Chris Ware - C or D?

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This question doesn't appear to have come up in previous comics related threads. So... classic or dud?

Chriddof (Chriddof), Sunday, 6 July 2003 17:15 (10 years ago) Permalink

Probably hasn't come up because I can't imagine anyone saying dud. Absolute classic. Only dud is that he's like two years between Acme Novelty Library issues.

anthony kyle monday (akmonday), Sunday, 6 July 2003 19:06 (10 years ago) Permalink

i'm always tempted to move copies of jimmy corrigan to the roleplaying bit of the bookshop, or at least put them next to superman, because frankly he's asking for it at this point

thom west (thom w), Sunday, 6 July 2003 19:08 (10 years ago) Permalink

I have no idea what Thom means.

Classic, no doubt about it. It's good to see reviews of comics in the mainstream press, but they still miss a lot of what is great in JC that is comics - it's often reviewed as if it's a novel with some clever artistic additions, which misses the point.

Martin Skidmore (Martin Skidmore), Sunday, 6 July 2003 19:16 (10 years ago) Permalink

classic. went to a party the night before I left nyc for seattle at a friend's house--said friend has a big CW mural in his room, which is about the coolest thing anyone I know has in their house anywhere.

M Matos (M Matos), Sunday, 6 July 2003 20:10 (10 years ago) Permalink

the old quimby's comics in chicago used to have an interior painted by c.w.

amateurist (amateurist), Sunday, 6 July 2003 20:20 (10 years ago) Permalink

His design work on the indispensable Fantagraphics reprints of Krazy Kat Sundays is terrific too, BTW.

Martin Skidmore (Martin Skidmore), Sunday, 6 July 2003 20:23 (10 years ago) Permalink

Unbearably classic.

Chris P (Chris P), Monday, 7 July 2003 01:02 (10 years ago) Permalink

not just classic, but my friend Chris D. who works in the industry claims that Chris Ware is universally known as a Really. Nice. Guy., one of the few who can be mentioned this way

now watch someone else come along and say 'he stole my girl and ate my dog, he's a bastart, I'll glass him next chance'

Neudonym, Monday, 7 July 2003 01:09 (10 years ago) Permalink

i have soured on him quite a bit in the last few years.

jess (dubplatestyle), Monday, 7 July 2003 01:12 (10 years ago) Permalink

if anything i find i feel the opposite of the usual criticism these days: jimmy corrigan is almost mawkishly emotional, nearly unbearable in places, and cooly/cruelly manipulative in a way i feel he would dismiss in other artists.

jess (dubplatestyle), Monday, 7 July 2003 01:14 (10 years ago) Permalink

to be sure i think it's some kind of masterpiece, but the kind i feel like i can never read again and be no worse for the wear

of course he's technically impeccable and his commitment to pushing the boundaries of the medium are admirable, but a few of his innovations likewise verge on schtick at this point (cf. the "family history breakdown diagrams" in j.c.)

jess (dubplatestyle), Monday, 7 July 2003 01:16 (10 years ago) Permalink

i.e. the first time it showed up in the first acme novelty i was floored, when he used it later in jimmy corrigan it was in service of a "shocking" plot twist and somewhat let of the hook because of it...any future use might be a bit iffy

jess (dubplatestyle), Monday, 7 July 2003 01:17 (10 years ago) Permalink

jess otm.

martin, the paperback of jimmy corrigan has a(n ironic? WHO CARES) one-page strip on the back about the sad unfortunate fate of a copy of the hardback of said book, which is filed with the proper books, but then an uncaring shop assistant moves it next to something supposedly EMBLEMATIC of the poor fate he gets trying to be MEANINGFUL in comic books; actually i may be conflating it with this interview:

"But I didn't realize that all the junk that companies like DC and Marvel have been selling under the rubric of "graphic novels" has created a new shelf in bookstores, and that's where our stuff ends up: torn and soiled, next to Batman: Firestorm At Midnight. Recently, I was in Barnes & Noble here in Chicago, and found a copy of my book in the role-playing-games section. I had to choke back a sob. It's a reminder of how little respect this sort of endeavor garners."

thom west (thom w), Monday, 7 July 2003 01:46 (10 years ago) Permalink

so, uh, going by the, uh, three i've read, why are all indie comics as bad as all indie rock?

thom west (thom w), Monday, 7 July 2003 01:49 (10 years ago) Permalink

similar/same audience/creators, maybe? and I'm w/Jess on a lot of his criticisms, though I still think Ware is mad talented.

