anticipate TRUE GRIT by the Coen brothers

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Sure this is from Jeff Wells, but sort of encouraging nonetheless.

http://hollywood-elsewhere.com/2010/02/grit-speak.php

Fusty Moralizer (Dr Morbius), Wednesday, 10 February 2010 17:30 (4 years ago) Permalink

only one blond bodybuilder so who knows

pro bono publico (history mayne), Wednesday, 10 February 2010 17:32 (4 years ago) Permalink

surely Matt Bourne is not gonna play Glen Campbell

Fusty Moralizer (Dr Morbius), Thursday, 11 February 2010 19:10 (4 years ago) Permalink

Somebody should take away his record player to be certain.
Although with Jeff Bridges as Cogburn this might just work.

might seem normal (snoball), Thursday, 11 February 2010 19:19 (4 years ago) Permalink

lol Cogburn, what a great name for a character

Wrinkles, I'll see you on the other side (Shakey Mo Collier), Thursday, 11 February 2010 19:23 (4 years ago) Permalink

A blond bodybuilder is going to play the kid?!

queen frostine (Eric H.), Thursday, 11 February 2010 19:24 (4 years ago) Permalink

nrq was riffing on my dis of The Departed

Fusty Moralizer (Dr Morbius), Thursday, 11 February 2010 19:25 (4 years ago) Permalink

(although you could peroxide the wolfboy from Twilight, but he's playing Stretch Armstrong)

Fusty Moralizer (Dr Morbius), Thursday, 11 February 2010 19:26 (4 years ago) Permalink

6 months pass...

We have first official photo:

Ned Raggett, Wednesday, 25 August 2010 19:43 (4 years ago) Permalink

the original is a very good film

difficult not to suspect that the coens wasting their time with playful yet redundant rehashes after the success of srs man

nakhchivan, Wednesday, 25 August 2010 19:49 (4 years ago) Permalink

can imagine the casting discussions....

# Barry Pepper as "Lucky" Ned Pepper

nakhchivan, Wednesday, 25 August 2010 20:08 (4 years ago) Permalink

1 month passes...

Trailer

No Good, Scrunty-Looking, Narf Herder (Gukbe), Monday, 27 September 2010 21:29 (4 years ago) Permalink

Excluding Skits and Such (Eazy), Monday, 27 September 2010 21:47 (4 years ago) Permalink

ok, that actually looks kind of awesome.

get off my lawn (rockapads), Monday, 27 September 2010 22:53 (4 years ago) Permalink

I don't understand their remake fascination, but this has to be better the Ladykillers.

Fig On A Plate Cart (Alex in SF), Monday, 27 September 2010 23:01 (4 years ago) Permalink

I'm in.

rhythm fixated member (chap), Monday, 27 September 2010 23:04 (4 years ago) Permalink

I'm in with anything True Grit related - the book, the movie, the remake. Sign me up!

VegemiteGrrrl, Monday, 27 September 2010 23:29 (4 years ago) Permalink

Love that trailer by the way. I need to watch the original again.

VegemiteGrrrl, Monday, 27 September 2010 23:29 (4 years ago) Permalink

I shd probly read the book as I am only familiar w/ Wayne's parody

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Tuesday, 28 September 2010 01:43 (4 years ago) Permalink

stoked 4 the grit

ice cr?m, Tuesday, 28 September 2010 01:46 (4 years ago) Permalink

xpost Morbs, the book is wonderful...lots more color to the characters than the movie. Any of Charles Portis' novels well worth the time - my personal fave is Dog of the South, aside from True Grit.

VegemiteGrrrl, Tuesday, 28 September 2010 01:48 (4 years ago) Permalink

btw earlier this evening our best beloved cankles posted this trailer on facebook, i subsequently loged a lewd comment, and he deleted it! of all people!

ice cr?m, Tuesday, 28 September 2010 01:50 (4 years ago) Permalink

thats not true grit

If Airplanes Could Fly This Place Would Be An Airport (s1ocki), Tuesday, 28 September 2010 05:05 (4 years ago) Permalink

Please, filmmakers! NO more Westerns!!!

Oh man, schnitzelwich (admrl), Tuesday, 28 September 2010 05:20 (4 years ago) Permalink

lol

salem witch bile (Tape Store), Tuesday, 28 September 2010 05:22 (4 years ago) Permalink

more feminist westerns plz

salem witch bile (Tape Store), Tuesday, 28 September 2010 05:22 (4 years ago) Permalink

there's like, what, one western a year?

COME ON ADAM R L

If Airplanes Could Fly This Place Would Be An Airport (s1ocki), Tuesday, 28 September 2010 05:22 (4 years ago) Permalink

also paging Barry Jenkins, we need a western to reexamine race

salem witch bile (Tape Store), Tuesday, 28 September 2010 05:23 (4 years ago) Permalink

Guess you never saw Young Guns? Lou Diamond Phillips? Throwing knives?

drop s7ocki (bnw), Tuesday, 28 September 2010 05:39 (4 years ago) Permalink

uh yeah this looks FUCKING AMAZING

J0rdan S., Tuesday, 28 September 2010 05:41 (4 years ago) Permalink

they've been kind of on an epic roll and this looks dope imo

('_') (omar little), Tuesday, 28 September 2010 05:42 (4 years ago) Permalink

Yeah, I love their last three movies, esp. A Serious Man.

Simon H., Tuesday, 28 September 2010 05:43 (4 years ago) Permalink

xpost actually s1ocki there's probably at least 10 to 15 Westerns released on dvd a year, at least but they're all direct-to-video. But good Westerns? Yeah totally, they're scarce.

Not that I'm complaining...psyched for this. Love a good Western.

VegemiteGrrrl, Tuesday, 28 September 2010 05:45 (4 years ago) Permalink

i hope this is good but it would be cool if it sucked and i got to use the hed TRUE SHIT

If Airplanes Could Fly This Place Would Be An Airport (s1ocki), Tuesday, 28 September 2010 13:50 (4 years ago) Permalink

I'm in with anything True Grit related - the book, the movie, the remake. Sign me up!

You forgot the theme song!

Tom A. (Tom B.) (Tom C.) (Tom D.), Tuesday, 28 September 2010 13:51 (4 years ago) Permalink

Please, filmmakers! NO more Westerns!!!

― Oh man, schnitzelwich (admrl), Tuesday, September 28, 2010 1:20 AM (8 hours ago) Bookmark Suggest Ban Permalink

dude seriously, what the hell.

kkvgz, Tuesday, 28 September 2010 13:52 (4 years ago) Permalink

Personally I'm hoping they try their hand at a viking movie next.

rhythm fixated member (chap), Tuesday, 28 September 2010 14:05 (4 years ago) Permalink

I shd probly read the book as I am only familiar w/ Wayne's parody

Srsly. I've only read the book, but that John Wayne trailer is wtf. It's looks like a parody trailer like the happy Shining one.

And, those are some tall-ass mountains in Oklahoma.

http://tinyurl.com/vrrr0000m (Pleasant Plains), Tuesday, 28 September 2010 14:33 (4 years ago) Permalink

Bnw ftw.

What can i say? Young Guns aside, the western is not my favorite genre. And it does seem like every filmmaker of note has to make one eventually. The Proposition is probably the only recent western that I've liked. Plus i've seen a LOT of horrible student Westerns and I've been reading all the festival hype about Meek's Cutoff and suspect that it will suck.

I do like the Coen brothers though.

American History Mayne X (admrl), Tuesday, 28 September 2010 14:43 (4 years ago) Permalink

meek's cutoff is rad

If Airplanes Could Fly This Place Would Be An Airport (s1ocki), Tuesday, 28 September 2010 14:46 (4 years ago) Permalink

I'm not particularly fond of Westerns either.

raging hetero lifechill (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Tuesday, 28 September 2010 14:48 (4 years ago) Permalink

And it does seem like every filmmaker of note has to make one eventually

no? not since a long time ago anyway

The Managing Director of Being (nakhchivan), Tuesday, 28 September 2010 15:44 (4 years ago) Permalink

'western' is a little broad to make a value judgement on

ice cr?m, Tuesday, 28 September 2010 15:53 (4 years ago) Permalink

to of my fav movies are westerns btw: high plains drifter & dead man

ice cr?m, Tuesday, 28 September 2010 15:54 (4 years ago) Permalink

srsly

caek, Tuesday, 28 September 2010 15:54 (4 years ago) Permalink

my word is iron, fuiud

caek, Tuesday, 28 September 2010 15:54 (4 years ago) Permalink

that scene is amazing

ice cr?m, Tuesday, 28 September 2010 16:00 (4 years ago) Permalink

i watched that movie because you posted that scene (to your bl☭g?)

caek, Tuesday, 28 September 2010 16:01 (4 years ago) Permalink

Love Outlaw of Josey Wales!!! Killer.

VegemiteGrrrl, Tuesday, 28 September 2010 16:02 (4 years ago) Permalink

o ha lol xp

ice cr?m, Tuesday, 28 September 2010 16:06 (4 years ago) Permalink

I like Dead Man, too.

American History Mayne X (admrl), Tuesday, 28 September 2010 16:12 (4 years ago) Permalink

We'll see about Meek's Cutoff

American History Mayne X (admrl), Tuesday, 28 September 2010 16:12 (4 years ago) Permalink

I've still yet to see a Rooster Cogburn that resembled Grover Cleveland.

http://tinyurl.com/vrrr0000m (Pleasant Plains), Tuesday, 28 September 2010 16:14 (4 years ago) Permalink

my friend is in this film...i'm not friends with jeff bridges. not anymore.

I see what this is (Local Garda), Tuesday, 28 September 2010 16:17 (4 years ago) Permalink

I think my problem with westerns is that too many of them fall into the middle ground between adherence to the classic western and a radical break from it, insistence on historical accuracy or wilful ignorance of it. There have been a lot of bloated, confused average westerns made in the last 15-20 years. This has also given birth to that cliche "take away the location and the time period of [film X] and it is in fact A WESTERN", in terms of structure, character, politics, etc. The Western being an entirely made-up genre for the most part, most of these may as well be science fiction - Westworld had it right.

American History Mayne X (admrl), Tuesday, 28 September 2010 16:22 (4 years ago) Permalink

dunno how anyone can say this "looks amazing", you can't tell anything from this trailer..

progressive cuts (Tracer Hand), Tuesday, 28 September 2010 16:29 (4 years ago) Permalink

introducing

JOSH BROLIN

as

JOHN MARSTEN

progressive cuts (Tracer Hand), Tuesday, 28 September 2010 16:29 (4 years ago) Permalink

JEFF BRIDGES

as

LANDON RICKETTS

progressive cuts (Tracer Hand), Tuesday, 28 September 2010 16:30 (4 years ago) Permalink

the font looks amazing

If Airplanes Could Fly This Place Would Be An Airport (s1ocki), Tuesday, 28 September 2010 16:31 (4 years ago) Permalink

I R EXCITED

Gene Shalit in a Child's Sailor Hat (Shakey Mo Collier), Tuesday, 28 September 2010 16:36 (4 years ago) Permalink

STELLA MCCARTNEY

as

CLINT EASTWOOD

progressive cuts (Tracer Hand), Tuesday, 28 September 2010 16:37 (4 years ago) Permalink

and JACK BLACK

as

BIGFOOT

progressive cuts (Tracer Hand), Tuesday, 28 September 2010 16:39 (4 years ago) Permalink

dunno how anyone can say this "looks amazing", you can't tell anything from this trailer..

― progressive cuts (Tracer Hand),

kinda otm. That said, I'll go see this.

If you want me to "get there," pay attention to my angina (WmC), Tuesday, 28 September 2010 16:40 (4 years ago) Permalink

This looks like a Coen Bros. movie.

No Good, Scrunty-Looking, Narf Herder (Gukbe), Tuesday, 28 September 2010 16:41 (4 years ago) Permalink

u can totally vibe off this trailer

ice cr?m, Tuesday, 28 September 2010 16:44 (4 years ago) Permalink

so is the book totes awes or what

If Airplanes Could Fly This Place Would Be An Airport (s1ocki), Tuesday, 28 September 2010 16:44 (4 years ago) Permalink

should i read it

If Airplanes Could Fly This Place Would Be An Airport (s1ocki), Tuesday, 28 September 2010 16:44 (4 years ago) Permalink

is it "true"ly "grit"ty

If Airplanes Could Fly This Place Would Be An Airport (s1ocki), Tuesday, 28 September 2010 16:44 (4 years ago) Permalink

It's a fast read. It's funny. Mattie Ross is your typical Portis protagonist who's gotten herself way too deep into a situation she doesn't need to be in. There's a lot of action. The first quarter of the book is just her wandering around Fort Smith, and it's enough to keep you suckered in until the "good parts". Something not clear in the movie, but is in the book is that she's narrating the book as an old woman. So you've got this 14-year-old trying to avenge her father's murder all of a sudden namechecking Al Smith at times.

I usually hate remakes, but this new True Grit movie should be dead-on since "dark and funny" is pretty much the Coens' forté.

http://tinyurl.com/vrrr0000m (Pleasant Plains), Tuesday, 28 September 2010 16:54 (4 years ago) Permalink

'western' is a little broad to make a value judgement on

― ice cr?m, Tuesday, 28. September 2010 11:53 (1 hour ago) Bookmark

otm

groovemaaan, Tuesday, 28 September 2010 17:52 (4 years ago) Permalink

u can totally vibe off this trailer

― ice cr?m, Tuesday, September 28, 2010 11:44 AM (1 hour ago) Bookmark

J0rdan S., Tuesday, 28 September 2010 17:54 (4 years ago) Permalink

I'm not sure why the Coens didn't cast Meryl Streep as Cogburn.

raging hetero lifechill (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Tuesday, 28 September 2010 18:02 (4 years ago) Permalink

She doesn't look like Grover Cleveland either.

http://tinyurl.com/vrrr0000m (Pleasant Plains), Tuesday, 28 September 2010 18:05 (4 years ago) Permalink

Meryl Streep

vs Grover

raging hetero lifechill (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Tuesday, 28 September 2010 18:06 (4 years ago) Permalink

so this will be obviously great

max, Wednesday, 29 September 2010 07:39 (4 years ago) Permalink

and probably adamrl will see it and he will literally die while watching it, he will have a heart attack from how much it owns

max, Wednesday, 29 September 2010 07:40 (4 years ago) Permalink

oh no :(

If Airplanes Could Fly This Place Would Be An Airport (s1ocki), Wednesday, 29 September 2010 13:26 (4 years ago) Permalink

^^is that Brian Doyle Murray?

andrew m., Wednesday, 29 September 2010 14:49 (4 years ago) Permalink

I wish they would make only westerns

I will make allowances for horror westerns, this is a vital subgenre

aerosmith: live at gunpoint (underrated aerosmith albums I have loved), Wednesday, 29 September 2010 15:00 (4 years ago) Permalink

are you excited about the film of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abraham_Lincoln,_Vampire_Hunter

caek, Wednesday, 29 September 2010 15:10 (4 years ago) Permalink

if you're not excited, then maybe the news that it will be produced by TIM BURTON will change that

caek, Wednesday, 29 September 2010 15:10 (4 years ago) Permalink

Don't worry guys, I won't stop you liking westerns.

Faerie Liquide (admrl), Wednesday, 29 September 2010 15:26 (4 years ago) Permalink

I didn't say I don't think this will be good, I just said I am sick of westerns.

