was a bartender used to say people would just go nuts and I've observed similar.

Am absolutely nothing like what I'm supposed to be like according to my sign and don't really believe astrology at all. People I've told that who are way into it have said I need a full reading or something but idk.

ENBB, Sunday, 3 April 2011 19:27 (3 years ago) Permalink

The full moon = more lunacy connection does have some corroborating evidence beyond just anecdotes. Statistically, police arrests predictably increase on full moon nights. This is verifiable data, but it doesn't prove causation, only a strong correlation that suggests a causal link.

Aimless, Sunday, 3 April 2011 19:32 (3 years ago) Permalink

I think people see a full moon and figure they've got license to act out a little bit.

The Louvin Spoonful (WmC), Sunday, 3 April 2011 19:33 (3 years ago) Permalink

I'd be willing to accept that plays into it somehow.

ENBB, Sunday, 3 April 2011 19:34 (3 years ago) Permalink

would like to see data for cloudy vs. clear full moon nights

bernard snowy, Sunday, 3 April 2011 20:23 (3 years ago) Permalink

xp Which is odd, because street lighting has the exact opposite effect.

Christine Green Leafy Dragon Indigo, Sunday, 3 April 2011 22:54 (3 years ago) Permalink

totally believe that full moons cause werewolves

das reboot (latebloomer), Sunday, 3 April 2011 22:55 (3 years ago) Permalink

Also, I'd be careful about relying on data from cops, because there are a lot of superstitious cops. A lot.

Christine Green Leafy Dragon Indigo, Sunday, 3 April 2011 22:55 (3 years ago) Permalink

Anyway, I've never been able to shake the feeling that Reagan had dementia a lot longer than is currently accepted.

Christine Green Leafy Dragon Indigo, Sunday, 3 April 2011 22:58 (3 years ago) Permalink

(I mean, had it longer before what is currently accepted.)

Christine Green Leafy Dragon Indigo, Sunday, 3 April 2011 22:59 (3 years ago) Permalink

Maybe the cops are the ones suffering lunacy during full moons and therefore arrest more ppl.

Aimless, Monday, 4 April 2011 03:57 (3 years ago) Permalink

1. Sunkist didn't have caffeine in it until I was about 15 or 16.
2. Cold temperatures produce cold-like symptoms, as in, symptoms of the virus.

bamcquern, Monday, 4 April 2011 04:10 (3 years ago) Permalink

i still believe in the existence of "clutch hitters"

ban drake (the rapper) (max), Monday, 4 April 2011 04:11 (3 years ago) Permalink

yeah that whole thing recently about how the parameters were wrong and you are probably a different sign was weird b/c I am totally Scorpio, even though my TRUE sign, now, is Virgo

FWIW that wasnt actually true. The signs have not changed, it was misinformation spread by a ranty skeptic astrology hater dude.

Not that I believe in astrology, but neither did the signs "change".

Concubine Tree (Trayce), Monday, 4 April 2011 04:17 (3 years ago) Permalink

If we stop believing in Tinkerbelle, she will die. I swear it.

Aimless, Monday, 4 April 2011 04:20 (3 years ago) Permalink

I find it really amusing that astrology is so solid that one over publicized guy can make tons of people question their pseudo-beliefs. Say something like that about actual religion and people would be up in arms.

sarcasdick (mh), Monday, 4 April 2011 04:23 (3 years ago) Permalink

I like to think that if I concentrate, I will know what I need to eat to have balanced nutrition. Like, my body will make me hungry for broccoli if I lack iron or something.

sarcasdick (mh), Monday, 4 April 2011 04:25 (3 years ago) Permalink

that line of thinking led to a pint of peanut butter fudge swirl ice cream today

lukas, Monday, 4 April 2011 04:34 (3 years ago) Permalink

I like to think that if I concentrate, I will know what I need to eat to have balanced nutrition.

Heh. On a similar tip, I like to think that the cravings I have are my body flagging a need for a certain mineral/vitamin/trace element. And its not like I crave ice cream and chips, I'll get WEIRD random cravings for broccoli or sardines or V8 juice or something.

Concubine Tree (Trayce), Monday, 4 April 2011 04:40 (3 years ago) Permalink

2. Cold temperatures produce cold-like symptoms, as in, symptoms of the virus.

yeah, but are people really so dumb that they can't distinguish between a runny nose caused by cold weather and a runny nose caused by an actual illness?

(answer: yes)

if you stay out in the cold long enough to get pneumonia, your immune system is definitely going to suffer. but a few minutes in 30°F weather isn't going to do it, and frostbite is a more immediate concern than the possibility of coming down with the sniffles.

administratieve blunder (unregistered), Monday, 4 April 2011 04:50 (3 years ago) Permalink

MERCURY IN RETROGRADE

all yoga attacks are fire based (rogermexico.), Monday, 4 April 2011 05:48 (3 years ago) Permalink

that drinking water with your ears plugged cures hiccups

symsymsym, Monday, 4 April 2011 09:37 (3 years ago) Permalink

I don't know about that but drinking water without taking a breat and taking as many sips as poss before you have to breathe actually does cure mine every single time.