M Matos (M Matos), Monday, 7 July 2003 01:51 (10 years ago) Permalink

So who is the Andrew WK of comix, then? The indie guy who actually wants to rock out in Todd McFarlane style but 'knowingly'?

Ned Raggett (Ned), Monday, 7 July 2003 01:55 (10 years ago) Permalink

for the first time in your life, Ned, you're giving W.K. way too much credit

M Matos (M Matos), Monday, 7 July 2003 02:27 (10 years ago) Permalink

Heh heh.

Ned Raggett (Ned), Monday, 7 July 2003 02:48 (10 years ago) Permalink

so, uh, going by the, uh, three i've read, why are all indie comics as bad as all indie rock?

The three indie rock bands you'll eventually hear will thrill you as much as the three indie comics you've bothered with.

J0hn Darn1elle (J0hn Darn1elle), Monday, 7 July 2003 02:56 (10 years ago) Permalink

Are there really comix pop-ists around here: people who'd argue that the real quality is with Marvel and DC? I mean...maybe I'm indier than I think I am, but I can't imagine that.

J0hn Darn1elle (J0hn Darn1elle), Monday, 7 July 2003 02:59 (10 years ago) Permalink

haven't those companies painted themselves into a corner by targeting the "comics fan" instead of some kid who might pick up a few comics?

amateurist (amateurist), Monday, 7 July 2003 03:04 (10 years ago) Permalink

(n.b. I don't hate W.K.)

M Matos (M Matos), Monday, 7 July 2003 03:05 (10 years ago) Permalink

"kid who might pick up a few comics" = gone the way of Randolph Scott riding his horse in the rain, etc.

J0hn Darn1elle (J0hn Darn1elle), Monday, 7 July 2003 03:07 (10 years ago) Permalink

really? well the newspaper kiosks that used to seel comics are mostly gone in chicago at least.

what are the kids buying now? do they read at all?

amateurist (amateurist), Monday, 7 July 2003 03:17 (10 years ago) Permalink

heh, comics are the one thing i'm mad rockist about

jess (dubplatestyle), Monday, 7 July 2003 03:44 (10 years ago) Permalink

OK Thom, I'd not seen that stuff you refer to. It reminds me of finding Spiegelman's Maus, when it was published in the UK by Penguin, in the humour section of bookshops, because that's where cartoons went. The RPG section is an idiotic place for them, but if a bookshop has a GN section, I don't see why Chris Ware shouldn't share that with Batman and so on. This is pomposity, and unnecessary - we can all tell his work from the latest Hulk tie-in, same as we can tell a new Roth from a new Archer.

As for rockist/popist, I'm not sure if I really think that, say, Grant Morrison's run on the JLA was better than Jimmy Corrigan, but I'd be willing to give the argument a try, because I'm not sure I don't believe it either. I suspect that The Ultimates, for instance, might be better than almost anything put out by Vertigo (bar stuff by Morrison, probably). And historically, I'm not sure how much 'indie' stuff there is in the history of US comic books to rank with Kirby's superheroes for Marvel and DC, or Barks' duck material, let alone ranking above it. Kurtzman and Crumb are the ones I'd probably rank as highly, and only the latter is far from the mainstream.

Martin Skidmore (Martin Skidmore), Monday, 7 July 2003 11:42 (10 years ago) Permalink

I have been pleased to see Joe Sacco's stuff just alongside regliar books etc. Hurrah. Have I missed the Joe Sacco chat at the ICA anyone?

So who is the Andrew WK of comix, then?
Evan Dorkin?

Alan (Alan), Monday, 7 July 2003 11:46 (10 years ago) Permalink

last wednesday. cock.

Alan (Alan), Monday, 7 July 2003 11:48 (10 years ago) Permalink

Chris Ware is universally known as a Really. Nice. Guy.