Faerie Liquide (admrl), Wednesday, 29 September 2010 15:27 (4 years ago) Permalink

go away adam

max, Wednesday, 29 September 2010 15:37 (4 years ago) Permalink

your kinds not wanted here

max, Wednesday, 29 September 2010 15:37 (4 years ago) Permalink

you dont display

TRUE GRIT

max, Wednesday, 29 September 2010 15:37 (4 years ago) Permalink

TRUE BRIT

Faerie Liquide (admrl), Wednesday, 29 September 2010 15:41 (4 years ago) Permalink

caek, Friday, 1 October 2010 21:25 (4 years ago) Permalink

how awesome is this movie, i love westerns, and especially this one

ice cr?m, Friday, 1 October 2010 23:50 (4 years ago) Permalink

i wish that when im watching the facebook movie its this instead, even tho im quite sure to enjoy the facebook movie

ice cr?m, Friday, 1 October 2010 23:50 (4 years ago) Permalink

i would rather see this movie once than this movie once and the facebook movie once

ice cr?m, Friday, 1 October 2010 23:51 (4 years ago) Permalink

thats how much i like it

ice cr?m, Friday, 1 October 2010 23:51 (4 years ago) Permalink

im anticipating it

ice cr?m, Friday, 1 October 2010 23:51 (4 years ago) Permalink

truly

ice cr?m, Friday, 1 October 2010 23:51 (4 years ago) Permalink

grittily

ice cr?m, Friday, 1 October 2010 23:52 (4 years ago) Permalink

Truly, grittily, deeply

VegemiteGrrrl, Saturday, 2 October 2010 00:53 (4 years ago) Permalink

http://movies.yahoo.com/movie/1810153253/video/22265614

caek, Monday, 4 October 2010 17:51 (4 years ago) Permalink

yeahhhhhhhh

she's one intense bitch, she rides a unicycle (arby's), Monday, 4 October 2010 17:58 (4 years ago) Permalink

I think my problem with westerns is that too many of them fall into the middle ground between adherence to the classic western and a radical break from it

Well what really inspired the revisionism was Vietnam + Peckinpah. And since we have since regressed to the most reactionary pop culture since the pre-rock '50s, obv there are gonna be a lot of faux-reviz westerns.

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Monday, 4 October 2010 18:06 (4 years ago) Permalink

God, everything about now sucks ... so ... bad!

Eric H., Monday, 4 October 2010 18:08 (4 years ago) Permalink

this weekend i picked up a vintage paperback of the book ("soon to be major motion picture starring john wayne") which i plan to read before seeing this

tangelo amour (elmo argonaut), Monday, 4 October 2010 18:12 (4 years ago) Permalink

book is out of print in the uk ;_;

caek, Monday, 4 October 2010 18:20 (4 years ago) Permalink

I would hope that matt damon braining dudes with the butt end of his gun is a john wayne tribute.

Astronaut Mike Dexter (Jimmy The Mod Awaits The Return Of His Beloved), Monday, 4 October 2010 18:26 (4 years ago) Permalink

also BEAR FACE

Astronaut Mike Dexter (Jimmy The Mod Awaits The Return Of His Beloved), Monday, 4 October 2010 18:31 (4 years ago) Permalink

Yeah, I was gonna say.

http://tinyurl.com/hommphommp (Pleasant Plains), Monday, 4 October 2010 18:32 (4 years ago) Permalink

also BEAR FACE

^^^somebody 3-frames this asap

she's one intense bitch, she rides a unicycle (arby's), Monday, 4 October 2010 19:38 (4 years ago) Permalink

book is out of print in the uk ;_;

This is in Ireland granted but i've seen plenty of copies of the 2005 reissues of Portis's novels in second-hand bookshops.

Number None, Monday, 4 October 2010 21:08 (4 years ago) Permalink

God, everything about now sucks ... so ... bad!

ok, 1975-91 was pretty bad too, especially the pop music

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Tuesday, 5 October 2010 02:38 (4 years ago) Permalink

That's our Morbs!

No Good, Scrunty-Looking, Narf Herder (Gukbe), Tuesday, 5 October 2010 02:45 (4 years ago) Permalink

Hmm, and yet the western was mostly nascent during that time period. If only directors could've found a way to work in some crack and AIDS metaphors into Monument Valley horse operas.

Eric H., Tuesday, 5 October 2010 02:53 (4 years ago) Permalink

what about the Reagan White House?

raging hetero lifechill (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Tuesday, 5 October 2010 03:15 (4 years ago) Permalink

1 month passes...

wow, thats a great read! thanks! holky ufuk im excited for this!!!!!! rrraAGHGUHHGHHGHGH *tears shirt off and screams*

Onigaga (Princess TamTam), Thursday, 18 November 2010 19:53 (4 years ago) Permalink

2 weeks pass...

Is anyone really anticipating? The trailer was more Bridges in grumpy mode.

look at it, pwn3d, made u look at my peen/vadge (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 4 December 2010 13:50 (3 years ago) Permalink

are you kidding im anticipating the balls outta this

couldnt u say the original was john wayne in grumpy mode??? it still owned!

also i get the feeling that the girl playing mattie ross could end up stealing this, she looks great in the trailers

Princess TamTam, Saturday, 4 December 2010 14:06 (3 years ago) Permalink

Never seen the original -- it looks, well, like the movie for which John Wayne won his Oscar.

look at it, pwn3d, made u look at my peen/vadge (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 4 December 2010 14:12 (3 years ago) Permalink

the original's awesome! the source material's really underrated, lots of cool moments and cracking dialogue...

Princess TamTam, Saturday, 4 December 2010 14:20 (3 years ago) Permalink

I'll see it, because I see most Coen films--well above half, anyway. But the idea that the guys who made Miller's Crossing, Fargo, and No Country for Old Men felt it necessary to revisit a popular, not-seriously-regarded John Wayne film (which, in fairness, I've never seen) is not all that encouraging to me. If nothing else, I'm sure it'll be better than Scorsese's Cape Fear remake.

clemenza, Saturday, 4 December 2010 14:24 (3 years ago) Permalink

It's on my Netflix queue.

look at it, pwn3d, made u look at my peen/vadge (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 4 December 2010 14:26 (3 years ago) Permalink

i'd probably recommend the book first... the movie's pretty watered down though still beloved for the elements it does retain... since Cape Fear was brought up, that material is a lot less strong and it's the kind of thing that succeeds because of Mitchum and some moody photography, but there are a lot of actors who could knock Rooster Cogburn out of the park because it's such a great part and its such an awesome story... imo...

Princess TamTam, Saturday, 4 December 2010 14:39 (3 years ago) Permalink

well, mattie ross is really The Great Part but w/e

Princess TamTam, Saturday, 4 December 2010 14:40 (3 years ago) Permalink

anyone not anticipating this is nutso

ice cr?m, Saturday, 4 December 2010 15:43 (3 years ago) Permalink

John Wayne pretty much gives a comedy performance in the first film. (I know you ppl who will never see it will say that's probably unintentional cuz u know he was a Republican moron and not one of the great American stars blah blah.)

anyway, had no time to read the book, seeing this Tuesday.

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Saturday, 4 December 2010 16:10 (3 years ago) Permalink

Wayne, at his best (The Searchers, Red River), was as good as almost anybody; my own post above wasn't intended to imply otherwise. I just always assumed, perhaps unfairly, that Red River: True Grit = Godfather II: Scent of a Woman (which I also haven't seen...I make a lot of assumptions).

clemenza, Saturday, 4 December 2010 16:19 (3 years ago) Permalink

But the idea that the guys who made Miller's Crossing, Fargo, and No Country for Old Men felt it necessary to revisit a popular, not-seriously-regarded John Wayne film (which, in fairness, I've never seen

Don't understand why people can't get their heads round the fact that this is simply another adaptation of the book, not a remake of the John Wayne movie

Number None, Saturday, 4 December 2010 17:07 (3 years ago) Permalink

cuz if they're too lazy to watch a john wayne movie they're sure as fuck not about to read some book

balls, Saturday, 4 December 2010 17:11 (3 years ago) Permalink

maybe they just heard abt it and thought that sounds good is all

ice cr?m, Saturday, 4 December 2010 17:13 (3 years ago) Permalink

this is simply another adaptation of the book, not a remake of the John Wayne movie

That's a good point. Again, I don't know either book or film, but: if they're putting the Wayne film aside and going back to the book, and if the book has lots of elements that the Wayne film missed, then remaking it would seem justified. There's some precedent I'm trying to remember, where somebody got it right the second time, but I can't come up with the title. (There are probably a number of precedents.)

clemenza, Saturday, 4 December 2010 17:16 (3 years ago) Permalink

Wayne, at his best (The Searchers, Red River), was as good as almost anybody; my own post above wasn't intended to imply otherwise. I just always assumed, perhaps unfairly, that Red River: True Grit = Godfather II: Scent of a Woman (which I also haven't seen...I make a lot of assumptions).

― clemenza, Saturday, December 4, 2010 11:19 AM (51 minutes ago) Bookmark

it aint red river, but yeah that's pretty unfair. im amazed how many people havent seen it, did you guys not have TBS when you were kids? i think its more like... carlito's way, idk.

Princess TamTam, Saturday, 4 December 2010 17:16 (3 years ago) Permalink

their justification for making it was prob they liked the work and thought they could make a good movie out of it im guessing

ice cr?m, Saturday, 4 December 2010 17:17 (3 years ago) Permalink

everything i've heard from folks who have seen it is that it owns

omar little, Saturday, 4 December 2010 17:18 (3 years ago) Permalink

I think there's been a number of times where something was adapted once, then adapted again with the aim of being more true to the material

Princess TamTam, Saturday, 4 December 2010 17:19 (3 years ago) Permalink

yaaaaa

Princess TamTam, Saturday, 4 December 2010 17:19 (3 years ago) Permalink

It is weird that I've never seen True Grit. Possibly I saw it at a drive-in as a kid, but if so, I don't remember. I guess I've always stayed away because 1) Wayne's best-actor award is usually singled out as Exhibit #1 in the career-achievement category of undeserved Academy Awards (I'm a huge Midnight Cowboy fan...), and 2) it makes me think of the word "rollicking," and that's not my favorite kind of film.

clemenza, Saturday, 4 December 2010 17:22 (3 years ago) Permalink

I think there's been a number of times where something was adapted once, then adapted again with the aim of being more true to the material

BATMAN BEGINS
THE INCREDIBLE HULK
SPIDERMANS
STAR TREK

BIG MUFFIN (gbx), Saturday, 4 December 2010 17:23 (3 years ago) Permalink

clemenza, you may be over thinking this

ice cr?m, Saturday, 4 December 2010 17:24 (3 years ago) Permalink

Wow, that's what someone said to me on the Woody Allen thread the other day...for someone who doesn't do a great deal of serious thinking, you folks sure do think I do a lot of thinking!

clemenza, Saturday, 4 December 2010 17:26 (3 years ago) Permalink

quantity/quality

ice cr?m, Saturday, 4 December 2010 17:28 (3 years ago) Permalink

let go

BIG MUFFIN (gbx), Saturday, 4 December 2010 17:29 (3 years ago) Permalink

Now, don't get me mad--I'm pretty good at nasty if the right button's pushed.

clemenza, Saturday, 4 December 2010 17:30 (3 years ago) Permalink

Coen Brothers and Roger Deakins are making a movie so who cares what it's based on or remaking or adapted from.

Gukbe, Saturday, 4 December 2010 17:31 (3 years ago) Permalink

ice cr?m, Saturday, 4 December 2010 17:33 (3 years ago) Permalink

Big cartoon hand as metaphor for "Sorry for saying something so silly" noted.

clemenza, Saturday, 4 December 2010 17:35 (3 years ago) Permalink

yeah thats how i always note that

ice cr?m, Saturday, 4 December 2010 17:38 (3 years ago) Permalink

Anyway, take a step back, Yojimbo. I began by expressing skepticism that this project was a good idea, always making my assumptions clear along the way; conceded what I thought was a very good point by Number None; then tried to honestly explain why I've never seen the original. At what magical point did I begin "over-thinking"? That seems to be a very fluid line around here.

clemenza, Saturday, 4 December 2010 17:41 (3 years ago) Permalink

thats just cr?my bein cr?my bro, dont take it personal

Princess TamTam, Saturday, 4 December 2010 17:43 (3 years ago) Permalink

its a v fuiud line

ice cr?m, Saturday, 4 December 2010 17:44 (3 years ago) Permalink

lol i read it that way too, at first

Princess TamTam, Saturday, 4 December 2010 17:44 (3 years ago) Permalink

Ah, acronyms...could it be at all possible that you might under-thinking a little?

clemenza, Saturday, 4 December 2010 17:46 (3 years ago) Permalink

unpossible

ice cr?m, Saturday, 4 December 2010 17:46 (3 years ago) Permalink

Okay--we make the peace over a well-placed Ralph Wiggum quote. Touche.

clemenza, Saturday, 4 December 2010 17:48 (3 years ago) Permalink

There's some precedent I'm trying to remember, where somebody got it right the second time, but I can't come up with the title.

Huston-Bogart was the THIRD version of The Maltese Falcon.

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Saturday, 4 December 2010 18:27 (3 years ago) Permalink

That fits for sure, but it wasn't the one I was thinking of...I don't know. I love Michael Radford's 1984, but I haven't seen the '50s version and can't compare them. I know that Radford stayed fairly true to the novel, and I'm assuming (more assumptions) that he stayed truer than the earlier film.

clemenza, Saturday, 4 December 2010 18:48 (3 years ago) Permalink

kind of amazed that anyone is anticipating this when the trailer strongly indicates that jeff bridges' character may be grumpy in some scenes

shirley summistake (s1ocki), Saturday, 4 December 2010 19:36 (3 years ago) Permalink

You're coming perilously close to over-thinking there--be careful.

clemenza, Saturday, 4 December 2010 19:49 (3 years ago) Permalink

Reviews are coming in.

Also, NYT talking about Wayne vs. Bridges and points this out:

But other film devotees were less charmed, particularly when they viewed “True Grit” through the filter of Vietnam-era politics and Wayne’s conservative principles — which he had said were illustrated by a scene in which Cogburn shoots a rat after demonstrating the futility of trying to treat it under due process of law. (The new film has no such moment.)

The rat scene was in the book, so who knows yet which one is more faithful.

Pleasant Plains, Sunday, 5 December 2010 19:52 (3 years ago) Permalink

Wau, first ed of book had aws cover:

ball (Hurting 2), Sunday, 5 December 2010 21:17 (3 years ago) Permalink

Thats the edition i have! Bought it at a library sale <3

Square-Panted Sponge Robert (VegemiteGrrrl), Sunday, 5 December 2010 21:34 (3 years ago) Permalink

This is perfectly fine. Bridges is a hoot whenever he's yakking, and ultimately touching (but then i gasp "I've grown old" about 5 times a week).

An attendee who watched the 1969 version yesterday reports it's 90% like the Wayne film. I'm glad they filmed the book's epilogue, though, as not liking Mattie much pays off.

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Wednesday, 8 December 2010 04:04 (3 years ago) Permalink

Borderline spoiler --- there's a character that lives in the book, but dies in the 1969 movie. What happens to that character in the 2010 version?

