Watergate: S & D

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Search: Liddy, the 'plumbers', Nixon, tapes, 'Parallax View', Spiro Agnew, "I am not a crook"

Destroy: Dean, Colson, 'All the President's Men', Ford

dave q, Sunday, 14 October 2001 00:00 (12 years ago) Permalink

who just watched the ice storm then heh?

search egil "evil" krogh, martha mitchell, haldeman referring to nixon as "the p", rose mary woods and the missing 18-and-a-half minutes, [expletive deleted], ratfucking, robert bork selling out the constitution

mark s, Sunday, 14 October 2001 00:00 (12 years ago) Permalink

search " Anton " destroy " roay"

Mike Hanle y, Sunday, 14 October 2001 00:00 (12 years ago) Permalink

destroy: redefinition of presidential misconduct from illegal/immoral policy-making to simply bad planning. Bob Woodward imagines that all our problems would disappear if the executive branch just played by the rules. The rules they play by are the whole preblem.

Tracer Hand, Sunday, 14 October 2001 00:00 (12 years ago) Permalink

Search: the film "Dick". Also, the film "Nixon", also, paranoia.

Sterling Clover, Monday, 15 October 2001 00:00 (12 years ago) Permalink

I second that Dick searching. Ahem. Nice to see last night Weaver in the Ice Storm and Weaver in Alien:Resurrection with Hedaya who plays Nixon in Dick.

Pete, Monday, 15 October 2001 00:00 (12 years ago) Permalink

I love the fact that Monica Lewinsky cloistered herself in the Watergate hotel during Jizz-gate.

Weirdest Watergate ephemera I've come across: "Born Again", a Christian comic book adaption of Coulsen's memoirs.

search: Bernstein; destroy: Woodward.

fritz, Monday, 15 October 2001 00:00 (12 years ago) Permalink

7 years pass...

Bernard Barker, a Watergate Burglar, Dies at 92

By SUSAN JO KELLER

Bernard L. Barker, one of the burglars whose 1972 break-in at the Watergate building in Washington led to the resignation of President Richard M. Nixon, died Friday. He was 92.

His stepdaughter, Kelly Andrad, told The Associated Press that Mr. Barker, who had lung cancer and heart problems, died Friday morning at his suburban Miami home after being taken to the Veterans Affairs Medical Center the night before.

Mr. Barker, a Cuban-born American, was recruited for undercover operations during the Nixon administration by E. Howard Hunt Jr. The ties between the two went back to Mr. Hunt’s days in the Central Intelligence Agency and the planning of the 1961 invasion of the Bay of Pigs in Cuba.

In 1971, Mr. Barker took part in a break-in at the Los Angeles office of the psychiatrist of Daniel Ellsberg, who disclosed the Pentagon papers to the press.

Then on June 17, 1972, Mr. Barker was found crouching under a desk at Democratic National Committee headquarters in the Watergate office building. Three other men caught with him also had ties to the Bay of Pigs operation. A fifth, James W. McCord Jr., was security chief for Nixon’s re-election campaign.

In May 1973, Mr. Barker told the Senate Watergate committee that his aim in the Watergate break-in had been to find proof that the Democratic Party had received financial support from the government of Cuba and thus speed the “liberation” of Cuba.

Mr. Barker pleaded guilty in January 1973 to seven charges of conspiracy, burglary and wiretapping. Later, however, he asked Judge John J. Sirica to allow him to withdraw his guilty plea and stand trial. Judge Sirica denied that request and on Nov. 19, 1973, sentenced Mr. Barker to a prison term of 18 months to six years.

In January 1974, Mr. Barker was freed from prison to appeal that decision. On July 11, 1975, Judge Sirica told Mr. Barker and the other three Cuban-Americans involved in the Watergate break-in that he was reducing their sentences to time served.

After his release from prison, Mr. Barker, a former real estate agent, went to work for the City of Miami as a sanitation inspector as part of a federally financed jobs program. He later worked as a city building inspector but took early retirement at the age of 64 rather than fight charges that he had been loafing on the job.

In repeated interviews, Mr. Barker expressed no regrets about his role in the two break-ins, saying he believed he had been acting in the interests of national security. But in 1976, he did tell a reporter: “Washington’s a place to keep away from. Cubans don’t do very well up there.”

