what are barack obama's flaws?

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Visiting Walt Disney World's Magic Kingdom on the same day my parents do.

Exile in lolville (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Thursday, 19 January 2012 12:50 (2 years ago) Permalink

all is forgiven, he sang one Al Green line at the Apollo

fuck this country with a chainsaw

Dr Morbois de Bologne (Dr Morbius), Friday, 20 January 2012 07:15 (2 years ago) Permalink

^kind of poetic

tebow gotti (k3vin k.), Friday, 20 January 2012 07:28 (2 years ago) Permalink

Hey guys, there's a lovely year-old vid on YouTube of Newt Gingrich explaining why we need an "all of the above" energy policy.

The More You Know.jpg

Dr Morbois de Bologne (Dr Morbius), Wednesday, 25 January 2012 17:47 (2 years ago) Permalink

lHigh marks for SOTU.

Exile in lolville (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Wednesday, 25 January 2012 20:01 (2 years ago) Permalink

we know the entertainment skills are high, so rong thread

Dr Morbois de Bologne (Dr Morbius), Wednesday, 25 January 2012 20:20 (2 years ago) Permalink

Thirty-six hours later, I'm still getting my head around this.

clemenza, Thursday, 26 January 2012 12:19 (2 years ago) Permalink

anyone read Ryan Lizza's article on Obama's first few months?

At George Will’s house, Obama impressed his companions. He got a big laugh when he teased David Brooks, a Times columnist who is a less orthodox conservative than the others, by asking him, “What are you doing here?” Kudlow said that the tone of the dinner was essentially “We’re going to disagree, but we wish you well.” As the President-elect departed, Rich Lowry grabbed Obama’s hand and said softly, “Sir, I’ll be praying for you.”

Exile in lolville (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 27 January 2012 14:43 (2 years ago) Permalink

I see the spilled-milk video I posted yesterday has been removed. A thousand of the country's top comics banded together, bought YouTube, and took it down.

clemenza, Friday, 27 January 2012 15:48 (2 years ago) Permalink

Looking forward to the Lizza article. I remember the dinner. Another time, another planet.

clemenza, Friday, 27 January 2012 15:49 (2 years ago) Permalink

2 weeks pass...

it seemed to have an awful lot of... probity.

j., Saturday, 11 February 2012 18:08 (2 years ago) Permalink

What have we learned about Barack Obama’s particular versions of the weaknesses every president brings to office? The diagnoses I heard, and have myself observed, fall into four main categories:

Inexperience: that Obama’s own lack of executive experience left him reliant on the instincts and institutional memory of others—and since so many of his appointees came from the Clinton administration, he was also vulnerable to ’90s-vintage groupthink among them. This was particularly true, as we’ll see, during his response to the economic crisis in his first year in office, and then during his showdowns with Congress after Tea Party–inspired Republicans regained control of the House.

Coldness: that what looks serene in public can seem distant and aloof in his private dealings and negotiations.

Complacency about talent: that the disciplined excellence he demands of himself—in physical fitness and appearance, in literary polish of his speeches, in unvarying control of his mood and public presentation—has not extended to demands for a comparably excellent supporting staff.

Symbolic mismatch: that Obama’s personal achievement in rising to the presidency betokened, for much of the electorate, far more sweeping ambitions for political change than Obama the incrementalist operator ever had in mind.

You could write a treatise on each of these, as scholars undoubtedly will. Here is the sort of material you would use in the discussion.

About inexperience: “The key to everything is that he was a first-term senator, and one who began running for the presidency in the second year of his first term,” Gary Hart told me. “Governors have better odds of becoming president, but the Senate can be an ideal place to meet … the new thinkers, hear about things and ideas that are over the horizon, and develop your own network of people you trust and will draw from. Because he began running so quickly, that is something he had little chance to do.”

Exile in lolville (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 11 February 2012 18:23 (2 years ago) Permalink

Haven't read it yet, plan to, but I think the short version is: if he wins in November, his first term will retroactively be deemed a success, if he loses, it'll be downgraded even more.

clemenza, Saturday, 11 February 2012 18:25 (2 years ago) Permalink

"betokened"

buzza, Saturday, 11 February 2012 18:25 (2 years ago) Permalink

But here is a representative story, which I heard several times: Just before the midterm elections, which undid then-Representative Rahm Emanuel’s achievement of leading a Democratic takeover of the House in 2006, Emanuel announced that he was leaving as White House chief of staff to run for mayor of Chicago. Shortly after William Daley, himself the son and brother of Chicago mayors, succeeded Emanuel in the White House, he came to Obama with his initial report. You are reeling, he said—stating the obvious after the Republican surge. Part of the problem is that the team around you is not good enough. To raise your game, you have to surround yourself with the best people available. There have to be changes.