Pleasant Plains, Wednesday, 8 December 2010 04:56 (3 years ago) Permalink

zombie

ice cr?m, Wednesday, 8 December 2010 05:00 (3 years ago) Permalink

you'll hafta see, wontcha

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Wednesday, 8 December 2010 05:11 (3 years ago) Permalink

kinda skimmed the thread but key takeaways i took from a joel (?) coen interview was that the original lacked the humor and darkness of the book, as well as the narrative POV was not very faithful to the source.

that said, i saw the trailer and am very stoked. i'm planning on taking my mom to see it around xmas.

i love you but i have chosen snarkness (Steve Shasta), Wednesday, 8 December 2010 05:34 (3 years ago) Permalink

I'm honestly shocked the book is so popular. Is it that good?

look at it, pwn3d, made u look at my peen/vadge (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Wednesday, 8 December 2010 12:14 (3 years ago) Permalink

Are you shocked because the characters wear chaps instead of the petticoats required by fine literature?

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Wednesday, 8 December 2010 15:56 (3 years ago) Permalink

Ok so admittedly I am probably not going to love this in the first place, but I gave it a chance. Pretty good performances all round, particularly surprised by Matt Damon. Shot beautifully. Nice score. Just really...kinda boring?

Keep in mind I do like SOME westerns, but not many, and I mostly like the Coen brothers.

Tilda Swinton Wreck Up A Dread Dub (admrl), Sunday, 12 December 2010 07:37 (3 years ago) Permalink

it's a really beautifully photographed Disney western w/ nastier violence, that reveals in the epilogue that yes, that annoying girl grew up to be a c**t.

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Sunday, 12 December 2010 08:07 (3 years ago) Permalink

Oh can we not say cunt on ilx now?

Haha iPhone tried to change "cunt" to "cynthia"

Tilda Swinton Wreck Up A Dread Dub (admrl), Sunday, 12 December 2010 08:10 (3 years ago) Permalink

i feel sorry ms plaster caster

Ward Fowler, Sunday, 12 December 2010 08:11 (3 years ago) Permalink

Girl was ok I guess. I mean she had to be fairly competent for movie to work, and it did. It was just unremarkable

Tilda Swinton Wreck Up A Dread Dub (admrl), Sunday, 12 December 2010 08:12 (3 years ago) Permalink

hey, I quite liked the performance. I also liked the drops of racism, as opposed to 'let's all pretend our 19th-century western characters are enlightened.'

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Sunday, 12 December 2010 08:14 (3 years ago) Permalink

Aside from some of the dialogue, this has to be the must un-coen bros coen bros movie I have thus far seen.

Tilda Swinton Wreck Up A Dread Dub (admrl), Sunday, 12 December 2010 08:22 (3 years ago) Permalink

I don't know how much of the dialogue is NOT from the book, but the Old West and its literature was absurdist long before they got to it.

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Sunday, 12 December 2010 08:24 (3 years ago) Permalink

Although it’s hard not to notice Mr. Bridges’s turn as the Dude playing the Duke with a dash of Bad Blake, much of the film rests on the diminutive shoulders of Ms. Steinfeld, a 13-year-old who was plucked from 15,000 girls who turned up at casting calls or sent taped auditions.

“It was, as you can probably imagine, the source of a lot of anxiety,” Ethan said. “We were aware if the kid doesn’t work, there’s no movie.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/12/12/movies/12grit.html?_r=1&hpw=&pagewanted=all

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Sunday, 12 December 2010 08:47 (3 years ago) Permalink

“We all enjoyed ourselves. Except Joel. I don’t think that’s his specialty."

Princess TamTam, Sunday, 12 December 2010 09:12 (3 years ago) Permalink

Hey, Ethan stole my quote! Hi if you're reading, Coen Bros

Tilda Swinton Wreck Up A Dread Dub (admrl), Sunday, 12 December 2010 13:01 (3 years ago) Permalink

no country for old men was pretty un-coens

akm, Sunday, 12 December 2010 17:44 (3 years ago) Permalink

i'm only marginally interested in seeing this film

akm, Sunday, 12 December 2010 17:44 (3 years ago) Permalink

this really kind of feels like a wonderful world of disney special

the chronicles of nornius (s1ocki), Wednesday, 15 December 2010 02:52 (3 years ago) Permalink

oh, looks like morbs beat me to it.

the chronicles of nornius (s1ocki), Wednesday, 15 December 2010 02:52 (3 years ago) Permalink

this really kind of feels like a wonderful world of disney special

^^^ I haven't seen it yet, but apparently "Coen Bros" and "Jeff Bridges" are enough for some of my friends to forget how redundant it all looks.

Gus Van Sotosyn (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Wednesday, 15 December 2010 02:58 (3 years ago) Permalink

it's not a BAD wonderful world of disney special! it actually plays like a pretty good, unflinchy family movie. which i think is kinda cool!

the chronicles of nornius (s1ocki), Wednesday, 15 December 2010 03:01 (3 years ago) Permalink

if i had a kid i would totally show that kid this and "me and orson welles"

the chronicles of nornius (s1ocki), Wednesday, 15 December 2010 03:01 (3 years ago) Permalink

Although it's an Old Movie, the original still gets shown often on cable. I prefer Bridges in grizzled mode to John Wayne but c'mon.

Gus Van Sotosyn (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Wednesday, 15 December 2010 03:03 (3 years ago) Permalink

I'm with you on Me and Orson Welles.

Gus Van Sotosyn (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Wednesday, 15 December 2010 03:03 (3 years ago) Permalink

oh, you mean redundant cuz of the earlier one. gotcha.

the chronicles of nornius (s1ocki), Wednesday, 15 December 2010 03:07 (3 years ago) Permalink

Just got back from a screening of this. Blah. With that lilting piano score and beginning narration, I thought it was Ken Burns' True Grit -- and that score never let up. The performances were pleasant enough and some of the dialogue was amusing, but it just doesn't create much interest or emotional investment (not a Coen specialty, I know). I couldn't even get that annoyed. Just mildly bored. Loved A Serious Man though.

Hubie Brown, Wednesday, 15 December 2010 03:51 (3 years ago) Permalink

looks like morbs beat me to it.

That's not what quite I said; Disney made a few decent movies that weren't about nannies, y'know. This certainly beats the hell out of The Fighter, Black Swan et al.

I'm dubious about the Coens saying they haven't seen the first film since they were kids. Sure their visual style is different, but the camera ANGLES for the "Fill your hand, you son of a bitch" scene looked practically the same. And the stables owner who keeps getting strongarmed by Mattie sounded an awful like Strother Martin, so I looked up the '69 cast and see he was played by Strother Martin.

On Charles Portis:

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/12/12/magazine/12FOB-WWLN-t.html

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Wednesday, 15 December 2010 04:50 (3 years ago) Permalink

thats a cool article... i should check out more of his stuff

xX_420_GoKu_ChRiStWaRrIoR_Xx (Princess TamTam), Wednesday, 15 December 2010 05:00 (3 years ago) Permalink

well that's not really what i said either; i don't think disney-esque is necc. a bad thing.

the chronicles of nornius (s1ocki), Wednesday, 15 December 2010 05:03 (3 years ago) Permalink

Escape From True Grit Mountain

Ned Raggett, Wednesday, 15 December 2010 05:07 (3 years ago) Permalink

anyone catch David Edelstein's rant in the comments section of his own New York review?

Wow. John Wayne fans are just as abusive as fanboys now. Wayne was funny in True Grit but he wasn't allied with the mass-murderer Quantrill and he didn't babble incessantly for hours on the ride through Indian country (as Bridges does). He was nowhere near as ugly a drunk. And listen to how Bridges handles the line quoted--he enunciates it carefully, in a Biblical cadence, whereas Wayne employs his own familiar rhythms and it has half the impact. Nonetheless, Wayne met the book's Rooster halfway, won an Oscar, and still owns the part, the way Bela Lugosi owns Dracula despite being a worse actor than many of the Draculas who followed him. Sit down with Portis's book, meanwhile, and see all the cynical episodes left out in Hathaway's movie. And look again at the landscapes, which don't evoke Arkansas or Oklahoma Indian country at all. (The Coens shot in New Mexico, too, but elsewhere, in high desert and cold forests.)

What's interesting is the language above. "Blatant errors." "Did the reviewer actually ever SEE the Wayne version?" Why are you so filled with anger? Hathaway's True Grit is a good enough movie--and more emotionally stirring than the Coens'--but doesn't evoke the ghoulish flavor of the book. What gives you the right to hurl abuse at someone who has a slightly different opinion than yours?

Gus Van Sotosyn (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Thursday, 16 December 2010 14:38 (3 years ago) Permalink

are nymag writers encouraged to interact with the plebs or something? i wouldnt even read the comments if i were him

xX_420_GoKu_ChRiStWaRrIoR_Xx (Princess TamTam), Thursday, 16 December 2010 14:46 (3 years ago) Permalink

"Why are you so filled with anger" = typical liberal rhetorical question

Gus Van Sotosyn (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Thursday, 16 December 2010 14:47 (3 years ago) Permalink

haha yeah i just read the comments he's responding to and they're hardly 'abusive'

xX_420_GoKu_ChRiStWaRrIoR_Xx (Princess TamTam), Thursday, 16 December 2010 14:48 (3 years ago) Permalink

I dunno if that's a 'rant,' seems thoroughly otm

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Thursday, 16 December 2010 15:04 (3 years ago) Permalink

ya it's not like he's frothing at the mouth there, for a comments section argument that's pretty chill & articulate

the jazz zinger (s1ocki), Thursday, 16 December 2010 15:09 (3 years ago) Permalink

I don't disagree with him, but I did wonder why he acts like it's the first time he reads a comments section.

Gus Van Sotosyn (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Thursday, 16 December 2010 15:13 (3 years ago) Permalink

i dunno dude, that shit can get to you, he's only human, etc etc

the jazz zinger (s1ocki), Thursday, 16 December 2010 15:14 (3 years ago) Permalink

haha there are only 4 comments on that article and one "abusive" one?

ok i take it back, chill out edelstein

the jazz zinger (s1ocki), Thursday, 16 December 2010 15:19 (3 years ago) Permalink

Maybe he got foul emails as well.

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Thursday, 16 December 2010 15:20 (3 years ago) Permalink

I saw this last night and I loved it. I'm such a huge fan of the book, and it was great to see more of it on the screen this time. Bridges and Damon played off each other really well, and that little girl who played Mattie was great. Obviously I wasn't asking a lot of the movie, but honestly, I found this really really enjoyable.

Square-Panted Sponge Robert (VegemiteGrrrl), Wednesday, 22 December 2010 16:37 (3 years ago) Permalink

Wayne version is on TCM tonight.

My fave line from the Coens' film, which I assume is from Portis, might be "Keep your seat, trash!"

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Wednesday, 22 December 2010 16:40 (3 years ago) Permalink

That was indeed a Portis line.

Square-Panted Sponge Robert (VegemiteGrrrl), Wednesday, 22 December 2010 17:56 (3 years ago) Permalink

this is awesome

everyone's really good (barry pepper!), but the girl playing mattie kills it, such an awesome character - i could watch a zillion hours of hailee steinfeld being a pain in the ass to crusty old men

third act left me a little wanting but that's mostly the book onscreen so, y'know, what can you do

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cMf0MTweXYc (Princess TamTam), Wednesday, 22 December 2010 23:44 (3 years ago) Permalink

those moments when Mattie shows that she really is just a 14 year old girl, and she gets that happy, sweet look on her face like when she wants to tell ghost stories...Steinfeld kills. And the haggling scene was perfect.

Square-Panted Sponge Robert (VegemiteGrrrl), Thursday, 23 December 2010 00:45 (3 years ago) Permalink

yeah, totally! though i read the ghost story thing as calculating - trying to defuse the situation. the haggling was great. i loved her continually catching the male characters off-guard with her brassiness. the first scene with Brolin is fantastic. Brolin kinda surprised me actually.

btw im pretty sure JK Simmons had a cameo of sorts doing the voiceover of Lawyer Daggett.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cMf0MTweXYc (Princess TamTam), Thursday, 23 December 2010 02:51 (3 years ago) Permalink

I could watch those two kids get kicked off that porch stoop over and over and over.

benanas foster (Eric H.), Thursday, 23 December 2010 02:58 (3 years ago) Permalink

lol yeah the porch scene was funny. And TamTam otm, Brolin was GREAT. Way more charismatic as Chaney than I expected...I expected sort of a dead, dumb mean delivery but he was great, especially in that river meeting.

And Barry Pepper (cast as Lucky Ned Pepper, lol!)...really brought the right shade of grey to Ned, where he's almost likeable with the way he runs things and deals with Mattie but you still know that he's a mean sonofabitch.

Square-Panted Sponge Robert (VegemiteGrrrl), Thursday, 23 December 2010 03:27 (3 years ago) Permalink

just saw the original on TCM!

mmmm... yung hummus (Whiney G. Weingarten), Thursday, 23 December 2010 03:48 (3 years ago) Permalink

Yeah I just watched it too... I saw it when I was a kid but I'd forgotten a lot of it. I think Wayne might be a better Cogburn tbh, but the new one does everything else better, probably.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cMf0MTweXYc (Princess TamTam), Thursday, 23 December 2010 03:58 (3 years ago) Permalink

All I could think while watching that was how annoying Bernstein's score was.

pixel farmer, Thursday, 23 December 2010 03:59 (3 years ago) Permalink

your score is annoying!!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cMf0MTweXYc (Princess TamTam), Thursday, 23 December 2010 04:01 (3 years ago) Permalink

I could not believe that was Barry Pepper.

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Thursday, 23 December 2010 04:28 (3 years ago) Permalink

I really didn't like Mattie in the original. She was just so damn bug-eyed all the time.

Square-Panted Sponge Robert (VegemiteGrrrl), Thursday, 23 December 2010 04:29 (3 years ago) Permalink

I loved how messed up Peppers face was too...and all the spit flying out of his mouth when the camera was pointing up at his face...so great

Square-Panted Sponge Robert (VegemiteGrrrl), Thursday, 23 December 2010 04:30 (3 years ago) Permalink

btw im pretty sure JK Simmons had a cameo of sorts doing the voiceover of Lawyer Daggett.

(Princess TamTam), Wednesday, December 22, 2010 9:51 PM (2 hours ago) Bookmark Suggest Ban Permalink

yeah this was definitely simmons

max, Thursday, 23 December 2010 04:55 (3 years ago) Permalink

I'm not the biggest Coens fan you'll meet, but I have a really good feeling about this. Can't wait to see it.

Davek (davek_00), Thursday, 23 December 2010 15:56 (3 years ago) Permalink

quality picture imo

all yoga attacks are fire based (rogermexico.), Saturday, 25 December 2010 02:47 (3 years ago) Permalink

i dont want to SPOILERZ this but i think the 'disney' stuff is a little much, i mean what's interesting is how it deals w/ the morality of revenge -- the chain of events that leads her to the place she ends up ---

oh fuck it, SPOILERRRRRRRRRRRRRRZ

losing her arm because she takes the kill shot isnt a v. 'disney' way to approach it (fwiw im assuming this was in the book) but i think the alcoholism, the hero's patheticness, the bumbling idiocy of the bad dudes, its very puncturing of myth & the whole mysticism of westerns, doesnt feel particularly DISNEY to me imo

lyrics is weak ... like clock radio similes (deej), Saturday, 25 December 2010 07:25 (3 years ago) Permalink

by 'hero's patheticness' im talking about cogburn btw not protaganist

lyrics is weak ... like clock radio similes (deej), Saturday, 25 December 2010 07:25 (3 years ago) Permalink

of COURSE it is plenty dark... but the snarky definition of 'Disney' overlooks the fact that Bambi and Old Yeller traumatized millions of children by introducing them to death.