If by "nice," you mean extremely shy and therefore polite by default. I met him after a Chicago Humanities Festival lecture a couple years ago: I was pleased that when he left, he did the anemic indie-boy goodbye wave, hand close to chest, like Dick in High Fidelity. A couple days later at the Festival, he was on a panel of comix creators (Spiegelman, Eisner, Katchor, Gaiman, McCloud) and answered questions by first putting his head down on the table and shielding his eyes with his hands before whispering into the microphone. Of course, after a while, you begin to wonder if it's a shtick.

jaymc (jaymc), Monday, 7 July 2003 14:15 (10 years ago) Permalink

yes, but martin OLD comics are immediately the province of the rockists! just like the indie/rockist kids have no problem watching vh1 classic even if they would vomit at the thought of putting on trl, etc.

jess (dubplatestyle), Monday, 7 July 2003 14:50 (10 years ago) Permalink

(and before john comes riding back in on his hobby horse: "some things are cliches for a reason"...i had to deal with the vh1 classic/m2 dichotomy this weekend, in fact.)

jess (dubplatestyle), Monday, 7 July 2003 14:53 (10 years ago) Permalink

Are there really comix pop-ists around here: people who'd argue that the real quality is with Marvel and DC?

I would argue that there are certain titles put out by Marvel and DC which are quality. I don't really go for indie comics after wasting a good chunk of change on one of the newer versions of "Strangers In Paradise" and not feeling any type of investment or interest in the characters, their issues or their lives.

Dan Perry (Dan Perry), Monday, 7 July 2003 14:56 (10 years ago) Permalink

I certainly hate a lot of indie comics more than almost any mainline Marvel/DC comic I've ever read, so it's like indie music there.

Martin Skidmore (Martin Skidmore), Monday, 7 July 2003 16:53 (10 years ago) Permalink

Someone once recommended that if I wanted to get my wife into comics, I should let her read "Strangers In Paradise". Her response was along the lines of, "Oh my god, this is even more embarrassing than the thousands of X-Men books you read." I later found out that the way to get her interested in comic book storylines was via animated series and movies; she still has no interest in reading comic books but she's a lot more receptive to hearing what happens in them and can actually hold her own in non-hardcore X-Men conversations.

Dan Perry (Dan Perry), Monday, 7 July 2003 17:04 (10 years ago) Permalink

"Strangers in Paradise" = HORRIFIC DUD, and you will not find a bigger flag-waver for indie comics than I am.

Douglas (Douglas), Monday, 7 July 2003 20:22 (10 years ago) Permalink

yeah, i can't think of a comic i'd recommend less, to anyone.

the middlebrow indie comic is the bane of my existence.

jess (dubplatestyle), Monday, 7 July 2003 21:39 (10 years ago) Permalink

what else qualifies jess? maybe adrian tomine?

amateurist (amateurist), Monday, 7 July 2003 21:40 (10 years ago) Permalink

WHERE WERE YOU PEOPLE WHEN I WAS READING REC.ARTS.COMICS.MISC?

Dan Perry (Dan Perry), Monday, 7 July 2003 21:45 (10 years ago) Permalink

I was too busy coming around to _SiP_'s dudness.

David R. (popshots75`), Monday, 7 July 2003 21:55 (10 years ago) Permalink

yeah, i can't think of a comic i'd recommend less, to anyone.

Explain why this comic is worse than ElfQuest.

Andrew Farrell (afarrell), Tuesday, 8 July 2003 02:38 (10 years ago) Permalink

No wolves. Advantage: ElfQuest.

David R. (popshots75`), Tuesday, 8 July 2003 03:03 (10 years ago) Permalink

JesseFox (JesseFox), Tuesday, 8 July 2003 05:05 (10 years ago) Permalink

2 years pass...
i'm kinda sick of chris ware. yeah, i know, he's a genius. the depresso-ness of it all began to wear on me a couple years back. i kinda wish i had my old copies of Elfquest. they were autographed! hell yeah, i stood in line.

scott seward (scott seward), Saturday, 26 November 2005 23:58 (8 years ago) Permalink

i think he did the cover of the new penguin edition of candide. i was looking at it in barnes and noble. it's really unattractive!

caitlin oh no (caitxa1), Sunday, 27 November 2005 00:04 (8 years ago) Permalink

I have had several professors in common with Mr. Ware, and remember back when he was drawing toons for the Daily Texan.

classic, motherfuckers.