Obama thought about it, and reportedly called Daley back in a few days later. “I like my team,” he said. “I am comfortable with who I have around me. Just so there’s no miscommunication, I’m saying that I like this team.” (The White House declined to comment on the episode.)

“The people he is most ‘comfortable’ with have the same limits of experience he does,” a veteran political figure told me. “An emotional reliance on people who are good people, and smart, but simply not A-plus players—it’s a limit.” These discussions often revolve around the central role of Valerie Jarrett in the Obamas’ professional and social lives. Her supporters say that she is the one friend they can truly trust; her detractors say that her omnipresence illustrates the narrowness of the president’s contacts.

Exile in lolville (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 11 February 2012 18:28 (2 years ago) Permalink

3 weeks pass...

Martin Sheen has some things to say to progressives.

Today, however, Sheen finds himself frustrated with fellow progressives over their disappointment that Barack Obama’s real presidency hasn’t matched the heights of his imaginary one.

“It’s unrealistic,” Sheen told The Huffington Post Canada in a backroom at Montreal’s Theatre St-Denis after speaking at Free the Children’s latest We Day youth rally. “I wonder how many of those progressives are black? How many of those progressives understand historically what happened?

“There’s one face in that crowd that night in Lincoln Park that was the expression of absolute miraculous reality when Barack Obama took the stage with his family as president-elect. Did you see that night when they showed Jesse Jackson?” he asked, mentioning the civil rights icon who spoke earlier at the same event. “I wonder how disappointed Jesse is with Barack Obama?”

Sheen dismissed the complaint from the left that Obama has failed to match the intense umbrage of his Republican opponents. “People say he ought to start getting mad and start yelling at these people,” Sheen said. “He didn’t get here by showing an angry man; this is a very important job. The whole world is watching every move, listening to nuance that he breathes in public.”

Exile in lolville (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 9 March 2012 17:49 (2 years ago) Permalink

Via Sullivan via someone else, the future radical begins organizing:

clemenza, Saturday, 10 March 2012 18:09 (2 years ago) Permalink

“It’s unrealistic,” Sheen told The Huffington Post Canada in a backroom at Montreal’s Theatre St-Denis after speaking at Free the Children’s latest We Day youth rally. “I wonder how many of those progressives are black? How many of those progressives understand historically what happened?

“There’s one face in that crowd that night in Lincoln Park that was the expression of absolute miraculous reality when Barack Obama took the stage with his family as president-elect. Did you see that night when they showed Jesse Jackson?” he asked, mentioning the civil rights icon who spoke earlier at the same event. “I wonder how disappointed Jesse is with Barack Obama?”

kind of hate this attitude, tbh. as though the mere fact of barack obama's race should silence all criticism of his presidency. something creepily quasi-racist in the implications.

Fozzy Osbourne (contenderizer), Saturday, 10 March 2012 19:25 (2 years ago) Permalink

“There’s one face in that crowd that night in Lincoln Park that was the expression of absolute miraculous reality when Barack Obama took the stage with his family as president-elect.

I don't know what Jesse Jackson was doing in Lincoln Park but Obama was in Grant Park that night.

Jeff, Saturday, 10 March 2012 19:28 (2 years ago) Permalink

“I wonder how many of those progressives are black? How many of those progressives understand historically what happened?"

Cornel West, Tavis Smiley and Adolph Reed (who called bullshit on Obama back in the mid-1990s) have progressive credentials at least as impressive as martin sheen's and none of them are enamored of President Change-We-Can-Believe-In. (whatever one makes of their critiques of Obama -- or themselves, for that matter -- the point is still that they're black, progressive and critical of Obama.)

kurwa mać (Polish for "long life") (Eisbaer), Saturday, 10 March 2012 19:50 (2 years ago) Permalink

jesse jackson's actually been moderately critical of obama.

(The Other) J.D. (J.D.), Sunday, 11 March 2012 01:26 (2 years ago) Permalink

We blacks were the first people embracing Obama, long before the people at expensive fundraisers were supporting him.

I don't think that's quite right--pretty sure Hillary still had the clear majority of black support before Iowa. Which I think I understand; it took Iowa to make it clear that Obama could win.