SPOILERING more:

I'm pretty sure Kim Darby doesn't lose any limbs in the first film of TG, which is certainly a crucial omission; Mattie has to pay a price for wasting Tom Chaney.

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Saturday, 25 December 2010 14:46 (3 years ago) Permalink

fuck

hey mods plz add "now with spoilers" to the thread title plz?

kanellos (gbx), Saturday, 25 December 2010 15:22 (3 years ago) Permalink

good, not great picture. brolin was funny. matt damon is always charming. couldn't decide about lead actress. score was really banal.

overall... is this the coen brothers' most conventional film?

by another name (amateurist), Saturday, 25 December 2010 20:47 (3 years ago) Permalink

score didnt take me out of the film at all, cant imagine how it would unless you were expecting something jarring or yeah unconventional & yes this would probably be the most conventional film theyve done -- which imo is not a bad thing.

really unsure how u can be uncertain about the lead, she was great!

i do like pita inn tho so we will always have that

lyrics is weak ... like clock radio similes (deej), Saturday, 25 December 2010 20:57 (3 years ago) Permalink

Mattie has to pay a price for wasting Tom Chaney

bingo. she says as much in the opening voice-over.

all yoga attacks are fire based (rogermexico.), Saturday, 25 December 2010 21:40 (3 years ago) Permalink

the score wasn't good - didnt take me out of the movie and ordinarily i like carter burwell, but this kind of thing isn't his strength - u could tell at a couple points he was trying to echo elmer bernstein's 'stirring' score for the orig and it wasnt working imo

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cMf0MTweXYc (Princess TamTam), Saturday, 25 December 2010 23:28 (3 years ago) Permalink

Burwell has been ruled ineligible for a scoring Oscar, too many preexisting hymns.

Hoberman took Coens to task for using "Leaning on the Everlasting Arm" and thus invoking its use in a better film -- The Night of the Hunter. I thought that was quite intentional, as Mattie's severe, inhuman faith reminds me of the rather annoying Lillian Gish in that film.

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Saturday, 25 December 2010 23:36 (3 years ago) Permalink

its a film w similar themes so im sure it was intentional

lyrics is weak ... like clock radio similes (deej), Saturday, 25 December 2010 23:39 (3 years ago) Permalink

'good not great' otm. lots of good laugh lines.

2nd tier coens still better than most stuff. relatively few overly coen moments/characters.

iatee, Sunday, 26 December 2010 00:18 (3 years ago) Permalink

Agreed, No Country still had the Harrelson/Root moments, among others, to briefly hint at the fact it was a Coen bros film.

This was a very good genre exercise and had some great moments. I'd rewatch it sooner than a lot of films, and found the humor well-balanced.

mh, Sunday, 26 December 2010 03:13 (3 years ago) Permalink

so i went to see this today and the projector broke so i did not see it, ffs

ice cr?m, Sunday, 26 December 2010 03:15 (3 years ago) Permalink

also dim sum was an intolerably long wait

ice cr?m, Sunday, 26 December 2010 03:15 (3 years ago) Permalink

No grit for old cr?m

mh, Sunday, 26 December 2010 03:59 (3 years ago) Permalink

p sure btw the projector wasnt particularly broken just the guy who could sort whatever issue they were having wasnt there because it was christmas - they called him and he said restart it and it should work - i know this because the usher in detailing troubleshooting efforts described the projector as 'like a little computer'

ice cr?m, Sunday, 26 December 2010 04:07 (3 years ago) Permalink

saw this w/ my mom and the night of the hunter thing is the 1st thing she mentioned afterward

johnny crunch, Sunday, 26 December 2010 14:12 (3 years ago) Permalink

Aggressively OK-ish.

benanas foster (Eric H.), Sunday, 26 December 2010 18:14 (3 years ago) Permalink

Did not realize that was Iris DeMent over the end titles!

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Monday, 27 December 2010 02:56 (3 years ago) Permalink

btw i totally dug this. "second-tier coens" is right but ill take it. bridges, damon and the girl all kill it, barry pepper too.

max, Monday, 27 December 2010 02:57 (3 years ago) Permalink

Bridges takes the annual Winona Ryder Memorial Marble Mouth Award with ease

progressive cuts (Tracer Hand), Monday, 27 December 2010 03:58 (3 years ago) Permalink

pepper was electric

progressive cuts (Tracer Hand), Monday, 27 December 2010 03:59 (3 years ago) Permalink

i love the pepman

ೋ*¨*ೋALWAYz A F4RT3R ♥ 24/7/365ೋ*¨*ೋ (Princess TamTam), Monday, 27 December 2010 04:07 (3 years ago) Permalink

When Pepper was five years old, his family set sail in a homemade ship, navigating through the South Pacific islands for five years.[1][2] His education was completed in both public schools and correspondence courses. Due to the lack of television as entertainment, the family used sketch acting as a means of fun.

max, Monday, 27 December 2010 04:19 (3 years ago) Permalink

btw i totally dug this. "second-tier coens" is right but ill take it. bridges, damon and the girl all kill it, barry pepper too.

― max, Sunday, December 26, 2010 9:57 PM (Yesterday) Bookmark

saw this tonight & this pretty much sums up my sentiments. I will add that Deakins also rules (as usual).

jerkstore cowboy (Pillbox), Monday, 27 December 2010 07:18 (3 years ago) Permalink

yah max otm

lyrics is weak ... like clock radio similes (deej), Monday, 27 December 2010 08:39 (3 years ago) Permalink

This was fun (Matt Damon was the surprise), but about ten minutes too long.

I could watch those two kids get kicked off that porch stoop over and over and over.

OTM.

Gus Van Sotosyn (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Tuesday, 28 December 2010 17:45 (3 years ago) Permalink

hahaha I forgot about that part, so classic

iatee, Tuesday, 28 December 2010 18:38 (3 years ago) Permalink

I gotta say: Bridges was the weakest of the three leads, in that Damon and Steinfeld consistently surprised me and did the most with that wonderful dialogue.

Gus Van Sotosyn (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Tuesday, 28 December 2010 18:54 (3 years ago) Permalink

Bridges became MVP briefly, though, during the cornbread shootoff.

I was not feeling the denouement much until the last line, which is so beautifully terse. The Coens can end their movies with the best of them these days. Four in a row now.

benanas foster (Eric H.), Wednesday, 29 December 2010 02:58 (3 years ago) Permalink

Okay, but not great. I just felt disconnected from the whole thing, like I was watching a well-acted and shot film made by people who didn't really feel like giving me anything to explore or care about. (nb: only Coen Bros. films I really like are Blood Simple and Hudsucker Proxy, and I haven't seen the latter in 10+ years)

boots get knocked from here to czechoslovakier (milo z), Wednesday, 29 December 2010 03:35 (3 years ago) Permalink

;_;

Square-Panted Sponge Robert (VegemiteGrrrl), Wednesday, 29 December 2010 03:41 (3 years ago) Permalink

I do not remember the last line of Spinster Mattie's v/o, just Cogburn's.

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Wednesday, 29 December 2010 04:55 (3 years ago) Permalink

"Time just slips away from us."

benanas foster (Eric H.), Wednesday, 29 December 2010 06:11 (3 years ago) Permalink

well see, "I've grown old" does that better.

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Wednesday, 29 December 2010 12:27 (3 years ago) Permalink

this was a kids movie, but v gory and raw, maybe how kids movies would be if parents werent such pussies - coens played it v straight, reminded me of when lynch went G rated - the whole thing was a lil wtf to me i must admit, well done but wtf

ice cr?m, Thursday, 30 December 2010 16:29 (3 years ago) Permalink

i think by kids movie you mean "not smirky."

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Thursday, 30 December 2010 16:35 (3 years ago) Permalink

it's a really beautifully photographed Disney western w/ nastier violence

― kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Sunday, December 12, 2010 3:07 AM (2 weeks ago) Bookmark Suggest Ban Permalink

idk morbs u tell me

ice cr?m, Thursday, 30 December 2010 16:36 (3 years ago) Permalink

Loved this but I unfortunately saw it on an Oscar-screener DVD, would like to ~rescreen~ in the theater or on a proper DVD with subs.

i love you but i have chosen snarkness (Steve Shasta), Thursday, 30 December 2010 17:04 (3 years ago) Permalink

This was fun (Matt Damon was the surprise), but about ten minutes too long.

I could watch those two kids get kicked off that porch stoop over and over and over.

OTM.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ plus the guy in the bear suit.

peacocks, Thursday, 30 December 2010 17:24 (3 years ago) Permalink

kids /= Disney, joe

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Thursday, 30 December 2010 17:33 (3 years ago) Permalink

WAHT! outrageous

ice cr?m, Thursday, 30 December 2010 17:33 (3 years ago) Permalink

btw smirky is prob the most common quality of contempo kids movies, unfortunately

ice cr?m, Thursday, 30 December 2010 17:34 (3 years ago) Permalink

this one doesnt have a partic 'contemporary' feel given the debt to Portis's tone (tho I'm thinking they added the hush the hanging Indian joke?).

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Thursday, 30 December 2010 17:39 (3 years ago) Permalink

i guess it felt 'childrens' or ya fictiony to me cause of the lack of subtlety

ice cr?m, Thursday, 30 December 2010 17:49 (3 years ago) Permalink

god that dude in the bear suit was so great.

VegemiteGrrrl, Thursday, 30 December 2010 18:10 (3 years ago) Permalink

this was a kids movie, but v gory and raw, maybe how kids movies would be if parents werent such pussies - coens played it v straight, reminded me of when lynch went G rated - the whole thing was a lil wtf to me i must admit, well done but wtf

― ice cr?m, Thursday, December 30, 2010 11:29 AM (2 hours ago) Bookmark

heh i actually had a convo w/my friend yesterday where he declared that this was the Coens' Straight Story, i totally agreed - love it for that reason too

Princess TamTam, Thursday, 30 December 2010 18:57 (3 years ago) Permalink

i guess it felt 'childrens' or ya fictiony to me cause of the lack of subtlety

you missed the adult, Rohmeresque nuances of Barton Fink and Fargo, huh

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Thursday, 30 December 2010 20:20 (3 years ago) Permalink

this didnt feel a lil more spelled out than those to you

ice cr?m, Thursday, 30 December 2010 20:33 (3 years ago) Permalink

im nto trying to be clever here, it really played like a kids movie to me, did anyone else feel this way

ice cr?m, Thursday, 30 December 2010 20:34 (3 years ago) Permalink

why is 'straightforward' = 'kids movie'

lyrics is weak ... like clock radio similes (deej), Thursday, 30 December 2010 20:35 (3 years ago) Permalink

the deep complexities of a serious man, only to be comprehended as ~deep~ by adults

lyrics is weak ... like clock radio similes (deej), Thursday, 30 December 2010 20:35 (3 years ago) Permalink

like if someone had said to me 'the coen bros made a kids film here watch this' i wouldve been like 'o ok p cool sort of violent for kids but thats rad in its own way'

ice cr?m, Thursday, 30 December 2010 20:36 (3 years ago) Permalink

i guess its a more universally comprehensible movie, which could translate to 'kids movie'

lyrics is weak ... like clock radio similes (deej), Thursday, 30 December 2010 20:37 (3 years ago) Permalink

or: starring a kid = kids movie?

i love you but i have chosen snarkness (Steve Shasta), Thursday, 30 December 2010 20:37 (3 years ago) Permalink

its not particularly a lack of depth, i feel like true grit had some depth, im obvs having a hard time putting my finger on it but something abt how all the plot and character elements are discrete and obvious - no ambiguity or complexity of meaning anywhere - also having a bad ass kid in the lead

ice cr?m, Thursday, 30 December 2010 20:39 (3 years ago) Permalink

there are a lot of movies that lack ambiguity and complexity that aren't kids movies though.

peacocks, Thursday, 30 December 2010 20:48 (3 years ago) Permalink

admittedly Barton Fink was incomprehensible crap

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Thursday, 30 December 2010 21:00 (3 years ago) Permalink

Which movie can you picture some sixth-grade class watching in the second week of May, True Grit or Fargo?

Pleasant Plains, Thursday, 30 December 2010 21:54 (3 years ago) Permalink

Not eager to lose my job, we'll probably stick with School of Rock or something.

clemenza, Thursday, 30 December 2010 21:59 (3 years ago) Permalink

ha was gonna say, neither?

lyrics is weak ... like clock radio similes (deej), Thursday, 30 December 2010 22:05 (3 years ago) Permalink

this was a fun, nice-looking movie but i'm not sure i'll be eager to see it again. really liked the three lead performances - especially damon - even if i sort of felt like bridges was laying it on a bit thick at times. someone upthread said this was the least coenesque coens movie which i agree with for a reason i can't really put my finger on, which is not really a great thing for me per se since i love the coens

k3vin k., Thursday, 30 December 2010 22:10 (3 years ago) Permalink

otm via the damon thread:

yeah he's wonderful in TG, tho in retrospect I think he was doing his McConaughey impression the whole time

― ೋ*¨*ೋALWAYz A F4RT3R ♥ 24/7/365ೋ*¨*ೋ (Princess TamTam), Tuesday, December 28, 2010 9:36 PM (2 days ago) Bookmark Suggest Ban Permalink

for those who havent been blessed

ice cr?m, Thursday, 30 December 2010 22:33 (3 years ago) Permalink

It's just so great

VegemiteGrrrl, Thursday, 30 December 2010 22:42 (3 years ago) Permalink

ha!

ENBB, Friday, 31 December 2010 00:29 (3 years ago) Permalink

I guess I could see this as a kids movie in the sense that it seems to function as a simple old-testament allegory. Pretty sure if the bible was written in the 1800's this story would def have been in there. Except for the part with the bearskin man.

Cosmo Vitelli, Friday, 31 December 2010 01:50 (3 years ago) Permalink

admittedly Barton Fink was incomprehensible crap

This is one of my favorite Coen films :(

mh, Saturday, 1 January 2011 01:47 (3 years ago) Permalink

BEARSKIN WAS AMAZING

Astronaut Mike Dexter (Jimmy The Mod Awaits The Return Of His Beloved), Saturday, 1 January 2011 02:06 (3 years ago) Permalink

it seems to function as a simple old-testament allegory

hmmm, surely it's a little more skeptical that that? which is why we get to see Older Mattie as a miserable, lone c**t?

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Saturday, 1 January 2011 19:09 (3 years ago) Permalink

felt like young mattie had more going on than old mattie, didnt quite buy the transition

ice cr?m, Saturday, 1 January 2011 19:10 (3 years ago) Permalink

fit like a glove I thought.

also re JB "laying it on thick," Rooster Cogburn is not a role where you wanna be low-key w/ Bressonian subtlety.

(btw the Quantrill dialogue indicates he's likely a war criminal)

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Saturday, 1 January 2011 19:12 (3 years ago) Permalink

Ugh Morbs, really.

VegemiteGrrrl, Saturday, 1 January 2011 19:14 (3 years ago) Permalink

saw this last night, unfortunately fell asleep for about 20 minutes of it though (late showing in a too-warm theater); I think it was probably good.

akm, Saturday, 1 January 2011 19:14 (3 years ago) Permalink

young mattie is actively brilliant, old mattie didnt seem possessed of that genius

ice cr?m, Saturday, 1 January 2011 19:14 (3 years ago) Permalink

admittedly Barton Fink was incomprehensible crap

yeah this is my favorite one too

akm, Saturday, 1 January 2011 19:15 (3 years ago) Permalink

Old Mattie looked like Alice Roosevelt Longworth.