Austin Still (Austin, Still), Sunday, 27 November 2005 00:08 (8 years ago) Permalink

His classic status is long since assured, but I know what Scott's saying. The unleavened disappointment and self-pity of his characters has its limits in terms of how much you really wanna read. I wish he did some other things too. Like a space adventure comic or something.

gypsy mothra (gypsy mothra), Sunday, 27 November 2005 00:15 (8 years ago) Permalink

Ah Elfquest. But anyway.

Surprised I didn't say more on this thread earlier, though I know I've praised Ware elsewhere on here in the past. Oddly enough I find myself thinking along the lines of Jess more now, though I'm still deeply impressed by his talents and by Jimmy Corrigan as a whole. I think, however, there's a willful disregard/disdain for the 'modern day' which ultimately grates on me. That Ware was able to capture a Chicago now beyond living memory in the World's Fair section was wonderful -- it made reading The Devil in the White City much more lively. But so much of his approach seems to rely on an ill-disguised (and often not disguised at all) feeling that anything made after 1940 is questionable -- I think it makes his older characters much more interesting than his younger ones, because he has a greater affinity for them, but playing the 'I am out of sync with my time' card becomes a crutch. God knows what he would do if you ever confronted him with an iPod filled with music created solely in the last five years.

I wish he did some other things too. Like a space adventure comic or something.

Well, there was Rocket Sam...sorta.

Ned Raggett (Ned), Sunday, 27 November 2005 00:16 (8 years ago) Permalink

> I wish he did some other things too. Like a space adventure comic or something.

You wanna borrow my copy of Floyd Farland, Citizen of the Future? It's super rare! He had most of the run pulped.

Anyway, yeah, I can dig that. I hope that he isn't simply making all his stuff about people dissappointed in their lives because he thinks that's what will get him critical acclaim as serious literature. And let's face it, it's worked so far, so it's understandable that he's felt reinforcement to continue in that direction.

But from reading his work for decades now, and from the Rayburn book, and so forth, I think that he's actually more interested in being a formal innovator than anything else. Content may be a secondary consideration to form for him.

Austin Still (Austin, Still), Sunday, 27 November 2005 00:20 (8 years ago) Permalink

Are there really comix pop-ists around here: people who'd argue that the real quality is with Marvel and DC? I mean...maybe I'm indier than I think I am, but I can't imagine that.

...and then there was ILC.

Daniel_Rf (Daniel_Rf), Sunday, 27 November 2005 00:37 (8 years ago) Permalink

Anyone see that Chris Ware mural or facade or whatever above that gallery in the Mission? If it's not his then it's obviously in tribute, with Quimby-type mouses and empty word balloons all over the thing.

bamcquern, Wednesday, 24 June 2009 02:13 (4 years ago) Permalink

Rusty Brown and Chalky White just stunning stuff, heavy at times but had to keep reading to see where it would all end up.

how did you get back here to post, shouldn't you still be reading until 2015 or something?

fucken cumstomers (sic), Wednesday, 24 June 2009 05:04 (4 years ago) Permalink

I never, ever get the point of this guy ever.

Garri$on Kilo (Hurting 2), Wednesday, 24 June 2009 06:04 (4 years ago) Permalink

xp you mean above the pirate store? pretty sure that's him, since that store is mcsweeney's headquarters or something

where we turn sweet dreams into remarkable realities (just1n3), Wednesday, 24 June 2009 06:10 (4 years ago) Permalink

Oh Jesus Christ it figures.

bamcquern, Wednesday, 24 June 2009 06:11 (4 years ago) Permalink

how did you get back here to post, shouldn't you still be reading until 2015 or something?

noo not the whole series, just the series in the book i have (not sure of the number, it's the one that ends with Chalky White vs Brittany year sum up)

Great Scott! It's Molecular Man. (Ste), Wednesday, 24 June 2009 08:35 (4 years ago) Permalink

(╬ ಠ益ಠ) (cankles), Thursday, 25 June 2009 01:21 (4 years ago) Permalink

:-/

i want to marry a pizza (gbx), Thursday, 25 June 2009 01:22 (4 years ago) Permalink

lyfe, man

i want to marry a pizza (gbx), Thursday, 25 June 2009 01:23 (4 years ago) Permalink

everybody kill themselves now!