Reprinted from Saturday’s late editions.
Copyright 2009 The New York Times Company

Dr Morbius, Sunday, 7 June 2009 15:25 (5 years ago) Permalink

I hear variations on that quote once a day.

Bud Huxtable (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Sunday, 7 June 2009 15:26 (5 years ago) Permalink

D: "oh, nixon did what they all did -- he just got caught!" etc etc

(The Other) J.D. (J.D.), Monday, 8 June 2009 00:52 (5 years ago) Permalink

2 months pass...

HAPPY ANNIVERSARY

I didn't realize at the time it would be the apex of the American state.

Indiana Morbs and the Curse of the Ivy League Chorister (Dr Morbius), Sunday, 9 August 2009 15:24 (5 years ago) Permalink

the Eisenhower guy looks cute in that one.

Anatomy of a Morbius (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Sunday, 9 August 2009 15:35 (5 years ago) Permalink

that's Ed Cox, Tricia's husband. David Eisenhower never looked cute.

Indiana Morbs and the Curse of the Ivy League Chorister (Dr Morbius), Sunday, 9 August 2009 15:40 (5 years ago) Permalink

1 year passes...

Morbius, by 'apex' did you mean that in punishing high corruption for once, this was as good as the USA ever got?

the pinefox, Saturday, 2 April 2011 00:25 (3 years ago) Permalink

in my lifetime, certainly.

your generation appalls me (Dr Morbius), Saturday, 2 April 2011 00:27 (3 years ago) Permalink

I would have thought Morbius would be apalled by Ford's pardon.

I suspect Nixon was ultimately punished more for approval ratings that were cratering than for the high corruption. If the public had decided Watergate wasn't that big a deal, I'm sure Goldwater and the rest of them would have stood their ground and the impending impeachment would never have reached the stage it did (which I think was a recommendation to proceed with impeachment hearings...I'd have to double-check). I'm not defending Nixon, believe me; I'm just saying I'm not ready to ascribe noble principals to the Republicans who bailed on him (or, to be truthful, to the Democrats who were swarming either). It's politics; most everyone was acting out of self-interest.

clemenza, Saturday, 2 April 2011 16:35 (3 years ago) Permalink

uh, I was appalled by Ford's pardon. That was a month later.

Sure, the pols acted out of self-interest. It's the public deciding that Watergate was big a deal that was the triumph. HOWEVER, there actually was a throng of principled liberal Democrats in Congress at the time, a nearly extinct species now. And I could see the modern Rethuglican army urging Dick to fight on.

your generation appalls me (Dr Morbius), Saturday, 2 April 2011 17:19 (3 years ago) Permalink

I brought up Ford only because you answered yes to the previous poster about high corruption being punished; you could make the argument that Nixon wasn't punished. (I wouldn't--losing the presidency and spending the rest of his life as a pariah was ample punishment.)

clemenza, Saturday, 2 April 2011 17:30 (3 years ago) Permalink

He was NOT a pariah: he was actively consulted by Reagan and Bush I, and Clinton made public that he sought his counsel re Russia. His books were best sellers. He should have gone to jail.

Hey Look More Than Five Years Has Passed And You Have A C (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 2 April 2011 17:50 (3 years ago) Permalink

Moreover, sending him in jail would have prevented him from giving cynical, malicious counsel. He actually advised Reagan not to talk to Gorby (Reagan ignored him), then blasted Bush I in the early nineties for not talking to the Soviets enough. As the Monica Crowley books showed, this thug only cared about public recognition, as when he wet his pants thinking about what Clinton's public embrace would mean for his fucking "credibility."

Hey Look More Than Five Years Has Passed And You Have A C (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 2 April 2011 17:54 (3 years ago) Permalink

Hunter S. Thompson:

If the right people had been in charge of Nixon's funeral, his casket would have been launched into one of those open-sewage canals that empty into the ocean just south of Los Angeles. He was a swine of a man and a jabbering dupe of a president. Nixon was so crooked that he needed servants to help him screw his pants on every morning. Even his funeral was illegal. He was queer in the deepest way. His body should have been burned in a trash bin.