Gus Van Sotosyn (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 1 January 2011 19:20 (3 years ago) Permalink

the coda was p depressing, what particularly were they trying to say by demonstrating the calcification of her worst qualities

ice cr?m, Saturday, 1 January 2011 19:22 (3 years ago) Permalink

That the pursuit of the wicked is not always conducted by the spotlessly virtuous, and stains all.

Ugh Morbs, really.

yes Grrrl, really! Quantrill is a notorious name in the history of our civil war. It's like saying you were in Lt. Calley's unit in Vietnam.

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Saturday, 1 January 2011 19:25 (3 years ago) Permalink

dont think that what she was ughing at

ice cr?m, Saturday, 1 January 2011 19:26 (3 years ago) Permalink

That the pursuit of the wicked is not always conducted by the spotlessly virtuous, and stains all.

― kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Saturday, January 1, 2011 2:25 PM (49 seconds ago) Bookmark Suggest Ban Permalink

this is a reasonable point to make for sure, but it seems like they went out of their way to make old mattie kinda awful, im basing this entirely on her calling that guy trash, but still

ice cr?m, Saturday, 1 January 2011 19:28 (3 years ago) Permalink

I'm w/ Morbs on this one - sorry but not everyone grows up to be a superstar.

Simon H., Saturday, 1 January 2011 19:30 (3 years ago) Permalink

the girl is kinda awful!

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Saturday, 1 January 2011 19:31 (3 years ago) Permalink

Not like she was gonna be president or anything.

it also takes hip-hip with it (Eric H.), Saturday, 1 January 2011 19:32 (3 years ago) Permalink

I'm w/ Morbs on this one - sorry but not everyone grows up to be a superstar.

― Simon H., Saturday, January 1, 2011 2:30 PM (9 seconds ago) Bookmark Suggest Ban Permalink

thats a fine principle but particularly does it make sense that thats who she grew up to be, and what does it mean

ice cr?m, Saturday, 1 January 2011 19:33 (3 years ago) Permalink

the girl is a piece of work for sure but shes also an adventurous genius

ice cr?m, Saturday, 1 January 2011 19:34 (3 years ago) Permalink

im basing this entirely on her calling that guy trash, but still

That was Frank James, brother of Jesse. They robbed and killed a lot of people in the Ozarks and a good Christian women like Mattie wouldn't accept his graces even if the trash did stand up when a lady was present.

Pleasant Plains, Saturday, 1 January 2011 19:35 (3 years ago) Permalink

what more could a one handed girl in that time period grow up to be? I think she turned out pretty well all things considered.

iatee, Saturday, 1 January 2011 19:35 (3 years ago) Permalink

what more could a one handed girl in that time period grow up to be?

Anxiously anticipating 2 Grit 2 Furious.

it also takes hip-hip with it (Eric H.), Saturday, 1 January 2011 19:37 (3 years ago) Permalink

she is NOT a genius, re Eric's first comment, today she might grow up to be S*r*h Palin.

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Saturday, 1 January 2011 19:39 (3 years ago) Permalink

Barbara Streisand's stepson should've pushed her off the cliff.

it also takes hip-hip with it (Eric H.), Saturday, 1 January 2011 19:40 (3 years ago) Permalink

Where in the world are you people coming up with ways to call Mattie Ross the worst and a cunt? I'm totally not riding along with any of that.

THe coda showed that maybe her desire not for justice, but for revenge cast a cloud over the rest of her life, that there were consequences, but I don't buy the hate.

And Morbz, she says in the book that she supported Al Smith for president. How can she be a proto-Palin?

Pleasant Plains, Saturday, 1 January 2011 19:44 (3 years ago) Permalink

She seems like she grew up and found out that most people had no grit/moxy whatsoever, and became appropriately isolated.

Simon H., Saturday, 1 January 2011 19:46 (3 years ago) Permalink

what more could a one handed girl in that time period grow up to be? I think she turned out pretty well all things considered.

― iatee, Saturday, January 1, 2011 2:35 PM (8 minutes ago) Bookmark Suggest Ban Permalink

well she turned out v mean, and yeah i did consider that it was a statement abt cultural marginalization of a one armed alpha female, but that doesnt feel quite right for this movie

ice cr?m, Saturday, 1 January 2011 19:47 (3 years ago) Permalink

Where in the world are you people coming up with ways to call Mattie Ross the worst and a cunt? I'm totally not riding along with any of that.

― Pleasant Plains, Saturday, January 1, 2011 2:44 PM (6 minutes ago) Bookmark Suggest Ban Permalink

yeah i found her pretty appealing

ice cr?m, Saturday, 1 January 2011 19:51 (3 years ago) Permalink

pp otm, the rest of you saw a different coda than me, maybe.

they call him (remy bean), Saturday, 1 January 2011 19:54 (3 years ago) Permalink

to be clear i found the young mattie appealing, the old one was mean and purely uptight

ice cr?m, Saturday, 1 January 2011 19:56 (3 years ago) Permalink

also, we're basing this all off like 2 minutes of screentime

iatee, Saturday, 1 January 2011 19:58 (3 years ago) Permalink

maybe she was just having a bad day

iatee, Saturday, 1 January 2011 19:58 (3 years ago) Permalink

i got more of a "pain in the ass" reading from both the younger and older mattie. in the younger one it read as precocious, and in the older one it read as difficult... but it seemed very essentially the same character

they call him (remy bean), Saturday, 1 January 2011 19:59 (3 years ago) Permalink

xpost Yeah, maybe she just found out her hero just died hours before she could be reunited with him.

it also takes hip-hip with it (Eric H.), Saturday, 1 January 2011 19:59 (3 years ago) Permalink

dunno feel like it was pretty purposeful

ice cr?m, Saturday, 1 January 2011 20:00 (3 years ago) Permalink

I think when a novelist or filmmaker jumps ahead 25 years to give you a glimpse of the protagonist, it's supposed to be fairly representative of her character.

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Saturday, 1 January 2011 20:02 (3 years ago) Permalink

What is endearing in children is irritating and worse in adults. Go fig.

it also takes hip-hip with it (Eric H.), Saturday, 1 January 2011 20:10 (3 years ago) Permalink

i intend to stop belaboring this point but: thats a pretty broad brush

ice cr?m, Saturday, 1 January 2011 20:12 (3 years ago) Permalink

Anyway, I think PP's interpretation of the exchange is undoubtedly the correct one.

it also takes hip-hip with it (Eric H.), Saturday, 1 January 2011 20:18 (3 years ago) Permalink

yeah prob

ice cr?m, Saturday, 1 January 2011 20:32 (3 years ago) Permalink

the missing arm pretty much drives the point home

ice cr?m, Saturday, 1 January 2011 20:33 (3 years ago) Permalink

I simply cant bear old Mattie being described as a c---. I let it go the first time way upthread but yeah, please, not that word for her.

(I'm not above using it in anger at inanimate objects but I hate it as a descriptor.)

I admit it's more a personal thing, the book is close to my heart for a long long time, Mattie especially. *That* word just undermines everything she went through.

Im not going to flip out or anything, just needed to state my case for her.

Carry on!

VegemiteGrrrl, Saturday, 1 January 2011 20:33 (3 years ago) Permalink

Perhaps that was harsh, sorry; I suppose one can pity the way old-school Protestantism has warped her (and America) if that's not too severe.

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Saturday, 1 January 2011 20:43 (3 years ago) Permalink

didn't realise this was a portis story. his stuff is hilare

joran van der snood (cozen), Saturday, 1 January 2011 20:46 (3 years ago) Permalink

Thanks Morbs. You're a good stick :)

FYI for anyone who is interested, The book (and history) sheds more light on her distaste for Frank James on the final scene: the other elderly outlaw was Cole Younger. Younger was partnered with the James gang at the Northfield robbery where the gang was caught: Frank James killed the bank officer, but surrendered to police & later acquitted. Younger was charged with the murder, did 25 years for Frank James' crime.

VegemiteGrrrl, Saturday, 1 January 2011 20:51 (3 years ago) Permalink

in the movie it seemed like it was because he didnt stand up

ice cr?m, Saturday, 1 January 2011 21:10 (3 years ago) Permalink

Yeah I know. Which plays fine, as it stand. I kinda think that outburst seems extreme without the context.

VegemiteGrrrl, Saturday, 1 January 2011 21:23 (3 years ago) Permalink

i'm kinda amazed at all the ppl outraged she dissed frank james here - you fuckers all bobby brady or something?

balls, Saturday, 1 January 2011 23:02 (3 years ago) Permalink

lol

VegemiteGrrrl, Saturday, 1 January 2011 23:26 (3 years ago) Permalink

i mean morbs using 'she got a little grouchier when she was older' as some sorta 'gaze into the abyss' parable w/o irony is a bit much imo.

balls, Saturday, 1 January 2011 23:48 (3 years ago) Permalink

I dunno that I said that. She's seems essentially unchanged at the core, as most of us are after we're five years old.

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Sunday, 2 January 2011 00:22 (3 years ago) Permalink

Can't believe I called this "aggressively OK-ish." it's definitely grown in memory.

it also takes hip-hip with it (Eric H.), Sunday, 2 January 2011 01:34 (3 years ago) Permalink

i might be conflating yr thoughts w/ some other - my bad morbs! i enjoyed this a great deal, would love more matt damon comedies (i even enjoyed that farrelly bros one enough), the girl was pretty great. wish this was more the baseline intelligence and skill we could expect from a hollywood entertainment than the exception but i'll take what i can get. somewhat suprised the coens didn't go wilder w/ their western pic, somewhat relieved at the same time. would like to see more coen westerns. would like to see a rooster cogburn remake w/ jennifer jason leigh in full hudsucker mode.

balls, Sunday, 2 January 2011 02:00 (3 years ago) Permalink

Can't believe I called this "aggressively OK-ish."

Especially since they filmed it all in NM and TX!

Pleasant Plains, Sunday, 2 January 2011 02:35 (3 years ago) Permalink

would like to see a rooster cogburn remake w/ jennifer jason leigh in full hudsucker mode.

this is sort of an amazing idea

they call him (remy bean), Sunday, 2 January 2011 03:01 (3 years ago) Permalink

Cosign

VegemiteGrrrl, Sunday, 2 January 2011 03:05 (3 years ago) Permalink

So this is officially the highest grossing Coen Bros film to date.

Gus Van Sotosyn (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Monday, 3 January 2011 03:35 (3 years ago) Permalink

Thought that was weird until I checked and saw that the previous title-holder was No Country. Americans love them some Coen westerns.

it also takes hip-hip with it (Eric H.), Monday, 3 January 2011 03:38 (3 years ago) Permalink

Ha it's the 6th highest grossing Western of all time, about to pass Back to the Future 3... lol, earthlings, i do not understand you.

Kerm, Monday, 3 January 2011 03:44 (3 years ago) Permalink

and the Coens are closer to becoming household names: True Grit is the only movie non cineastes watched and wanted to talk about over the holiday, I noticed, and every relative/friend I talked to alluded to the Coen filmography.

Gus Van Sotosyn (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Monday, 3 January 2011 03:46 (3 years ago) Permalink

lol @ WWW @ #2 on that list

it also takes hip-hip with it (Eric H.), Monday, 3 January 2011 03:50 (3 years ago) Permalink

Open Range!

Gus Van Sotosyn (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Monday, 3 January 2011 03:50 (3 years ago) Permalink

Yeah, Coens are definitely approaching Hitchcock/Spielberg territory where people who don't even particularly know what directors do know them/their work.

it also takes hip-hip with it (Eric H.), Monday, 3 January 2011 03:51 (3 years ago) Permalink

these are not inflation adjusted grosses so w/e

ice cr?m, Monday, 3 January 2011 03:53 (3 years ago) Permalink

Totally entertaining movie, which makes it my favorite Coen thing since Lebowski (the last time they were willing to be totally entertaining, or maybe able to). First 5 minutes I thought Mattie was going to annoy me, but then she turned out to be cool. All three leads are really good. I like the classicism, and I think it makes sense for the Coens. They can do a lot worse than punchy genre exercises.

something of an astrological coup (tipsy mothra), Monday, 3 January 2011 04:21 (3 years ago) Permalink

Not that I could even tell it was Barry Pepper when watching the film, but he's kind of like a mini-4th lead in my opinion. Even if Brolin got higher billing.

mh, Monday, 3 January 2011 04:31 (3 years ago) Permalink

btw No Country is not a western. Set in West /= western.

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Monday, 3 January 2011 04:38 (3 years ago) Permalink

(need horses)

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Monday, 3 January 2011 04:39 (3 years ago) Permalink

I found Intolerable Cruelty totally entertaining, if minor.

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Monday, 3 January 2011 04:40 (3 years ago) Permalink

Pickup trucks are the horses of our time, especially when driving across cattle lands.

mh, Monday, 3 January 2011 04:40 (3 years ago) Permalink

Plus, Tommy Lee Jones borrowed his wife's horse.

Kip Squashbeef (pixel farmer), Monday, 3 January 2011 04:41 (3 years ago) Permalink

plus he used that cattle killing thing to off the cop

ice cr?m, Monday, 3 January 2011 04:44 (3 years ago) Permalink

bardem^

ice cr?m, Monday, 3 January 2011 04:44 (3 years ago) Permalink

it's a noir in the desert, mostly

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Monday, 3 January 2011 04:47 (3 years ago) Permalink

j0e that is an OLD MOVIE term, so get the garlic out

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Monday, 3 January 2011 04:48 (3 years ago) Permalink

Mexico = Indian Territory, the suitcase = the gold under the grave next to Arch Stanton's, etc. Totally a western.

Kip Squashbeef (pixel farmer), Monday, 3 January 2011 04:50 (3 years ago) Permalink

villain vanishes into ether at the end? not in any western I recall.

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Monday, 3 January 2011 05:00 (3 years ago) Permalink

j0e that is an OLD MOVIE term, so get the garlic out

― kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Sunday, January 2, 2011 11:48 PM (Yesterday) Bookmark Suggest Ban Permalink

not sure what youre referring to here, but fwiw i do agree that ncfom wasnt a western

ice cr?m, Monday, 3 January 2011 05:02 (3 years ago) Permalink

noir

I'm glad we agree

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Monday, 3 January 2011 05:07 (3 years ago) Permalink

oh lol yeah what does than mean even is it like 3D

ice cr?m, Monday, 3 January 2011 05:09 (3 years ago) Permalink

almost, w/out glasses

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Monday, 3 January 2011 05:12 (3 years ago) Permalink

ncfom is not a western. it's pretty straight noir w/ a touch of southern gothic (which may just be a subset of noir anyway). though to be fair the villain vanishes into ether at the end of shane.

balls, Monday, 3 January 2011 05:17 (3 years ago) Permalink

heh i thought real cineastes hated the term 'noir'

this was tremendous, the sequence of running the horse to dxxth (spoiler) is some of the best stuff they've ever done, put me in mind of both buscemi burying the money in the snow and the dude's hallucinations, but w/o any fucking around, if that makes sense. everybody was great, esp. damon.

goole, Monday, 3 January 2011 06:27 (3 years ago) Permalink

ever thtalwart

goole, Monday, 3 January 2011 06:27 (3 years ago) Permalink

Lol at 19 movies on that westerns list doing worse than Heavens Gate

our man flint flo$$y (Whiney G. Weingarten), Monday, 3 January 2011 07:27 (3 years ago) Permalink

villain vanishes into ether at the end? not in any western I recall.

― kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Monday, January 3, 2011 5:00 AM (7 hours ago) Bookmark Suggest Ban Permalink

High Plains Drifter? (agree on ncfom absolutely not being a western)

bear, bear, bear, Monday, 3 January 2011 12:39 (3 years ago) Permalink

No really, let's discuss how NCFOM is a western. For starters, it has the words "country" and "old men" in the title.

it also takes hip-hip with it (Eric H.), Monday, 3 January 2011 13:12 (3 years ago) Permalink

and "for"

Gus Van Sotosyn (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Monday, 3 January 2011 13:39 (3 years ago) Permalink

the sequence of running the horse to dxxth (spoiler) is some of the best stuff they've ever done

yeah it was haunting and horrible. and the close-in shots of them riding had this borderline sexual passion to it.. amazing and uncomfortable and sublime all at the same time somehow

progressive cuts (Tracer Hand), Monday, 3 January 2011 13:47 (3 years ago) Permalink

thought this was great, if not exactly stunning in any particular way. i went in having read much of this thread, and gotta say that the "disney" thing seems totally otm, but for reasons i can't quite pin down yet. also had no difficulty squaring old mattie with young mattie, and didn't find her to be "unsympathetic" at all, i dunno

ullr saves (gbx), Monday, 3 January 2011 14:58 (3 years ago) Permalink

not exactly "unsympathetic"; I think it was Glenn Kenny who described the character as "a real pill."

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Monday, 3 January 2011 15:02 (3 years ago) Permalink

The one thing I'm trying to which I'm trying to reconcile is my forgiveness of some of the deus ex machina (that was in the book, too.)

Like oh no, Mattie is about to be kilt by Tom Chaney and oh look, there's La Bouef from out of nowhere there to save the day. Yay! Why is it that I would rmde any other time this happens, but I let it go with True Grit?

Also, the whole climax between Rooster and Ned's gang. Goes by pretty quick. It works, but the whole thing could've been shaky in the hands of any other actor/director/writer.

http://tinyurl.com/MO-02011 (Pleasant Plains), Monday, 3 January 2011 15:08 (3 years ago) Permalink

heh i thought real cineastes hated the term 'noir'

how'd you get that idea

Princess TamTam, Monday, 3 January 2011 15:13 (3 years ago) Permalink

i think there's a lot of things i'm willing to forgive ~in this film~ just because it's an adaptation (which may not be fair at all). i've never seen the original or read the book, but i'd probably roll my damn eyes a lot harder at a john wayne movie. here i'm like 'well this is what they're working with, and they managed it well.'

ullr saves (gbx), Monday, 3 January 2011 15:13 (3 years ago) Permalink

also i kinda liked how perfunctory the final showdowns were (both mattie/chaney and rooster/ned). just kinda 'welp.'

ullr saves (gbx), Monday, 3 January 2011 15:15 (3 years ago) Permalink

Kinda like the spoiler in No Country.

http://tinyurl.com/MO-02011 (Pleasant Plains), Monday, 3 January 2011 15:16 (3 years ago) Permalink

The one thing I'm trying to which I'm trying to reconcile is my forgiveness of some of the deus ex machina (that was in the book, too.)

Like oh no, Mattie is about to be kilt by Tom Chaney and oh look, there's La Bouef from out of nowhere there to save the day. Yay! Why is it that I would rmde any other time this happens, but I let it go with True Grit?

Also, the whole climax between Rooster and Ned's gang. Goes by pretty quick. It works, but the whole thing could've been shaky in the hands of any other actor/director/writer.

http://tinyurl.com/MO-02011 (Pleasant Plains), Monday, January 3, 2011 10:08 AM (4 minutes ago) Bookmark

yeah, the laboef coming in from off-screen to save the day stuff is cheap - but otoh who cares

the climax b/w rooster and the gang is handled pretty similarly in the first movie... i dont know if there's really a myriad of ways to get it across

Princess TamTam, Monday, 3 January 2011 15:16 (3 years ago) Permalink

It was really exciting in the book, especially the tension of La Bouef making that impossible shot.

http://tinyurl.com/MO-02011 (Pleasant Plains), Monday, 3 January 2011 15:17 (3 years ago) Permalink

and the close-in shots of them riding had this borderline sexual passion to it..

This shot was def in the wayne version too!

our man flint flo$$y (Whiney G. Weingarten), Monday, 3 January 2011 15:19 (3 years ago) Permalink

Still haven't watched that version yet. The book was so good, the 2010 version was so good, not sure if I want to see Rocky Mountain Rhinestone Cowboy with the Happy Ending just yet.

http://tinyurl.com/MO-02011 (Pleasant Plains), Monday, 3 January 2011 15:21 (3 years ago) Permalink

i'd probably roll my damn eyes a lot harder at a john wayne movie

RRREALLY

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Monday, 3 January 2011 15:23 (3 years ago) Permalink

yeah duh it's old and corny

ullr saves (gbx), Monday, 3 January 2011 15:26 (3 years ago) Permalink

new one's still a lot better, funnier w/wayyyy better performances in the mattie and laboeuf roles, but the original's not bad - wayne's better than bridges, robert duvall owns, the dialogue is great and mostly untouched

Princess TamTam, Monday, 3 January 2011 15:26 (3 years ago) Permalink

challop, but Pepper as Pepper looked like he was doing his Duvall imitation.

I've read that in a 100 places, but agree with it.

http://tinyurl.com/MO-02011 (Pleasant Plains), Monday, 3 January 2011 15:36 (3 years ago) Permalink

no I totally agree - i liked him a lot, but his perf reminded me more of his counterpart's than anyone else's.

Princess TamTam, Monday, 3 January 2011 15:39 (3 years ago) Permalink

wayne plays the role a lot more dry than Bridges, so his lines are way funnier

our man flint flo$$y (Whiney G. Weingarten), Monday, 3 January 2011 15:40 (3 years ago) Permalink

Yeah, the consensus amongst friends who were familiar with the original: Wayne >>>> Bridges

Gus Van Sotosyn (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Monday, 3 January 2011 15:49 (3 years ago) Permalink

"dry"

has anyone seen the '69 version since this one? am I right about the Strother Martin soundalike?

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Monday, 3 January 2011 15:49 (3 years ago) Permalink

I wouldn't say one Cogburn is better than the other. Wayne made at least 20 better westerns.

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Monday, 3 January 2011 15:50 (3 years ago) Permalink

yes, and you are

Princess TamTam, Monday, 3 January 2011 15:51 (3 years ago) Permalink

Bridges was fine if unsurprising. Wayne's turn is more winning when you've got those 20 other performances in mind.

Gus Van Sotosyn (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Monday, 3 January 2011 15:52 (3 years ago) Permalink

wayne's better for the part too cuz he actually was a fat piece of shit - bridges looks like a trainyard hobo and it sounds weird when people keep calling him a fat old man

Princess TamTam, Monday, 3 January 2011 15:56 (3 years ago) Permalink

Yeah, the consensus amongst friends who were familiar with the original: Wayne >>>> Bridges

Despite top-billing, Bridges definitely kept his character in supporting role to Mattie Ross'. It's another cliche that I'm willing to forgive in this case, the young warrior taking guidance from an eccentric chief.

Some of the things in the book that were cut out of the Coen's version, like Rooster shooting the rat after asking it for writ of habeas corpus, could've filled out the 2010 Rooster character, but that wasn't really the new version's point to make.

http://tinyurl.com/MO-02011 (Pleasant Plains), Monday, 3 January 2011 15:58 (3 years ago) Permalink

xpost OTM

it also takes hip-hip with it (Eric H.), Monday, 3 January 2011 15:59 (3 years ago) Permalink

he's a year younger than Wayne was, and if I'm fat, he's fat

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Monday, 3 January 2011 16:29 (3 years ago) Permalink

Aw, hell. I'll post one more:

http://tinyurl.com/MO-02011 (Pleasant Plains), Monday, 3 January 2011 16:31 (3 years ago) Permalink

They're both fat (Wayne and Bridges)

it also takes hip-hip with it (Eric H.), Monday, 3 January 2011 16:34 (3 years ago) Permalink

fat aint fat no more

ice cr?m, Monday, 3 January 2011 16:35 (3 years ago) Permalink

bridges isnt fat, hes just like a normal old guy - prob same deal w/morbz

Princess TamTam, Monday, 3 January 2011 16:45 (3 years ago) Permalink

Let's not talk about One-Eyed Morbs.

http://tinyurl.com/MO-02011 (Pleasant Plains), Monday, 3 January 2011 16:46 (3 years ago) Permalink

heh i thought real cineastes hated the term 'noir'

how'd you get that idea

― Princess TamTam, Monday, January 3, 2011 9:13 AM (1 hour ago) Bookmark

so what you're saying is that you're not very real

goole, Monday, 3 January 2011 16:48 (3 years ago) Permalink

could be the day I quit ilx

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Monday, 3 January 2011 16:49 (3 years ago) Permalink

joshing ya, fwiw.

http://tinyurl.com/MO-02011 (Pleasant Plains), Monday, 3 January 2011 16:53 (3 years ago) Permalink

forgot to mention that when she fell down the snakepit hole, kid next to me said, "That's the most EPIC FAIL ever"

darwin deej (Whiney G. Weingarten), Tuesday, 4 January 2011 19:08 (3 years ago) Permalink

I liked how the snake bite itself was almost thrown away: no hysterical music or cutting. It just happens.

Gus Van Sotosyn (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Tuesday, 4 January 2011 19:11 (3 years ago) Permalink

thought this was pretty great. bridges and damon and pepper were awesome, hailee steinfeld was even better. brolin's character was strangely sympathetic and really, really well-played. the scene at the river, that kinda genuine dumb concern on his face when he's asking her why she's all the way out in the wilderness is kinda heartbreaking even.

omar little, Tuesday, 4 January 2011 19:12 (3 years ago) Permalink

brolin's character was strangely sympathetic and really, really well-played. the scene at the river, that kinda genuine dumb concern on his face when he's asking her why she's all the way out in the wilderness is kinda heartbreaking even.

yeah i really liked that its not at all cut and dried that brolin's character is Evil or w/e

ullr saves (gbx), Tuesday, 4 January 2011 19:34 (3 years ago) Permalink

exactly. The best thing about the movie and the book is the shades of grey within all of the characters.

VegemiteGrrrl, Tuesday, 4 January 2011 19:36 (3 years ago) Permalink

also Damon needs to have a half-severed tongue in every role

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Tuesday, 4 January 2011 19:37 (3 years ago) Permalink

Saw this today. It might not make my Coens' top five, but I enjoyed it quite a bit.

earnest goes to camp, ironic goes to ilm (pixel farmer), Wednesday, 5 January 2011 05:11 (3 years ago) Permalink

This was pretty good. Man, those snakes looked so fake though!

Young Guns aside, the western is not my favorite genre. (latebloomer), Wednesday, 5 January 2011 05:46 (3 years ago) Permalink

Herpetological realism is very important.

Young Guns aside, the western is not my favorite genre. (latebloomer), Wednesday, 5 January 2011 05:49 (3 years ago) Permalink

After Anaconda came out I was crying in my bedroom for weeks

Young Guns aside, the western is not my favorite genre. (latebloomer), Wednesday, 5 January 2011 05:59 (3 years ago) Permalink

Yeah, fake snakes :(

I liked how the snake bite itself was almost thrown away: no hysterical music or cutting. It just happens.

There was an article somewhere that said the Coens remove all trad climax from this story - that things simply happen, luck occurs, heroism is circumstantial if at all - can't remember who wrote it now, but it makes sense to me. The Coens are very existential - things usually are happening TO their protags rather than because of them. They get caught up in machinations they can't control. Mattie would seem like a huge counterexample, but even her indomitable will is at the mercy of so many happenstances and this new version clarifies that.

progressive cuts (Tracer Hand), Wednesday, 5 January 2011 10:45 (3 years ago) Permalink

...the Coens remove all trad climax from this story - that things simply happen, luck occurs, heroism is circumstantial if at all... The Coens are very existential - things usually are happening TO their protags rather than because of them. They get caught up in machinations they can't control.

― progressive cuts (Tracer Hand), Wednesday, January 5, 2011 2:45 AM (1 minute ago) Bookmark

this is OTM, but at the same time, the coen's take care always to reward, or at least to excuse, decency, and (of course) to cruelly punish sin, especially greed, cowardice and pride. odd combo of punitive moralism and existential absurdity. like, not a pleasant universe in which to wrestle with one's baser angels.

carles marx (contenderizer), Wednesday, 5 January 2011 10:53 (3 years ago) Permalink

"fake snakes." tsk, a generation's inability to suspend its disbelief, except for entire CGI dream cities.

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Wednesday, 5 January 2011 12:45 (3 years ago) Permalink

I can't suspend my disbelief for the dream cities either, FYI

progressive cuts (Tracer Hand), Wednesday, 5 January 2011 12:47 (3 years ago) Permalink

Tried really hard with the snakes, though

progressive cuts (Tracer Hand), Wednesday, 5 January 2011 12:51 (3 years ago) Permalink

did the snakes really bother you? who cares!!!

Princess TamTam, Wednesday, 5 January 2011 12:52 (3 years ago) Permalink

sorry... its your prerogative... to hate fake snakes...

Princess TamTam, Wednesday, 5 January 2011 12:54 (3 years ago) Permalink

It's not that they were fake, it's that they looked fake. The town looked real.

Kerm, Wednesday, 5 January 2011 12:56 (3 years ago) Permalink

To be fair, if a bunch of computer graphics started slithering over my shoulder I'd be pretty wigged out

progressive cuts (Tracer Hand), Wednesday, 5 January 2011 13:00 (3 years ago) Permalink

Josh should've called up his dad. James Brolin didn't fuck around with fake rattlesnakes... Ate the real one in Capricorn One, and shot the real one *playing a fake one* in Westworld.

Kerm, Wednesday, 5 January 2011 13:10 (3 years ago) Permalink

I realize this is a stretch but I couldn't help thinking of parallels with US foreign policy. Go into a foreign land to avenge a wrong done to your "family", hire some local talent with dubious ethical history, get your satisfaction through extra-legal means, and come home an amputee.

progressive cuts (Tracer Hand), Wednesday, 5 January 2011 14:58 (3 years ago) Permalink

damn

ullr saves (gbx), Wednesday, 5 January 2011 15:09 (3 years ago) Permalink

def flew thru my head, cept Chaney actually did kill her father, presumably

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Wednesday, 5 January 2011 15:11 (3 years ago) Permalink

Presumably

progressive cuts (Tracer Hand), Wednesday, 5 January 2011 15:13 (3 years ago) Permalink

Wait... is Dr. Morbius suggesting something about 9/11? Just trying to read between the lines here!

Princess TamTam, Wednesday, 5 January 2011 15:15 (3 years ago) Permalink

of course not, we all know Saddam did it

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Wednesday, 5 January 2011 15:16 (3 years ago) Permalink

Oh yeah! Heh. Whoa.