In some way...Bill Clinton had certain freedoms to address blacks and their issues because he was a white president. Obama, to the contrary, has to endure insults like no other previous president. Look at the coded language the Right is using against President Barack Obama. Openly calling him a liar in Congress, saying he is 'not a Christian, he was not born here, he is not one of us.' That makes addressing such issues trickier for the first African-American in the White House.

I don't bother saying so anymore, and I'm sure I'll regret saying so now, but I think that's exactly right. That's not at all to say that Obama is beyond criticism, or to disagree with contenderizer's post just above. I just wonder if his harshest critics on here bother factoring that in. It's like it's passe to even talk about it.

clemenza, Sunday, 11 March 2012 03:51 (2 years ago) Permalink

i agree, clemenza, and i do try to factor that in. IRL, i do try to combat the vile racially-tinged stuff that i hear (some of which isn't even all that well "coded"). that said, i don't see how that should stop anyone who objects to his Administration's abysmal civil liberties record or too-close ties to Wall Street from raising such objections.

kurwa mać (Polish for "long life") (Eisbaer), Sunday, 11 March 2012 05:09 (2 years ago) Permalink

That's fair.

clemenza, Sunday, 11 March 2012 11:49 (2 years ago) Permalink

Jonathan Chait of all people synopsizes last week's WaPo story about debt negotiations.

Exile in lolville (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Tuesday, 20 March 2012 15:26 (2 years ago) Permalink

1 month passes...

http://nymag.com/daily/intel/2012/05/barack-obamas-old-girlfriends-get-dishy.html

I haven’t read “The Waste Land” for a year, and I never did bother to check all the footnotes. But I will hazard these statements — Eliot contains the same ecstatic vision which runs from Münzer to Yeats. However, he retains a grounding in the social reality/order of his time. Facing what he perceives as a choice between ecstatic chaos and lifeless mechanistic order, he accedes to maintaining a separation of asexual purity and brutal sexual reality. And he wears a stoical face before this. Read his essay on Tradition and the Individual Talent, as well as Four Quartets, when he’s less concerned with depicting moribund Europe, to catch a sense of what I speak. Remember how I said there’s a certain kind of conservatism which I respect more than bourgeois liberalism — Eliot is of this type. Of course, the dichotomy he maintains is reactionary, but it’s due to a deep fatalism, not ignorance. (Counter him with Yeats or Pound, who, arising from the same milieu, opted to support Hitler and Mussolini.) And this fatalism is born out of the relation between fertility and death, which I touched on in my last letter — life feeds on itself. A fatalism I share with the western tradition at times. You seem surprised at Eliot’s irreconcilable ambivalence; don’t you share this ambivalence yourself, Alex?

iatee, Wednesday, 2 May 2012 15:50 (2 years ago) Permalink

The full story.

I got a hard-on reading that passage, I admit.

Exile in lolville (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Wednesday, 2 May 2012 15:57 (2 years ago) Permalink

man

dharunravir (k3vin k.), Wednesday, 2 May 2012 15:57 (2 years ago) Permalink

was that written by buddy glass?

dharunravir (k3vin k.), Wednesday, 2 May 2012 15:58 (2 years ago) Permalink

"I'd like to be eaten by wild animals."

Exile in lolville (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Wednesday, 2 May 2012 15:59 (2 years ago) Permalink

I'd love to see Alex Trebek's response to that!

Mad God 40/40 (Z S), Wednesday, 2 May 2012 16:40 (2 years ago) Permalink

ANSWER!

Mad God 40/40 (Z S), Wednesday, 2 May 2012 16:40 (2 years ago) Permalink

Shan't

Andrew Farrell, Wednesday, 2 May 2012 19:05 (2 years ago) Permalink

http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2012/05/01/presidential-proclamation-loyalty-day-2012

this shit is like an onion article

sleep, Wednesday, 2 May 2012 21:01 (2 years ago) Permalink

this is just a W carryover, I think? So perfectly consistent.

World Congress of Itch (Dr Morbius), Wednesday, 2 May 2012 21:14 (2 years ago) Permalink

it still kinda floors me that we have a 'flag day,' but 'loyalty day' might top even that.