These are harsh words for a man only recently canonized by President Clinton and my old friend George McGovern -- but I have written worse things about Nixon, many times, and the record will show that I kicked him repeatedly long before he went down. I beat him like a mad dog with mange every time I got a chance, and I am proud of it. He was scum.

Let there be no mistake in the history books about that. Richard Nixon was an evil man -- evil in a way that only those who believe in the physical reality of the Devil can understand it. He was utterly without ethics or morals or any bedrock sense of decency. Nobody trusted him -- except maybe the Stalinist Chinese, and honest historians will remember him mainly as a rat who kept scrambling to get back on the ship.

Hey Look More Than Five Years Has Passed And You Have A C (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 2 April 2011 18:06 (3 years ago) Permalink

Alfred & HST otm

your generation appalls me (Dr Morbius), Saturday, 2 April 2011 18:21 (3 years ago) Permalink

and that's why I am going to clown at his grave

your generation appalls me (Dr Morbius), Saturday, 2 April 2011 18:22 (3 years ago) Permalink

Of course he was a pariah; if I remember the first Crowley book correctly, he was alway mad at sitting presidents for giving him the brush-off. And when he was consulted, it was more of a symbolic gesture; no one really took him seriously. Anyway, he was a pariah in a much bigger sense, in that he spent the rest of his life trying to restore some semblance of public standing. And I'm not at all saying that that was unfair; he fully deserved his pariah status. But I don't think it's accurate to say he was this guy who was right in the middle of things. (If you're measuring his pariah or non-pariah status against the fact that you believe he should have gone before a firing squad, then yeah, he got off easy.)

clemenza, Saturday, 2 April 2011 18:35 (3 years ago) Permalink

Really kinda think if Watergate happened right now, they would just file it under Unstrippable National Security Powers of the President During Wartime and say STFU.

Telephoneface (Adam Bruneau), Saturday, 2 April 2011 19:02 (3 years ago) Permalink

If you want me to criticize Nixon's persecutors, the House Judiciary Com'tee failed to pass the article of impeachment on the invasion of Cambodia, which was even a bigger crime than Watergate.

your generation appalls me (Dr Morbius), Saturday, 2 April 2011 19:11 (3 years ago) Permalink

Cambodia was worse, agreed.

One point on which we part company is the idea that Nixon was evil. Sorry, don't believe that, no more than I believe George W. was/is evil. You could spend a month cataloguing Nixon's faults, and yes, he had much blood on his hands. As to the former--the small-mindedness, the paranoia, the manipulativeness, etc.--I recognize them as human failings, some of which I share. He had an inordinate number of them, an almost perfect storm, but I recognize the person there. In terms of the latter--the thousands upon thousands of deaths in Vietnam that he could have foreshortened--to me that's a complicated mixture of Nixon's personality, the institution of the presidency, the American character, the male character, etc., etc. If I'm not mistaken, Morbius, you describe almost every post-war president as evil. If you believe that, fine. I don't. Sorry to be obvious (naive, I'm sure say, my Kay Corleone to your Michael), but to me evil is Hitler and Manson and the like.

clemenza, Saturday, 2 April 2011 19:28 (3 years ago) Permalink

I consider Nixon's men sabotaging the Paris peace talks in '68 an act of depravity, and the manner in which Nixon's terrible prose and slipshod public statements unwittingly made clear his indifference to the lives he destroyed because he wanted or wanted to stay in power -- that's evil. Sorry, clemenza, but "evil" needn't be represented by Hitler and Manson.

Hey Look More Than Five Years Has Passed And You Have A C (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 2 April 2011 19:39 (3 years ago) Permalink

very Oliver Stone of you, clemenza

your generation appalls me (Dr Morbius), Saturday, 2 April 2011 19:39 (3 years ago) Permalink

I've read all the major Nixon biographies, and one of his "books." I've a pretty good understanding of the man, and it doesn't blind me to the casualness with which he resorted to malice -- a man whose first instincts were always to stab you in the back the second your back was turned. Let's not allow his psychological problems blind us to his pathology.

Hey Look More Than Five Years Has Passed And You Have A C (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 2 April 2011 19:41 (3 years ago) Permalink

And when he was consulted, it was more of a symbolic gesture; no one really took him seriously.