Princess TamTam, Wednesday, 5 January 2011 15:22 (3 years ago) Permalink

"He tried to kill my daddy"

progressive cuts (Tracer Hand), Wednesday, 5 January 2011 15:23 (3 years ago) Permalink

exactly. The best thing about the movie and the book is the shades of grey within all of the characters.

― VegemiteGrrrl, Tuesday, January 4, 2011 1:36 PM (4 days ago) Bookmark Suggest Ban Permalink

this is kind of a political statement too ... call it a reaction to the reactionary-ness of american conservative's idea of a 'fall' where at one time in the past morals were clear & clean, things have always been messy & complicated

ich bin ein ilxor (deej), Sunday, 9 January 2011 00:56 (3 years ago) Permalink

the phrase "shades of grey" irks me. it seems to deny some basics of dramaturgy. basically the coens gave their characters several traits: a few admirable, a few less so. the film isn't exactly infinitely complex. it just presents its characters as a mix of good and bad.

by another name (amateurist), Sunday, 9 January 2011 03:14 (3 years ago) Permalink

this is kind of a political statement too ... call it a reaction to the reactionary-ness of american conservative's idea of a 'fall' where at one time in the past morals were clear & clean, things have always been messy & complicated

that's stretching things. see almost every western since 1950.

by another name (amateurist), Sunday, 9 January 2011 03:15 (3 years ago) Permalink

i dunno if i can think of specific examples but in my mind a lot of films ive seen would be more likely to position the person getting revenge as a morally righteous one.

ich bin ein ilxor (deej), Sunday, 9 January 2011 05:05 (3 years ago) Permalink

rather than a person who, proactive or not, is dealing w/ outside confluence of events

ich bin ein ilxor (deej), Sunday, 9 January 2011 05:05 (3 years ago) Permalink

Saw the '68 version tonight, and man, did it just seem silly.

http://tinyurl.com/MO-02011 (Pleasant Plains), Sunday, 9 January 2011 06:03 (3 years ago) Permalink

COMMUNIST!

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Sunday, 9 January 2011 08:27 (3 years ago) Permalink

"flouridate our whiskey"

http://tinyurl.com/MO-02011 (Pleasant Plains), Sunday, 9 January 2011 15:45 (3 years ago) Permalink

not merely morally righteous but cinematically satisfying - clint's final reel shoot em up in "unforgiven" announces its moral ambiguity with red flashing sirens but the way it's directed and edited you're like "FUCK YEAH CLINT" - the new true grit doesn't traffic in that at all, which is i think at the root of a lot of people's complaints that it feels a bit flat or whatever

progressive cuts (Tracer Hand), Sunday, 9 January 2011 16:03 (3 years ago) Permalink

yeah, that Unforgiven climax tries to have it both ways, no doubt

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Sunday, 9 January 2011 16:05 (3 years ago) Permalink

I questioned whether this was a good idea way upthread, but as the great reviews started to come in, I realized I was being kind of silly and started looking forward to seeing it. The Coens have made a number of great films, so no matter what they're filming, there's always the chance they're going to make another one. They usually don't, but the chance is always there.

I didn't like it, though. It seemed like the same overly reverential, overly sombre western I've seen many times before. I didn't like Unforgiven, either, so clearly I don't have any feel for this kind of movie.

clemenza, Tuesday, 11 January 2011 05:43 (3 years ago) Permalink

"reverential" and "somber" are not words I would use for this.

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Tuesday, 11 January 2011 12:38 (3 years ago) Permalink

Am I alone in feeling a kind of tonal kinship pat garrett and billy the kid is a kind of cousin-in-temperament to coens' true grit?

they call him (remy bean), Tuesday, 11 January 2011 12:59 (3 years ago) Permalink

okay, less idiotically written:

am i alone in feeling a kind of tonal kinship between PG and BTK and coens' true grit?

they call him (remy bean), Tuesday, 11 January 2011 13:00 (3 years ago) Permalink

"reverential" and "somber" are not words I would use for this.

I guess people who like this--and clearly a lot of people do--would agree, or maybe they also find it reverential and somber, but connect with that kind of mood. I don't know. I won't make a list, but to me it had the kind of deference for genre conventions that you find in this kind of western; I didn't see how it strayed at all, although I'm not the best judge.

clemenza, Tuesday, 11 January 2011 14:54 (3 years ago) Permalink

well, the hero is a drunken fool with a morally questionable background.

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Tuesday, 11 January 2011 15:13 (3 years ago) Permalink

clemenza here's the essay i was trying to remember from before. it's by stanley fish (and could possibly have a used a bit of editing):

[In the original] we are told something about the nature of heroism and virtue and the relationship between the two. In the movie we have just been gifted with, there is no relationship between the two; heroism, of a physical kind, is displayed by almost everyone, “good” and “bad” alike, and the universe seems at best indifferent, and at worst hostile, to its exercise. ...

[T]here is no relationship between the bestowing or withholding of grace and the actions of those to whom it is either accorded or denied. You can’t add up a person’s deeds — so many good one and so many bad ones — and on the basis of the column totals put him on the grace-receiving side (you can’t earn it); and you can’t reason from what happens to someone to how he stands in God’s eyes (you can’t deserve it). ...

It is, says Mattie in a reflection that does not make it into either movie, a “hard doctrine running contrary to the earthly ideals of fair play”

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/12/27/narrative-and-the-grace-of-god-the-new-true-grit/?partner=rss&emc=rss

As I mention above, this is a pretty consistent theme in the Coens' movies, that the universe doesn't reward virtue except by accident.

If you want to get really pseud about it this goes all the way back to Achilles' speech in the Iliad, where he refuses the hand of Agamemnon's daughter in marriage. He's just had a huge realization and is in a kind of strop about it. "Equal fate" he says "befalls the negligent and the valiant fighter; equal honor goes to the worthless and the virtuous." Paul Feyerabend says this is the moment in Greek thought when honor and the rewards of honor became separate things. Previously they had been one. But now there exists the notion that a real yet hidden virtue can underlie a misleading - false - skein of material existence. (Feyerabend goes on to compare this with the current idea that there's a real atomic physics which underlies the misleading world of the visible). If we accept Fish's ideas about True Grit you could almost say that the Coens have gone back to a pre-Achilles point of view: that there is no hidden virtue to Mattie - or anyone - that goes rewarded or unrewarded. There is simply the will to do things, and the material rewards which accrue are what they are, neither true nor false.

progressive cuts (Tracer Hand), Tuesday, 11 January 2011 15:16 (3 years ago) Permalink

(Which makes Fish's conclusion that this is a "religious" movie a strange one)

progressive cuts (Tracer Hand), Tuesday, 11 January 2011 15:18 (3 years ago) Permalink

Thanks for the quote. As I say, I'm just not sensitive enough to fine distinctions within the western genre. I can listen to two power pop songs that would sound identical to someone else, but to me there'd be obvious differences; power pop is something I have a good feel for. Westerns, no. The limitation is mine.

clemenza, Tuesday, 11 January 2011 16:43 (3 years ago) Permalink

Well, in most (all?) Hollywood movies the spine of the story is about characters getting what's coming to them. Redemption, comeuppance, closure, whatever. If you don't have that your movie doesn't get greenlighted (greenlit?). Westerns might lean on this in a more visible way but it's not particular to them.

progressive cuts (Tracer Hand), Tuesday, 11 January 2011 16:55 (3 years ago) Permalink

Finely acted and played all around. Bridges straddles the comedic/dramatic line almost too much on the comedic side (stumbling around, playing up the physical comedy) - esp. noticeable in his scenes with Matty. She (the actress or the character? not sure) is so deadpan sober and serious. When Damon comes on he hams it up even more than Bridges - to the point where I thought, oh, here's the comic relief character. A live-action action figure.

It took an hour until the first real moment of tension creeped into the film for me - when Damon arrives on horseback at the house and the gang riding up behind him in the distance.

Brolin was the highlight for me. His facial expressions said so much more than his words. It instantly gave his character more dimension than just being the 'bad guy.'

And yeah, when Damon returns at the end to save Matty - the Han Solo save, etc... So much action in about a 5-minute span - the showdown with the gang, the shooting, Mattie falling into Slash's snakepit.

calstars, Thursday, 13 January 2011 13:01 (3 years ago) Permalink

max, Thursday, 13 January 2011 16:19 (3 years ago) Permalink

:/

progressive cuts (Tracer Hand), Thursday, 13 January 2011 16:20 (3 years ago) Permalink

Born nine months after Fargo was released.

http://tinyurl.com/MO-02011 (Pleasant Plains), Thursday, 13 January 2011 16:33 (3 years ago) Permalink

whoa... did her parents... you know... on opening night...

max, Thursday, 13 January 2011 16:35 (3 years ago) Permalink

I thought this a lark, but generally enjoyed it. It's like the Coens took a really square story and encouraged eccentric acting choices: Bridges' "Sling Blade" homage, Damon biting his tongue, Brolin's own mumble-mouth, Barry Pepper's spit-fostering fake teeth, a random weird gruff dude in a bear suit that briefly made me think of "Dead Man" ...

My only real take away was that this was another death of the Old West movie, with the girl wielding the 20th century threat of suits and lawyers as her principle weapon, and Rooster ending life relegated to a traveling Wild West show. Nothing new, but satisfying.

Josh in Chicago, Thursday, 13 January 2011 16:39 (3 years ago) Permalink

Damon biting his tongue

Pretty sure this was not an "acting choice" but part of the square story [sic] written in 1968

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Thursday, 13 January 2011 16:42 (3 years ago) Permalink

That's just being pedantic (story vs. novel). There is a story being told - in novel or film form - and it is relatively square. As in, standard western, not revisionist.

Anyway, I haven't read the book. Does the author write all of LaBouef's dialogue like his mouth is numb? In the movie it's played for comedy. Is it played for comedy in the book? The acting choice is telling Damon to be funny about it, and Bridges, too. Was I supposed to be horrified when Rooster threatens to yank his tongue out? Because as directed, it was funny, and everyone else in the theatre seemed to think it was funny, too. That's a directing/acting choice.

Josh in Chicago, Thursday, 13 January 2011 19:47 (3 years ago) Permalink

ask Vegemite Grrrl, I haven't read the book

The reaction to the tongue-yanking at my screening was aieeeee/laughter.

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Thursday, 13 January 2011 20:06 (3 years ago) Permalink

lit-crit consensus seemed to be the Portis novel was a revisionist western.

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Thursday, 13 January 2011 20:08 (3 years ago) Permalink

Really? That's ironic, considering the first movie(1969) is considered the last gasp of old school corny westerns - replete with theme song!. I mean, The Wild Bunch and Butch Cassidy, to name two, were also released the year after True Grit was published and both of them seem radically, miles more revisionist. In what context was True Grit (the book) considered revisionist, at least as we understand the word now? (Not being snide, I've just always thought True Grit the book was much like True Grit the movie - pretty traditional/conventional).

Josh in Chicago, Thursday, 13 January 2011 20:17 (3 years ago) Permalink

again, I am underqualified to say why. See Wiki.

It's not surprising that by 1969, a lauded western book was streamlined/altered to serve as a John Wayne vehicle.

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Thursday, 13 January 2011 20:20 (3 years ago) Permalink

Hmm, interesting. I've indeed dug up several references to the book being considered revisionist, which I suppose makes the Wayne version revisionist-revisionist! Even more convoluted, the Coens version, by honing to the then-revisionist text pretty faithfully, ended up making a movie that doesn't seem terribly revisionist by contemporary standards, compared to all the revisionist westerns that came before it.

Josh in Chicago, Thursday, 13 January 2011 20:25 (3 years ago) Permalink

also, Butch Cassidy is an easygoing, mildly 'serious' star comedy that's a skin-deep western.

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Thursday, 13 January 2011 20:41 (3 years ago) Permalink

For sure. But there's no doubting the credentials of its contemporary the Wild Bunch, the ur-revisionist western, in the modern sense. Both Butch and the Bunch do share similar "down" endings, at least in theory if not exactly in execution.

Josh in Chicago, Thursday, 13 January 2011 20:57 (3 years ago) Permalink

you would doubtlessly find it "corny," but Wayne's last film The Shootist, by Eastwood mentor Don Siegel, is far more touching (and honest) than Clint's Unforgiven.

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Thursday, 13 January 2011 21:09 (3 years ago) Permalink

late to thread...but as far as revisionist status of the original novel goes, it's about the characters that Portis chooses to include in his Western, and their behaviour. The setting and time period easily leads you to think it's straight down the line...but there are a couple of particular beats to the story that reflect its 1968 publication date

a) independent unmarried female protagonist who really isn't a love interest nor does she consider either La Bouef or Cogburn a potential love interest (though La Boeuf certainly crosses her mind, lol)...

b) heavy focus on the recent Civil war as a parallel to Vietnam...regular back and forth about the nature of Quantrill and his raiders in particular. Portis deliberately chooses to raise uncomfortable truths about that war as a parallel to the uncomfortable truths that were abounding about Vietnam.

That's just a couple. But the genius of the way Portis chose to write the book is that he never actually waves his arms and draws attention to the subversion of the genre. He plays it straight down the line and keeps the irony just under the surface. I think that's why I enjoy the Coen's movie so much, is they bring back that subversion. the Wayne movie is fine, but it becomes the Rooster Cogburn show which really wasn't my way into the book. Mattie's my gal.

VegemiteGrrrl, Thursday, 13 January 2011 22:45 (3 years ago) Permalink

i gotta read this book

max, Friday, 14 January 2011 00:36 (3 years ago) Permalink

veg have you ever read oakley halls warlock?

max, Friday, 14 January 2011 00:36 (3 years ago) Permalink

No, I haven't. What is it?

VegemiteGrrrl, Friday, 14 January 2011 05:45 (3 years ago) Permalink

terrific 'revisionist' western from '58. not quite like true grit (the movie) in tone, maybe closer to deadwood. but i just finished it so its on my mind.

max, Friday, 14 January 2011 06:03 (3 years ago) Permalink

I'll check it out thanks Max!

VegemiteGrrrl, Friday, 14 January 2011 06:26 (3 years ago) Permalink

I absolutely loved it. Matty was amazing, and it was often very funny despite being essentially quite a sad film.