ENBB, Monday, 4 April 2011 13:24 (3 years ago) Permalink

whenever i get hiccups (which is thankfully not often because i hate them) i spend the whole episode wondering if i'm going to be one of those poor hiccup people who can never stop hiccupping, year after year.

estela, Monday, 4 April 2011 13:33 (3 years ago) Permalink

That happened to my mom's uncle and so the thought of it scares me to death. He had them for like 7 years or something until he died of something totally unrelated.

ENBB, Monday, 4 April 2011 13:37 (3 years ago) Permalink

sometimes i complicate my wondering by wondering if worrying about it might perversely bring on the condition so then i try not to think about it but i still do.

estela, Monday, 4 April 2011 13:41 (3 years ago) Permalink

lol same - it's very stressful!

ENBB, Monday, 4 April 2011 13:41 (3 years ago) Permalink

rip poor uncle hic.

estela, Monday, 4 April 2011 13:42 (3 years ago) Permalink

i was not scared of this phenomenon until now.

DISPLAY NAMING RIGHTS (Upt0eleven), Monday, 4 April 2011 13:42 (3 years ago) Permalink

hiccup runneth over

the salmon of procrastination (darraghmac), Monday, 4 April 2011 13:47 (3 years ago) Permalink

i wasn't scared of it either before i heard of it and then when i did i decried it by saying wtf and whatnot but my criticism was to no avail, it didn't help sufferers one bit.

estela, Monday, 4 April 2011 13:49 (3 years ago) Permalink

if you shouted WTF very loudly behind them, perhaps?

Though it would probably just add nerve problems to an already tough situation

the salmon of procrastination (darraghmac), Monday, 4 April 2011 13:54 (3 years ago) Permalink

If the moon can affect tides and we have water in our brains then surely it has the capacity to affect the water in our brains.

Uh guys the gravitational attraction between the moon and your brain, even at the moon's closest approach, is less than that between your brain and the chair you're sitting in. Gravitational force is a function of mass. The moon weighs about 7.35 x 10^22 kg. The ocean weighs about 1.4 x 10^21 kg. Your brain weighs about 1,400 g.

Anti-mist K-Lo (Phil D.), Monday, 4 April 2011 13:56 (3 years ago) Permalink

LA LA LA I CAN'T HEAR YOU LA LA LA

ENBB, Monday, 4 April 2011 13:57 (3 years ago) Permalink

so full moon madness has something to do with bigger chairs?

portrait of velleity (woof), Monday, 4 April 2011 13:58 (3 years ago) Permalink

Pictured: The full moon effect

Anti-mist K-Lo (Phil D.), Monday, 4 April 2011 13:59 (3 years ago) Permalink

*hic*

estela, Monday, 4 April 2011 14:00 (3 years ago) Permalink

This thread is infuriating. That is all, carry on.

Jeff, Monday, 4 April 2011 14:03 (3 years ago) Permalink

i think some of youse are looking for the thread where we believe in stuff fully supported by science

the salmon of procrastination (darraghmac), Monday, 4 April 2011 14:09 (3 years ago) Permalink

I like to think that if I concentrate, I will know what I need to eat to have balanced nutrition.

I had a friend who lived by this philosophy, that he body was giving her cravings for nutritional reasons & we should all just listen to our bodies to have a balanced diet. This lead to her regularly doing things like making an entire pot of caramel sauce & eating it with a spoon, or eating a bag of mini Babybel cheeses in one sitting.

Publicidad de Sexo (Abbbottt), Monday, 4 April 2011 14:10 (3 years ago) Permalink

Yeah that would be me if I tried that tbh.

ENBB, Monday, 4 April 2011 14:12 (3 years ago) Permalink

You must also eat the red Babybel wax for a balanced meal

40% chill and 100% negative (Tracer Hand), Monday, 4 April 2011 14:13 (3 years ago) Permalink

Oh she totally did that. She'd also make & eat batches of the salt dough you make for kids to play with. I am blaming the copious amounts of marijuana her body also told her to smoke.

Publicidad de Sexo (Abbbottt), Monday, 4 April 2011 14:15 (3 years ago) Permalink

i am always drawn to people like that, i believe the water in my brain is gravitationally attracted to the liquid molecules in their caramel sauce.

estela, Monday, 4 April 2011 14:15 (3 years ago) Permalink

My brain has been telling me I need a constant supply of whisky lately, but I'm trying to tell it to shut up.

sarcasdick (mh), Monday, 4 April 2011 14:31 (3 years ago) Permalink

When I was an early adolescent, I used to believe that girls would deeply know if I had ... impure ... thoughts about them. Not as in: "he likes me, and he's unsubtle," but the actual content and/or narrative of the fantasies I had imagined. Poor, poor Jazmine D.;

they call him (remy bean), Monday, 4 April 2011 15:32 (3 years ago) Permalink

I also imagined it was possible to share dreams; to meet up and hang out with other people in your sleep.

they call him (remy bean), Monday, 4 April 2011 15:32 (3 years ago) Permalink

xp: That tangentially reminds me of how I used to think (ca. 5th grade) that teachers could tell if I had done my homework that morning, as opposed to the night before when it should have been done. I imagined that they had equipment that could determine how recently the pencil marks had been made, or whatever. I have somewhat of a history with giving authority figures entirely too much credit for their technological sleuthing abilities.

kkvgz, Monday, 4 April 2011 15:46 (3 years ago) Permalink


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