This is incorrect.

Hey Look More Than Five Years Has Passed And You Have A C (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 2 April 2011 19:43 (3 years ago) Permalink

I'll let you guys set the bar on what constitutes evil. Make sure you set it carefully, safely out of reach of anything you've ever done yourself.

clemenza, Saturday, 2 April 2011 19:43 (3 years ago) Permalink

his indifference to the lives he destroyed because he wanted or wanted to stay in power

Yes, Nixon was unique among politicians in this regard.

clemenza, Saturday, 2 April 2011 19:44 (3 years ago) Permalink

This is incorrect.

According to you. I'll skim Crowley's book again; if I'm wrong, I'll come back and say so.

clemenza, Saturday, 2 April 2011 19:45 (3 years ago) Permalink

I don't know what kind of standard you've set, man. Are you suggesting that my own venality prevents me from judging Nixon? Really? Seriously? I judge a man by his actions, and Nixon's are well-documented.

Hey Look More Than Five Years Has Passed And You Have A C (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 2 April 2011 19:46 (3 years ago) Permalink

According to you. I'll skim Crowley's book again; if I'm wrong, I'll come back and say so

Who do you think suggested Alexander Haig and Richard Allen to Reagan? Reagan's people actually brought Nixon to the Residence in the middle of the night in 1986 on the eve of Reagan's Iceland summit.

Crowley was a hack herself who could barely acknowledge her idol's culpability in Watergate.

Hey Look More Than Five Years Has Passed And You Have A C (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 2 April 2011 19:47 (3 years ago) Permalink

What I'm suggesting is that things you're calling evil are very human failings. Nixon was incredibly small-minded; so am I sometimes. He was incredibly manipulative; so am I sometimes. And before he entered politics, he was a guy with a family, just back from the war. I don't think the presidency transforms you from there to a state of evil.

clemenza, Saturday, 2 April 2011 19:49 (3 years ago) Permalink

I think the other point I'm making is something along the lines of the boy who cried wolf. When Morbius daily refers to virtually every president as evil, including the sitting one, his outrage over Nixon becomes harder to take seriously. It's a version of right-wing radio; the outrage machine loses credibility at a certain point of saturation.

clemenza, Saturday, 2 April 2011 19:52 (3 years ago) Permalink

I'll let you guys set the bar on what constitutes evil. Make sure you set it carefully, safely out of reach of anything you've ever done yourself.

scuse me, off to napalm the Bronx

your generation appalls me (Dr Morbius), Saturday, 2 April 2011 19:52 (3 years ago) Permalink

Sigh.

clemenza, Saturday, 2 April 2011 19:53 (3 years ago) Permalink

The Nixon-Kissinger historical record in Greece, Chile, Laos, Cyprus, the Ellsberg burglary -- not just their sneers and chuckles and terrible jokes, but the ease with which they separate motive from consequences as only sociopaths can -- amply proves that this person's acts were not "human failings."

Hey Look More Than Five Years Has Passed And You Have A C (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 2 April 2011 19:54 (3 years ago) Permalink

and as I've said, all modern US presidents are evil, just as all Mafia dons are. There are degrees, of course.

your generation appalls me (Dr Morbius), Saturday, 2 April 2011 19:56 (3 years ago) Permalink

I don't at all think Obama is at Nixon levels yet or has shown Nixonian intentions.

As discussed in our poll, those post-WWII presidents are a vile bunch.

Hey Look More Than Five Years Has Passed And You Have A C (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 2 April 2011 19:57 (3 years ago) Permalink

Then I'll go back to the way I phrased it originally: "If you believe that, fine. I don't." I do realize I have a minority viewpoint here. But I also think it's a valid one. And I suspect I've listened to, read about, and thought about Nixon as much as you guys have.

(Another point on which we disagree; I don't think evil has gradiations.)

clemenza, Saturday, 2 April 2011 19:57 (3 years ago) Permalink

At least I have Neil Young on my side...

clemenza, Saturday, 2 April 2011 19:59 (3 years ago) Permalink

sure it has gradations, that's why I held my nose and voted for Bill Bradley over Gore in the 2000 primary.

your generation appalls me (Dr Morbius), Saturday, 2 April 2011 20:07 (3 years ago) Permalink

Of course evil has gradations: that's why, as you pointed out, he could love his grandchildren and speak intelligently about Hegel.