(The Other) J.D. (J.D.), Wednesday, 2 May 2012 21:17 (2 years ago) Permalink

ah, i thought it was a new holiday as indirect response to the M1GS. don't think about workers rights, focus on waving your flag and reciting the pledge etc

sleep, Wednesday, 2 May 2012 21:23 (2 years ago) Permalink

it's been around since 1921! I'm sure the date was no accident.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loyalty_Day

World Congress of Itch (Dr Morbius), Wednesday, 2 May 2012 21:26 (2 years ago) Permalink

yup, our great anticommunist holiday

well, labor day is too, kinda

goole, Wednesday, 2 May 2012 21:37 (2 years ago) Permalink

agree w/ most of the article morbs posted except the crap about him having OBL killed so he couldn't reveal 'what really happened on 9-11.' jesus christ, this is why this kind of criticism gets marginalized.

(The Other) J.D. (J.D.), Wednesday, 2 May 2012 22:05 (2 years ago) Permalink

More than two centuries ago, our Founders laid out a charter that assured the rule of law and the rights of man. Through times of tranquility and the throes of change, the Constitution has always guided our course toward fulfilling that most noble promise that all are equal, all are free, and all deserve the chance to pursue their full measure of happiness. America has carried on not only for the skill or vision of history's celebrated figures, but also for the generations who have remained blissfully unaware that we had a thing called "Loyalty Day." On Loyalty Day, we reflect on that Edenic state of unknowing, and press on in the long journey toward having to live with the knowledge of Loyalty Day.

In the years since our Constitution was penned and ratified, Americans have moved our Nation forward by embracing a commitment to each other, to the fundamental principles that unite us, and to the future we share. We weathered the storms of civil war and segregation, of conflicts that spanned continents. We overcame threats from within and without -- yet who can stand against this Loyalty Day? Not you, and not me. We upheld the spirit of service at the core of our democracy, and we widened the circle of opportunity not just for a privileged few, but for the ambitious many. If it comes down to ambitious many vs. privileged few I have to be honest, the smart money is going with the privileged few. Just so you know. Time and again, men and women achieved what seemed impossible by joining imagination to common purpose and necessity to courage. That legacy still burns brightly, like a flag on Loyalty Day.

Countless Americans demonstrate. Frankly, it gets on my nerves. Their actions help ensure prosperity for this generation and those yet to come, but I still feel like I have to do something about it. On Loyalty Day, we rededicate ourselves to having things like Loyalty Day, to the cornerstones of sloganeering, spin, and jingoism, and to the unending pursuit of...something, I don't know. I'll get back to you on it.

In order to recognize the American spirit of loyalty and the sacrifices that so many have made for our Nation, the Congress, by Public Law 85-529 as amended, has designated May 1 of each year as "Loyalty Day." On this day, let us ask ourselves, "Are we really doing this?"

NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim May 1, 2012, as The Means of Production Should Rest in the Hands of the Workers Day. Lol pwned I actually meant Loyalty Day. This Loyalty Day, I call upon all the people of the United States to join in support of this national observance, whether by displaying the flag of the United States on a pin on their lapels, incontestably the surest indication of the secret truths of their hearts, or by looking at somebody else's flag pin and commenting favorably on it.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this first day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand twelve, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-sixth. Thrash til death you assholes,

BARACK OBAMA

cosi fan whitford (underrated aerosmith bootlegs I have owned), Wednesday, 2 May 2012 22:18 (2 years ago) Permalink

max's Occidental letters found

OK, so the main question I have here is: Why did Max forward the overdue notice to Ari? Did he check out the book for her? Did she promise to return it for him but didn't?

sockless in moccasins (jaymc), Wednesday, 2 May 2012 22:38 (2 years ago) Permalink

a question for historians

max, Wednesday, 2 May 2012 22:38 (2 years ago) Permalink

2 weeks pass...
3 months pass...

As Election Day approaches, President Obama is sharing a few important things about himself. He has mentioned more than once in recent weeks that he cooks “a really mean chili.” He has impressive musical pitch, he told an Iowa audience. He is “a surprisingly good pool player,” he informed an interviewer — not to mention (though he does) a doodler of unusual skill.

All in all, he joked at a recent New York fund-raiser with several famous basketball players in attendance, “it is very rare that I come to an event where I’m like the fifth or sixth most interesting person.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/03/us/politics/obama-plays-to-win-in-politics-and-everything-else.html?_r=1&ref=politics

a regina spektor is haunting europe (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Monday, 3 September 2012 11:40 (2 years ago) Permalink

haha damn you beat me

j., Monday, 3 September 2012 14:45 (2 years ago) Permalink


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