Nhex, Thursday, 25 June 2009 01:40 (4 years ago) Permalink

Our kids play together in the park a lot. Nice guy!

Josh in Chicago, Thursday, 25 June 2009 02:09 (4 years ago) Permalink

1 year passes...

Read ANL no. 20 aka Lint the other day and he'd be classic all over again just for that. (My impressions above still hold for a certain strain of his work and most everything he's been doing lately I've barely kept in touch with so i likely have missed a bigger shift but Lint as a self-contained standalone is amazing stuff, actually living in the past, present and future in a way that works more for me than he'd used to.)

Ned Raggett, Monday, 11 April 2011 23:22 (3 years ago) Permalink

The previous issue was a similarly stand-alone chapter in the giant Rusty novel, and also serves as another answer to

I wish he did some other things too. Like a space adventure comic or something.
― gypsy mothra (gypsy mothra), Sunday, 27 November 2005 11:15 (5 years ago)

side splitting genital based username (vdgna) (sic), Tuesday, 12 April 2011 00:43 (3 years ago) Permalink

20 is amazing. It's a "raise the bar" moment for American comics - keep up folks! 19, with the intertwining of pulpy sci-fi and a sad humdrum existence, is highly recommended as well.

For someone whose work I'd previously thought of as top-down experiences - tremendous for a mental workout, but not immediately engaging - those two books are arguably the some of the most viscerally engaging lose-track-of-time works of art I've encountered over the past few years.

Ramen Noodles & Ketchup (R Baez), Tuesday, 12 April 2011 00:44 (3 years ago) Permalink

I forget the review I scrounged up which noted that if this were something by Lethem -- or more to the point, written in Lethem's text-only medium -- it might garner wider attention beyond the Ware niche. My thoughts on that aren't to agree or disagree, but to think that Lint really proves the point that Ware can tell a story about the 'real' world in a way that I admit I would not have read or even thought about reading if it were simply word-only fiction (or, for that matter, a movie in that vein). It's not a sign of the supposed maturity of the form, more that Ware's use of the form itself succeeds where others will not or cannot, at least for me and I'd guess for others as well -- a straightforward story of Lint in verbal fiction could well be a compelling read, but if you sold it to me with "It's a book about this schmuck of a well-off straight white guy over his entire life and his struggles and self-delusions and all that" I would not care to explore it at all. Ware makes me care, that's a gift.

Related to which, the use of lacunae throughout is masterful.

Ned Raggett, Tuesday, 12 April 2011 01:13 (3 years ago) Permalink

I hate not having a decent comic book store in my town anymore. I would always buy these when I saw them but for some reason I never get it together to mailorder them from a town only a 5-hour drive away.

sleeve, Tuesday, 12 April 2011 02:20 (3 years ago) Permalink

better distributed to bookstores these days tbh.

side splitting genital based username (vdgna) (sic), Tuesday, 12 April 2011 02:34 (3 years ago) Permalink

1 year passes...

Cool endpaper diagram from Ware’s “Building Stories” (ACME Novelty Library No. 16)

right click - view image - zoom in

All his Building Stories comics will be distributed as “many little books in a beautiful box” early October 2012.

I haven't read all the Building Stories installments that were published in New York Times Magazine, The New Yorker, Acme Novelty Library, etc., but I hesitate to think there will be any new material in this box set. Nor do I think he'll ever release a graphic novel with all new material ever again. Just stuff like ACME and compilations.

I'll probably like this box set as if it isn't all old stuff, but whatever.

we gotta move these refrigerators (CaptainLorax), Thursday, 24 May 2012 00:43 (1 year ago) Permalink

that is fucking gorgeous and oh will i buy that for sure

I want L'interieur chicken, not Hausu chicken (jjjusten), Thursday, 24 May 2012 00:48 (1 year ago) Permalink

i stand by some of my cranky criticisms in 2003, but after acme nos. 19 and 20, and the most recent batch of building stories strips, i really feel like i am living through the flowering of one of the greatest living artists.

jesus christ (strongo hulkington's ghost dad), Thursday, 24 May 2012 00:51 (1 year ago) Permalink

I hesitate to think there will be any new material in this box set.

I don't.