Hey Look More Than Five Years Has Passed And You Have A C (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 2 April 2011 20:18 (3 years ago) Permalink

I've been skimming the Crowley book, and while I can't find exactly what I'm looking for, it was likely a passage like this that prompted my comments upthread:

"Nixon relished the idea that Clinton might defer to him on international affairs and permit him greater latitude than either Regan or Bush had. Clinton might grant more weight to his opinions and advice and perhaps even act on them."

Now, you say she's a hack (simultaneously saying "as the Monica Crowley books showed"...)--I remember liking the first book, but maybe you're right, I don't know. But she's probably primarily guilty of being a mouthpiece for Nixon, in which case those the preceding quote would be reflective of how Nixon perceived Regan and Bush's treatment of him. My sense is that when they conferred with Nixon, it was more because he was a potential nuisance to be pacified, Johnson's thing about having someone inside the tent rather than out. I don't view carryover in appointments as especially significant; that's a standard Washington thing, where new administrations overlook everything except who can step in on day one and have some idea of what's supposed to be done.

Bill Bradley less evil than Al Gore? I don't know, they're both pretty scary guys...We disagree. There's evil, which is innate, and there's bad behaviour, bad decisions, momentary insanity, etc. That's the way I see it, anyway.

clemenza, Saturday, 2 April 2011 20:22 (3 years ago) Permalink

Omit "those," and "Reagan" for "Regan."

clemenza, Saturday, 2 April 2011 20:23 (3 years ago) Permalink

Here's where I recommend Thomas Mallon's new novel.

a regina spektor is haunting europe (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Wednesday, 13 June 2012 17:45 (2 years ago) Permalink

recommendation accepted. ding!

Peppermint Patty Hearst (VegemiteGrrl), Wednesday, 13 June 2012 18:01 (2 years ago) Permalink

Happy 40th to the gang!

clemenza, Sunday, 17 June 2012 15:40 (2 years ago) Permalink

Afaics, the major legacy of this scandal was a determination on the part of the power elite never to allow the media to be independent enough to pursue a story like this, if the elite prefer the story should not be pursued. An independent press is far too much of a danger to those who hold power to allow it to flourish for any reason.

Aimless, Sunday, 24 June 2012 02:09 (2 years ago) Permalink

backing up to the Nixon pardon i recommend Barry Werth's short book 31 Days about the Ford transition. anyone reading this thread will eat it up

(REAL NAME) (m coleman), Sunday, 24 June 2012 11:07 (2 years ago) Permalink

hell yes Nixon should have gone to jail; the next 25 years might've turned out differently but hey that's water(gate) under the bridge

(REAL NAME) (m coleman), Sunday, 24 June 2012 11:18 (2 years ago) Permalink

Yes -- great book.

a regina spektor is haunting europe (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Sunday, 24 June 2012 11:48 (2 years ago) Permalink

31 Days sounds great.

piscesx, Sunday, 24 June 2012 13:00 (2 years ago) Permalink

i'm no nixon apologist but i gotta say, this is the most devastating end of a long wikipedia article i've ever come across:

Nixon believed that putting distance between himself and other people was necessary for him as he advanced in his political career and became president. Even Bebe Rebozo, by some accounts his closest friend, did not call him by his first name. Nixon stated of this, "Even with close friends. I don't believe in letting your hair down, confiding this and that and the other thing—saying, 'Gee, I couldn't sleep' ... I believe you should keep your troubles to yourself. That's just the way I am. Some people are different. Some people think it's good therapy to sit with a close friend and, you know, just spill your guts ... (and) reveal their inner psyche—whether they were breast-fed or bottle-fed. Not me. No way."(263) When told that most Americans, even at the end of his career, did not feel they knew him, Nixon replied, "Yeah, it's true. And it's not necessary for them to know."(263)

(The Other) J.D. (J.D.), Friday, 29 June 2012 01:16 (2 years ago) Permalink

7 months pass...