Rejoice that you weren't eaten (chap), Saturday, 15 January 2011 18:26 (3 years ago) Permalink

i got warlock for xmas! havent started it yet tho

just sayin, Saturday, 15 January 2011 18:35 (3 years ago) Permalink

re: the discussion upthread about this being a "religious" movie: the last part of this post outlines my general take on the Coens' sensibility and why I see it as more "religious" than absurd/nihilistic/whatever; I'm having trouble directly connecting it to this movie, tho, and the stuff I throw out there at the very end is just kind of speculation.

bernard snowy, Saturday, 15 January 2011 18:58 (3 years ago) Permalink

oh yeah uh also I just saw this movie! it was good! I don't understand why everyone had to talk like that but it was an... interesting stylistic choice

bernard snowy, Saturday, 15 January 2011 19:00 (3 years ago) Permalink

("like that" = excessively witty and lightning-quick volleys of convoluted verbiage from which contractions would seem to be almost entirely absent)
felt like gilmore girls/aaron sorkin at times

bernard snowy, Saturday, 15 January 2011 19:02 (3 years ago) Permalink

Frank Rich attempts to read TG/TSN sociopolitical tea leaves:

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/23/opinion/23rich.html

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Monday, 24 January 2011 12:46 (3 years ago) Permalink

pretty all over the place, that article

progressive cuts (Tracer Hand), Monday, 24 January 2011 12:55 (3 years ago) Permalink

yeah I don't really get what point/s he's trying to make (though that might be bc I'm tired, lol)

VegemiteGrrrl, Monday, 24 January 2011 16:23 (3 years ago) Permalink

progressive cuts (Tracer Hand), Monday, 24 January 2011 16:26 (3 years ago) Permalink

haha

VegemiteGrrrl, Monday, 24 January 2011 16:30 (3 years ago) Permalink

While “Social Network” fictionalizes Mark Zuckerberg, it mines the truth of an era — from the ability of the powerful and privileged to manipulate the system to the collapse of loyalty as a prized American virtue at the top of that economic pyramid.

the (relatively) powerful and privileged people in the social network are comically defeated, and i'm pretty sure there were movies about business betrayals before 2008

You almost wish Rooster were around to get the job done.

what

also, a movie in which a preadolescent's utterly cold obsession with justice leads to a life as a crippled spinster with a single alcoholic fuckup friend who dies at the end is maybe not so much a comforting ode to strong punitive principles?

difficult listening hour, Monday, 24 January 2011 16:53 (3 years ago) Permalink

not saying that it's relativistic and opposed to mattie but i mean it is not exactly an untroubling movie!

difficult listening hour, Monday, 24 January 2011 16:55 (3 years ago) Permalink

Yeah I mean harkening back to the 'simpler' time of frontier justice in True Grit is wtf because the justice that is served is not just served on the wrongdoers, the avengers themselves pay a heavy price personally, even physically. Dude is just hammering the corners off that story to make it fit some crazy rant he came up with in the shower that morning.

VegemiteGrrrl, Monday, 24 January 2011 17:00 (3 years ago) Permalink

I think someone drew that cartoon of Rooster and Zuckerberg sitting next to each other, and the editor assigned someone to write a story around it.

Pleasant Plains, Monday, 24 January 2011 17:05 (3 years ago) Permalink

haha I think you're right

VegemiteGrrrl, Monday, 24 January 2011 17:06 (3 years ago) Permalink

Frank Rich doesn't get assigned. He was the Times' theatre critic for a dozen or more years, and now writes about whatever he pleases in Op-Ed.

That said, his column didn't make a whole lotta sense to me (nor does the profundity he, or anyone else, sees in The Social Network).

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Monday, 24 January 2011 17:07 (3 years ago) Permalink

The column was kind of rambling and wtf already, and then he brings in Social Network and I'm like "Okay now I have NO idea what you're on about"

VegemiteGrrrl, Monday, 24 January 2011 17:07 (3 years ago) Permalink

(he also though The Talented Mr Ripley was a great film) xp

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Monday, 24 January 2011 17:08 (3 years ago) Permalink

The column was worthless. Frank Rich is a dream of a columnist: he writes cogently, is liberal, and utterly predictable.

Rich Lolwry (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Monday, 24 January 2011 19:46 (3 years ago) Permalink

did rich write a dark knight/wall-e mccain/obama column in 08? seems very his style. also he was crazily feared as a theater crit right? was it for any reasons specific to him or just 'he was the times theater critic'?

balls, Tuesday, 25 January 2011 00:42 (3 years ago) Permalink

The Conversation, published in Slant, is outstanding.

Rich Lolwry (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Tuesday, 1 February 2011 14:42 (3 years ago) Permalink

That was fantastic, thanks Morbs!

Me the nerdy book-stan gets bummed out by every reviewer that says "I didn't read the book" but eh, it's not book club, I should probably get over it :)

VegemiteGrrrl, Tuesday, 1 February 2011 17:51 (3 years ago) Permalink

Surprised by that Zanzie review that they referenced, about how the Coens version is a *rejection* of the lessons of Unforgiven.
Makes me wonder if people are watching the Coens version through a Hathaway lens, you know, with the old movie still hanging in their mind. Because to me, there's nothing in the Coens version that could possibly leave you with that impression, unless you just weren't paying attention/didn't care.

VegemiteGrrrl, Tuesday, 1 February 2011 17:57 (3 years ago) Permalink

yeah honestly the only people i can imagine reading the coen version as capital punishment cheerleading are people who are pro-capital-punishment in the first place and thus aren't bothered by all the bothersome things, or interested in noticing the (pretty heavily telegraphed!) irony in the suggestion that if god has held anyone accountable for their actions it's mattie.

difficult listening hour, Tuesday, 1 February 2011 18:01 (3 years ago) Permalink

Exactly. It's a pretty flawed reading of the movie if you're coming away with that interpretation.

VegemiteGrrrl, Tuesday, 1 February 2011 18:08 (3 years ago) Permalink

I can't understand why people would bother projecting their social agendas on a film like this. It didn't even occur to me to regard the hanging as CAPITAL PUNISHMENT.

Rich Lolwry (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Tuesday, 1 February 2011 18:12 (3 years ago) Permalink

It's like with Juno and its "pro-choice agenda."

Rich Lolwry (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Tuesday, 1 February 2011 18:13 (3 years ago) Permalink

Hanging scene seemed to be contructed for "Don't let the Injun talk" gag

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Tuesday, 1 February 2011 18:30 (3 years ago) Permalink

I always figured it was more to establish the vengeance/punishment theme, where Mattie has established that she's seeking vengeance and that she lives in a society where vengeance is something of a spectacle. And for Mattie to begin to see the human face of it.

VegemiteGrrrl, Tuesday, 1 February 2011 18:34 (3 years ago) Permalink

Saw this last night, it was ace, and lol-packed according to the theatre I was in, which

Totally entertaining movie, which makes it my favorite Coen thing since Lebowski (the last time they were willing to be totally entertaining, or maybe able to).

Morbz already cited Intolerable Cruelty, and I’d also throw in O Brother Where Art Thou, Burn After Reading, Bad Santa (which they wrote) and Ladykillers. Reading and Santa do also act like they’re ~saying something~ about human behaviour, but the text explicitly says not to bother taking that too seriously, and Ladykillers fails, but they certainly seemed willing to totally entertain there. (Haven’t seen A Serious Man.)

Like oh no, Mattie is about to be kilt by Tom Chaney and oh look, there's La Bouef from out of nowhere there to save the day.

The text has the grace to actually explain this retroactively though, and the set-up makes total sense once LaBouef lays it out

wayne's better for the part too cuz he actually was a fat piece of shit - bridges looks like a trainyard hobo and it sounds weird when people keep calling him a fat old man

Bridges looks OK upright, on horseback but they make sure to show you his giant fat gut spilling out of his underwear when Mattie has her first extended conversation with him, bargaining in the back of the Chinese grocers

basically just a 2/47 freak out (sic), Wednesday, 2 February 2011 02:36 (3 years ago) Permalink

I saw the original. I just saw the remake. I give the Coen Bros high marks for their version. Very entertaining stuff.

wayne's better for the part too cuz he actually was a fat piece of shit - bridges looks like a trainyard hobo and it sounds weird when people keep calling him a fat old man

Wayne was a fat piece of shit, but he couldn't act like anyone but John Wayne saying lines from a script. Bridges can act. Therefore it doesn't matter if he's all that fat. His Cogburn has life. Wayne's just had sounds and motions.

Aimless, Wednesday, 2 February 2011 03:57 (3 years ago) Permalink

i'd say the point of no country was to be 'totally entertaining' which is why its so frickin rad.

Bridges looks OK upright, on horseback but they make sure to show you his giant fat gut spilling out of his underwear when Mattie has her first extended conversation with him, bargaining in the back of the Chinese grocers

― basically just a 2/47 freak out (sic), Tuesday, February 1, 2011 9:36 PM (1 hour ago) Bookmark

eh i wouldnt call that a giant fat gut, its just a regular 60-year old man gut

strongly disagree about Wayne aimless

My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic (Princess TamTam), Wednesday, 2 February 2011 04:04 (3 years ago) Permalink

There's lots of room to disagree about John Wayne. To me, he wasn't really an actor, but a movie star. He could fill a screen. He could carry a film with his presence. But his dismal failures (like that Ghengis Khan biopic) are pretty much of a piece with his best roles; they are cut from precisely the same cloth, delivered with the same inflections, the same facial expressions, displaying the same level of acting ability: it's the only John Wayne we ever got.

Aimless, Wednesday, 2 February 2011 04:21 (3 years ago) Permalink

it's the only John Wayne we ever got.

you could say that about a lot of the greats. a memorable performer is a memorable performer, whether they're an 'actor' or a 'movie star'... i will agree that some performers are more notable for their star quality than acting ability and wayne's probably one of them, but i can't make that leap to his cogburn being lifeless

My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic (Princess TamTam), Wednesday, 2 February 2011 04:33 (3 years ago) Permalink

It worked most of the time, and then...

there were times it didn't.

Pleasant Plains, Wednesday, 2 February 2011 04:40 (3 years ago) Permalink

haha are you kidding that looks AMAZING

"that gun's not licensed, McQ!"

"...neither am I!!!!"

My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic (Princess TamTam), Wednesday, 2 February 2011 04:44 (3 years ago) Permalink

"I don't like bears."

Pleasant Plains, Wednesday, 2 February 2011 04:45 (3 years ago) Permalink

There's lots of room to disagree about John Wayne. To me, he wasn't really an actor, but a movie star. He could fill a screen. He could carry a film with his presence. But his dismal failures (like that Ghengis Khan biopic) are pretty much of a piece with his best roles; they are cut from precisely the same cloth, delivered with the same inflections, the same facial expressions, displaying the same level of acting ability: it's the only John Wayne we ever got.

But you could say this about many Hollywood actors then and now. Why hold his failures against them?

Rich Lolwry (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Wednesday, 2 February 2011 11:57 (3 years ago) Permalink

plus, as Pleasant Plains suggested, writing that "He could fill a screen. He could carry a film with his presence" is certainly one way of defining screen acting. What do you think Cary Grant and George Clooney do?

To my eyes, the Method has dated far worse than Wayne's star power.

Rich Lolwry (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Wednesday, 2 February 2011 12:03 (3 years ago) Permalink

I'll take Wayne's worst over Pacino and DeNiro's worst, thanks

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Wednesday, 2 February 2011 12:38 (3 years ago) Permalink

Larry McMurtry & Diana Ossana discuss:

http://www.nybooks.com/blogs/nyrblog/2011/feb/08/talking-about-true-grit/#

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Wednesday, 9 February 2011 18:36 (3 years ago) Permalink

Thanks for posting that Morbs, that was pretty cool. Kind of wish they had a video version of the discussion...they change gears pretty sharply in the transcript, lol.
Ossana bringing up the way the story harkens back to childhood adventure novels, but with a girl in the lead kind of hones in on what I love about the movie, and the book...just the fact that this gutsy, serious, determined girl can lead these two men on an adventure, and us...I mean, it shows the possibility of the genre, of female protagonists and it's done in a way that isn't condescending.

And I'm with Larry. I don't really see how it's a story of Rooster's redemption either. Saving Maddie is some kind of redemption but spending the last of his days in a touring gun show with the James brothers hardly seemed redemptive to me, it almost seemed to suggest that maybe there are only acts of kindness, that you can never truly gain redemption? I dunno. But it never seemed as cut and dried to me.

VegemiteGrrl, Thursday, 10 February 2011 03:28 (3 years ago) Permalink

3 weeks pass...

http://jeffbridges.com/true_grit_book/

max, Thursday, 3 March 2011 19:00 (3 years ago) Permalink

Finally saw this last night, loved it pretty much unreservedly. It was more brutal than I expected, I had to close my eyes at the tongue wrangling scene. The scene where Rooster Cogburn was galloping through the night to get Mattie treated was both otherworldly and viscerally exciting.

Haven't saw any mention of the sniper scene where LaBeouf says a prayer before shooting Lucky Ned Pepper. I'm sure that's a nod to Barry Pepper's character in 'Saving Private Ryan'.

Cluster the boots (Billy Dods), Sunday, 13 March 2011 12:57 (3 years ago) Permalink

I read the Portis last week and was amused to discover than Cogburn is in his early 40s (the headstone at the end of the Coens film follows this too), but "built like Grover Cleveland." So he should've been played by Paul Giamatti.

Fuck bein' hard, Dr Morbz is complicated (Dr Morbius), Tuesday, 15 March 2011 16:15 (3 years ago) Permalink

I liked Bridges in this, but Giamatti would have been a good choice too! But he doesn't have much box office draw power, so --

lowfat dry milquetoast (WmC), Tuesday, 15 March 2011 16:26 (3 years ago) Permalink

11 months pass...

Watching this for the first time and just realized that our own pleasant plains looks a lot like Barry Pepper.

wolf kabob (ENBB), Monday, 20 February 2012 05:09 (2 years ago) Permalink

Oh and this rules. The little girl is awesome as are several others.

wolf kabob (ENBB), Monday, 20 February 2012 05:14 (2 years ago) Permalink

yay! I love this movie so much!

Janet Snakehole (VegemiteGrrl), Monday, 20 February 2012 05:17 (2 years ago) Permalink

god this was a great movie ... love how the dialogue was written in a kind of an obsolete vernacular. most fascinating dialogue in a movie in a while, for sure.

not sure what the best line was, maybe a toss-up between "that is to say ... your eye" or "that's a good name!"

the late great, Wednesday, 29 February 2012 21:30 (2 years ago) Permalink

Most of the dialogue came directly from the book, that's what made it so great. If you haven't read it, you should check it out.

Peppermint Patty Hearst (VegemiteGrrl), Wednesday, 29 February 2012 21:42 (2 years ago) Permalink

^^

Diary of Anne Frank, Confessions Of A Teenage Drama Queen (scottfree), Thursday, 1 March 2012 00:34 (2 years ago) Permalink

"Vámonos, amigos," he whispered, and threw the busted leather flintcraw over the loose weave of the saddlecock. And they rode on in the friscalating dusklight.

RudolfHitlerFtw (Hungry4Ass), Thursday, 1 March 2012 00:45 (2 years ago) Permalink

;-D

the late great, Thursday, 1 March 2012 01:08 (2 years ago) Permalink

5 months pass...

This might be a bit obscure but if you're interested in more background on Quantrill's Raiders, Cole Younger & his involvement with the James gang, this CBS radio docudrama from the 50's does a pretty good job of it:

http://archive.org/details/OTRR_Crime_Classics_Singles - episode 28 "The Younger Brothers and Why Some Of Them Grew No Older" (geddit hur)
(can listen to the ep here online, or it's available on itunes for download too)

set the controls for the heart of the sun (VegemiteGrrl), Saturday, 4 August 2012 02:50 (2 years ago) Permalink

4 months pass...

just watched this again

i liked it when i first saw it, but i somehow failed to notice that it is unbelievably great

Author ~ Coach ~ Goddess (s1ocki), Monday, 17 December 2012 06:15 (1 year ago) Permalink

yeah! i rewatched it a few months ago remembering that i liked it a lot when it came out but had still filed it away as minor coens... it really isnt though, its top tier. choked up at the end

turds (Hungry4Ass), Monday, 17 December 2012 06:39 (1 year ago) Permalink

yup.

Author ~ Coach ~ Goddess (s1ocki), Monday, 17 December 2012 06:40 (1 year ago) Permalink

holds up to multiple rewatches for sure. Gets better as time goes on, I think.

set the controls for the heart of the sun (VegemiteGrrl), Monday, 17 December 2012 06:43 (1 year ago) Permalink


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