Nor do I think he'll ever release a graphic novel with all new material ever again.

He never has.

┗|∵|┓ (sic), Thursday, 24 May 2012 01:08 (1 year ago) Permalink

correct me if I'm wrong but the jimmy corrigan strips were mostly all different than the stuff in the book...

we gotta move these refrigerators (CaptainLorax), Thursday, 24 May 2012 01:26 (1 year ago) Permalink

ok i hate stuff now but i really really want that box.

jed_, Thursday, 24 May 2012 01:29 (1 year ago) Permalink

I guess I'm probably wrong. I picked up the giant Quimby the Mouse book after I read Jimmy Corrigan because I wanted to test out other Ware. The Quimby the Mouse book put me off ever trying to read anything else because I didn't like having scattered mini installments all in one book

we gotta move these refrigerators (CaptainLorax), Thursday, 24 May 2012 01:30 (1 year ago) Permalink

4 months pass...

apparently this is really dope btw. i've only read stray syndications of a couple of them.

unprotectable tweetz (schlump), Tuesday, 9 October 2012 04:25 (1 year ago) Permalink

With the increasing electronic incorporeality of existence, sometimes it’s reassuring—perhaps even necessary—to have something to hold on to. Thus within this colorful keepsake box the purchaser will find a fully-apportioned variety of reading material ready to address virtually any imaginable artistic or poetic taste, from the corrosive sarcasm of youth to the sickening earnestness of maturity—while discovering a protagonist wondering if she’ll ever move from the rented close quarters of lonely young adulthood to the mortgaged expanse of love and marriage. Whether you’re feeling alone by yourself or alone with someone else, this book is sure to sympathize with the crushing sense of life wasted, opportunities missed and creative dreams dashed which afflict the middle- and upper-class literary public (and which can return to them in somewhat damaged form during REM sleep).

*buffs lens* (schlump), Sunday, 14 October 2012 16:12 (1 year ago) Permalink

First ever coffee table book that's about the size and weight of a coffee table.

Josh in Chicago, Sunday, 14 October 2012 19:07 (1 year ago) Permalink

Chris told me that's me in the upper right. My mother in law framed it for me for father's day!

Josh in Chicago, Sunday, 14 October 2012 19:09 (1 year ago) Permalink

i got it in the mail the other day (along with the new installment of Charles Burns' Jonny 23 series) but I haven't had a chance to look at much of it yet. However, this is what it looks like. holy shit:

Z S, Sunday, 14 October 2012 19:10 (1 year ago) Permalink

stoked, just purchased.

jed_, Sunday, 14 October 2012 21:00 (1 year ago) Permalink

>Chris told me that's me in the upper right. My mother in law framed it for me for father's day!

Josh, that's *great*, a lovely thing to be part of :)

I'm hoping to get the box set for my birthday this week, it looks fantastic laid out like that.

that mustardless plate (Bill A), Sunday, 14 October 2012 21:11 (1 year ago) Permalink

yes that's amazing josh!

jed_, Sunday, 14 October 2012 21:43 (1 year ago) Permalink

you're the one with the baby harness/papoose thing?

jed_, Sunday, 14 October 2012 21:44 (1 year ago) Permalink

looking forward v much to this - ware has been doing a lot of press for this, but wondering if anyone has asked him abt The Unfortunates by B.S. Johnson yet

Ward Fowler, Sunday, 14 October 2012 22:21 (1 year ago) Permalink

yeah holy shit josh!, that's so lovely. what a lovely way to carry on existing somewhere.

will try to get hold of this somehow, i can't buy it yet but i want it bad. i'm super psyched for the new charles burns, too.

*buffs lens* (schlump), Sunday, 14 October 2012 22:24 (1 year ago) Permalink

First ever coffee table book that's about the size and weight of a coffee table.

wait, what is?

set the controls for the arse of your mum (sic), Sunday, 14 October 2012 23:51 (1 year ago) Permalink

check z s' pic!