After Richardson and Ruckelshaus refused to carry out Nixon’s order, the White House sent a car to the Justice Department to fetch Bork.

He met the car outside the department and found Nixon lawyers Leonard Garment and Fred Buzhardt in the passenger seats. Bork says he joked that he felt like he was being taken for a ride, as in a scene from a gangster movie, but that no one else laughed.

Shortly after he sent Cox a two-paragraph letter, he was taken in to see Nixon. Bork says the resignation and firings should have been called “The Saturday Night Involuntary Manslaughter” because Nixon didn’t plan the episode, but blundered into it.

It was in that conversation that Bork says Nixon for the first and only time offered up the next Supreme Court seat.

the little prince of inane false binary hype (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Tuesday, 26 February 2013 17:53 (1 year ago) Permalink

The War Powers Resolution, passed by Congress over the veto of Nixon in November 1973, expanded congressional control over the limits of presidential authority in the use of force abroad. Had the president asked for my advice, I would have suggested that instead of vetoing the Resolution, and thus giving it the dignity of a statute, Nixon should have returned the bill to Congress with a note saying he thanked them for their essay on his constitutional powers and, when he found time in his busy schedule, he would send them an essay of his own on his understanding of his constitutional powers. This would have treated the War Powers Resolution with the frivolous gesture it deserved.

goole, Friday, 8 March 2013 17:12 (1 year ago) Permalink

More goodies, freshly unconvered.

The disruption of Johnson’s peace talks then enabled Nixon to hang on for a narrow victory over Democrat Hubert Humphrey. However, as the new President was taking steps in 1969 to extend the war another four-plus years, he sensed the threat from the wiretap file and ordered two of his top aides, chief of staff H.R. “Bob” Haldeman and National Security Advisor Henry Kissinger, to locate it. But they couldn’t find the file.

We now know that was because President Johnson, who privately had called Nixon’s Vietnam actions “treason,” had ordered the file removed from the White House by his national security aide Walt Rostow.

Rostow labeled the file “The ‘X’ Envelope” and kept it in his possession, although having left government, he had no legal right to possess the highly classified documents, many of which were stamped “Top Secret.” Johnson had instructed Rostow to retain the papers as long as he, Johnson, was alive and then afterwards to decide what to do with them.

Nixon, however, had no idea that Johnson and Rostow had taken the missing file or, indeed, who might possess it. Normally, national security documents are passed from the outgoing President to the incoming President to maintain continuity in government.

But Haldeman and Kissinger had come up empty in their search. They were only able to recreate the file’s contents, which included incriminating conversations between Nixon’s emissaries and South Vietnamese officials regarding Nixon’s promise to get them a better deal if they helped him torpedo Johnson’s peace talks.

the little prince of inane false binary hype (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 15 March 2013 16:18 (1 year ago) Permalink

Man.

What Rostow didn’t know was that there was a third – and more direct – connection between the missing file and Watergate. Nixon’s fear about the file surfacing as a follow-up to the Pentagon Papers was Nixon’s motive for creating Hunt’s burglary team in the first place.

Rostow apparently struggled with what to do with the file for the next month as the Watergate scandal expanded. On June 25, 1973, fired White House counsel John Dean delivered his blockbuster Senate testimony, claiming that Nixon got involved in the cover-up within days of the June 1972 burglary at the Democratic National Committee. Dean also asserted that Watergate was just part of a years-long program of political espionage directed by Nixon’s White House.

The very next day, as headlines of Dean’s testimony filled the nation’s newspapers, Rostow reached his conclusion about what to do with “The ‘X’ Envelope.” In longhand, he wrote a “Top Secret” note which read, “To be opened by the Director, Lyndon Baines Johnson Library, not earlier than fifty (50) years from this date June 26, 1973.”

In other words, Rostow intended this missing link of American history to stay missing for another half century.

the little prince of inane false binary hype (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 15 March 2013 16:20 (1 year ago) Permalink

holy crap

set the controls for the heart of the sun (VegemiteGrrl), Friday, 15 March 2013 16:37 (1 year ago) Permalink

I have been thinking about this all morning

set the controls for the heart of the sun (VegemiteGrrl), Friday, 15 March 2013 18:54 (1 year ago) Permalink

Nixon’s fear about the file surfacing as a follow-up to the Pentagon Papers was Nixon’s motive for creating Hunt’s burglary team in the first place.

crazy that this turned out to be true, I remember this being speculated upon in Arrogance of Power, I think...?

his girlfriend was all 'ugh and he wears a solar backpack' (Shakey Mo Collier), Friday, 15 March 2013 19:15 (1 year ago) Permalink

I checked out one of Parry's books.

Most reporters have given short shrift to the Chennault material. The recent book by those TIME suckups on the ex-presidents inadvertently did more to raise the specter of those signals sent from Texas to the White House during the Nixon years.

the little prince of inane false binary hype (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 15 March 2013 19:18 (1 year ago) Permalink

which book, Alfred?

I'm thinking Lost History looks like my kinda wheelhouse

set the controls for the heart of the sun (VegemiteGrrl), Friday, 15 March 2013 20:18 (1 year ago) Permalink

http://www.amazon.com/Fooling-America-Washington-Manufacture-Conventional/dp/0688109276

It reminds me of Mark Hertsgaard's On Bended Knee, a superb account of press genuflection before St. Ronnie.

the little prince of inane false binary hype (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 15 March 2013 20:23 (1 year ago) Permalink

oh that's the new one, right?

hmm

set the controls for the heart of the sun (VegemiteGrrl), Friday, 15 March 2013 20:24 (1 year ago) Permalink

OKAY FINE I'LL GET IT

set the controls for the heart of the sun (VegemiteGrrl), Friday, 15 March 2013 20:27 (1 year ago) Permalink

The BBC picks up the story. Nothing from US newspapers?

the little prince of inane false binary hype (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Monday, 18 March 2013 15:58 (1 year ago) Permalink

I haven't seen a peep from anyone. I want to say 'unbelievable' but it's so totally, depressingly believable.

set the controls for the heart of the sun (VegemiteGrrl), Monday, 18 March 2013 19:29 (1 year ago) Permalink

Yeah, totally. It's like Robert Parry pointed out in the Alternet link Alfred posted, no major US news organization has any interest in embarrassing itself further at this point.

Darth Magus (Tarfumes The Escape Goat), Monday, 18 March 2013 19:55 (1 year ago) Permalink

think i first read about this in hitchens' kissinger book. as usual, history turns out to be more sordid and disgusting than any conspiracy theory.

kinda can't help regretting that LBJ didn't follow through with his 'surprise! i'm running again!' plan; four more years of LBJ at his worst couldn't have been worse than four years of nixon.

(The Other) J.D. (J.D.), Monday, 18 March 2013 20:19 (1 year ago) Permalink

Hersh's Kissinger book first advanced it but to see it confirmed...

the little prince of inane false binary hype (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Monday, 18 March 2013 20:46 (1 year ago) Permalink

hard to imagine two more vicious bastards than Nixon and LBJ trying to kneecap each other

his girlfriend was all 'ugh and he wears a solar backpack' (Shakey Mo Collier), Monday, 18 March 2013 20:48 (1 year ago) Permalink

man throw Walt Rostow on the fucking dung heap too and set it on fire.

the little prince of inane false binary hype (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Monday, 18 March 2013 20:49 (1 year ago) Permalink

10 months pass...

anyone see the Robert Redford-narrated doc All the President’s Men Revisited?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2OttPE1PCQA

piscesx, Wednesday, 29 January 2014 20:14 (8 months ago) Permalink

3 months pass...

Jeb Magruder dead

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/jeb-stuart-magruder-jailed-for-watergate-role-dies-at-79/

I saw 'Bud' Krogh on a panel at the National Archives this morning.

images of war violence and historical smoking (Dr Morbius), Friday, 16 May 2014 22:40 (4 months ago) Permalink

One by one, our old friends are gone. Death--natural or not--prison, deported.