*buffs lens* (schlump), Monday, 15 October 2012 00:06 (1 year ago) Permalink

I've held the box though, and it's not even the size of a D&Q Moomin collection

set the controls for the arse of your mum (sic), Monday, 15 October 2012 00:23 (1 year ago) Permalink

holy fucking shit does that look awesome. this guy really gives you value for your dollar.

flesh, the devil, and a wolf (wolf) (amateurist), Monday, 15 October 2012 00:25 (1 year ago) Permalink

(xpost, brain kept firing)

it's not even close to the Quimby or Book Of Jokes collections!

let alone Ninja or So Many Splendid Sundays [or any of Maresca's other books] or George Sprott or Wally Wood's EC Stories [or any of the other IDW Artists Editions] or Wednesday Comics or (to cite something from the new Ware) Kramer's 7 or Paris Soirees or Les Yeux Du Chat.

(or even the Stray Bullets hardcovers or Picturebox's Panter monograph or Fanta's Gahan Wilson Playboy collection, or their Dedini collection for that matter. and that's just comics, not actual coffee table books - half the Taschen line and those LaChappelle semi-boxed volumes are immdiately twice the size of Building Stories....)

set the controls for the arse of your mum (sic), Monday, 15 October 2012 00:36 (1 year ago) Permalink

Gyrate For Physicet (Old Lunch), Monday, 15 October 2012 00:49 (1 year ago) Permalink

^ back cover was printed with fitted screw-holes in the corners

set the controls for the arse of your mum (sic), Monday, 15 October 2012 00:59 (1 year ago) Permalink

xpost Yeah, that's me with the Baby Bjorn. The weird thing is, so many of the subtle details are exactly right, down to the age span between my two daughters, one's blue crocs and blonde hair, etc., ... but exactly right three or four years ago. I wonder if he took a picture? Sketched it up and held onto it until he had a use for it? Very mysterious, the way the guy works. That's genius for you.

I found his knowledge and recall of old school New Yorker covers remarkable:

http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/culture/2012/04/mothers-day-the-women-cover-artists-of-the-new-yorker.html#slide_ss_0=1

Josh in Chicago, Monday, 15 October 2012 03:03 (1 year ago) Permalink

this is fking huge! i'm torn between "can't wait to start" and "where the hell do i start?" and, as a result it has sat in it's massive box untouched. I have to say though that this is a beautiful object and a bargain at amazon prices.

jed_, Saturday, 20 October 2012 00:16 (1 year ago) Permalink

Joe McCullogh posted a suggested reading order if you really want one

set the controls for the arse of your mum (sic), Saturday, 20 October 2012 00:21 (1 year ago) Permalink

yes please. although i may disregard it.

jed_, Saturday, 20 October 2012 00:28 (1 year ago) Permalink

thanks, sic.

jed_, Saturday, 20 October 2012 12:51 (1 year ago) Permalink

2 months pass...

haha, never knew about this:

Fortune 500 cover

In 2010, Ware designed the cover for Fortune magazine's "Fortune 500" issue, but it was rejected.[21] Ware had mentioned the work at a panel at the Chicago Comic and Entertainment Expo on April 16, as first noted in an April 20 blog post by Matthew J. Brady.[22] The cover, featuring the circle-shaped humans common in Ware's more broadly socially satirical comic-strips, turned the numbers 500 into skyscrapers looming over the continental United States. On the roofs, corporate bosses drink, dance, and sun themselves as a helicopter drops a shovelful of money down for them. Below, among signs reading "Credit Default Swap Flea Market," "Greenspan Lube Pro," and "401K Cemetery," a helicopter scoops money out of the US Treasury with a shovel, cars pile up in Detroit, and flag-waving citizens party around a boiling tea kettle in the shape of an elephant. In the Gulf of Mexico, homes are sinking, while hooded prisoners sit in Guantanamo, a "Factory of Exploitation" keeps going in Mexico, China is tossing American dollars into the Pacific, and the roof of bankrupted Greece's Treasury has blown off. A spokesperson for the magazine only said that, as is their practice, they had commissioned a number of possible covers from different artists, including Ware.[23] Brady wrote in his blog that Ware said at the panel he "accepted the job because it would be like doing the [cover for the] 1929 issue of the magazine".[22]

"reading specialist" (Z S), Friday, 28 December 2012 20:32 (1 year ago) Permalink

He recently wrote a neat piece on the Laura Ingalls Wilder books... I think it was on The Millions site?

~farben~ (Jon Lewis), Friday, 28 December 2012 20:48 (1 year ago) Permalink


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