Who's left?

clemenza, Friday, 16 May 2014 23:29 (4 months ago) Permalink

shocked to find Big Bob Haldeman died 21 years back at 67.

piscesx, Friday, 16 May 2014 23:46 (4 months ago) Permalink

Kissinger, Dean, and Liddy come to mind (as being alive), although beyond telling Nixon whatever he wanted to hear, I don't think Kissinger had direct Watergate involvement. Maybe I'm forgetting something. Alexander Butterfield's still alive too.

clemenza, Saturday, 17 May 2014 00:06 (4 months ago) Permalink

I'm surprised Kissinger didn't show up at Baba Wawa's farewell so she could fellate him AGAIN

images of war violence and historical smoking (Dr Morbius), Saturday, 17 May 2014 03:25 (4 months ago) Permalink

Pat and Bob died within six months of each other. After that, Nixon wasn't long for this world.

pplains, Saturday, 17 May 2014 04:10 (4 months ago) Permalink

Did a bit of reading on Magruder yesterday, found out he got his start in '62 working for Rumsfeld, and then he worked for Goldwater in '63. Would love to have seen Pete Frame take on the two American political parties.

clemenza, Saturday, 17 May 2014 11:36 (4 months ago) Permalink

2 months pass...

anniversary party album

son of a lewd monk (Dr Morbius), Saturday, 9 August 2014 04:30 (1 month ago) Permalink

Beat me to it. Not just a regular anniversary; 40th.

clemenza, Saturday, 9 August 2014 05:04 (1 month ago) Permalink

love that album

"trough lolly"??? (stevie), Saturday, 9 August 2014 09:59 (1 month ago) Permalink

lasting legacy from Watergate is in Dick:

"no president will ever lie to us again"

son of a lewd monk (Dr Morbius), Saturday, 9 August 2014 13:12 (1 month ago) Permalink

Probably a little blurry:

clemenza, Saturday, 9 August 2014 18:22 (1 month ago) Permalink

Oops, wrong chart--that's for the week ending August 3, 1974. The correct chart would be towards the end of this issue.

clemenza, Saturday, 9 August 2014 18:27 (1 month ago) Permalink

None of (his war crimes) brought down Nixon. However weary the country was with Vietnam, it was regarded as standard policy, however misguided. Only when Nixon attacked a powerful target did his political career collapse.

Unlike antiwar dissidents, the Democratic Party had serious mainstream pull. It was one thing to spy on the Black Panthers and the Yippies; it was quite another to wiretap people connected to corporate and private wealth....

Still, imagine how Nixon would enjoy Obama's NSA and drone wars.

He'd be right at home, along with the rest of us.

http://dennisperrin.blogspot.com/2014/08/downfall-ii-oval-delirium.html

son of a lewd monk (Dr Morbius), Monday, 11 August 2014 21:10 (1 month ago) Permalink

what brought him down were the tapes

guess that bundt gettin eaten (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Monday, 11 August 2014 21:15 (1 month ago) Permalink

...about ratfucking the Dems

son of a lewd monk (Dr Morbius), Monday, 11 August 2014 21:25 (1 month ago) Permalink

(and covering up)

son of a lewd monk (Dr Morbius), Monday, 11 August 2014 21:25 (1 month ago) Permalink

4 weeks pass...

Perlstein on the 40th anniversary of The Pardon:

First Woodward, then Bernstein, came to conclude there had been no deal, and that this was instead an extraordinarily noble act: Ford “realized intuitively that the country had to get beyond Nixon.” After Ford died in 2006, Peggy Noonan went even further. She said Ford “threw himself on a grenade to protect the country from shame.”

They’re wrong. For political elites took away a dangerous lesson from the Ford pardon — our true shame: All it takes is the incantation of magic words like “stability” and “confidence” and “consensus” in order to inure yourself from accountability for just about any malfeasance.

http://www.salon.com/2014/09/08/watergates_most_lasting_sin_gerald_ford_richard_nixon_and_the_pardon_that_made_us_all_cynics/

son of a lewd monk (Dr Morbius), Monday, 8 September 2014 17:44 (3 weeks ago) Permalink

I can't remember if it was Mad Magazine or Nixon enemy Paul Conrad who had the best cartoon about the pardoning: President Huntz Hall Ford cheerfully staring into the "things to do your first day as president" list: 1. Pardon Nixon. 2. Don't bomb the Russians

Elvis Telecom, Monday, 8 September 2014 20:55 (3 weeks ago) Permalink


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